You are on page 1of 14

ThinkHazard!

Identify natural hazards in your project area


and understand how to reduce their impact

Kota Samarinda
Indonesia , Kalimantan Timur


River flood Earthquake Water scarcity Cyclone


Volcano Coastal flood Tsunami Landslide

Report generated on 2017-02-20


from http://thinkhazard.org/report/18131-indonesia-kalimantan-timur-kota-samarinda
About ThinkHazard!
ThinkHazard! is a new web-based tool enabling non-specialists to consider the impacts of disasters on new development
projects. Users of ThinkHazard! can quickly and robustly assess the level of river flood, earthquake, drought, cyclone, coastal
flood, tsunami, volcano, and landslide hazard within their project area to assist with project planning and design.

ThinkHazard! is a simple flagging system to highlight the hazards present in a project area. As such, a user is only required to
enter their project location national, provincial or district name. The results interface shows a user whether they require high,
medium or low awareness of each hazard when planning their project.

ThinkHazard! also provides recommendations and guidance on how to reduce the risk from each hazard within the project area,
and provides links to additional resources such as country risk assessments, best practice guidance, additional websites.
ThinkHazard! also highlights how each hazard may change in the future as a result of climate change.

Developed by

In partnership with

The following organizations have contributed data and / or expert input to the development of this tool:

ThinkHazard! holds local data for the countries displayed in this map. Global data is available for river flood, earthquake,
cyclone, water scarcity, and landslide.

The World Bank does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations, and
other information shown on any map in this work do not imply any judgment on the part of The World Bank concerning the legal
status of any territory or the endorsement or acceptance of such boundaries.

Source of Administrative boundaries: The Global Administrative Unit Layers (GAUL) dataset, implemented by FAO within the
CountrySTAT and Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) projects.
The tool code is open source, to encourage other users to adapt the tool to their needs. The code can be found on Github. Current
instance version is 1.5.3 .

ThinkHazard! is available under the GNU General Public Licence, Version 3, 29 June 2007. Text content is licenced under CC-BY-
SA. Classified hazard levels are licenced under CC-BY. Original hazard data are licenced under their original terms, which are
contained in the associated layer metadata.

The data was published for the last time on Thu Feb 2 17:06:34 2017.

This report is a product of the staff of the World Bank. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this report
do not necessarily reflect the views of the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent.

The World Bank does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations
and other information shown on any map in this work do not imply any judgment on the part of the World Bank concerning
the legal status of any territory or the endorsement or acceptance of such boundaries.

2015 The World Bank 1818 H Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20433

All rights reserved


ThinkHazard! 2017-02-20 | http://thinkhazard.org/report/18131-indonesia-kalimantan-timur-kota-samarinda/FL

Kota Samarinda
Indonesia , Kalimantan Timur

River flood Hazard level: High


In the area you have selected (Kota Samarinda) river flood hazard is classified as high according to the information that
is currently available to this tool. This means that potentially damaging and life-threatening river floods are expected to
occur at least once in the next 10 years. Project planning decisions, project design, and construction methods
must take into account the level of river flood hazard. Surface flood hazard in urban and rural areas is not included
in this hazard classification, and may also be possible in this location. The following is a list of recommendations that
could be followed in different phases of the project to help reduce the risk to your project. Please note that these
recommendations are generic and not project-specific.

Climate change impacts: Medium confidence in more frequent and intense heavy precipitation days and an increase in
the number of extreme rainfall events. The present hazard level may increase in the future due to the effects of climate
change. It would be prudent to design projects in this area to be robust to river flood hazard in the long-term.

High Medium Low Very low

Data source: SSBN

10 km

Mapbox OpenStreetMap

Recommendations
Location assessment: The high-level information available in this tool may indicate the presence of river flood hazard
in your project area. Before committing significant resources to this issue, a study of the surrounding landscape can help
you to assess whether more detailed assessment and/or intervention should be considered.

Obtain pre-existing flood hazard information: The high-level information available in this tool may indicate the
presence of flood hazard in your project area. However, because flood hazard can change dramatically over short
distances, the exact geographical location of your project should be checked against pre-existing flood hazard
information.

Professional guidance: Consultation with professionals will provide a more detailed understanding of the risk posed
to your asset by flooding. The level of guidance required will depend upon the level of hazard present, the vulnerability
of the asset and local legislation that might apply.

Consider relocation of the project: If local flood risk information confirms your project is exposed to a high level of
flood hazard, relocation to areas not prone to flooding is recommended where viable. This decision will need to be
undertaken with the consideration of other hazards.

Identify Early Warning Systems: Early warning systems (EWS) are designed to provide communities with advance
warning of an imminent flood event based on information such as weather forecasts, recorded rainfall or rising water
levels upstream. They can be used to trigger protocols (such as the deployment of portable flood defences or
evacuation) to mitigate against an incoming flood event.

Consider vulnerability of other assets within the project's dependency network: If your project is interdependent with
other projects, it is important to assess the vulnerability of the entire network if the service provided is critical.

Flood management: Your project or development should consider flood management measures.

Built infrastructure may alter flood hazard: Constructing a significant piece of infrastructure can significantly alter the
landscape and potentially influence how an area responds during a flood. Any alteration of the landscape should be
undertaken with consideration as to how this will influence the local hydrology.

Further resources
Climate risk management in Indonesia

Indonesia: Advancing a National Disaster Risk Financing Strategy Options for Consideration

National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) disaster loss and damage database

Overview of Natural Disasters and their Impacts in Asia and the Pacific 1970 - 2014

Analysis and evaluation of Flood risk management practice in selected megacities

Cities and Flooding: A Guide to Integrated Urban Flood Risk Management for the 21st Century

Cities and Flooding: A Guide to Integrated Urban Flood Risk Management for the 21st Century

Climate Change Knowledge Portal

Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction: Country Profiles

Defining disaster resilience: a DFID approach paper

EMDAT: Country Profile on Historical Disaster Events

Towards Safer School Construction

Understanding Risk in an Evolving World - Emerging Best Practices in Natural Disaster Risk Assessment

Understanding the Economics of Flood Risk Reduction

Weather and Climate Resilience: Effective Preparedness through National Meteorological and Hydrological Services

Global Risk Patterns and Trends in Global Assessment Report

Guidance on Safe School Construction

INFORM: Index for Risk Management


ThinkHazard! 2017-02-20 | http://thinkhazard.org/report/18131-indonesia-kalimantan-timur-kota-samarinda/CY

Kota Samarinda
Indonesia , Kalimantan Timur

Cyclone Hazard level: Very low


In the area you have selected (Kota Samarinda) cyclone (also known as hurricane or typhoon) hazard is classified as
very low according to the information that is currently available. This means that there is less than a 1% chance of
potentially-damaging cyclone-strength winds in your project area in the next 10 years. Based on this information, the
impact of cyclones does not necessarily need to be considered in different phases of the project, in particular during
design and construction. Although the hazard is considered to be very low in the project location based on the
information available in ThinkHazard!, other sources may show some level of cyclone hazard. If local or additional
information sources suggest that there are cyclones, follow the recommendations below and seek expert guidance on
additional recommended actions.

Climate change impact: Global average tropical cyclone wind speed and rainfall is likely to increase in the future, and
the global average frequency of tropical cyclones is likely to decrease or remain unchanged. It is possible that the
frequency of the most intense tropical cyclones will increase substantially in some ocean regions (IPCC, 2013). The
present hazard level in areas currently affected by tropical cyclones may increase in the long-term. Projects located in
such areas should be robust to future increases in cyclone hazard.

High Medium Low Very low

Data source: UNISDR

10 km

Mapbox OpenStreetMap

Recommendations
For cyclone wind risks that cannot be mitigated, consider insurance products specifically aimed at alleviating the
financial costs associated with wind risk.

Project planning, design, and construction practices should account for strong wind from potential cyclones in your
project area.

Consider the regional and national governments emergency response policy and protocols to cyclones in your project
area.

If the project involves the development of critical infrastructure (e.g., a hospital, fire station, or power transmission
line), or will support critical infrastructure, you should consider how your project can be affected by wind beyond the
specific project location.
Consider consulting with an expert familiar with cyclone wind risk and has experience with natural hazards and/or
construction practices in your local area. Such consulting professionals include structural engineers, civil engineers, and
atmospheric scientists. Consider incorporating local and subject matter expertise in the design, construction, and
maintenance phases of your project.

Further resources
Indonesia: Advancing a National Disaster Risk Financing Strategy Options for Consideration

National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) disaster loss and damage database

Overview of Natural Disasters and their Impacts in Asia and the Pacific 1970 - 2014

Past Tropical Cyclones

Climate Change Knowledge Portal

Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction: Country Profiles

Defining disaster resilience: a DFID approach paper

EMDAT: Country Profile on Historical Disaster Events

Towards Safer School Construction

Understanding Risk in an Evolving World - Emerging Best Practices in Natural Disaster Risk Assessment

Weather and Climate Resilience: Effective Preparedness through National Meteorological and Hydrological Services

Guidance on Safe School Construction

INFORM: Index for Risk Management


ThinkHazard! 2017-02-20 | http://thinkhazard.org/report/18131-indonesia-kalimantan-timur-kota-samarinda/VA

Kota Samarinda
Indonesia , Kalimantan Timur

Volcano Hazard level: Very low


In the area you have selected (Kota Samarinda) volcanic hazard is classified as very low according to the information
that is currently available. This means that no eruption has been reported in this area. Based on this information, the
impact of volcanic eruption need not be considered in different phases of the project. Although the hazard is
considered to be very low or non-existent in the project location based on the information available in ThinkHazard!,
additional information may show some level of hazard. If local or additional information sources suggest that there is
volcanic hazard, follow the recommendations below and seek expert guidance on additional recommended actions.

High Medium Low Very low

Data source: GFDRR

10 km

Mapbox OpenStreetMap

Recommendations
Check with local authorities for any local regulations concerning volcanic hazards. Ensure that the project conforms to
1) any applicable volcanic hazard land use planning regulations; 2) any existing plans for warning and evacuation; and
3) any national laws, regulations and rules.

Consider the effects of volcanic ashfall and gases on the project. These hazards are the most far-reaching of the
volcanic hazards and can affect areas hundreds or even thousands of km downwind of volcanoes.

Further resources
Indonesia: Advancing a National Disaster Risk Financing Strategy Options for Consideration

National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) disaster loss and damage database

Overview of Natural Disasters and their Impacts in Asia and the Pacific 1970 - 2014

Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction: Country Profiles

Database of Volcanoes - Global Volansim Program

Defining disaster resilience: a DFID approach paper

EMDAT: Country Profile on Historical Disaster Events


The health hazards of volcanic ash - A guide for the public

Towards Safer School Construction

Understanding Risk in an Evolving World - Emerging Best Practices in Natural Disaster Risk Assessment

Volcanic Ash impacts on critical infrastructure

Volcanic Ash: What it can do and how to prevent damage

Volcanic ash fall hazard and risk

Volcanic gases and aerosols guidelines

Volcanic hazards and their mitigation - Progress and problems

Volcano Observatory database - World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO)

Guidance on Safe School Construction

Guidelines on preparedness before, during and after an ashfall

Living with volcanoes - The sustainable livelihoods approach for volcano-related opportunities
ThinkHazard! 2017-02-20 | http://thinkhazard.org/report/18131-indonesia-kalimantan-timur-kota-samarinda/EQ

Kota Samarinda
Indonesia , Kalimantan Timur

Earthquake Hazard level: Very low


In the area you have selected (Kota Samarinda) earthquake hazard is classified as very low according to the
information that is currently available. This means that there is less than a 2% chance of potentially-damaging
earthquake shaking in your project area in the next 50 years. Based on this information, the impact of earthquake need
not be considered in different phases of the project, in particular during design and construction. Although the hazard is
considered to be very low or non-existent in the project location based on the information available in ThinkHazard!,
additional information may show some level of hazard. If local or additional information sources suggest that there is
earthquake hazard, follow the recommendations below and seek expert guidance on additional recommended actions.

High Medium Low Very low

Data source: UNISDR

10 km

Mapbox OpenStreetMap

Recommendations
EARTHQUAKE HISTORY AND HAZARD: Get information about any earthquakes and secondary hazards (fires,
landslides, tsunami in coastal areas) that have affected the project area in the past and the effects these caused.
Community memory and historical accounts of any past earthquakes can provide useful information to supplement
scientific studies. Contact the governmental organisations (e.g. Ministry of Environment and Geological Survey/ Ministry
of Earth Sciences) responsible for earthquake risk management in the project country to obtain more detailed
information on any potential earthquake hazard.

LOCAL BUILDING REGULATIONS: Find out if the local building regulations include minimum standards for earthquake
protection, even in very low hazard areas. To do this, engage the local engineering community, especially those serving
with the local government, in discussions; or consult external experts. Comply with the minimum standards.

INSURANCE: Consider purchasing multi-hazard insurance to cover potential losses to the project. While insurance
does not prevent injuries or deaths, or save communities, it can certainly reduce financial losses and enable the project
to recover from the effects of the earthquake and regain its function more quickly.

Further resources
The Padang, Sumatra - Indonesia earthquake of 30 September 2009

Indonesia: Advancing a National Disaster Risk Financing Strategy Options for Consideration

National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) disaster loss and damage database

The Indian Ocean Tsunami of 26 December 2004

Overview of Natural Disasters and their Impacts in Asia and the Pacific 1970 - 2014

Temblor

Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction: Country Profiles

Defining disaster resilience: a DFID approach paper

E-learning course: Understanding Risk (World Bank)

EMDAT: Country Profile on Historical Disaster Events

Earthquake-report.com - Independent Earthquake Reporting Site

Reducing Earthquake Risk in Hospitals

Understanding Risk in an Evolving World - Emerging Best Practices in Natural Disaster Risk Assessment

Global Earthquake Model - GEM Foundation

Global Risk Patterns and Trends in Global Assessment Report

Guidance on Safe School Construction

INFORM: Index for Risk Management

Learning from Megadisasters: Lessons from the Great Japan Earthquake

Towards Safer School Construction


ThinkHazard! 2017-02-20 | http://thinkhazard.org/report/18131-indonesia-kalimantan-timur-kota-samarinda/DG

Kota Samarinda
Indonesia , Kalimantan Timur

Water scarcity Hazard level: Very low


In the area you have selected (Kota Samarinda) water scarcity is classified as very low or non-existent according to the
information that is available to this tool. However, additional information may show some level of hazard. If local or
additional information sources suggest that there is drought hazard, follow the recommendations below and seek
expert guidance on additional recommended actions. In the area you have selected droughts will occur much less than
once every 1000 years. Based on this information, drought hazard does not need to be explicitly considered for
your project. Although the drought hazard is considered to be very low or non-existent in the project location, additional
information may show some level of hazard. If local or additional information sources suggest that there is drought
hazard, follow the recommendations below and seek expert guidance on additional recommended actions.

Climate change impact: Model projections are inconsistent in their estimates of change in drought hazard, which
influences water scarcity. The present hazard level may increase in the future due to the effects of climate change. It
would be prudent to design projects in this area to be robust to increased drought hazard and water scarcity in the long-
term.

High Medium Low Very low

Data source: IVM / VU University Amsterdam

10 km

Mapbox OpenStreetMap

Recommendations
Vulnerability assessment. The high-level information available in ThinkHazard! indicates the presence of water
scarcity in your project area. Before committing significant resources to this issue, you should further evaluate if your
project is vulnerable to water scarcity and whether a more detailed assessment and/or intervention should be
considered.

Obtain pre-existing drought and water scarcity information. ThinkHazard! predominantly uses global datasets,
therefore you should determine the availability of pre-existing local drought and water scarcity information to check
whether your project is indeed located in a drought prone region where water scarcity is an issue.

Water scarcity management. Your project or development should consider water scarcity management measures.
Further resources
Climate risk management in Indonesia

Indonesia: Advancing a National Disaster Risk Financing Strategy Options for Consideration

National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) disaster loss and damage database

Overview of Natural Disasters and their Impacts in Asia and the Pacific 1970 - 2014

National Drought Management Policy Guidelines: A Template for Action

Climate Change Knowledge Portal

Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction: Country Profiles

Defining disaster resilience: a DFID approach paper

Drought Risk Reduction: Framework and Practices

EMDAT: Country Profile on Historical Disaster Events

Towards Safer School Construction

Understanding Risk in an Evolving World - Emerging Best Practices in Natural Disaster Risk Assessment

Guidance on Safe School Construction

INFORM: Index for Risk Management