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1.

Depletion region or depletion layer is a region in a P-N junction


diode where no mobile charge carriers are present. Depletion layer acts
like a barrier that opposes the flow of electrons from n-side and holes from p-
side.
2. Why mobility of electrons is more than holes?
Therefore there is a time lag associated when an electron leaves atom to
occupy the vacancy i.e. hole. Therefore the mobility of holes is lesser than
that of electrons which are free.

3. How is the depletion layer formed in a pn junction?


Depletion Region. When a p-n junction is formed, some of the free electrons
in the n-region diffuse across the junction and combine with holes to form
negative ions. In so doing they leave behind positive ions at the donor
impurity sit

4. Why the mass of hole is greater than electron?


In that sense, you could say that holes usually have a greater effective mass
than electrons because they are less mobile. In any case, the simple analysis
is that holes are usually slower because they stay in the valence energy band
while electrons can be in the conduction bands.

5. What is intrinsic carrier concentration?


The intrinsic carrier concentration is the number of electrons in the
conduction band or the number of holes in the valence band
in intrinsic material. This number of carriers depends on the band gap of the
material and on the temperature of the material.

6. What is drift velocity?


The drift velocity is the flow velocity that a particle, such as an electron,
attains due to an electric field. It can also be referred to as axial drift velocity.
In general, an electron will propagate randomly in a conductor at the
Fermi level

7. How does a pn junction diode work?


Working of a p-n junction diode when forward biased. If p-type semiconductor
and n-type semiconductor of a diode are equally doped, and if the diode is
forward biased, then holes will move toward the n-type semiconductor and
electrons will move toward the p-type semiconductor and they will diffuse
with each other.

8. What is forward and reverse bias?


Forward biasing is when voltage is applied across a P-N junction in
the forward direction, according to About.com. A reverse bias does just as the
name suggests, reversing the flow of the current through the diode.

9. What is the reverse bias?


Reverse bias: The applied d.c. voltage that prevents or greatly reduces
current flow in a diode, transistor, etc. For example, a negligible current will
flow through a diode when its cathode is made more positive than its anode;
the diode is then said to be reverse biased. Compare forward bias.

10. What is a forward bias?


When the pn junction is forward-biased, electric charge flows freely due to
reduced resistance of the pn junction. When the pn junction is reverse-
biased, however, the junction barrier (and therefore resistance) becomes
greater and charge flow is minimal.

11. What is an electron hole?


In electronic engineering, an electron hole is the lack of an electron at a
position where one could exist in an atom or atomic lattice. It is different from
the positron, which is an actual particle of antimatter. If an electron is excited
into a higher state it leaves a hole in its old state.

12. What is intrinsic carrier density?


The intrinsic carrier concentration is the number of electrons in the
conduction band or the number of holes in the valence band
in intrinsic material. This number of carriers depends on the band gap of the
material and on the temperature of the material.

13. How does the drift velocity of electrons vary with increase in
temperature?
Due to this, they undergo a lot more collisions. The 'temporary' acceleration
is very short-lived. Ultimately, the velocity with which they reach the positive
side (the drift velocity) of the conductor is less than before. To sum up, drift
velocity of an electron would decrease with increase in temperature.

14. What is the charge on the electron?


Protonpositive; electronnegative; neutronno charge. The charge on the
proton and electron are exactly the same size but opposite. The same
number of protons and electrons exactly cancel one another in a neutral
atom.