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THE EFFECTS OF FINANCIAL PROGRAMS OF TAGANITO MINING

CORPORATION TO THE PHYSIOLOGICAL NEEDS OF THE BENEFICIARIES

A Research Proposal
Presented to the
Senior High School Department of
St. Paul University-Surigao

In Partial fulfillment
Of the Requirement of the Course
MiningTechnology

By
KAREN BORJA
MARGIENEL NASAYAO
JEFPREY JUMALON
SHERYL GA

May 2017
PREFACE
The Philippines --- situated in the so-called Pacific "rim of fire" --- is a mineral-rich

country. However, its vast mineral reserves remain untapped for a variety of socio-

economic, legal and environmental reasons.

Mindful of the potential of mining in jumpstarting the Philippine economy, the

Government has embarked on a program to revitalize the industry, guided by the

principle of balancing mining development with socio-environmental concerns. With the

recent decision of the Supreme Court allowing foreign investment in mining projects in

the Philippines, the mining industry has been given a new impetus to fulfill its role in the

economic development of the country.

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Mining Potentials

Such minor contributions to the Philippine economy by the mining sector would be a

thing in the past once the country's mining potentials, now lying hidden beneath its lands

and waters, are tapped in a responsible manner.

On-shore, nine (9) million hectares are high potential sites for copper, gold, nickel,

chromite, and other minerals. With this mineral wealth, the Philippines has the potential

to be in the top 10 largest mining power in the world. Sadly, only 1.4% of potential sites

are now covered by mining permits.

Off-shore, the Philippine's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) covers 2.2 million square

kilometers with mineral resources of Placer including gold, chromite, magnetite, and

silica. It has also aggregate resources, manganese nodules/encrustations with associated

copper, gold, zinc, cobalt, and Polymetallic sulfide deposits containing copper, cobalt and

other minerals.

As of 1996, the mineral reserves of the Philippines were comprised of 6.67 billion metric

tons of metallic and 78.472 metric tons of non-metallic minerals. A large part of the

metallic reserves is copper (70%) followed by nickel (16%). Limestone and marble

account for almost 85% of the non-metallic mineral reserves. A study conducted by East-

West Center in 1994 estimated that about 11 new deposits under a "conservative

estimate" and 25 deposits under a "most likely estimate" might be developed during the

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period 1995-2015. Such figures are fairly large relative to the land area of the country.

This is the reason why there has been a renewed interest in setting up investments in the

Philippine mining industry in recent years.

Recently, the government has identified twenty-three (23) potential medium to large-scale

metallic mining projects estimated to have a gross value of mineral deposits of US$ 90.8

billion. The Philippine Government is, thus, expecting around US$ 6.5 billion in foreign

direct investments with an annual sales/foreign exchange of US$ 3.4 billion. Annual

excise tax from these projects is estimated to be US$ 61.4 million with annual corporate

income tax of US$ 432 million. Above all, an estimated 200,000 direct and indirect

employment would be generated. For the job multiplier effect alone of 10 allied jobs per

mining job created, around 2 million jobs will be generated by these 23 identified mining

projects. That is why, of the many sectors the DENR has in its mandate, only mining has

been explicitly included in President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo's Ten-Point Program of

Government.

Indeed, the mining sector is standing up to its lofty calling. Mines of world-class quality

are emerging from Luzon to Mindanao. In Luzon is the Lepanto Far Southeast Copper-

Gold deposit, which is open for joint-venture partnership. In Mindanao is the Philex

Boyongan Copper-Gold deposits under the joint-venture partnership of Philex Gold and

Anglo-American, and the Tampakan Copper-Gold deposit under the consortium of JV of

Sagittarius, Indophil, Xstrata and J.P. Morgan.

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There are six (6) pipeline projects that are online nationwide. These are the Didipio

Copper-Gold Project in Nueva Vizcaya, the Rapu-Rapu Polymetallic deposit and the

Aroroy gold deposit, both in the Bicol area. The Palawan HPP Project in Palawan, the

Canatuan gold project in Zamboanga del Norte, and the Diwalwal gold deposit in Davao.

Several other Copper-Gold projects are now in various stages of exploration. In Luzon,

the Teresa gold project of Lepanto Consolidated; Padcal copper expansion project of

Philex mines; the government-owned Batong-Buhay Copper-Gold project; and the San

Antonio copper project of Marcopper. In the Visayas is the Atlas Copper project of

Alakor Corporation while in Mindanao, are the government-owned Amakan copper-gold

project and KingKing copper gold project of Benguet Corporation.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The researchers would like to thank the following who paved the way for this

research to happen:

Our Almighty God for the guidance and strength during sleepless nights,

Our Parents for the financial and moral support,

Our Friends for all the memories that we have shared and for being there for each

other all the time.

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We could have not make this Research possible without all of you. Thank you for

everything!

ABSTRACT
TAGANITO MINING CORPORATION (TMC) was registered with the

Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on March 04, 1987, and is

primarily engaged in the mining and exporting of nickel saprolite and limonite ore, and

exploration activities. The Company is 65% owned by NICKEL ASIA CORPORATION.

The other stockholders are PACIFIC METALS CO. LTD. (33.5%) And SOJITZ

CORPORATION (1.5%). TMCs registered office address is 4th Floor, NAC Centre

(formerly BMMC Building), 143 Dela Rosa corner Adelantado Streets, Legaspi Village,

Makati City (http://www.chamberofmines.com.ph/members/01taganitomining.html).

Social impact is seen from the view point of civil society whose interest are

directly affected by the mining industry. There are internal stakeholders whose economic

welfare must be addressed and at the same time as key human resource in mining

production whose health and wellness must be promoted. The external stakeholders are

the community and the environment. The heightened awareness of climate change,

5
global warning and the occurrence of mining disasters like that of Marcopper and Philiex

continue to haunt the mining in the Philippines. The NGOs and religious groups remain

extremely watchful and active in this regard. Thus, the economic impact of mining has

been deterred not only by civil society but mainly disharmonious policies of the national

and local government.

With the positive effects brought about by various financial programs of Taganito

Mining Corporation, this study will attempt to figure out the effects of financial programs

to the physiological needs of the beneficiaries.

This study can also embolden the people living in Claver because they will be

able to appreciate all the financial programs of these mining companies.

The researchers in this study will use the quantitative research

design. Questionnaires will be distributed to the beneficiaries of the

financial programs and the quantitative data will be taken from the

survey.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface 2
Approval Sheet
Acknowledgment 5
Abstract 6
Table of Contents 8
CHAPTER I 9
Introduction 9
Review of Related Literature 10
Theoretical Framework 18
Statement of the Problem 22
Objectives 22
Assumptions 23
Significance of the study 24
Scope and Limitation 24

CHAPTER II
Research Design 26
Research Locale 26
Respondents 27
Sampling Procedure 27
Methods of Data Gathering 27
Research Instruments 28
Methods of Data Analysis 28

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CHAPTER I
THE PROBLEM AND ITS SCOPE

Introduction

The mining industry provides communities with jobs, economic growth, and

improvements in peoples lives.

Mining for many decades served as an important component of countries revenue

source especially for developing countries that have been endowed with the mineral

wealth. If properly managed, countries can grow their economies with proceeds from

mining activities in the form of royalties and foreign exchange earnings for the export of

mineral related products.

The environmental and social impacts can to a larger extent change the dynamics

of community living and can make the lives of its residents better or worse. The way

these impacts are managed by the communities and the mining company involved can

either further worsen or make lives rather better for the community and its residents. This

calls for drastic attention being paid to issues of Corporate Social Responsibility where

mining companies make great efforts in honoring its social obligations to the

communities of operation.

TAGANITO MINING CORPORATION (TMC) was registered with the

Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on March 04, 1987, and is

8
primarily engaged in the mining and exporting of nickel saprolite and limonite ore, and

exploration activities. The Company is 65% owned by NICKEL ASIA CORPORATION.

The other stockholders are PACIFIC METALS CO. LTD. (33.5%) And SOJITZ

CORPORATION (1.5%). TMCs registered office address is 4th Floor, NAC Centre

(formerly BMMC Building), 143 Dela Rosa corner Adelantado Streets, Legaspi Village,

Makati City (http://www.chamberofmines.com.ph/members/01taganitomining.html).


TMC produces nickel saprolite and limonite ore for shipment to customers in

Japan and China. Pursuant to an Operating Contract with the government of the

Philippines dated February 14, 1989, it operates 3,278.84 has. in Parcel-I of the Surigao

Mineral Reservation located in Claver, Surigao del Norte

(http://www.chamberofmines.com.ph/members/01taganitomin-ing.html).
TMCs commitment to its host and neighboring communities is formalized

through the annual Social Development Management Program. The Social Development

Management Program covers projects governed by the Health, Education, Livelihood,

Public utilities/services and Socio-cultural preservation (HELPS) as defined by the Mines

and Geosciences Bureau RXIII. (NAC 2015 Sustainability Report).

Review of Related Literature

Nowadays, it cannot be denied that the mining industry both has positive and negative

social impact.

Mining Industry in the Philippines

The Philippines is endowed with US$ 1.4 trillion in mineral reserves, including

gold, copper, nickel, aluminum, and chromite. The mining potential is one of largest in

the world; being second in in gold and third in copper resources. The country is also

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ranked top five in the world for overall mineral reserves, although less than 2% has

received mining permits (http://sesprofessionals.com/overview-of-philippines-mining-

industry/).

The Government has proposed to significantly raise taxes on the mining industry,

and with national elections to be held in May 2016, the industry is waiting to see what the

next administrations policy will be when it comes to minerals development

(http://sesprofessionals.com/overview-of-philippines-mining-industry/).

There is discussion to declare some jurisdictions as mining-free zones, both

through local ordinances and national law.

The Philippine mining industry is promoting the passage of a rational and competitive

mining fiscal regime that gives the government a fair share in mining revenues. It would

allow for inclusive growth in host communities, and give investors security and allows

them a fair and reasonable return on their investments.

Mining and its Social Impact

Social impact is seen from the view point of civil society whose interest are

directly affected by the mining industry. There are internal stakeholders whose economic

welfare must be addressed and at the same time as key human resource in mining

production whose health and wellness must be promoted. The external stakeholders are

the community and the environment. The heightened awareness of climate change,

global warning and the occurrence of mining disasters like that of Marcopper and Philiex

continue to haunt the mining in the Philippines. The NGOs and religious groups remain

10
extremely watchful and active in this regard. Thus, the economic impact of mining has

been deterred not only by civil society but mainly disharmonious policies of the national

and local government. In 2014, the mining industry employed only 235,000 workers; its

gross value of P84.2 billion contributed to merely .7 percent of GDP (Oxford Business

Group reports .9 percent), a significant drop from P299.5 billion or 3.3 percent of GDP in

2013.The Executive Order issued in 2014 further restricted mining operations. The last

say on mining operations in the Philippines appears to be the clearance of the local

government which the city and barangay councils approval have to be secured. The

political impact refers to governance. Politics in a young democracy like the Philippines

has been used as a power to gain common interest of certain sectors and not necessarily

common good. Common interest can be the alignment of the business interest with the

personal gain of those who hold power and authority. The overall assessment of the

mining industry in the Philippines is that it has declined because of politics and

governance issues, environmental and civic issues brought about by the new mandate for

triple bottom line, which highlights care for the planet. But many are hopeful that its

economic potential will be achieved through tripartite effort of business, civil society and

government (Hudtohan, November 2015).

Mining and its Effects on Health

Bad mining practices can ignite coal fires, which can burn for decades, release fly ash

and smoke laden with greenhouse gasses and toxic chemicals. Furthermore mining

releases coal mine methane, a greenhouse gas 20 times more powerful than carbon

dioxide. Coal dust inhalation causes black lung disease among miners and those who live

nearby, and mine accidents kill thousands every year. Coal mining displaces whole

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communities, forced off their land by expanding mines, coal fires, subsidence and

contaminated water supplies (https://www.environment.co.za/mining-2/effects-of-

mining.html).

According to a study, here are some of the common health threats

posed by coal mining:

o Pneumoconiosis, aka black lung disease or CWP, is caused when miners breathe

in coal dust and carbon, which harden the lungs. Estimates show that 1,200 people in

the US still die from black lung disease annually. The situation in developing

countries is even worse.

o Cardiopulmonary disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension,

lung disease, and kidney disease have been found in higher-than-normal rates among

residents who live near coal mines, according to a 2001 US study.

o Toxic levels of arsenic, fluorine, mercury, and selenium are emitted by coal fires,

entering the air and the food chain of those living nearby.

o Mine collapses and accidents kill thousands of workers around the world every

year. Chinese coal mine accidents killed 4,700 people in 2006.

According to a study by Joseph Yaw Yeboah B. A. (Hons.), the combined effects of

environmental problems have culminated into health problems with high prevalence of

diseases such as malaria, respiratory tract infections and skin diseases. The hypothesis

that infection of malaria and respiratory infections among residents is inversely related to

distance from the mines was validated. The findings of the research have demonstrated

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vividly that mining effects on health of residents in the communities is a function of

distance from active mine sites. This is a valuable contribution to existing knowledge.

However, despite the ill effects of mining to the health of the people living nearby

mining operations, mining industries are doing a lot of effort for the people.

Funds were provided to enable construction of health-related infrastructure and

procurement of medical equipment to cater to the needs of the community. Medical

assistance is provided together with other community initiatives to promote a healthy

community. The health workers were also given wage subsidies/honorarium, as well as

training and capacity building, to improve their wellbeing and raise their skill-sets.

Below is the 2015 Sustainability Report of Nickel Asia Corporation, the mother

company of Taganito Mining Corporation in their health program:

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Mining and Education

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) refers to voluntary actions undertaken by

mining companies to either improve the living conditions (economic, social,

environmental) of local communities or to reduce the negative impacts of mining

projects. By definition, voluntary actions are those that go beyond legal obligations,

contracts, and license agreements.

CSR programs usually invest in infrastructure (potable water, electricity, schools,

roads, hospitals, hospital equipment, drainage repairs, etc.), building social capital

(providing high-school and university education, providing information on HIV

prevention, workshops on gender issues, information on family planning, improving

hygiene, etc.), and building human capital (training local people to be employed by the

mining enterprise or to provide outsourced services, promote and provide skills on micro

business, aquaculture, crop cultivation, animal rearing, textile production, etc.)

(http://www.miningfacts.org/communities/what-is-corporate-social-responsibility/).

One of the CSR that is very important is that of the education programs.

Scholarship programs helps the students shape their future.

Taganito Mining Corporation (TMC) continues its endeavor in supporting

education as it extended its scholarship grant beyond the municipality of Claver.

A total of 64 Grade 11 scholars, accompanied by their parents, from Clavers two

neighboring municipalities Gigaquit and Bacuag signed a Memorandum of Agreement

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(MOA) with TMC under its Mining Technology and Geosciences ResearchFull

Academic Scholarship last July 20, 2016.

The new scholarship grant has been offered by TMC in support to the Senior High

School program of the government. The scholars are currently enrolled in the Science,

Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) strand under the Mining Technology

specialization in St. Paul UniversitySurigao. TMC and SPUS have long been partners in

developing and producing responsible graduates.

Below is the 2015 Sustainability of Nickel Asia Corporation on the educational

program:

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Mining and Livelihood Program

Livelihood is the means by which households obtain and maintain access to the

resources necessary to ensure their immediate and long-term survival. These essential

resources can be categorized into six categories: physical, natural, human, financial,

social, and political.

Mining companies help in equipping people in the communities with skills and

knowledge in socio-economic and entrepreneurship for self-reliance and help in

transforming them as partners for the progress and development of their communities

through implementation of different livelihood programs and enterprise development.

Taganito Mining Corporation has its various livelihood programs also as part of their

community development.

The people of the community who wished to enhance their skills and livelihood also

benefitted from the programs. In 2015, training was offered to the community on

Rootcrop Production and Cassava Food Processing, Tailoring Skills, Dump Truck

Driving and Hydraulic Excavator, and Carpentry and Masonry. The communitys

cooperatives were also given financial assistance to aid in their operations and for the

improvement of their facilities.

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

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The researchers will anchor the study on Triple Bottom Line approach of

Corporate Social Responsibility Theory.


The title corporate social responsibility has two meanings. First, its a general

name for any theory of the corporation that emphasizes both the responsibility to make

money and the responsibility to interact ethically with the surrounding community.

Second, corporate social responsibility is also a specific conception of that responsibility

to profit while playing a role in broader questions of community welfare.

The triple bottom line is a form of corporate social responsibility dictating that

corporate leaders tabulate bottom-line results not only in economic terms (costs versus

revenue) but also in terms of company effects in the social realm, and with respect to the

environment. There are two keys to this idea. First, the three columns of responsibility

must be kept separate, with results reported independently for each. Second, in all three

of these areas, the company should obtain sustainable results.

The notion of sustainability is very specific. At the intersection of ethics and

economics, sustainability means the long-term maintenance of balance. As elaborated by

theorists including John Elkington, heres how the balance is defined and achieved

economically, socially, and environmentally:

Economic sustainability values long-term financial solidity over more volatile,

short-term profits, no matter how high. According to the triple-bottom-line model,

large corporations have a responsibility to create business plans allowing stable and

prolonged action. That bias in favor of duration should make companies hesitant

about investing in things like dot-coms. While its true that speculative ventures may

lead to windfalls, they may also lead to collapse. Silicon Valley, California, for

example, is full of small, start-up companies. A few will convert into the next

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Google, Apple, and Microsoft. What gets left out, however, of the newspaper reports

hailing the accomplishments of a Steve Jobs or a Bill Gates are all those other people

who never made itall those who invested family savings in a project that ended up

bankrupt. Sustainability as a virtue means valuing business plans that may not lead to

quick riches but that also avoid calamitous losses.

Moving this reasoning over to the case of W. R. Grace dumping toxins into the

ground soil, theres a possible economic-sustainability argument against that kind of

action. Corporations trying to get away with polluting the environment or other kinds

of objectionable actions may, its true; increase their bottom line in the short term.

Money is saved on disposal costs. Looking further out, however, theres a risk that a

later discovery of the action could lead to catastrophic economic consequences (like

personal injury lawyers filing huge lawsuits). This possibility leads immediately to

the conclusion that concern for corporate sustainability in financial terms argues

against the dumping.

Social sustainability values balance in peoples lives and the way we live. A

world in which a few Fortune 500 executives are hauling down millions a year, while

millions of people elsewhere in the world are living on pennies a day cant go on

forever. As the imbalances grow, as the rich get richer and the poor get both poorer

and more numerous, the chances that society itself will collapse in anger and

revolution increase. The threat of governmental overthrow from below sounds remote

almost absurdto Americans who are accustomed to a solid middle class and

minimal resentment of the wealthy. In world history, however, such revolutions are

quite common. That doesnt mean revolution is coming to our times developed

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nations. It may indicate, however, that for a business to be stable over the long term,

opportunities and subsequently wealth need to be spread out to cover as many people

as possible.

The fair trade movement fits this ethical imperative to shared opportunity and wealth.

Developed and refined as an idea in Europe in the 1960s, organizations promoting

fair trade ask businessesespecially large producers in the richest countriesto

guarantee that suppliers in impoverished nations receive reasonable payment for their

goods and services even when the raw economic laws of supply and demand dont

require it. An array of ethical arguments may be arranged to support fair trade, but on

the front of sustainability, the lead argument is that peace and order in the world

depend on the worlds resources being divided up in ways that limit envy, resentment,

and anger.

Social sustainability doesnt end with dollars; it also requires human respect. All

work, the logic of stability dictates, contains dignity, and no workers deserve to be

treated like machines or as expendable tools on a production line. In todays

capitalism, many seeand the perception is especially strong in Europea world in

which dignity has been stripped away from a large number of trades and professions.

They see minimum wage workers wholl be fired as soon as the next economic

downturn arrives. They see bosses hiring from temporary agencies, turning them over

fast, not even bothering to learn their names. Its certainly possible that these kinds of

attitudes, this contempt visible in so many workplaces where the McJob reigns, cant

continue. Just as people wont stand for pennies in wages while their bosses get

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millions, so too they ultimately will refuse to accept being treated as less dignified

than the boss.

Finally, social sustainability requires that corporations as citizens in a specific

community of people maintain a healthy relationship with those people. Fitting this

obligation into the case of W. R. Grace in Woburn, its immediately clear that any

corporation spilling toxins that later appear as birth defects in area children isnt

going to be able to sustain anything with those living nearby. Any hope for

cooperation in the name of mutual benefit will be drowned by justified hatred.

Environmental sustainability begins from the affirmation that natural resources

especially the oil fueling our engines, the clean air we breathe, and the water we

drinkare limited. If those things deteriorate significantly, our children wont be

able to enjoy the same quality of life most of us experience. Conservation of

resources, therefore, becomes tremendously important, as does the development of

new sources of energy that may substitute those were currently using.

Further, the case of an industrial chemical company pouring toxins into the ground

that erupt years later with horrific consequences evidences this: not only are

resources finite, but our earth is limited in its ability to naturally regenerate clean air

and water from the smokestacks and runoff of our industries. There are, clearly, good

faith debates that thoughtful people can have about where those limits are. For

example, have we released greenhouse gases into the air so heavily that the earths

temperature is rising? No one knows for sure, but its certain that somewhere theres a

limit; at some point carbon-burning pollution will do to the planet what toxic runoff

did in Woburn: make the place unlivable. Sustainability, finally, on this

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environmental front means actions must be taken to facilitate our natural worlds

renewal. Recycling or cleaning up contamination that already exists is important

here, as is limiting the pollution emitted from factories, cars, and consumer products

in the first place. All these are actions that corporations must support, not because

theyre legally required to do so, but because the preservation of a livable planet is a

direct obligation within the triple-bottom-line model of business responsibility.

Together, these three notions of sustainabilityeconomic, social, and environmental

guide businesses toward actions fitted to the conception of the corporation as a

participating citizen in the community and not just as a money machine

(http://catalog.flatworldknowledge.com/bookhub/1695?e=brusseau-ch13_s02).

Statement of the Problem


With the positive effects brought about by various financial programs of Taganito

Mining Corporation, this study will attempt to figure out the effects of financial programs

to the physiological needs of the beneficiaries.


Generally, it sought to answer the question:

What are the effects of financial programs of Taganito Mining Corporation to the

physiological needs of the beneficiaries?

Specifically, it will attempt to answer to following questions:

1. What is the effect of the health program to the beneficiaries in terms of

their daily food intake and their health?


2. What is the effect of the scholarship program to the beneficiaries in terms

of their education and schooling?


3. What is the effect of the livelihood program to the beneficiaries in terms of

their daily needs at home?

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Objectives of the Study
This study aims to achieve the following objectives:

1. To know how the health program of TMC affects the beneficiaries.


2. To identify how the scholarship program of TMC affects the beneficiaries.
3. To determine the effects of livelihood program of TMC to the beneficiaries.

Assumptions

The people from the host and neighboring communities are benefitted in areas of

health, education, and livelihood from the financial programs of Taganito Mining

Corporation.

In this study the researchers assumes that in terms of the health of the

beneficiaries, they benefit a lot from the medicines and free check ups of TMC.

Also it is assumes that the beneficiaries are well compensated in terms of the

scholarship program of TMC and that they receive monthly allowances and yearly school

supplies.

Further, the researchers assumes that the beneficiaries are able to eat more than

three times a day and buy materials for their shelter as effects of the livelihood program.

Significance of the Study

The life of the people living near mining operations is indeed hard because of the

many effects of mining industries. The Beneficiaries, who are Clavernons, the people

who live in Claver, Surigao del Norte, where Taganito Mining Corporation is located, is

affected in many ways.

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Clavernons have always been closely bound with that of the mining industry. This

study hopes to be in addition to the developing studies conducted for the mining

industries and its people. Since the life of Clavernons is centered on its vast lands, this is

the main source of many of their livelihood.

This study can also embolden the people living in Claver because they will be

able to appreciate all the financial programs of these mining companies.

This study can also be in addition to the studies conducted by the Mines and

Geosciences Bureau. This study will help in adding information as to how important are

the social impacts of mining industries.

Moreover, the respondents of this study will gain information regarding the social

impact of mining industry to the people.

Scope and Limitation

This study will focus on measuring the perceptions of the Beneficiaries in terms

of the effects of financial programs of Taganito Mining Corporation.


The selected financial programs are that of Health, Scholarship and Livelihood.

This study will focus only on the effects brought about by these financial programs. This

study will not include other financial programs.


The official Beneficiaries will be the respondents of this study as they are

considered the appropriate respondents of this study.

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CHAPTER II

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

This chapter will present the methods that will be used in

gathering and analyzing the data. It describes the research design,

respondents, sampling procedure, and methods of data gathering,

instruments and method of data analysis.

Research Design

The selected financial programs will focus on that of the Health,

Education and Livelihood. The researcher aims to know the effects of

the financial programs of Taganito Mining Corporation to the

physiological needs of the beneficiaries.

The researchers in this study will use the quantitative research

design. Questionnaires will be distributed to the beneficiaries of the

financial programs and the quantitative data will be taken from the

survey.

Research Locale

This study will be conducted in Barangay Taganito in the

Municipality of Claver and province of Surigao del Norte where the

Taganito Mining Corporation is located.

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Respondents

The respondents of this study will be the listed beneficiaries that

will be coming from the official list of the beneficiaries of Taganito

Mining Corporation (TMC).

The respondents that were chosen because they are the ones

greatlty affected with the financial programs of TMC because they

residents of Barangay Taganito where TMC is located for several years

already.

Sampling Procedure

The study will consider those in the official list of the

Beneficiaries from TMC. Purposive Sampling will be used to identify the

respondents of the study.

A purposive sample includes subjects selected on the basis of

specific characteristics or qualities and eliminates those who fail to

meet these criteria. In this study, the researcher will select all the

beneficiaries in the financial programs on health, education and

livelihood.

Methods of Data Gathering

A letter will be addressed to Taganito Mining Corporations

Community Relations Office seeking for approval to conduct a survey

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and asking for the official list of the beneficiaries of their financial

programs. The respondents will then be informed that they will be

given questionnaires. After answering the questionnaires, the

researchers will then collect it from the beneficiaries. After that the

researchers will then interpret and analyze the data.

Research Instruments

The researches will prepare a one-page questionnaire for the

respondents in English and Bisaya medium for better understanding.

Methods of Data Analysis

The mean and percentages and the Likert Scale will be used as

the statistical tools in the analysis of the data.

Frequency and Percentage Distribution will be used to describe

the profile of the respondents.

1. P = f x 100
N

Where: p = percentage
f = frequency
N = number of respondents

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