Sie sind auf Seite 1von 16

1

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY MINORITY AND WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESS CAPACITY ANALYSIS M/WBE FIRMS CERTIFIED BY THE CITY OF
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
MINORITY AND
WOMEN-OWNED
BUSINESS CAPACITY
ANALYSIS
M/WBE FIRMS CERTIFIED BY THE CITY
OF NEW YORK
PREPARED BY:
EUQUANT, INC.
DATE:
MAY, 2017

Copyright © 2017 Building Trades Employer’s Association (BTEA) All Rights Reserved.

2

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

ABOUT EUQUANT ECONOMIC RESEARCH COMPANY

EuQuant(pronouncedU-Quant)islocatedinAtlanta,Georgia.Founded25yearsago,itis

one of the nation’s leading economic research companies specializing in performance evaluations of small, minority and diverse suppliers. EuQuant’s founder and CEO, Dr. Thomas “Danny” Boston, received a Ph.D. in Economics from Cornell University. He is also a Professor of Economics and International Affairs in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). The company’s Vice President, Dr. Catherine Ross, received the Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning and Civil Engineering from Cornell. She specializes in transportation planning and regional analysis.

In 2013, the U. S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship designated EuQuant as the Committee’s “Primary Research and Data Analytics Company.” In 2012, the Atlanta Tribune designated EuQuant “#2 among Black-owned Business in the State of Georgia,” in recognition of the company’s innovative research, community commitment, and financial capacity. The company has performed pioneering M/WBE research for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and the US Small Business Administration’s 8(a) Business Development Program and Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Program. Dr. Boston served as advisor to the Justice Department and Department of Commerce during the revision of federal minority and women business programs in response to US Supreme Court decisions. In this capacity, he developed the benchmarking methodology currently used to set aspirational goals for Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Programs of the federal government. EuQuant has conducted multiple studies of minority and diverse supplier performance and capacity studies for federal, state and local agencies and major corporations. Among other distinctions, EuQuant recently evaluated the economic impact of 70 US bilateraltradeagreementsfortheInternationalTradeAdministrationandiscompilinga database for the African Union to monitor and evaluate the progress of African countries toward democracy and development.

Some of the noted recognitions of the company’s leaders are as follows: In 2016 Dr. Boston was awarded “Entrepreneur of the Year” by the Atlanta Business League; he is former President of the National Economic Association; former Senior Economist to the Joint Economic Committee of Congress; and past Professor of the Year at Georgia Tech. He was an officer in the US Army and is a recipient of the Purple Heart. Dr. Ross is former President of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning; former member of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academy of Sciences; and was the first Executive Director of the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority. Together, Drs. Ross and Boston have published eight (8) books and numerous scholarly articles and reports. Linje Boston, EuQuant’s Chief Operating Officer, served as the principal researcher on the NYC M/WBE capacity study. A ten-year company employee, he holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in Statistics from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Michigan respectively.

3

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

PURPOSE

This report measured the capacity of 3,133 M/WBE contractors certified by the NYC Department of Small Business Services. The contract award data covered the 3 Year

Period of 2012-2015. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind in the nation.

Capacity is the dollar value of work that a contractor can efficiently perform during a given period. It is different from revenue and may be greater or smaller.

Capacity is the dollar value of work that a contractor can perform efficiently during a given period. It is different from revenue and may be greater or smaller. This study measured capacity by a complex

procedure which takes into consideration numerous factors. The report used four categories of information to estimate capacity:

1. Contracting data on all businesses (including M/WBEs and Non-M/WBEs) that

performed prime contracts and subcontracts with NYC;

2. Data on the size, industry, and characteristics of each contract awarded;

3. Data on the business-related attributes of all contractors that received awards; and

4. Data on all certified M/WBEs.

The study used public data from the Checkbook NYC website as well as NYC’s online directory of certified businesses. Proprietary data sources were used to collect some information and the research also used EuQuant’s extensive national small business database. The Building Trades Employers’ Association (BTEA) of NYC commissioned the study. The research team plans to conduct similar capacity studies for other NY agencies once data are available. Those agencies are as follows: New York State Empire Development Corporation, Metropolitan Transit Authority, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and the New York State Department of Transportation.

THIS CAPACITY STUDY IS NOT A DISPARITY STUDY

This report is not a Disparity Study and its results are not intended to be used or interpreted as such.

Disparity Studies derive their name from their primary objective. Specifically, to evaluate whether or not there are statistically significant differences (or disparities) between the amount of work that a governmental agency awards to M/WBEs and the amount one would expect them to receive given their qualifications, capabilities and interest in working with the agency. The purpose of a Disparity Study is to determine if there are patterns of race or gender discrimination that help explain any disparities in contracting that are identified in the statistical data. Both NYC and NYS are currently conducting disparity studies. In contrast, this study did not measure disparities; instead, it measured the capacity of M/WBEs.

The research was commissioned by the Building Trades Employers’ Association (BTEA) of NYC and was conducted by EuQuant.

4

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

CONCLUSIONS

1. M/WBE construction capacity in New York City is surprisingly low for a city that is the largest in the country. The relatively low level of M/WBE capacity makes it very difficult to see how NYC’s aspirational goals can be met.

2. New York City needs to invest more financial resources into M/WBE business/ capacity building programs in order to create greater opportunities for M/WBE contractors.

3. The overwhelming majority of NYC and NYS certified M/WBE’s did not have the licenses/registrations required by the NYC Building Code in order to be awarded contracts for performing work in these trades:

M/WBE CONTRACTOR CAPACITY:

The capacity measures were broken down by industry, race and ethnicity (i.e. Blacks, Hispanics, Asians) and by gender. Note that non-minority women comprised 72% of women- owned firms, while women belonging to various minority groups comprised the remaining 28%. The five construction industries examined in the study are listed below, followed by the six-digit North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. The codes indicate the sub-industries that are rolled up in the broader industry category.

Heavy, Street, Bridge, Sewer Construction: (237110, 237310)

Commercial and Institutional Building Construction: (236220)

All Other Specialty Trades Contracting: (238990)

Poured Concrete Foundations and Structure Contractors: (238110)

Electrical, Plumbing, and Building Equipment Contractors: (238210 – 238290)

Heavy Construction, Streets Bridges, and Sewers:

2.5% or 6 of 249 M/WBEs certified in Heavy Construction, Streets Bridges, and Sewers had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $27.0 million.

13% or 32 of 249 M/WBEs certified in Heavy Construction, Streets Bridges, and Sewers had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $6.0 million. There were 104 contracts larger than $6.0 million; they totaled $2.5 billion. The total value of all contracts in this industry (i.e. those greater and less than $6.0 million) was $2.9 billion.

5

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

Of the 32 M/WBEs that had the capacity to perform Heavy Construction, Streets Bridges, and Sewer contracts larger than $6.0 million, 13 were Asian, 14 WBEs, 6 Hispanic, 1 Black. Also, some firms had operational capacities in more than one industry. Therefore, the sum (derived by adding each group) may not be equal to the total for all M/WBEs. Note that $6 million is the breakpoint for the largest 25% of contracts. The largest 25% of contracts accounted for 86% of total award value, or $2.5 bill/$2.93 bill.

Commercial and Institutional Building Construction:

3.2% or 17 of 519 M/WBEs certified in Commercial and Institutional Building Construction had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $30 million.

35% or 184 of 519 M/WBEs certified in Commercial and Institutional Building Construction had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $1.9 million. There were 137 contracts larger than $1.9 million; they totaled $2.82 billion. The total value of all contracts in the industry (i.e. those greater and less than $1.9 million) was $2.95 billion.

Of the 184 M/WBEs that had capacity to perform Commercial and Institutional Building Construction contracts larger than $2.0 million, 64 were Asian, 55 WBEs, 41 Hispanic, 37 Black. Note that $2 million is the breakpoint for the largest 25% of contracts. The largest 25% of contracts accounted for 96% of total award value, or ($2.83 bill/$2.96 bill).

Electrical, Plumbing, and Building Equipment:

• 10% or 64 of 624 M/WBEs certified in Electrical, Plumbing, and Building Equipment had
• 10%
or
64
of
624
M/WBEs
certified
in
Electrical,
Plumbing,
and
Building
Equipment had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $5.3 million.
• 362 M/WBEs in Electrical, Plumbing, and Building Equipment had the capacity
to perform contracts larger than $412,000, this included 112 Asian, 100 WBEs, 78
Hispanic, 91 Black.

Other Specialty Trades Contracting:

622 M/WBEs were certified in Other Specialty Trades Contracting; 159 had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $1.0 million, this included 34 Asian, 59 WBEs, 34 Hispanic, 21 Black.

6

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

Poured Concrete Foundations and Structural Construction:

343 M/WBEs in Poured Concrete Foundations and Structural Construction, 294 had capacity to perform contracts larger than $390,000, this included 108 Asian, 86 WBEs, 57 Hispanic, and 64 Black.

The data shows that the capacity of Black contractors is particularly low in comparison to the capacity of other M/WBE’s:

1 of the 66 Black Contractors certified in Heavy construction, Streets Bridges and Sewers had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $6.0 million.

Less than 28% of 132 Black Contractors certified in Commercial and Institutional Building Construction had the capacity to perform contracts larger than $1.9 million

4% or 7 of 171 Black Contractors certified in Electrical, Plumbing and Building Equipment had the capacity to perform contracts that were larger than $5.3 million.

7

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

NEW YORK CITY LICENSES AND REGISTRATIONS

Using the New York City Department of Buildings skilled trade licenses website, each firm was searched by company name and other identifying information to determine whether it had an ACTIVE license/registration in a special trade. The results were as follows:

Overall, only 14.3% of New York City M/WBE contractors in five major construction Industries had required licenses:

ELECTRICAL LICENSE HOLDERS 18% or 73 82% or 340
ELECTRICAL LICENSE HOLDERS
18% or 73
82% or 340

Firms With Electric Licenseslicenses: ELECTRICAL LICENSE HOLDERS 18% or 73 82% or 340 Firms Without Electric Licenses MASTER PLUMBER

Firms Without Electric LicensesHOLDERS 18% or 73 82% or 340 Firms With Electric Licenses MASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS 5%

MASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS 5% or 10 95% or 174
MASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS
5% or 10
95% or 174

Firms With Master Plumber LicensesMASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS 5% or 10 95% or 174 Firms Without Master Plumber Licenses GENERAL

Firms Without Master Plumber Licenses5% or 10 95% or 174 Firms With Master Plumber Licenses GENERAL CONTRACTORS 21% or 263

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 21% or 263 79% or 984
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
21% or 263
79% or 984

Firms With General Contractor LicensesPlumber Licenses GENERAL CONTRACTORS 21% or 263 79% or 984 Firms Without General Contractor Licenses POURED

Firms Without General Contractor Licensesor 263 79% or 984 Firms With General Contractor Licenses POURED CONCRETE LICENSES 3% or 14

POURED CONCRETE LICENSES 3% or 14 97% or 494
POURED CONCRETE LICENSES
3% or 14
97% or 494

Firms With Poured Concrete LicensesLicenses POURED CONCRETE LICENSES 3% or 14 97% or 494 Firms Without Poured Concrete Licenses FIRE

Firms Without Poured Concrete Licenses3% or 14 97% or 494 Firms With Poured Concrete Licenses FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 2% or

FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 2% or 5 98% or 226
FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES
2% or 5
98% or 226

Firms With Fire Suppression LicensesWithout Poured Concrete Licenses FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 2% or 5 98% or 226 Firms Without Fire

Firms Without Fire Suppression LicensesFirms Without Poured Concrete Licenses FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 2% or 5 98% or 226 Firms With

8

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

NEW YORK STATE LICENSES AND REGISTRATIONS

New York State’s Unified Certification Program Business Directory (UCP) combines the business directories of the NYS Department of Transportation, Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority and Port Authority of NY & NJ. The directory was downloaded and each firm individually searched in the NYC Buildings Department website for license/ registration holders that have an Active License/Registration.

10% of New York State DBE/ACDBE contractors in five major construction industries had required licenses:

ELECTRICAL LICENSE HOLDERS 10% or 24 90% or 208
ELECTRICAL LICENSE HOLDERS
10% or 24
90% or 208

Firms With Electric Licenseslicenses: ELECTRICAL LICENSE HOLDERS 10% or 24 90% or 208 Firms Without Electric Licenses MASTER PLUMBER

Firms Without Electric LicensesHOLDERS 10% or 24 90% or 208 Firms With Electric Licenses MASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS 2%

MASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS 2% or 2 98% or 88
MASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS
2% or 2
98% or 88

Firms With Master Plumber LicensesLicenses MASTER PLUMBER LICENSE HOLDERS 2% or 2 98% or 88 Firms Without Master Plumber Licenses

Firms Without Master Plumber Licenses2% or 2 98% or 88 Firms With Master Plumber Licenses GENERAL CONTRACTORS 11% or 18

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 11% or 18 89% or 143
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
11% or 18
89% or 143

Firms With General Contractor LicensesPlumber Licenses GENERAL CONTRACTORS 11% or 18 89% or 143 Firms Without General Contractor Licenses POURED

Firms Without General Contractor Licenses11% or 18 89% or 143 Firms With General Contractor Licenses POURED CONCRETE LICENSES 0% or

POURED CONCRETE LICENSES 0% or 1 100% or 475
POURED CONCRETE LICENSES
0% or 1
100% or 475

Firms With Poured Concrete LicensesLicenses POURED CONCRETE LICENSES 0% or 1 100% or 475 Firms Without Poured Concrete Licenses FIRE

Firms Without Poured Concrete Licenses0% or 1 100% or 475 Firms With Poured Concrete Licenses FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 0.20% or

FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 0.20% or 1 99.80% or 458
FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES
0.20% or 1
99.80% or 458

Firms With Fire Suppression LicensesPoured Concrete Licenses FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 0.20% or 1 99.80% or 458 Firms Without Fire Suppression

Firms Without Fire Suppression LicensesWithout Poured Concrete Licenses FIRE SUPPRESSION LICENSES 0.20% or 1 99.80% or 458 Firms With Fire

9

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. NYC should invest significant financial resources into M/WBE business development programs as a way of assisting firms in building capacity and attaining the various contractor licenses/registrations required to perform work in NYC. The City of New York’s M/WBE program has focused primarily on aspirational goals as a way of creating more opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses. That effort is very important to leveling the playing field for M/WBEs. However, this report also strongly recommends that the City put significant resources into M/WBE business development programs as a way of assisting firms in building capacity and gaining the licenses and permits required to work on City contracts. NYC requires contractors to have a work permit to perform construction-related work in virtually all contracting areas. In many industries, contractors must have certain licenses before they can get permits. Furthermore, to get a license a contractor must have attained a level of advanced education beyond high school and have conducted years of journeymen work. NYC also has a unique institutional and regulatory environment. The regulatory factors have reduced the number of M/WBEs that have sufficient capacity. It is important to understand how these complex regulatory and institutional factors operate to affect M/WBEs and what must be done to assist M/WBEs in overcoming such barriers.

2. NYC should make sure that aspirational goals are correctly aligned with M/WBE capacity.

3. Business

development

and

capacity

building

efforts

should

be

targeted

toward

industries and groups that are experiencing significant deficits in capacity.

4. NYC

should

measure

the

capacity

of

each

M/WBE

it

certifies

and

information available to all prime contractors.

make

that

5. NYS should establish an Executive Office responsible for gathering M/WBE contract data from all its agencies and independent authorities. It should collect and centralize M/WBE contract data. NYS would then be in a better position to determine the capacity of M/WBEs and develop capacity building programs to supplement its efforts at attaining aspirational goals.

6. This research was not intended to determine what the appropriate aspirational goals should be for NYC or identify how the level of M/WBE capacity compared to

That is the job of a Disparity Study, and it is our

understanding that such a study is currently underway. That study should provide detailed insight into these issues and recommend policies that are effective at resolving them. The study should also take those factors into consideration when recommending aspirational goals and other remedial policies.

NYC’s aspirational goals.

7. Finally, NYC should structure its M/WBE program to achieve business development goals along with aspirational goals. The future success of M/WBE programs in New York City and across the country will depend heavily on the extent to which agencies focus on achieving business development and capacity building, rather than just aspirational goals. We believe this report provides a unique starting point for NYC to begin this process.

10

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

Key Data of NYC Certified M/WBE Contractors

INDUSTRY DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED FIRMS, CITY OF NEW YORK 2015-2016

OF M/WBE CERTIFIED FIRMS, CITY OF NEW YORK 2015-2016 RACE AND ETHNIC DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED

RACE AND ETHNIC DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED FIRMS, CITY OF NEW YORK, 2015-2016

ETHNIC DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED FIRMS, CITY OF NEW YORK, 2015-2016 LOCATION DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED

LOCATION DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED FIRMS,

ETHNIC DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED FIRMS, CITY OF NEW YORK, 2015-2016 LOCATION DISTRIBUTION OF M/WBE CERTIFIED

11

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

High-Level Summary of the Capacity of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

What is capacity and how was it determined? Capacity is the amount of work (measured in dollars) that a company can perform efficiently during a single year. A five-step procedure was used to determine M/WBE capacity. First, the research team examined all prime contracts and subcontracts NYC awarded in 2015 and 2016. Second, the team collected detailed information on the market characteristics of firms that performed each contract. Third, a model was used to identify the relationship between companies’ market characteristics and the amount of work they performed (i.e. their capacity). Fourth, information on the market characteristics of M/WBEs was collected. Finally, the research team used the information and model results to estimate the amount of work each M/WBE ought to be able to perform, i.e. its capacity.

Tables 1 through 7 below provide a high-level summary of the capacity estimates for M/WBEs. Those tables are from the full report, where they appear as Tables 10 – 16. In Table 1, the average capacity of all M/WBEs is broken down by industry. Tables 2 through 7 provide detailed information for each M/WBE group; including Asians, Blacks, Hispanic/Latinos, non-minorities that are certified M/WBEs, and non-minority women-owned businesses that are certified M/WBEs. Each table has six columns:

Column 1 gives the name of the industry in which the firm operated. The study examined seven different industries.

Column 2 records the number of firms that operated in the industry.

Column 3 gives the “mean capacity” of all firms that operated in the industry. The “mean capacity” is just a different way of saying the “average capacity.” Anytime results are derived from estimates, the “mean” rather than the “average” is the correct expression to use.

Column 4 records the “median capacity” of firms in the industry. The “median” is simply the value that separates the top half of capacity values from the bottom half. Specifically, if one were to arrange the capacities of all firms in order from the smallest amount to the largest amount, the halfway point between the smallest and the largest values is the “median.”

Column 5 records the “75th percentile capacity” of firms in the industry. Suppose we arranged all capacity values in the industry in order from the smallest amount to the largest amount. The amount that separates the top 25% of capacity values from the bottom 75% is the “75th percentile”.

Column 6 records the “95th percentile capacity” of firms in the industry. Similar to the example above, if we arranged all capacity values in order from the smallest amount to the largest amount, the amount that separates the top 5% of capacity values from the bottom 95% of capacity values is the “95th percentile”.

12

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

The Results

Table 1 shows the mean capacity of M/WBEs across all industries. The mean was $3.5 million. Firms in Environmental Consulting Services had the highest mean capacity, $6.2 million. That industry was followed respectively by Commercial and Institutional Building Construction, $5.1 million; Heavy, Street, Bridge, Sewer Construction, $4.7 million; and Poured Concrete Foundations and Structure Contractors $4.1 million. The two industries with the smallest mean capacities were Architectural, Engineering, Geophysical Services ($1.6 Million) and All Other Specialty Trades Contracting ($1.9 Million).

TABLE 1. MEAN CAPACITY FOR ALL CERTIFIED M/WBES BY INDUSTRY

NAME OF INDUSTRY

MEAN CAPACITY

Architectural, Engineering, Geophysical Services

Commercial and Institutional Building Construction

All Other Specialty Trades Contracting

Electrical, Plumbing and Building Equipment Contractors

Environmental Consulting Services

Poured Concrete Foundations and Structure Contractors

Heavy, Street, Bridge, Sewer Construction

Mean Across Industries

$1,559,328

$5,114,067

$1,942,909

$3,060,772

$6,179,617

$4,085,560

$4,703,346

$3,543,865

Table 2 provides detail capacity estimates for all M/WBEs. It includes the number of firms in each industry, the mean capacity, the median capacity, the 75th percentile capacity and the 95th percentile capacity. Across all industries, mean capacity was $3.5 million and median capacity was $.760 million. The industry with the largest median capacity was Heavy, Street, Bridge, Sewer Construction ($1.8 million). The 75th percentile capacity was $2.4 million, and the 95th percentile capacity for all M/WBEs was $12.3 million. M/WBEs in Environmental Consulting Services had the highest 95th percentile capacity ($17.2 Million).

13

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

TABLE 2. CAPACITY MEASURES FOR ALL CERTIFIED M/WBES BY INDUSTRY, NYC 2015-2016

UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY
UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY

Table 3 provides capacity estimates for 1010 Asian-owned firms that were certified M/WBEs. Across all industries, the mean capacity of Asian firms was $3.3 million, the median capacity was $.895 million, the 75th percentile capacity was $3.3 million, and the 95th percentile capacity was $12.6 million. Asian firms in Environmental Consulting Services had the highest mean capacity ($7.1 million), and Asian firms in the same industry had the highest median capacity ($7.8 million). Similarly, Asian firms in that industry had the highest 75th percentile capacity ($9.7 million) as well as the highest 95th percentile capacity ($17.4 million).

TABLE 3. CAPACITY MEASURED FOR CERTIFIED ASIAN-OWNED M/WBES BY INDUSTRY, NYC 2015-2016

UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY
UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY

14

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

Table 4 provides capacity estimates for 786 Black-owned firms. Those firms had the smallest capacity of all M/WBE groups, individually and collectively, see Table 4. For example, mean capacity of Black-owned firms was $1.4 million, while for all M/WBEs it was $3.5 million. Median capacity of Black-owned firms was $0.554 million while it was $0.760 million for all M/WBEs. The 75th percentile capacity of Black-owned firm capacity was $1.3 million while it was $2.4 million for all M/WBEs. Finally, the 95th percentile capacity of Black-owned firms was $5.2 million while for all firms it was $12.2 million. The largest mean capacity of Black- owned firms was in Commercial and Institutional Building Construction ($2.3 Million). For Blacks, the largest 95th percentile capacity was in Civil Engineering Construction and Envi- ronmental Consulting ($7.9 million).

TABLE 4. CAPACITY MEASURED FOR CERTIFIED BLACK-OWNED M/WBES BY INDUSTRY, NYC 2015-2016

UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY
UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY
M/WBES BY INDUSTRY, NYC 2015-2016 UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY Table 5 gives capacity results for Hispanic/Latino firms.

Table 5 gives capacity results for Hispanic/Latino firms. The total number of Hispanic/ Latino-owned M/WBEs examined in the study was 602. Their mean capacity was $4.9 million, median capacity was $0.718 million, 75th percentile capacity was $2.2 million, and 95th percentile capacity was $15.0 million. Among Hispanic/Latinos, the industry with the highest median capacity was Heavy, Street, Bridge, Sewer Construction ($1.8 million). The same industry had the largest 95th percentile capacity ($30.8 million).

15

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

TABLE 5. CAPACITY MEASURED FOR CERTIFIED HISPANIC/LATINO-OWNED M/WBES BY INDUSTRY, NYC

2015-2016

UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY
UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY

Table 6 provides capacity estimates for 486 women-owned firms that were certified M/WBEs. WBEs had the highest capacity of all M/WBE groups. Their mean capacity was $5.2 million, and the median capacity was $1.3 million. The capacity value for the 75th percentile was $5.3 million, and for the 95th percentile, it was $20.6 million. Among women, the industry with the highest median capacity was Environmental Consulting Services ($7.4 million). The largest 95th percentile capacity value for women-owned firms was in Commercial and Institutional Building Construction ($37.3 million).

TABLE 6. CAPACITY MEASURED FOR CERTIFIED WOMEN-OWNED M/WBES BY INDUSTRY, NYC 2015-2016

UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY
UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY

16

2017 Capacity Analysis of Certified M/WBEs in NYC

Finally, Table 7 provides capacity estimates for 712 non-minority-owned firms that were certified by the M/WBE program. Presumably, those firms met the criteria required for establishing social and economic disadvantage. Among firms in this category, the mean capacity was $5.2 million, and the median capacity was $1.1 million. The capacity value for the 75th percentile was $4.0 million, and for the 95th percentile, it was $18.9 million, see Table 7.

TABLE 7. CAPACITY MEASURED FOR CERTIFIED NON-MINORITY-OWNED M/WBES BY INDUSTRY, NYC

2015-2016

UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY
UPPER CAPACITY BOUNDARY