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IEP Case Study 1

IEP Case Study


Jonathan Robinson
SPED 741
Spring 2017
Towson University
IEP Case Study 2

Part I: Background Information


I.A. Student Background Information
The student is a thirteen year old African-American male. He is an eighth grade student at

Ridgely Middle School. As an eighth grader, this will be his last year at Ridgely Middle School

as he will be transitioning to high school next year. Currently, it is the last quarter of the school

year. He has an IEP and he is in all inclusion classes. He lives with his mother in an apartment

in the Lutherville-Timonium area. In addition, the mothers boyfriend lives with them. In

addition, the student has a twin brother who also lives in the house with him. The students

biological father his not a physical presence in his life, as the father lives in the New York area.

However, he does have communication with him. The twins were both born in the United States

and are originally from New York.

The student has been receiving special education services since the age of seven

during the 2010-2011 school year. He has been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactive

Disorder and multiple disabilities based on a speech/language impairment. This impacts his

behavior and social interactions in the classroom, academic success, cognitive processes and

organization. While he was in the second grade, it was noted that he began to display behaviors

related to being impulsive and it was also noted that his grades were declining. This led to the

student being tested to determine whether he should receive special education services. On his

current IEP, it is noted that his primary disability is other health impairments. Specifically,

the student has been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD since 2011. The student has goals related to

reading, written language, mathematics, and behavior. He receives his services through the

general education setting. He needs support with academic activities related to reading and

writing, displaying appropriate behaviors and organizational skills. While this was not an
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IEP meeting related to transition to high school, the student has stated that he wants to play either

basketball or be a lawyer. He enjoys social interactions with his peers, even when they are

interactions that are distracting or detrimental to his academic success. At times, he can be very

well-mannered. This is usually when he is taking his medicine. When he does not take his

medicine, he will become distracted and unfocused on his work.

The reason for referral for this meeting was the students annual review. The meeting

took place on February 28th, 2017 and did not require any pre-referral strategies. Therefore,

there wasnt a timeline of the process to document either.

I.B. IEP Process

Prior to any IEP meeting taking place, there is a process that takes place to gather

information, to make necessary changes to the IEP and to ensure that the guardians and the

student are informed and invited to participate in the meeting. Before the date of the meeting, the

case manager will send an email to all of his teachers. The email requests that the teacher

comment on his academic and social progress, strengths and weaknesses displayed and any

accommodations that have been implemented that both have worked or failed. This information

is gathered in preparation for the annual review. Based on teacher feedback, observations and

testing, the case manager will update the IEP to reflect his current progress. The updated IEP will

be considered a draft until the IEP team meets and finalizes the IEP. The draft of the IEP is

usually mailed to his mother five to ten days prior to the meeting.

Written notice is always provided and is required to be sent to the guardians of any

child who has an IEP. The written notice is generally sent fourteen to twenty-one days prior to

the meeting. The parent is required to respond to the notice. The response should indicate
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whether that guardian plans to attend the meeting or not. If the school does not receive a formal

response by the parent/guardian, the case manager will attempt to make contact to determine if

that parent or guardian will attend. The students mother did respond to the invitation and stated

that both she and her live-in boyfriend would attend. The student was also invited to attend,

however, he declined the invitation. Because she attended, she was mailed a copy of the

Procedural Safeguards Parental Rights form as mandated by the Individuals with

Disabilities Education Improvement Act prior to the meeting.

The students case manager coordinated often and made frequent contact with his

team members before the annual review. While his case manager reached out to all of his

teachers, she primarily worked with his mathematics and Language Arts teachers. This is because

his goals are specifically aligned with the skills developed in those two classes. The case

manager asked questions that related to the strengths and weaknesses that the student displays as

it relates to reading, writing, and aspects of mathematics. The other teachers generally provided

feedback related to his behavior. All of his teachers provided feedback and completed the teacher

report forms. Primarily, this is the role of each of his service providers in preparation for the

meeting. These reports were read during the IEP team meeting.

The IEP chair began the meeting by introducing herself and her role related to the school

and to the team. She then explained the reasoning for the meeting, which was the annual review

of the students IEP. She then asked that everyone who was present introduce themselves. After

the introductions, everyone was required to sign the participation form. When those formalities

were completed, the case manager took over the meeting and began to discuss his current

academic progress. She then read each of the teacher reports. The case manager made copies of
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each report and gave them to the students mother. The case manager also printed a grade report

for each of his classes and gave those to his mother as well. From there, the case manager

reviewed the Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance. While

conducting the review the case manager juxtaposed the information from the old IEP to the new

draft. The case manager went over any changes from the old IEP to the new. The case manager

also provided justifications for those changes. His mother was in agreement with all changes.

The goals, and any changes to those, were also discussed. Once the team was in agreement with

the updated IEP, it was finalized. His mother was informed that she would receive the final copy

of the IEP within the week.

II. A: Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Performance

Academics: Reading

Sources: Informal assessments, current classroom based assessments, classroom based

observations, and student and general education teacher input.

Instructional Grade Level Performance:

Eighth grade passage: 20% without reader; 40% with reader

4th grade: 80% with and without reader

Word Identification: 4th grade

Eighth grade words: 0%

Seventh grade words: 40%

Sixth grade words: 60%


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Assessment: Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills Date: 2/16/2017

Results: Overall, the student is currently performing at a fourth grade reading level. The student

has difficulty reading complex, compound, complex-compound sentences. In addition, the

student has difficulty reading higher level vocabulary terms. Lastly, the student has difficulty

with reading comprehension. Often, he is not able to comprehend what he is reading without

modifications or assistance from his instructional aide.

Strengths: Needs:

-Sight words -Phonics

-Literal comprehension -Comprehension

-Using context clues with reading assistance

Academics: Mathematics

Sources: Informal assessments, current classroom based assessments, and classroom based

observations.

Instructional Grade Level Performance:

Calculation: 1st grade without calculator; 5th grade with calculator

Problem-solving: 2nd grade without a reader and calculator; 4th grade with a reader and calculator

Assessment: Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills Date: 2/16/2017

Results: The student is able to complete basic addition and subtraction mathematical problems.

However, he struggles with addition and subtraction that requires multi-digits. He also has

extreme difficulty with division, fractions, and decimals. The student is unable to compute and
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solve mathematical problems without the aid of a calculator and an assistant. He requires the

assistance of both his math teacher and his aide to comprehend the math problems. He will shut

down if the problems become too difficult for him. However, if the problems are easy enough, he

will work to solve them.

Strengths: Needs:

-Basic addition and subtraction -multi-digit addition and

subtraction

-division and multiplication

-fractions

-problem solving

Academic: Writing

Source: Informal assessments, current classroom based assessments, and district and/or state

assessments

Instructional Grade Level Performance:

7th grade

Assessment: Brigance Comprehensive Inventory of Basic Skills Date: 2/16/2017

Results: As it relates to writing, the student is performing at a 7th grade level. He is able to

effectively communicate through written expression through simple sentences. He is able to

formulate ideas in his head and effectively transfer those ideas into writing. He does, however,

have difficulty writing compound and complex sentences and constructing paragraphs.
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Strengths: Needs:

-Simple sentence construction -Expanded sentence

construction

-Paragraph

construction

Behavioral: Behavior

Sources: Current classroom based assessments, classroom based observations, informal

assessments, behavioral data, and checklists

Level of Performance: Below grade/age expectations. The student continues to need constant

cues, prompts, and support to stay on task and submit assignments.

Assessment: Informal data Date: 2/16/2017

Results: The student had been in mostly self-contained classes during his sixth grade year. When

he transitioned to the seventh and eighth grades, he was integrated into all general education

classes. He does enjoy social interactions with both peers and adults, however, his social

interactions with peers can be detrimental to his academic progress. He will allow others to

distract him and he can distract others. The student needs constant redirection to focus on the

tasks in the classroom.

Strengths: Needs:

-Responds to praise -On-task behavior

-Enjoys working with adults


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-Wants to make friends and work with peers

What is the parental input regarding the students educational progress?

The students mother states that she believes that the program is well designed but it is difficult

to get her son to do his part and to take responsibility.

What are his strengths, interest areas, significant personal attributes and personal

accomplishments?

The student is a curious young man who enjoys using the computer. He reports that he enjoys

school and enjoys discussing family outings.

How does the students disability affect his involvement in the general education

curriculum?

His visual processing, retrieval, verbal reasoning, attention, depth of acquired knowledge,

sensory, motor and verbal reasoning areas are impacted. These areas then impact his ability to

sort and efficiently retrieve recently learned information, follow multi-step directions,

comprehend auditory and visual information, attend to instruction for extended periods of time,

and maintain on task behaviors during instruction. Math, reading, and written language are

impacted. These areas, in turn, impact participation in science and social studies.

II. B. Instructional and Testing Accommodations

Presentation Accommodations: (I covers all instructional/interventions including the Bridge

Plan)

Auditory Presentation Accommodations:


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Human Reader or Audio Recording for Verbatim Reading of Entire Test (I, A)
Multi-Sensory Presentation Accommodations
Text to Speech Software for Verbatim Reading of Entire Test (I, A)
Text to Speech Software for Selected Sections of Test (I, N/A)
Document Basis for Decision: The student requires presentation accommodations of a human

reader and a screen reader for verbatim reading of the entire test. Based on a review of formal,

informal, and classroom based assessments, a significant weakness in phonics (G, E, 1) and

reading comprehension (G, E, K) makes it necessary for him to have grade level or higher

material read to him in its entirety. Due to his reading abilities being at a second grade level, he

needs grade level materials reads to him in order to improve his comprehension of the grade

level material. Due to his inattentiveness and significant comprehension skills, he needs reading

assistance with grade level written material.


How accommodations will be implemented: The student requires a human/audio reader due to

his below grade level reading abilities. The above accommodations will be provided during any

tests/quizzes and when needed in the classroom setting. This is necessary as a means to help the

student access the grade level material that is embedded in 8th grade curricula.
Response Accommodations: (I covers all instructional/intervention including Bridge Plan)
Scribe (I, A)
Document Basis for Decision: The student requires accommodations of a scribe in order to

organize responses and calculation devices (calculator, number line, calculation charts, and

manipulatives) in order to solve problems. A significant weakness in calculation (G, E, 1) makes

it necessary for him to use calculation devices. Due to his off-task behaviors which causes him to

lose focus and his train of thought, a scribe is needed to record his responses.
How accommodations will be implemented: The student requires a scribe due to his inability

to organize his thoughts and to calculate mathematical problems. The above accommodation will

be provided during writing tasks and calculating tasks in the general education setting. The

students instructional aide will provide the accommodation.


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Timing and Scheduling Accommodations: (I covers all instructional/intervention including

the Bridge Plan)


Extended Time: 20 minutes (I, A)
Multiple or Frequent Breaks (I, A)
Document Basis for Decision: Due to the students difficulties with attention, it may be

necessary to provide multiple or frequent breaks to enable him to demonstrate his knowledge.

The student must be provided extended time (time and a half). Due to the students weakened

processing speed, he needs extended time to complete a task.


How accommodations will be implemented: Due to the students inability to focus and

complete tasks, the student is required to have extended time. The above accommodation will be

implemented within the general education setting by the teacher. The accommodation will be

provided with any assessment, whether formal or informal.


Setting Accommodation: (I covers all instructional/intervention including the Bridge Plan)
Reduced Distractions to the Student (I, A)
Reduced Distractions to Other Students (I, A)
Document Basis for Decision: Reduced distractions to the student and to others is required to

enable him to hear what is being read, as well as to provide a setting that does not disturb other

students as he is being read to.


How accommodations will be implemented: The student requires reduced distractions to help

him focus. In addition, reduced distractions need to be provided to other students so that their

learning is not impeded when he is being read too. The accommodation will be implemented in

the general education setting when verbatim reading is required.

II.C. IEP Goals and Objectives

The below goals and objectives are uniquely designed to meet the needs of the students

instructional, educational and social needs. The three principles of Universal Design for Learning

(UDL) were carefully considered and incorporated when developing these goals and objectives.

The three principles of UDL are: 1. Multiple means of representation, 2. Multiple means of
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action and expression, and 3. Multiple means of engagement. Throughout the school year, the

student will be provided with traditional books, internet sources, videos and other forms of

technology as a means of representation. As it relates to action and expression, the student will

be given a variety of choices to express and to demonstrate his understanding of the concepts and

skills addressed in his classes. Also, the teachers have taken into consideration the interests of the

student and have incorporated these interests into daily lessons as a means of engagement. The

goals and the objectives developed are aligned with the PLAAFP and are aligned with the

MCCRS standards. In addition, the goals and the objectives are: Specific, Measurable,

Achievable, Relevant and Time-Bound (SMART).

Reading: GOAL
Goal: By March 2018, when given a grade level text that included syllabication patterns and

morphology, the student will decode the text with no more than 5 errors in 1 out of 5 reading

activities as measured by teacher running record.


Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures, Classroom-Based Assessment Data Sheet
With: 2 out of 5 targeted trials
ESY Goal? Yes
Objective 1: Given an unfamiliar word in a text, the student will break the word into

syllables.
Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment, Informal Procedures
With: 1 out of 5 targeted trials
Objective 2: Given an unfamiliar word in a text, the student will identify roots and

affixes.
Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment, Informal Procedures
With: 1 out of 5 targeted trials
Objective 3: Given grade level text, the student will be able to use word meanings and
order in sentences to confirm decoding efforts.
Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment, Informal Procedures
With: 1 out of 5 targeted trials
Reading: GOAL:
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Goal: After reading a text written at grade level, the student will support a central idea or key

conclusion of the text by using pieces of textual evidence to support their analysis for (4 out of 5)

texts.
Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures, Data Sheets
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
ESY? Yes
Objective 1: Given a grade level text, the student will highlight relevant pieces of textual

evidence that supports the central idea.


Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessments
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
Objective 2: Given a grade level text, the student will justify the supporting textual

evidence he chose, either orally or in writing.


Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
Written Language: GOAL
Goal: By March 2018, during a writing activity in the classroom, when writing a paragraph with

multiple sentences, the student will use a variety of sentence structures (i.e. simple, compound,

complex, and compound-complex) to signal differing relationships among ideas, according to a

teacher-created rubric, for 3 out of 5 writing sessions.


Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment, Work Samples
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
ESY?: Yes
Objective 1: The student will be able to generate ideas and topic for writing.
Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures, Work Samples
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials.
Objective 2: The student will be able to dictate or write sentences related to ideas
or illustrations.
Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment, Work Samples
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
Mathematics: GOAL
Goal: By March 2018, when given a series of 5 real-world problems involving rational

numbers, and requiring any of the four operations (i.e. subtraction, multiplication, division,

addition), the student will select an operation and solve 3 out of 5 problems correctly.
Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures, Work Samples
With: 50% accuracy
ESY Goal?: Yes
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Objective 1: Given real-world word problems, the student will highlight the key, relevant

details and/or words.


Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment
With: 50% accuracy
Objective 2: Given real-world word problems, the student will identify and use the

correct operation(s) needed to solve the problem.


Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment
With: 50% accuracy
Behavior: GOAL
Goal: By March 2018, when participating in an activity, the student will actively work on the

assigned task(s), use attentive posture (i.e. sitting up), and will refrain from off-task behaviors

(i.e. disrupting other students, daydreaming, walking around) for the duration of the activity, for

4 out of 5 trails.
Evaluation Method: Classroom-Bases Assessments, Observations
With: 4 out of 5 targeted trails
ESY Goal?: No
Objective 1: The student will respond appropriately to constructive feedback.
Evaluation Method: Classroom-Based Assessment, Observations
With: 4 out of 5 targeted trials
Objective 2: Given cues and support from the guidance counselor, the student will use

his words to appropriately express feelings of frustration and/or anger.


Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures, Behavior Charts
With: 4 out of 5 targeted trails
Objective 3: The student will speak appropriately to those around him when he becomes
angry and frustrated.
Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures, Behavior Charts
With: 4 out of 5 targeted trials
Behavior: GOAL
Goal: By March 2018, when given a directive, the student will demonstrate compliance by

looking at the person and saying okay or nodding his head within 10 seconds then completing

the directive and will refrain from engaging in non-compliant behavior (i.e. ignoring the speaker,

arguing) for 3 out of 5 directive given.


Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
ESY Goal? No
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Objective 1: Given a direction from an adult, the student will appropriately acknowledge

the person and the directive (i.e. head nod, saying okay, etc.).
Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
Objective 2: Given a direction form an adult, the student will avoid non-compliance
behavior.
Evaluation Method: Informal Procedures
With: 3 out of 5 targeted trials
Description of how the childs progress will be measured:
As described the goals and the objectives, the students progress will be measured through:

classroom-based assessments, informal procedures, observation records data charts and work

samples. The criterion to measure the students progress ranges from 3 out of 5 trials in reading,

writing and behavior to 50% accuracy in mathematics.


When periodic reports will be provided to parents:
The progress reports will be provided to the parent quarterly via email. The progress reports will

identify the progress that the student has made towards the goals and the objectives.
II. D. Supplementary Aids and Services, Program Modifications, and Supports
Special Education Services:
Service Nature: Classroom Instruction
Location: In General Education
Number of Sessions: 90
Length of Time: 45 minutes
Frequency: Monthly
Start Date: 2/28/2017
End Date: 2/28/2018
Duration: 36 weeks
Provider: P= General Education Teacher
Summary of Services: 67 hours, 30 minutes, Monthly
ESY Service Nature: Classroom Instruction
Location: In General Education
Number of Sessions: 3
Length of Time: 1 hour
Frequency: Daily
Start Date: 7/5/2017
End Date: 7/28/2017
Duration: 4 weeks
Provider: P= General Education Teacher
Summary of Services: 3 hours daily
Discussion of service(s) delivery: The student will receive all instruction in the content area in

the inclusion setting. In this setting, he will receive small group instruction as needed.
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Additionally, he will receive instruction and support in a small group pull-out setting for 45

minutes on alternative days.


Career and Technology Education Services:
Services Nature: Career and Technology Education with Support
Location: In General Education
Number of Sessions: 1
Length of Time: 30 minutes
Frequency: Yearly
Start Date: 2/28/2017
End Date: 2/28/2018
Duration: 36 weeks
Provider: P= Transition Facilitator, O= General Education Teacher O= Special Education

Teacher
Summary of Service: 30 minutes, yearly
Discussion of Service(s) delivery: Transition planning services provided by case manager,

teacher, counselor, transition facilitator, or additional personnel as appropriate.


Related Services:
Service Nature: Counseling Services and Transportation
Location: In General Education
Number of Sessions: 1
Length of Time: 15 minutes
Frequency: Weekly
Start Date: 2/28/2017
End Date: 2/28/2018
Duration: 36 Weeks
Provider: P=Guidance Counselor
Summary of Services: 15 minutes, Weekly
Discussion of Service(s) Delivery Including Description of Transportation Services if

Provided: The unstructured nature of the bus ride, coupled with the students impulsive nature,

provides an opportunity for unsafe actions.


Part III: Reflection
Throughout my tenure at Ridgely Middle School, all IEP meetings that I have attended

have been in adherence to the procedures developed and required by IDEA. The mother was able

to participate in the meeting. The mother was given advanced notice of the meeting. The notice

was given fourteen to twenty-one days before the meeting. The draft of her sons IEP was given

to her with the advanced notice. The IEP meeting started with formal introduction by the IEP
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chair. All members of the IEP team made formal introductions and signed the participation form.

The Procedural Safeguards Parental Rights document was offered to the mother, however, she

declined to take it, stating that she has an old copy and is aware of her rights. The special

educator juxtaposed the new IEP with the old, addressing any pertinent changes to the current

IEP. The team discussed ways to improve the students academic and social progress. The IEP

team also discussed the aspirations of the student when he becomes an adult. Although the

student wasnt present at the meeting, he did provide input for future goals. His mother also

offered insight into what his aspirations are. Upon review of the IEP, the mother agreed to all

changes and the IEP chair stated that the mother would receive the finalized copy of the IEP

within five days.


Prior to the IEP meeting, the team worked cooperatively and collaboratively to gather

appropriate data that would help to determine what changes needed to occur to the IEP. This data

included testing and teacher-gathered data. The special educator and I made sure that we reached

out to all of the students teachers to address any concerns that they had about the students

academic and behavioral progress in each of their classes. This included both positive and

negative concerns. As a team, we have worked with the student to continually develop his

academic skills that are related to reading, writing and mathematics. Equally important, we have

been working with him to address his behavior in both the classroom setting and in unstructured

settings, such as the hallway, the cafeteria, and the bus to and from school. While this is a

continual process, the student does understand that he has the support of both his teacher and his

mother to ensure that he is successful in all aspects of his life, whether academic or social. The

IEP team was able to work together to identify any necessary changes that would be needed to

ensure the aforementioned aspects. Because of this, the student has made great efforts to improve

his academics and his behavior.


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As his general education teacher in Language Arts, I have gotten to know the child over

the course of the school year. In particular, I have seen a vast improvement in his behavior

towards adults and towards peers. Innately, he wants to please others and to be successful. He

has worked hard to improve his academics, although he does struggle in that area. Nevertheless, I

have continued to encourage him to always do his best and to work hard. The IEP process has

helped me to understand how goals and objectives are developed. In addition, it has given me

insight into the culture of a childs household, the expectations and the dreams of the child, and

the services that each teacher provides to ensure that not only does he have the necessary tools,

but all of their student have them as well.