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MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

RUBIANO INSTITUTE
ENGLISH INVESTIGATION
TOPIC:
GOOD HEALTHY EATING HABITS
MEMBERS:
JOHANA AGUILAR
YANISBETH CAMARGO
AQUILINA GALLARDO
JOS RODRGUEZ
ESTEFANY GALLARDO
LESTER YEARWOOD
TEACHER:
MILVIA AYALA
LEVEL:
12 D
SUBJECT:
ENGLISH
DELIVERY DATE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 10TH, 2016
SCHOOL YEAR:
2016
Introduction

The food you eat can affect your health and your risk for certain diseases. To eat
healthier food, you may need to change some of your daily habits. You also may need to
change some things in your environment. Your environment includes everything around
you, like your home or the place you work.

You don't need to make huge changes to eat healthier. And you don't have to change
your habits all at the same time. It's best to set small goals and change your habits a
little bit at a time. Over time, small changes can make a big difference in your health.

This information will help you make useful changes for healthy eating.

Changing your eating habits and your environment can help you eat healthier foods.

A healthy diet is good for your overall health. It also can help you reach a healthy weight
and stay there.

To improve your eating habits, it's best to make small lifestyle changes that you can keep
doing over tim

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Index
Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 2
Good Healthy Eating Habits............................................................................................................ 5
Good Healthy Eating Habits As A Social Responsibility...................................................................7
Eating Disorders.............................................................................................................................. 8
What is an Eating Disorder?......................................................................................................... 8
Causes of Eating Disorders.......................................................................................................... 8
Examples of biological factors include:........................................................................................ 8
Signs & Symptoms of an Eating Disorder..................................................................................... 8
Treatment for an Eating Disorder................................................................................................. 9
Eating Disorders......................................................................................................................... 10
(Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Binge Eating)...........................................................................10
Anorexia nervosa....................................................................................................................... 10
Signs and symptoms of anorexia............................................................................................ 10
Getting help............................................................................................................................ 10
Bulimia....................................................................................................................................... 11
Warning signs......................................................................................................................... 11
Who is affected by bulimia nervosa?...................................................................................... 11
What to do.............................................................................................................................. 11
Binge eating............................................................................................................................... 12
Who is affected....................................................................................................................... 12
Getting help............................................................................................................................ 12
What causes binge eating?..................................................................................................... 13
How binge eating is treated.................................................................................................... 13
Pyramid Food................................................................................................................................ 14
Nutritional Facts............................................................................................................................ 15
Units of Measurement................................................................................................................... 16
ANNEX........................................................................................................................................... 17
Healthy Recipes...................................................................................................................... 18
Playgroup Granola Bars.......................................................................................................... 18
Ginger Glazed Mahi Mahi........................................................................................................ 19
Baked Honey Mustard Chicken............................................................................................... 20
Maple Salmon......................................................................................................................... 21

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Eating Disorders......................................................................................................................... 22
Anorexia.................................................................................................................................. 22
Bulimia.................................................................................................................................... 23
Binge eating........................................................................................................................... 23
Conclusion..................................................................................................................................... 24
Infography..................................................................................................................................... 25

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Good Healthy Eating Habits
By teaching your children healthy eating habits, and modeling these behaviors in
yourself, you can help your children maintain a healthy weight and normal growth. Also,
the eating habits your children pick up when they are young will help them maintain a
healthy lifestyle when they are adults.

Your child's health care provider can evaluate your child's weight and growth and let you
know if your child needs to lose or gain weight or if any dietary changes need to be
made.

Some of the most important aspects of healthy eating are portion control and cutting
down on how much fat and sugar your child eats or drinks. Simple ways to reduce fat
intake in your child's diet and promote a healthy weight include serving:

Low-fat or nonfat dairy products


Poultry without skin
Lean cuts of meats
Whole grain breads and cereals
Healthy snacks such as fruit and veggies

Also, reduce the amount of sugar sweetened drinks and salt in your child's diet.

If you are unsure about how to select and prepare a variety of foods for your family,
consult a registered dietitian for nutrition counseling.

It is important that you do not place your overweight child(ren) on a restrictive diet.
Children should never be placed on a restrictive diet to lose weight unless a doctor
supervises one for medical reasons.

Other approaches parents can take to develop healthy eating habits in their children
include:

Guide your family's choices rather than dictate foods. Make a wide variety of healthful
foods available in the house. This practice will help your children learn how to make
healthy food choices. Leave the unhealthy choices like chips, soda, and juice at the
grocery store. Serve water with meals.

Encourage your children to eat slowly. A child can detect hunger and fullness better
when they eat slowly. Before offering a second helping or serving, ask your child to wait
at least 15 minutes to see if they are truly still hungry. This will give the brain time to
register fullness. Also, that second helping should be much smaller than the first.

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Eat meals together as a family as often as possible. Try to make mealtimes pleasant with
conversation and sharing, not a time for scolding or arguing. If mealtimes are
unpleasant, children may try to eat faster to leave the table as soon as possible. They
then may learn to associate eating with stress.

Involve your children in food shopping and preparing meals. These activities will give you
hints about your children's food preferences, an opportunity to teach your children about
nutrition, and provide your kids with a feeling of accomplishment. In addition, children
may be more willing to eat or try foods that they help prepare.

Plan for snacks. Continuous snacking may lead to overeating, but snacks that are
planned at specific times during the day can be part of a nutritious diet, without spoiling
a child's appetite at meal times. You should make snacks as nutritious as possible,
without depriving your children of occasional chips or cookies, especially at parties or
other social events.

Discourage eating meals or snacks while watching TV. Try to eat only in designated areas
of your home, such as the dining room or kitchen. Eating in front of the TV may make it
difficult to pay attention to feelings of fullness, and may lead to overeating.

Encourage your children to drink more water. Over consumption of sweetened drinks and
sodas has been linked to increased rates of obesity in children.

Try not to use food to punish or reward your children. Withholding food as a punishment
may lead children to worry that they will not get enough food. For example, sending
children to bed without any dinner may cause them to worry that they will go hungry. As
a result, children may try to eat whenever they get a chance. Similarly, when foods, such
as sweets, are used as a reward, children may assume that these foods are better or
more valuable than other foods. For example, telling children that they will get dessert if
they eat all of their vegetables sends the wrong message about vegetables.

Make sure your children's meals outside the home are balanced. Find out more about
their school lunch program, or pack their lunch to include a variety of foods. Also, select
healthier items when dining at restaurants.

Pay attention to portion size and ingredients. Read food labels and limit foods with trans
fat. Also, make sure you serve the appropriate portion as indicated on the label.

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Good Healthy Eating Habits As A Social Responsibility
Health impact assessment is an essential tool for healthy policy-making and practice.
Health impact assessment addresses the basic question how are existing or planned
policies, programs or projects actually affecting, or likely to affect, people's health, for
good and for bad?. Answers to this question could help policy-makers and program
managers make the decisions and changes needed in order to perform their work in the
most socially responsible manner possible.

The arena of health impact assessment is young and developing very rapidly (Scott-
Samuel, 1996). International cooperation and coordination are being stimulated by,
among others, the WHO European Centre for Health Policy (Lehto and Ritsatakis, 1999).
They describe a general approach to health impact assessment that has the following
five elements.

Health impact assessment examines direct and indirect impacts on health of policies,
strategies, programs or projects.

The initial stage is screening using available information to determine if there is


confidence that impact is negligible, or if more information is needed.

If more information is needed, scoping is done to determine what level of resources and
expertise are required to develop the needed information (ranging from a rapid appraisal
using additional expertise to an in-depth impact analysis or an extensive impact review).

Generation of an assessment report.

Modification of the policy/project if indicated. Despite the jargon (screening, scoping),


models such as this should (with appropriate user interfaces) be useable in almost any
setting and be accessible to any group of interested citizens, regardless of level of formal
training. Science, business and government should have access to the technology, but so
should average citizens, including those living in difficult conditions. However, the trend
of ever more technical and complicated methods of impact assessment threatens to
exclude average citizens from participation. In the best of worlds, science develops
knowledge and some of that knowledge can be put to use by average people to solve
practical problems. That is technology born from science. Too frequently, however, as the
technology becomes more complex, elites take over and the technology transforms into
quasi-science.

This has happened in the environmental impact assessment arena and threatens to
happen to health impact assessment. The jargon is becoming inaccessible to the
average person and the methodology is becoming very complex. However, technological
development and user-friendliness can co-exist, as in the information technology field,
which has demonstrated how very complex technology can be made universally

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accessible through appropriate interfaces. User interfaces of the simplest kind are
needed if health impact assessment is to reach where it is most needed. Health
promotion should strive to build an approach to health impact assessment that any
person or group with average education and intelligence can master with some study
and practice.

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Eating Disorders

What is an Eating Disorder?


Eating Disorders describe illnesses that are characterized by irregular eating habits and
severe distress or concern about body weight or shape. Eating disturbances may include
inadequate or excessive food intake which can ultimately damage an individuals well-
being. The most common forms of eating disorders include Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia
Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder and affect both females and males.

Causes of Eating Disorders


Eating Disorders are complex disorders, influenced by a facet of factors. Though the
exact cause of eating disorders is unknown, it is generally believed that a combination of
biological, psychological, and/or environmental abnormalities contribute to the
development of these illnesses.

Examples of biological factors include:


Irregular hormone functions
Genetics (the tie between eating disorders and ones genes is still being heavily
researched, but we know that genetics is a part of the story).
Nutritional deficiencies
Examples of psychological factors include:
Negative body image
Poor self-esteem

Examples of environmental factors that would contribute to the occurrence of eating


disorders are:

Dysfunctional family dynamic


Professions and careers that promote being thin and weight loss, such as ballet
and modeling
Aesthetically oriented sports, where an emphasis is placed on maintaining a lean
body for enhanced performance. Examples include: rowing, diving, ballet,
gymnastics, wrestling, long distance running.
Family and childhood traumas: childhood sexual abuse, severe trauma
Cultural and/or peer pressure among friends and co-workers
Stressful transitions or life changes

Signs & Symptoms of an Eating Disorder


A man or woman suffering from an eating disorder may reveal several signs and
symptoms, some which are:

Chronic dieting despite being hazardously underweight


Constant weight fluctuations

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Obsession with calories and fat contents of food
Engaging in ritualistic eating patterns, such as cutting food into tiny pieces, eating
alone, and/or hiding food
Continued fixation with food, recipes, or cooking; the individual may cook intricate
meals for others but refrain from partaking
Depression or lethargic stage
Avoidance of social functions, family and friends. May become isolated and
withdrawn

Treatment for an Eating Disorder


Because of the severity and complexities of these conditions, a comprehensive and
professional treatment team specializing in eating disorders is often fundamental in
establishing healing and recovery. Treatment plans are utilized in addressing the many
concerns a man or woman may be facing in the restoration of their health and well-being
and are often tailored to meet individual needs. Treatment for an eating disorder is
usually comprised with one or more of the following and addressed with medical doctors,
nutritionists, and therapists for complete care:

Medical Care and Monitoring-The highest concern in the treatment of eating


disorders is addressing any health issues that may have been a consequence of
eating disordered behaviors.
Nutrition: This would involve weight restoration and stabilization, guidance for
normal eating, and the integration of an individualized meal plan.
Therapy: Different forms of psychotherapy, such as individual, family, or group, can
be helpful in addressing the underlying causes of eating disorders. Therapy is a
fundamental piece of treatment because it affords an individual in recovery the
opportunity to address and heal from traumatic life events and learn healthier
coping skills and methods for expressing emotions, communicating and
maintaining healthy relationships.
Medications: Some medications may be effective in helping resolve mood or
anxiety symptoms that can occur with an eating disorder or in reducing binge-
eating and purging behaviors.
Varying levels of treatment, ranging from outpatient support groups to inpatient
eating disorder centers, are available and based on the severity of the eating
disorder. In any case, recognizing and addressing the eating disorder are crucial in
being able to begin treatment.

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Eating Disorders

(Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Binge Eating)

Anorexia nervosa
Anorexia nervosa is a serious mental health condition. It's an eating disorder where a
person keeps their body weight as low as possible.People with anorexia usually do this by
restricting the amount of food they eat, making themselves vomit, and exercising
excessively.

The condition often develops out of an anxiety about body shape and weight that
originates from a fear of being fat or a desire to be thin. Many people with anorexia have
a distorted image of themselves, thinking they're fat when they're not.

Anorexia most commonly affects girls and women, although it has become more
common in boys and men in recent years. On average, the condition first develops at
around the age of 16 to 17.

Signs and symptoms of anorexia


People with anorexia often go to great lengths to hide their behavior from family and
friends by lying about what they've eaten or pretending to have eaten earlier.

Signs someone may have anorexia or another eating disorder include:

Missing meals, eating very little, or avoiding eating any fatty foods
Obsessively counting calories in food
Leaving the table immediately after eating so they can vomit
Taking appetite suppressants, laxatives, or diuretics (a type of medication that
helps remove fluid from the body)
Repeatedly weighing themselves or checking their body in the mirror
Physical problems, such as feeling lightheaded or dizzy, hair loss, or dry skin

Anorexia can also be associated with other psychological problems, such as depression,
anxiety, low self-esteem, alcohol misuse, and self-harm.

Read more about the symptoms of anorexia.

Getting help
People with anorexia often don't seek help, perhaps because they're afraid or don't
recognise they have a problem. Many have hidden their condition for a long time
sometimes years.

The most important first step is for someone with anorexia to realise they need help and
want to get better.

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If you think someone you know has anorexia, try talking to them about your worries and
encourage them to seek help.

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Bulimia
Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder and mental health condition.

People who have bulimia try to control their weight by severely restricting the amount of
food they eat, then binge eating and purging the food from their body by making
themselves vomit or using laxatives.

As with other eating disorders, bulimia nervosa can be associated with:

low self-esteem
alcohol misuse
depression
self-harm

Warning signs
Signs of bulimia nervosa include an obsessive attitude towards food and eating, an
overcritical attitude to their weight and shape, and frequent visits to the bathroom after
eating, after which the person might appear flushed and have scarred knuckles (from
forcing fingers down the throat to bring on vomiting).

Read more about the symptoms and warning signs of bulimia.

Bulimia can eventually lead to physical problems associated with poor nutrient intake,
excessive vomiting or overuse of laxatives. Read more about these complications of
bulimia.

Who is affected by bulimia nervosa?


As with all eating disorders, women are much more likely to develop bulimia than men.

However, bulimia nervosa is becoming increasingly common in boys and men. There are
an estimated 1.6 million Britons suffering from some form of eating disorder, and reports
estimate that up to 25% may be male.

Recent studies suggest that as many as 8% of women have bulimia at some stage in
their life. The condition can occur at any age, but mainly affects women aged between
16 and 40 (on average, it starts around the age of 18 or 19).

Bulimia nervosa can affect children, but this is extremely rare.

What to do
If you have an eating disorder such as bulimia, the first step is to recognise that you
have a problem. Then, you need to visit your GP for a medical check-up and advice on
how to get treatment.

If you think someone you know has bulimia nervosa, talk to them and try to persuade
them to see their GP.
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There are also many support groups and charities you can approach for help, including:

Beat: beating eating disorders


Mental Health Foundation

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Binge eating
Binge eating is an eating disorder where a person feels compelled to overeat on a
regular basis through regular binges.

People who binge eat consume very large quantities of food over a short period of time,
even when they are not hungry.

Binges are often planned in advance and can involve the person buying "special" binge
foods.

In rare cases, people describe themselves as being in a "dazed state" during a binge
particularly binges during the night and they are not able to recall what they ate.

People who binge eat feel they have no control over their eating. They often binge in
private because they feel embarrassed, guilty or disgusted with their behavior after they
have finished eating.

Episodes of binge eating sometimes alternate with periods where the person cuts down
on the amount of food they eat.

This can lead to a vicious cycle that is difficult to break where blood sugar levels rise
and fall rapidly, and false messages are sent to the brain, which result in cravings for
food when your body doesn't need it.

Who is affected
Anyone can be affected by binge eating.

While the condition is slightly more common in women than men, the numbers of men
and women affected are more equal than in other eating disorders, such as anorexia
nervosa.

The condition tends to first develop in young adults, although many people do not seek
help until they are in their 30s or 40s.

Its estimated that there is around a 1 in 30 to 1 in 50 chance of a person developing


binge eating disorder at some point during their life.

Getting help
Many people will occasionally binge on food this doesn't necessarily mean you have a
binge eating disorder. However, you should see your GP if you binge regularly and
excessively, particularly if the binges are having an effect on your physical and/or mental
health.

Your GP can diagnose the condition and may be able to refer you to a specialist,
such as a psychiatrist or a psychologist.
Your GP will ask you about your eating habits and look for the following signs:
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you eat much faster than normal during a binge
you eat until you feel uncomfortably full
you eat a large amount of food when you are not hungry
you eat alone or secretly due to being embarrassed about the amount of food you
are consuming
you have feelings of guilt, shame or disgust after binge eating

People who regularly eat this way are likely to have a binge eating disorder.

What causes binge eating?


It's not clear what causes binge eating, but, like most eating disorders, it's seen as a way
of coping with feelings of unhappiness and low self-esteem.

Things that may increase your risk of developing problems with binge eating include:

low self-esteem and a lack of confidence


depression or anxiety
feelings of stress, anger, boredom or loneliness
dissatisfaction with your body and feeling under pressure to be thin
stressful or traumatic events in your past
a family history of eating disorders, which may be related to your genes
differences in your brain or the level of hormones produced by your brain
compared to people who don't binge eat

How binge eating is treated


Binge eating is treatable and most people eventually get better with appropriate help
and support.

The main treatments are:

self-help programmes this may be individually with a book or online course, or as


part of a self-help support group
guided self-help (self-help supervised by regular contacts with a professional)
specialist group intervention
individual (one-to-one) psychological therapy such as cognitive behavioural
therapy (CBT)
medication called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)

These treatments can help you overcome the psychological issues associated with your
binge eating, but they won't usually have a significant impact on your weight.

If you are overweight, a healthcare professional may also draw up a weight loss plan to
follow during treatment or after any psychological issues have been dealt with.

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Pyramid Food

The food pyramid is designed to make healthy eating easier. Healthy eating is about
getting the correct amount of nutrients protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins and
minerals you need to maintain good health.

Foods that contain the same type of nutrients are grouped together on each of the
shelves of the Food Pyramid. This gives you a choice of different foods from which to
choose a healthy diet. Following the Food Pyramid as a guide will help you get the right
balance of nutritious foods within your calorie range. Studies show that we take in too
many calories from foods and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt, on the top shelf of the
Food Pyramid. They provide very little of the essential vitamins and minerals your body
needs. Limiting these is essential for healthy eating.

So in a nutshell, healthy eating involves:

Plenty of bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and cereals going for the wholegrain
varieties whenever you can
Plenty of fruit and vegetables
Some milk, cheese and yoghurt
Some meat, poultry, eggs, beans and nuts
A very small amount of fats and oils
And a very small amount or no food and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt

Supplements

If you eat a varied and balanced diet, then there is normally no need to take any food
supplements youll get everything you need from your food. The one exception to this
is folic acid. All women of child-bearing age who could become pregnant should take a

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supplement of 400g (micrograms) folic acid each day. If a woman does become
pregnant, she should continue to take the supplement during the first twelve weeks of
pregnancy.

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Nutritional Facts

The information in the main or top section (see #1-4 and #6 on the sample nutrition
label below), can vary with each food product; it contains product-specific information
(serving size, calories, and nutrient information). The bottom part (see #5 on the sample
label below) contains a footnote with Daily Values (DVs) for 2,000 and 2,500 calorie
diets. This footnote provides recommended
dietary information for important nutrients,
including fats, sodium and fiber. The footnote is
found only on larger packages and does not
change from product to product.

1. The Serving Size

The first place to start when you look at the


Nutrition Facts label is the serving size and the
number of servings in the package. Serving sizes
are standardized to make it easier to compare
similar foods; they are provided in familiar units,
such as cups or pieces, followed by the metric
amount, e.g., the number of grams.

2. Calories (and Calories from Fat)

Calories provide a measure of how much energy


you get from a serving of this food. Many Americans consume more calories than they
need without meeting recommended intakes for a number of nutrients. The calorie
section of the label can help you manage your weight (i.e., gain, lose, or maintain.)

3 and 4. The Nutrients: How Much?

Look at the top of the nutrient section in the sample label. It shows you some key
nutrients that impact on your health and separates them into two main groups:

5. Limit These Nutrients

The nutrients listed first are the ones Americans generally eat in adequate amounts, or
even too much. They are identified in yellow as Limit these Nutrients. Eating too much
fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, or sodium may increase your risk of certain
chronic diseases, like heart disease, some cancers, or high blood pressure.

6. The Percent Daily Value (%DV): The % Daily Values (%DVs) are based on the Daily
Value recommendations for key nutrients but only for a 2,000 calorie daily diet--not

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2,500 calories. You, like most people, may not know how many calories you consume in a
day. But you can still use the %DV as a frame of reference whether or not you consume
more or less than 2,000 calories.

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Units of Measurement
US fluid Units of Measure (by volume/capacity)

measure milliliters
drop 100.038507200114 16 drops = 1/8 teaspoon
teaspoon 104.928921614586 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
tablespoon 114.786764843759 1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons
ounce
(fluid) 129.573529687517 1 cup = 8 ounces
cup 336.588237500136 1 cup = 16 tablespoons
pint 573.176473000000 1 pint = 2 cups = 16 fluid ounces
pint (dry) 650.610471357500 1 dry pint = 33.6003125 cubic inches
1046.35295000054
quart 4 1 quart = 4 cups
1100.00000000000 1 liter = 0.264 gallons = 61.024 cubic
liter 0 inches
1201.22100000000
quart (dry) 0 1 dry quart = 67.2006 cubic inches
3885.41178000000
gallon 0 1 gallon = 128 fluid ounces
4504.88377086000
gallon (dry) 0 1 dry gallon = one-eighth of a bushel
8909.76800000000 1 Peck = 8 Dry Quarts = 537.6 cubic
peck 0 inches
35339.0701668800
bushel 00 1 US bushel = 1.24445608 cubic feet

Dry Units of Measure (by weight)

measure grams
ounce (dry) 128.349523100000
pound 553.592369600000 1 pound = 16 dry ounces
kilogram 1100.000000000000

Measurements are based on either weight, or volume (capacity). There is no


specific conversion between weight and volume unless you know the density of the
ingredient. However, water, at 4 C, is often used as a standard to derive the
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weight of a volume specification. For example, one cup of water (at 4 C) weighs
236.588 grams. A cup of popcorn, of course, weighs much less (8 grams). Here
is the USDA list of Food Item Densities for one cup of selected food items.

Both liquid measure and dry measure have the same volume.

For the most precise measurements, weigh all ingredients with a scale.

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ANNEX

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Healthy Recipes
Playgroup Granola Bars

Ingredients:

2 cups rolled oats


3/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup wheat germ
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup raisins (optional) 3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup honey
1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Generously grease a 9x13 inch
baking pan.
In a large bowl, mix together the oats, brown sugar, wheat germ, cinnamon, flour,
raisins and salt. Make a well in the center, and pour in the honey, egg, oil and
vanilla. Mix well using your hands. Pat the mixture evenly into the prepared pan.
Bake for 30 to 35 minutes in the preheated oven, until the bars begin to turn
golden at the edges. Cool for 5 minutes, then cut into bars while still warm. Do not
allow the bars to cool completely before cutting, or they will be too hard to cut.

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Ginger Glazed Mahi Mahi

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons honey
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
1 clove garlic, crushed or to taste
2 teaspoons olive oil
4 (6 ounce) mahi mahi fillets salt and pepper to taste
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Directions

In a shallow glass dish, stir together the honey, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar,
ginger, garlic and olive oil. Season fish fillets with salt and pepper, and place them
into the dish. If the fillets have skin on them, place them skin side down. Cover,
and refrigerate for 20 minutes to marinate.
Heat vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Remove fish from the
dish, and reserve marinade. Fry fish for 4 to 6 minutes on each side, turning only
once, until fish flakes easily with a fork. Remove fillets to a serving platter and
keep warm.
Pour reserved marinade into the skillet, and heat over medium heat until the
mixture reduces to a glaze consistently. Spoon glaze over fish, and serve
immediately.

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Baked Honey Mustard Chicken

Ingredients:

6 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves salt and pepper to taste


1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup prepared mustard
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried parsley

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).


Sprinkle chicken breasts with salt and pepper to taste, and place in a lightly
greased 9x13 inch baking dish. In a small bowl, combine the honey, mustard, basil,
paprika, and parsley. Mix well. Pour 1/2 of this mixture over the chicken, and brush
to cover.
Bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes. Turn chicken pieces over and brush
with the remaining 1/2 of the honey mustard mixture. Bake for an additional 10 to
15 minutes, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear. Let cool 10
minutes before serving.

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Maple Salmon

Ingredients:

1/4 cup maple syrup


2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon garlic salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 pound salmon

Directions

In a small bowl, mix the maple syrup, soy sauce, garlic, garlic salt, and pepper.
Place salmon in a shallow glass baking dish, and coat with the maple syrup
mixture. Cover the dish, and marinate salmon in the refrigerator 30 minutes,
turning once.
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
Place the baking dish in the preheated oven, and bake salmon uncovered 20
minutes, or until easily flaked with a fork.

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Eating Disorders

Anorexia

Bulimia

28
Binge eating

29
Conclusion

The more we eat healthy, the less natural it feels to reach for a piece of cookie or a bag
of chips when we get hungry. It is then not a matter of depriving ourselves or forcing
ourselves, but simply a conscious recognition of respecting what feels the best for our
body in the long-term run.

When we eat healthy, we physically feel good. We mentally have more energy to do the
things that matter. When we are both globally conscious and personally healthy in our
eating choices, we are contributing to the welfare of the planet. Our decision to practice
healthy eating habits has so many consequences in so many ways.

Now that you have all the information you need on eating healthy, the most important
action step you can do is to maintain this lifestyle choice as much as possible. Post
intents when you need motivation from others. Keep a diary of your food choices on your
blog or journal. Talk to other people when you are feeling tempted to indulge in
unhealthy desserts.

Eating healthy, after all, is not about losing your ability to enjoy indulgences. It is a
matter of gaining so many things that will affect you for the rest of your life: a longer life,
the ability to enjoy natural foods, a wholesome sense of self-esteem and the joy of
respecting your body for all that it does for you.

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Infography

https://myhealth.alberta.ca/Health/Pages/conditions.aspx?hwid=ad1169

http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--482/units-of-measure.asp

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/labelling/food-labelling-for-industry/nutrition-
labelling/presentation/eng/1387664849974/1387664998059

http://www.safefood.eu/Healthy-Eating/What-is-a-balanced-diet/The-Food-Pyramid.aspx

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Binge-eating/Pages/Introduction.aspx

http://www.allianceforeatingdisorders.com/portal/what-are-eating-disorders

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