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Translation and

Interpreting Studies
at the

University of Auckland
Contents

Are You Thinking About Studying Translation or Interpreting


at the University of Auckland?......................................................................................2
What is Translation? What is Interpreting? And Why Study Them?...............................2
What is Translation Studies? ............................................................................................3
Qualifications in Translation and Interpreting at the University of Auckland .................5
Postgraduate Diploma in Translation Studies (PGDipTranslationStud)............................5
The Master of Professional Studies (MProfStuds) in Translation ......................................6
Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Interpreting (PGCertAdvInterp) ............................8
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Translation Studies ...........................................................9
Certificates of Proficiency.................................................................................................10
Course Descriptions........................................................................................................10
Translation Courses ..........................................................................................................10
Interpreting Courses..........................................................................................................14
Language Acquisition and Advanced Translation Courses ..............................................14
Sample Student Programmes..........................................................................................15
Profile of the Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies .......................................16
IT Infrastructure and Software at the
Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies ..........................................................18
Answers to Some Frequently Asked Questions .............................................................18
For More Information.....................................................................................................22
Appendix 1 .....................................................................................................................23
Appendix 2 .....................................................................................................................24

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© 2008
Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Latest version: 22 January 2008
Are You Thinking About Studying Translation or
Interpreting at the University of Auckland?
Thanks so much for your interest in our postgraduate translation and interpreting
programmes. In this brochure we’ll try to answer as many of your questions as we can,
so that you have all the information you need to make the best decision for your
professional future.
We’ll start off with a brief introduction to translation and interpreting, then look at the
individual programmes in more depth (including a list of the available courses), and
then provide some sample student programmes to give you an idea of how you might
structure your course of study. Finally we’ll also tell you a bit about Auckland’s Centre
for Translation and Interpreting Studies, and provide answers to a list of FAQs
regarding fees, application procedures, and other important concerns.

What is Translation? What is Interpreting?


And Why Study Them?
First of all, let’s make sure we all understand what we're talking about:
• Translation involves the conversion of a written text from one language to another.
• Interpreting involves the conversion of the spoken word from one language to
another.
Translators mostly work into their mother tongue (or the language with which they feel
most comfortable), while interpreters, especially in so-called community interpreting
(e.g. in hospitals or courts), work both into and out of their mother tongue.
In addition, the term translation can be applied in a broader sense whenever the meaning
of one language is turned into another language, whether it’s written, spoken, or even
sign language.
People often believe that anyone who speaks a second language can automatically
translate or interpret. Speaking another language, however, is only the beginning.
Subject knowledge, social and cultural competence within two linguistic communities,
professional and technological skills, as well as ethics, are all essential for the
professional translator or interpreter.
Studying translation or interpreting can open doors to a variety of career opportunities,
including work in international organizations, within health and community
organisations, in international business and trade, online and offline publishing, or
software and website localisation.
Given the dynamics of globalisation, opportunities for translators and interpreters are
becoming more easily available. Translators and interpreters play a vital role in glo-
balisation, allowing the smooth functioning of trade, political negotiation and dialogue,
and assisting with business and organisational relationships across language and cultural
borders. And with the increasing presence of international trade treaties and common
markets, good translators and interpreters are becoming increasingly sought-after.

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Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Latest version: 22 January 2008
In New Zealand, as in many other countries, most translators work as freelancers,
advertising themselves over the internet and within their local communities, and do
work sent to them by translation agencies or directly by end clients. In addition, some
work fixed hours for a company as an in-house translator or for a translation agency.
Translators can, and most likely will, specialise in various subject areas, such as
software localisation (translating software for a regional market), technical translation in
a variety of fields (e.g. automotive, medical, legal), literary translation, and website
translation. In New Zealand, translation associated with business and trade is the most
highly demanded at present.
Interpreting is also a growing industry in New Zealand, with a current shortage of
interpreters in most languages. Interpreters may work with government agencies,
refugee and migrant organisations, or with the judicial and health systems. Most
interpreting work here belongs to the area of community interpreting, i.e. it satisfies the
needs of ethnic communities (for example in hospitals or courts).

What is Translation Studies?


Translation Studies (TS) is the academic discipline that deals with the above activities.
It contains both theoretical and practical elements. One of the main ideas of our
approach to the discipline is that the theory informs the practice of translation.
The theoretical side deals with important questions such as:

• What is equivalence between two translated texts?


• Are some language pairs easier to translate between than others? Why?
• How do you translate an ‘untranslatable’ word?
• How do cultural factors influence translation?
• How has globalisation affected modern translation?
• What has been the effect of new technology on translation?
• Will computers make human translators obsolete?
• What is the history of Translation Studies as a discipline?

By studying the practical side, on the other hand, you gain linguistic and pragmatic
skills, and come to understand contemporary translation technologies and those other
professional issues necessary for aspiring translators and interpreters to have mastery of
in order to succeed in an ever-growing and increasingly competitive language market.
At the University of Auckland, you can study TS at postgraduate level. The following
options are available:

ƒ Postgraduate Diploma in Translation Studies


ƒ Master of Professional Studies in Translation
ƒ Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Interpreting
ƒ Doctor of Philosophy in Translation Studies
ƒ Certificates of Proficiency

In the next section, we’ll describe each of these options in more detail.
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Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Latest version: 22 January 2008
Qualifications in Translation and Interpreting
at the University of Auckland
Firstly, a brief overview of the structure of Auckland University degrees in general.
A full-time study load for one academic year is usually 120 points, with 60 taken in
each semester. Most courses are either 15 or 30 points, although some postgraduate
ones have other point values. With this in mind, here’s an overview of the Translation
and Interpreting qualifications that you can study at Auckland University.

Postgraduate Diploma in Translation Studies (PGDipTranslationStud)


This Postgraduate Diploma is the first level in professional translator training, and is a
fourth-year programme that you can take after completing a BA (often in a second
language, but not always, especially if you’re already bilingual). Many of our students
come to us with a Bachelor in Science or Technology, which, given the high degree of
specialization in today’s market, is not a bad start at all. The PG Dip is a one-year full-
time qualification, which will prepare you for a career in the translation industry. You
can take up to four years to complete it if you want to study part-time, although part-
time degrees are normally completed in two years. It’s made up of a balanced mixture
of theoretical issues, hands-on translation practice, and learning to use and understand
the electronic tools essential to the modern translator. There’s a core of two theory
courses (TRANSLAT 702 and 703), to which you can add elective courses, as well as
advanced translation practice courses with your second language. You’ll get to learn
practical translation skills, translating various types of texts in a wide variety of fields.
You’ll also be able to study in-depth the electronic tools that are such an important part
of modern translation, including translation memories. We’ll also teach you how to
create a bilingual terminology database, how to use your computer most effectively,
how to use and evaluate information found on the internet, and how to link with other
professionals through electronic media. You’ll also have the option to learn more about
the subject areas of law, medicine and business, of special importance in New Zealand,
and to increase your vocabulary in these fields. If your native language is not English,
there’s also an opportunity to study English discourse and grammar, as well as the
editing of English texts.
When completed, the Postgraduate Diploma in Translation Studies will provide you
with a solid foundation for professional success and development, and you’ll be able to
become a full member of the New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters
(NZSTI) if you’ve received a B grade average or better and at least a B+ in your
translation practice course.

PGDip Overview

Admission Requirements
• A completed Bachelors degree or approved appropriate academic or professional
preparation, equivalent to a degree; and

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Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Latest version: 22 January 2008
• Competence in one of the languages offered for the Postgraduate Diploma
equivalent to at least a ‘B+’ grade in a language course at Stage III or above at
this University; and
• Proficiency in English to at least the standard of IELTS 7 or equivalent, if your
first language is not English.

Duration
One year full-time or up to four years part-time.

Required Course of Study


120 points as follows:

Core courses:
• 30 points: TRANSLAT 702 and 703

Optional courses:
• 30 points from CHINESE 725, FRENCH 720, GERMAN 740, GREEK 714,
715, ITALIAN 702, JAPANESE 705, KOREAN 705, LATIN 714, 715, MAORI
712, RUSSIAN 732, SPANISH 723, TRANSLAT 707
and
• 60 points from CHINESE 733, 734, FRENCH 700, GERMAN 701, GREEK
710, 711, ITALIAN 700, JAPANESE 704, 706, KOREAN 700, 701, LATIN
710, 711, MAORI 713, PACIFIC 701, RUSSIAN 710, SPANISH 700,
TRANSLAT 704-723

With the approval of the Coordinating Committee, Special Language Studies 700 level
courses (for language study overseas) may be substituted for points from language
acquisition courses.
For a list of the available courses, see the Faculty of Arts 2008 Postgraduate Handbook,
or visit the courses webpage:
http://www.cce.auckland.ac.nz/departments/index.cfm?P=735
For the Calendar regulations applying to this qualification, see here:
http://www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/fms/default/uoa/Students/Current%20Students/academic
%20life/calendar/regart.pdf (page 82).

The Master of Professional Studies (MProfStuds) in Translation


This is a one-year full-time or up to four years part-time programme. It’s a fifth-year
qualification, which can build on those skills acquired while studying the Postgraduate
Diploma in Translation Studies. However, it’s also a good choice for students who have
completed a BA (Honours) or a Masters in a different field, such as a foreign language,
and who are looking for an alternative career option. It places equal emphasis on the
acquisition of theoretical knowledge and the honing of practical skills.
You’ll have the opportunity to specialise in either technical (including localization) or
literary translation, translation theory, or community interpreting. You’ll do a 10,000 or

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Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
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15,000 word thesis (depending on whether you choose the 30 or 45-point dissertation
option), as well as a practical translation project (which can also be 10,000 or 15,000
words), which could be the translation of a chapter from a book, or a manual, or even
the localisation of a website, with the emphasis being a pragmatic one, so that the
resulting text can be used. Both the thesis and the translation project don’t require any
on-campus time, giving you maximum flexibility to combine work, family/social life,
and study.
When deciding in which subject area to do your dissertation, the best idea is to choose
the area that interests you most, and then to discuss this with the Director of the Centre
for Translation and Interpreting Studies (f.austermuehl@auckland.ac.nz), who can help
you make a decision. Williams and Chesterman’s (2002) book The Map [see Appendix
1] is also a useful source of ideas.
Take a look at Appendix 2 at the end of this brochure for some ideas regarding different
areas of specialisation.

MProfStuds Overview

Admission Requirements
• A four year Bachelors degree, or
• A Bachelors (Honours) degree, or
• A Bachelors degree combined with either a professional qualification equivalent
to one year’s advanced study or at least three years of relevant professional
experience.

Duration
One year full-time or up to four years part-time.

Required Course of Study


120 points as follows:

Taught Masters (Research Masters not available).


Either:
• 30 points from TRANSLAT 702, 703, 724, COMPLIT 703
• 60 points from TRANSLAT 702- 729, COMPLIT 703, 705, CHINESE 725,
FRENCH 720, GERMAN 740, 741, GREEK 714, 715, ITALIAN 702,
JAPANESE 705, KOREAN 705, LATIN 714, 715, MAORI 712, RUSSIAN 732,
SPANISH 723
• 30 points from TRANSLAT 790, ASIAN 790, FRENCH 790, GERMAN 780,
ITALIAN 780, PACIFIC 785, RUSSIAN 790
or:
• 30 points from TRANSLAT 702, 703, 724, COMPLIT 703
• 45 points from TRANSLAT 702-729, COMPLIT 703, 705, CHINESE 725,
FRENCH 720, GERMAN 740, GREEK 714, 715, ITALIAN 702, JAPANESE
705, KOREAN 705, LATIN 714, 715, MAORI 712, RUSSIAN 732, SPANISH
723

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Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
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• 45 points from TRANSLAT 792, ASIAN 792, FRENCH 792, GERMAN 792,
ITALIAN 792, MAORI 792, PACIFIC 792, RUSSIAN 792, SPANISH 792

For a list of the available courses, see the Faculty of Arts 2008 Postgraduate Handbook,
or visit the courses webpage:
http://www.cce.auckland.ac.nz/departments/index.cfm?P=735

For the Calendar regulations applying to this qualification, see here:


http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/students/index.cfm?P=10466

Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Interpreting (PGCertAdvInterp)


The Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Interpreting has a strong focus on community
interpreting, with special emphasis placed on the professional reality of interpreting in
New Zealand. The programme’s structure and goals reflect the belief that interpreters in
medical, legal and business contexts work at a fully professional level. To prepare you
academically and practically for this profession, the Certificate is based on research
from applied linguistics, communication and interpreting studies, as well as the
professional areas of medicine, law and business.
The programme is made up of three courses. The first course offers an introduction to
interpreting, in which you’ll focus on the theories, techniques (including public
speaking and the Geneva notation system) and ethics that are essential for interpreters
working in legal, medical, and business settings. You’re encouraged to think critically
about the interpreting process and their individual roles, linking theory with practice.
This course provides you with a solid basic understanding of interpreting in general,
while deepening your knowledge and ability to problem-solve, specifically in the area
of community interpreting. The second course exposes you to the main areas and
terminologies of the three subject areas most in demand in the New Zealand market: law,
medicine, and business. The third and final component of the programme is a
comprehensive interpreting practice course, in which you’ll simulate interpreting
situations and work with your main language combinations.

PGCertAdvInterp Overview

Admission Requirements
• A completed Bachelors degree, or an approved equivalent combination of
tertiary study and professional qualifications and/or experience; and
• Competence in English and an approved further language or languages to at
least the following levels:
o an IELTS score of 7.5 in the oral band for non-native speakers of English.
o for languages other than English, oral and written competency equivalent
to at least the level of advanced undergraduate courses at this University.
o An interview in both languages and an aptitude test is required.

Duration
One semester full-time or up to four semesters part-time.

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Required Course of Study
60 points: TRANSLAT 601, 602, and 605

For a list of the available courses, see the Faculty of Arts 2007 Postgraduate Handbook,
or visit the courses webpage:
http://www.cce.auckland.ac.nz/departments/index.cfm?P=735

For the Calendar regulations applying to this qualification, see here:


http://www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/fms/default/uoa/Students/Current%20Students/academic
%20life/calendar/regart.pdf (page 83).

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Translation Studies


If you have a strong background in two languages and any other field of study and you
wish to undertake a PhD thesis on a topic in translation, then you can contact the
Director of the Centre for Translation Studies (f.austermuehl@auckland.ac.nz) who will
advise you on the formulation of a project and assist with locating possible co-
supervisors.
The PhD is an opportunity for you to engage in advanced research. This research can be
carried out in any area within the Faculty of Arts, provided that supervision is available
and that the research proposal and supervision arrangements are approved by the
University. The demands of PhD research require a significant commitment in terms of
time and resources.
A thesis of an internationally recognised standard is one that makes an original
contribution to knowledge or understanding in its field. Normally the thesis may not
exceed 100,000 words or 250 pages. An oral examination takes place after the thesis has
been submitted.

Duration
The PhD is expected to be completed in three or four full-time years, although it may be
possible to complete on a part-time basis.

Admission
The usual requirement is a Master’s degree with Honours (First Class or Second Class,
First Division) from the University of Auckland, or an approved equivalent
qualification from New Zealand or overseas. You must also have demonstrated an
ability to pursue doctoral level research. All candidates must submit a research proposal
and obtain registration.
It’s also worth noting that international students enrolling for a PhD only have to pay
New Zealand domestic fees.

For more general information about this qualification, see


http://www.cce.auckland.ac.nz/departments/index.cfm?P=1343 and here:
http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/students/index.cfm?P=217, rr take a look at Faculty of
Arts 2008 Postgraduate Handbook.
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Certificates of Proficiency
If you want to study just one or two Translation or Interpreting courses without studying
a whole postgraduate qualification, a Certificate of Proficiency (COP) is an option.
These certificates will give you recognition for taking a course, although they’re not
creditable towards a degree. Certificates of Proficiency represent an excellent
opportunity to enrol in courses that allow you to upgrade your translation or interpreting
skills.
You can take any course or courses for the Certificate of Proficiency, provided that you
have the approval of the Associate Dean of Arts (Students) and you have passed any
prerequisites (and have obtained approval from the department to enrol).
Courses may not be cross-credited to any subsequent postgraduate programme. Courses
taken for a COP may not be subsequently transferred into a BA(Hons) or MA.
There are two types of Certificates of Proficiency.
The first option is COPUA: Certificate of Proficiency – University of Auckland. This is
the option suitable for domestic students, who want to study translation or interpreting
papers without studying a full qualification, or for those language professionals who
wish to add to their competency in a particular area (such as Translat 723 taken as a
refresher course in Trados and Déjà Vu, for example).
The second is COPOS: Certificate of Proficiency – Overseas. This is suitable for those
international students who are only staying for one semester or who aren’t able to
complete a full program of study, but who want to study a translation or interpreting
paper.

Course Descriptions
TRANSLAT 702 Theory and Methodology of Translation (15 points)
Semester 1
This course will provide an introduction to the discipline of translation studies and to
translation theories that have originated and developed during the twentieth century.
Applying a diachronic perspective, it will attempt to give an overview of major
translation paradigms focusing on the second half of the twentieth century. Among
these modern approaches, we will deal in greater detail with theories of translation,
applying their theoretical principles and methods to the hypothetical translation of
different text types. Overall, the concept of translation and the role of the translator will
be regarded as key parameters in the analysis and comparison of different approaches to
translation.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 703 Issues in Translation (15 points)


Semester 2
This course discusses the place of translation studies and that of the translator in a
globalised world. Continuing the discussion of major translation theories that we started
in the first semester, students will be introduced to three new approaches: Polysystems
theory, descriptive translation studies (especially translation and norms), and post-

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Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Latest version: 22 January 2008
colonial translation studies. These modern paradigms will be embedded in a larger
discussion of the impact that globalisation has had on the role and image of translators.
In this context, special emphasis will be placed on the role of digital tools and resources
for translators and the concept of localization as a possible new paradigm in translation
studies.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 704 Contextual Studies (15 points)


Semester 1
Introduces translators to a variety of professional areas in which they will be working
and extends their knowledge and understanding of the general structure of these subject
areas. A special focus will be on the terminologies, i.e. the specialized vocabularies, of
the disciplines covered. The subject areas dealt with reflect the professional reality of
translators and interpreters in New Zealand and include, among other things, law,
business, and medicine.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl
Restriction: TRANSLAT 602

TRANSLAT 706 Theory, Ethics and Techniques of Interpreting (15 points)


Semester 1
This course offers an overview of the discipline of interpreting, with special emphasis
on community interpreting. We will focus on the theories, techniques (including public
speaking and the Geneva notation system) and ethics that are essential for interpreters
working in legal, medical, and business settings. Students are encouraged to think
critically about the interpreting process and their individual roles, linking theory with
practice. This course provides students with a solid basic understanding of interpreting
in general, while deepening their knowledge of and problem-solving in the area of
community interpreting specifically.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl
Restriction: TRANSLAT 601

TRANSLAT 707 Advanced Translation Practice (30 points)


Semester 2
The focus is on further developing competence in translation. Students will translate a
wide variety of professional texts. Emphasis is on longer texts, which may require
special subject knowledge and terminology research.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 710 Research Tools and Professional Issues (15 points)


Semester 1
This course introduces students to a wide range of computer skills for professional
translators, covering a number of translation-related IT topics from file management to
word processing to information research and management. Participants will learn how
to set up an efficient professional IT environment and how to use software solutions
(e.g. terminology databases) to improve both the quality and the productivity of their
work. In addition to learning how to search, find, and evaluate information on the
internet, students will also be introduced to the editing and translation of websites. The
part of the course on electronic tools will be complemented with sessions aimed at

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Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Latest version: 22 January 2008
showing how translators can set up their own businesses in both the local and global
markets.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 721 Revising and Editing for Translators (15 points)


Semester 1
This course will provide an introduction on how to produce clear, concise and correct
texts in English. We will analyse the concepts of ‘editing’ and ‘revising’, and introduce
four types of editing. Our discussions will then deal with the four types individually,
starting with the macro level of texts. We will then focus on two types of micro-level
editing considered to be most useful for practising translators: copy editing and stylistic
editing. The first involves correcting texts to bring them into conformity with the rules
of a language community, and covers topics such as: using ‘house styles’, checking for
spelling and typographical errors as well as for syntax, idiom, punctuation, and usage.
In addition, we will analyse - and apply - revision and quality assessment techniques
with the aid of word processing software. Finally, students will be able to complement
the development of writing skills with oral and communication skills.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl
Restriction: This course is available only to students of non-English speaking
backgrounds.

TRANSLAT 722 English Discourse for Translators (15 points)


Semester 2
English discourse from a linguistic viewpoint. Examines the relationship between
choices about words, word order, grammatical forms and sentence types, and specific
discourse functions, social and pragmatic functions and context.
Restriction: This course is available only to students of non-English speaking
backgrounds.

TRANSLAT 723 Translation Memories (15 points)


Semester 1, repeated Semester 2
This course will provide students with an overview of and hands-on experience in the
use of two market-leading translation memory systems, namely Déjà Vu and Trados.
Both translation memory systems support common features such as: Project
management, translation memory management and translation memory maintenance,
terminology management, word counts and statistical reports, editing of different file
formats, quality assurance, etc. This course aims at introducing students to modern
electronic translation environments, and providing them with practical advice on how
translation memory systems can best be integrated into the translation process. Working
with two different translation memory systems will provide students with useful insight
to assess such systems and the way they affect the translation process.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 724 Localization (30 points)


Semester 2
This course covers theoretical and practical questions of localization, i.e. the translation
and adaptation of software, websites, and other electronic texts. Over the course of the
last ten years, the translation of websites and computer applications has become a

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dominant topic in translation, affecting both theory and practice. Students will analyse a
variety of electronic (or screen) texts and will learn to translate software applications
and websites using a variety of computer-based translation tools. Also deals with
theoretical issues arising from the localization paradigm.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 725 Research Essay (15 points)


Semester 1, repeated Semester 2
A supervised research essay or project on a specific topic in translation studies.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 726 Translation Project (30 points)


TRANSLAT 726 A & B Translation Project (30 points)
Semester 1, or Semester 2, or Semester 1 and 2 (full year)
A supervised research essay or project on a specific topic in translation studies.
To complete this course students must enrol in TRANSLAT 726 (if single semester) or
TRANSLAT 726 A and B (if full year).
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 727 Translation Project (45 points)


TRANSLAT 727 A & B Translation Project (45 points)
Semester 1, or Semester 2, or Semester 1 and 2 (full year)
A supervised research essay or project on a specific topic in translation studies.
To complete this course students must enrol in TRANSLAT 727 (if single semester) or
TRANSLAT 727 A and B (if full year).
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

TRANSLAT 728 Special Topic (15 points)


Availability and details to be advised

TRANSLAT 729 Special Topic (15 points)


Availability and details to be advised

TRANSLAT 790 Dissertation (30 points)


TRANSLAT 790 A & B Dissertation (30 points)
Semester 1, or Semester 2, or Semester 1 and 2 (full year)
To complete this course students must enrol in TRANSLAT 790 (if single semester) or
TRANSLAT 790 A and B (if full year).

TRANSLAT 792 Dissertation (45 points)


TRANSLAT 792 A & B Dissertation (45 points)
Semester 1, or Semester 2, or Semester 1 and 2 (full year)
To complete this course students must enrol in TRANSLAT 792 (if single semester) or
TRANSLAT 792 A and B (if full year).

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Interpreting Courses
TRANSLAT 601 Theory, Ethics and Techniques of Interpreting (15 points)
Semester 1
This course offers an overview of the discipline of interpreting, with special emphasis
on community interpreting. We will focus on the theories, techniques (including public
speaking and the Geneva notation system) and ethics that are essential for interpreters
working in legal, medical, and business settings. Students are encouraged to think
critically about the interpreting process and their individual roles, linking theory with
practice. This course provides students with a solid basic understanding of interpreting
in general, while deepening their knowledge of and problem-solving in the area of
community interpreting specifically.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl
Restriction: TRANSLAT 706

TRANSLAT 602 Contextual Studies (15 points)


Semester 1
Introduces translators to a variety of professional areas in which they will be working
and extends their knowledge and understanding of the general structure of these subject
areas. A special focus will be on the terminologies, i.e. the specialized vocabularies, of
the disciplines covered. The subject areas dealt with reflect the professional reality of
translators and interpreters in New Zealand and include, among other things, law,
business, and medicine.
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl
Restriction: TRANSLAT 704

TRANSLAT 605 Advanced Interpreting Practice (30 points)


TRANSLAT 605 A & B Advanced Interpreting Practice (30 points)
Semester 1, or Semester 2, or Semester 1 and 2 (full year)
Students will be taken from basic interpreting skills, in the context of triads, and short
segments of discourse through to unilateral consecutive interpreting in legal, medical
and business settings of medium to long stretches of discourse.
To complete this course students must enrol in TRANSLAT 605 (if single semester) or
TRANSLAT 605 A and B (if full year).
Convenor: Associate Professor Frank Austermühl

Language Acquisition and Advanced Translation Courses


See the Faculty of Arts 2007 Postgraduate Handbook for information on the Advanced
Translation Practice courses which apply to your language combination, which are
organised by the language departments concerned.

Also, if you are a native speaker of English, have a look at the same Handbook for more
information on the Language Acquisition courses for your particular second language.

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Sample Student Programmes
George Johnson, a native English speaker from New Zealand, wants to study full-time
towards a Postgraduate Diploma in Translation Studies, with Spanish as his second
language. He has already done an undergraduate degree in Spanish, at another New
Zealand university. His year would look something like this:

Translat 702 Theory and Methodology of Translation 15


Semester One Spanish 700 Language Acquisition 30
Translat 710 Research Tools and Professional Issues 15

Translat 703 Issues in Translation 15


Semester Two Translat 723 Translation Memories 15
Spanish 723 Advanced Spanish Translation 30
Total 120

Zheng Xi, a native speaker of Standard Mandarin, would like to study a Postgraduate
Certificate in Advanced Interpreting. He could take up to four semesters to complete
the Certificate if necessary, although it is easily done in one or two. If he chose to, he
could then go on to study a Master of Professional Studies in Translation, specialising in
community interpreting.

Translat 601 Theory, Ethics and Techniques of Interpreting 15


Semester One
Translat 602 Contextual Studies 30

Semester Two Translat 605 Advanced Interpreting Practice (Chinese) 30


Total 60

Misaki Saionji, a native speaker of Japanese, wants to study a Master of Professional


Studies in Translation. She has already begun studying translation in Japan, and would
like to go straight to the next level! First, she would contact the Graduate Advisor of the
Translation Studies department, who would discuss her Japanese academic record with
her, to find out what she would need to study here, and which Japanese university
courses could be credited towards her University of Auckland degree. Depending on
what is decided, she may study Translat 702 and Translat 703, doing her dissertation in
an area that interests her (Translat 792, 45 points; or Translat 790, 30 points), along
with a translation project (Translat 726 and 727, 30 and 45 points respectively). She
may also wish to study Translat 721 (Revising and Editing for Translators) or Translat
722 (English Discourse for Translators), given that she is not a native speaker of
English. She could take up to four years part-time to complete her Masters, but one or
two years would be recommended. (See Appendix 2 at the end of the brochure for an
overview of other options that she could take).

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Alessandra Mazzinghi, a native speaker of Italian, is visiting New Zealand for just one
semester. She can’t stay long enough to study a full qualification, but she would like to
experience a New Zealand university, and is interested in translation. She could take
just one paper, Translat 703 (Issues in Translation), for example, and credit it towards a
Certificate of Proficiency – Overseas (COPOS). This will enable her to receive
official recognition of her study, even though she will not be able to credit that paper
towards a degree at Auckland University, should she decide to return at a later date.

Jared Smith is a native English speaker from New Zealand, who works in the
translation industry as a freelancer. He has been working for several years, and would
simply like to do a refresher course in the areas of translation memories or localisation.
In this case he could take Translat 723 (Translation Memories) or Translat 724
(Localization), and receive a Certificate of Proficiency – University of Auckland
(COPUA), which will provide an official record of his study in the course that he
chooses.

Profile of the Centre for Translation


and Interpreting Studies
The Centre was established in 1998 and reflects a response to New Zealand’s increasing
internationalisation and the growing prominence of translation and interpreting. The
main objective of the Centre is to provide a modern programme in Translation Studies
and Interpreting that focuses on the role of the translator and interpreter in the age of
globalisation and automation. This approach includes political, economic, cultural and
technological aspects.
The Centre and its staff offer a high level of expertise in such state-of-the-art areas as
translation technology, translation pedagogy, and translation and politics (all areas with
ongoing research projects), and it is one of the most progressive in the world and unique
in Australasia. Given the current and future demand for translation between Chinese and
English, the Centre is also working to strengthen ties with Chinese universities in two
main areas – the development of curricula and translation-teacher training for
Translation Studies departments in China, and in translation market studies in order to
analyse current and future trends.
The programmes that the Centre offers are designed to meet this growing need for
professionally trained translators and interpreters. Equal emphasis is placed on the
acquisition of the theoretical background of the discipline and on practical skills. The
programmes involve collaboration between the School of European Languages and
Literatures, the School of Asian Studies, the Departments of Māori Studies, Classics
and Ancient History, the Centre for Pacific Studies, and the Department of Applied
Language Studies and Linguistics.
Staff at the Centre
The Centre currently has two permanent staff members and a number of tutors. Part of
the translation courses are also taught by staff from other departments.

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Permanent staff
Associate Professor Frank Austermühl is Director of the Centre for Translation and
Interpreting Studies. His research interests include the relationship between
globalization and translation, translation technology, and political discourse. Frank has a
PhD in Applied Linguistics and Translation Studies from the University of Heidelberg,
Germany. A Fulbright fellow at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and the
University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA, in 2001 and 2002, he’s currently working
a book on intertextuality and identity in US presidential discourse.
Vanessa Enríquez Raído is a senior tutor, and she teaches courses on translation
theory/methodology and translation technology at the Centre. A professional translator
of English, German and Spanish, she has an MA in Translation and Interpreting from
the Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Madrid), a Postgraduate Diploma in Translation
Technology from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona), and a Diploma of
Advanced Studies in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the Universitat Rovira i
Virgili (Tarragona). Vanessa is currently writing her PhD thesis on a holistic approach
to the teaching of translation practice and translation technology.
Tutors
David Atkinson is a Masters student at the Centre, where he teaches editing and revising
and sometimes translation theory. Spanish is his second language. When not teaching or
studying, he works part-time for an Auckland agency as a translator and editor. He has a
Postgraduate Diploma in Translation Studies from the University of Auckland.
Rodney Hellyer teaches the Japanese-English translation course. He has been translating
Japanese for over ten years, and owns his own Auckland-based translation, interpreting
and tour-guiding company with his wife Makiko, translating mainly in the mechanical,
industrial, business and electronics fields. He has a Graduate Diploma in Translation
Studies from the University of Auckland.
JIN Ying (金莹) previously taught at Beijing Foreign Studies University and Shenzhen
University. At the Centre, Ms. Jin teaches postgraduate courses on theory, ethics and
techniques of interpreting as well as advanced interpreting practice between Mandarin
and English. She is also a PhD candidate in Interpreting Studies at the Centre, and her
research interests are interpreter training, translation theory and practice, and second
language acquisition.
Christof Schneider teaches the use of Computer-Aided Translation tools and
technological issues at the Centre, as well as owning his own CAT tool consulting and
training company. He has been working in the local translation industry for over five
years, translating from English to German, and has a Graduate Diploma in Translation
Studies from the University of Auckland.
Staff from the various language departments of the university teach the language
acquisition courses and are also responsible for organising the advanced translation
practice courses.

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IT Infrastructure and Software at the Centre for
Translation and Interpreting Studies
The Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies has access to advanced IT resources.
We have all the usual: High-speed internet, a full range of current software, including
Microsoft Office, text-input options for all the commonly-used languages, web design
and statistics programmes, as well as two of the market leaders in translation memory
software – Déjà Vu and Trados.
This means that you’ll get to gain hands-on experience with the very tools that are
currently widely used within the translation industry, and that you’ll have the
opportunity to improve your computing skills in preparation for work as a translator, or
to sharpen them if you are already working in the field.

Answers to Some Frequently Asked Questions


How much will it cost?
There are two different types of fee structures, depending on whether you're a domestic
(Australia included) or an international student. For further information regarding
payment, due dates, additional charges, student loans, and other important information,
visit http://www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/for/currentstudents/money/fees/fees.cfm.

To check out current exchange rates using an online currency converter, visit
www.xe.com.

What kinds of scholarships are available?


There are countless scholarships available, including travel grants for overseas study.
To find a scholarship that best suits your needs, a good place to start looking is:
http://www.auckland.ac.nz/scholarships. If you choose the ‘Search for Scholarships’
option, you’ll get the chance to search through scholarships by category, which will
help you to find those that apply to you. Have a look here, too:
http://www.postgrad.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/for/postgradstudents/finance/scholarships/schol
arships.cfm.
International students can look here:
http://www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/for/prospective/welcomes/internationalstudents/costs/sc
holarships/scholarships_home.cfm.
Alternatively, you can email the scholarships office at scholarships@auckland.ac.nz or,
if you’re an international student, write to internationalscholarships@auckland.ac.nz.

How do I apply to study?


Most of your Auckland University application can be done online by entering as a
Guest using the Student Self Service, nDeva, and going through the application
procedures that follow. This begins the general application process to become a student

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at the University of Auckland. This process can also be started by going to the website
of the University of Auckland, and clicking on Apply Now.
During this process you’ll be asked to fill out by hand the AR30 Postgraduate Course
Selection Worksheet. This is so that your Graduate Advisor (A/P Frank Austermühl)
can approve the specific programme of study that you’ve selected. You may also need
to complete an AR20 Language Competency Form, depending on your qualifications
and experience concerning the languages of your choice.

Is distance learning available?


Currently, there are no translation or interpreting courses available for distance learning.
Courses taken at overseas institutions may be accredited to a University of Auckland
qualification, subject to the University’s approval.

Can I have already studied some of my Translation degree overseas?


You may be able to complete part of your degree at the University of Auckland as an
inbound study-abroad student. This involves paying University of Auckland fees.
You’ll need to consult both your home university and the University of Auckland
beforehand.

What kind of coursework is involved?


Assessment for the Translation and Interpreting qualifications at Auckland is all done
internally. This means that there is no exam period at the end of the courses.
Assessment is through essays, small and mid-sized assignments, practical translation
projects, in-class tests, and group presentations. Masters-level dissertations are assessed
both internally and by an external marker.

What’s the difference between the Postgraduate Diploma and the Master of
Professional Studies in Translation?
The principle difference between the PGDip and the MProfStuds is that the latter is a
fifth-year program (for which you need a BA [Honours] or a Masters to enter), while the
PGDip is a fourth-year program, with lower entry requirements (only a BA). In terms of
the course structure, the other main difference is that for the MProfStuds you have to
write a dissertation (either 30 or 45 points).

Which languages are available?


We have Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Spanish
available in any given year. Greek, Latin, and Māori may be available, subject to
demand.

How many languages can I study as part of a Translation or Interpreting


qualification?
You can only take English and one other language as part of the formal study
programme, but of course those skills that you’ll have acquired through the study of
translation practice in your second language can be used with any third or fourth
languages that you may have.

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What time of day are classes usually held?
Mostly in the afternoons, with Translat 702 and 703 classes being between 4pm and
6pm.

What level of English do I need if English is my second language?


For translation, you’ll need an IELTS Academic level of 7.0, or a TOEFL Written level
of 600. For interpreting, you’ll need an IELTS Spoken level of 7.5.

Will my Translation degree be equivalent to NAATI accreditation for my language


pair? (NAATI is the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and
Interpreters, based in Australia)
Not yet, unless you apply for accreditation yourself. We’re currently working on an
application to NAATI to have our Translation degrees made equivalent to the Translator
and Interpreter accreditation levels (formerly Level 3).

What kinds of opportunities will I have for working as a translator in New


Zealand?
This depends partly on your language combinations with English, the most popular
being Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Spanish. Others may
be in demand less frequently.
The majority of translators work as freelancers from home or a home office, but some
may work for an organisation, a company, or a government agency before becoming
freelancers in their fields of speciality. With telecommunications technology, distance
now has relatively little influence in terms of maintaining a network of international
clients, and with the increase in trade and commerce internationally, the outlook for
translators in New Zealand is good.
Take a look here for a little more information:
http://www.kiwicareers.govt.nz/default.aspx?id0=103&id1=J34311

What about opportunities for interpreting?


The opportunities for interpreting are growing, in similar fashion to those for translating.
As New Zealand society becomes more diverse linguistically, and as commercial,
political, and education links with other countries strengthen, so there is more demand
for trained and qualified interpreters. Many interpreters work as tour guides, in the
health and legal systems, and as community interpreters. There may also be
opportunities in the diplomatic field for highly skilled interpreters.
Take a look here for a little more information:
http://www.kiwicareers.govt.nz/default.aspx?id0=103&id1=J80316

For More Information...


If you need any more information that hasn’t been provided here, then feel free to
contact A/P Frank Austermühl, the Graduate Advisor of the Translation Studies
Department. He can answer any further queries that you may have. His e-mail address is
f.austermuehl@auckland.ac.nz.

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Appendix 1
Basic reading
These are the basic readings covering the ideas, the theories, and the history of
Translation Studies. If you want to ease the in-semester reading load by starting to read
them now, you’ll find most in the University of Auckland’s main library, and some in
the Short Loan library in the Kate Edger Information Commons.

Baker, Mona. 1998. Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies. London: Routledge.


Bassnet, Susan. 2002 . Translation Studies. London: Routledge, third edition.
Chesterman, Andrew & Emma Wagner. 2002. Can Theory Help Translators? A
Dialogue between the Ivory Tower and the Wordface. Manchester: St Jerome.
Chesterman, Andrew. 1989. Readings in Translation Theory. Helsinki: Finn Lectura.
Fawcett, Peter. 1997. Translation and Language: Linguistic Theories Explained.
Manchester: St Jerome.
Gentzler, Edwin. 2001. Contemporary Translation Theories (Second revised edition).
Clevedon, etc.: Multilingual Matters.
Munday, Jeremy. 2001. Introducing translation studies: theories and applications.
London/New York: Routledge.
Nord, Christiane. 1997. Translating as a Purposeful Activity: Functionalist Approaches
Explained. Manchester: St Jerome.
Shuttleworth, Mark & Moira Cowie. Dictionary of Translation Studies. Manchester: St.
Jerome.
Snell-Hornby, Mary. 1995. Translation Studies: An Integrated Approach. Amsterdam:
John Benjamins.
Steiner, George. 1993. After Babel: Aspects of Language and Translation (revised
edition). London: Oxford University Press.
Venuti, Lawrence. 2000. The Translation Studies Reader. London and New York:
Routledge.
Williams, Jenny and Andrew Chesterman. 2002. The Map. A Beginner's Guide to Doing
Research in Translation Studies. Manchester: St Jerome.

Note: Bibliographical references are ordered alphabetically and not by order of


importance. Chesterman and Wagner’s book (2002) is an easy and interesting read to
start with, as is Munday (2001).

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Appendix 2
Sample course outlines for the MProfStuds in Translation Studies
120 points
One year full-time – up to four years part time
Core elements (continued from PG Dip):
• Dissertation (30 / 45 points) – 10,000 / 15,000 words
• Translation Project (30 / 45 points) – 10,000 / 15,000 words
• Course work (30-60 points)

Four areas of specialization (Tracks):


• Localization
• Literary Translation
• Community Translation/Interpreting
• Translation Studies

Track 1: Localization
Option A
TRANSLAT 790 Dissertation (30) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 723 Translation Memories (15) – Semester 1
TRANSLAT 727 Translation Project (45) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 724 Localization (30) – Semester 2
Option B
TRANSLAT 792 Dissertation (45)
TRANSLAT 727 Translation Project (45) – SEM 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 724 Localization (30)

Track 2: Literary Translation


Option A
TRANSLAT 790 Dissertation (30) – Semester 1 and 2
COMPLIT 705 Reading Across Cultures (15) – Semester 1 (with AP Mike Hanne)
TRANSLAT 726 Translation Project (30) – Semester 1 and 2
COMPLIT 703 Rethinking Literary Translation (30) – Semester 2 (with AP Mike
Hanne)
Plus 15 points from Cultural Studies or Translation Studies
Option B
TRANSLAT 790 Dissertation (30) – Semester 1 and 2
COMPLIT 705 Reading Across Cultures (15) – Semester 1 (with AP Mike Hanne)
TRANSLAT 727 Translation Project (45) – Semester 1 and 2
COMPLIT 703 Rethinking Literary Translation (30) – Semester 2 (with AP Mike
Hanne)

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Track 3: Community Translation/Interpreting
Option A
TRANSLAT 792 Dissertation (45) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 704 Contextual Studies (15) – Semester 1
TRANSLAT 706 Interpreting Theory (15) – Semester 1
TRANSLAT 727 Translation Project (45) – Semester 1 and 2
Option B
TRANSLAT 792 Dissertation (45) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 605 Interpreting Practice – Semester 2 (30)
TRANSLAT 727 Translation Project (45) – Semester 1 and 2
Option C
TRANSLAT 790 Dissertation (30) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 704 Contextual Studies (15) – Semester 1
TRANSLAT 706 Interpreting Theory (15) – Semester 1
TRANSLAT 605 Interpreting Practice (30) – Semester 2
TRANSLAT 726 Translation Project (30) – Semester 1 and 2

Track 4: Translation Studies (Theory)


Option A
TRANSLAT 792 Dissertation (45) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 726 Translation Project (30) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 725 Research Essay (15) – Semester 1 or 2
Plus 15 points from Translation Studies, Cultural Studies, Linguistics, Comparative
Literature
Option B
TRANSLAT 792 Dissertation (45) – Semester 1 and 2
TRANSLAT 726 Translation Project (30) – Semester 1 and 2
Plus 30 points from Translation Studies, Cultural Studies, Linguistics, Comparative
Literature

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