Sie sind auf Seite 1von 56

HOA

Plan shape of a Japanese Pagoda

A. Round
B. Rectangle
C. Square
D. Triangular
square in plan

floor area is
determined by Ken
(Japanese modular
system)

each level has 12


pillars with a heart
pillar on the center
The final plan shape of the St. Peter's Basilica by Carlo Maderna

A. Latin Cross
B. English Cross
C. French Cross
D. Greek Cross
This church, 1st built by the Augustinian Fr. Miguel
Murguia, has an unusually large bell which was made from
approximately 70 sacks of coins donated by the towns
people

A. Panay Cathedral
B. Quiapo Church
C. Las Pinas Cathedral
D. Laoag Cathedral
Panay Church Five feet high, seven feet in
diameter and 10.4 ton in weight
Santa Monica Parish Church Dakong Lingganay was the largest
in Asia
Iglesia Parroquial de Santa third in the world when it was
Mnica finished on December 12, 1878.
The sound of the bell can be heard
as far as seven kilometers.
Roxas City, Capiz
He erected the entrance Piazza at St. Peter's Basilica.

A. Bernini
B. Hadrian
C. Agrippa
D. Vitruvius Italian: Piazza San Pietro
Latin: Forum Sancti Petri

is a large plaza located


directly in front of St.
Peter's Basilica in the
Vatican City

Both the square and the


basilica are named after
Saint Peter, an apostle of
Jesus and the first
Catholic Pope.
He erected the entrance Piazza at St. Peter's Basilica.
At the centre of the square
trapezoidal entrance,
A. Bernini is an ancient Egyptian
B. Hadrian obelisk, erected at the
current site in 1586.
C. Agrippa
D. Vitruvius Gian Lorenzo Bernini
designed the square almost
100 years later
massive Tuscan
colonnades,
four columns deep, which
embrace visitors in "the
maternal arms of Mother
Church".
A granite fountain
constructed by Bernini in
1675 matches another
fountain designed by
Carlo Maderno in 1613.
He erected the entrance Piazza at St. Peter's Basilica.

A. Bernini
B. Hadrian
C. Agrippa Gian Lorenzo Bernini
D. Vitruvius Gianlorenzo or Giovanni Lorenzo;

7 December 1598 28 November 1680


Italian sculptor and architect

While a major figure in the world of


architecture, he was the leading
sculptor of his age, credited with
creating the Baroque style of sculpture
He erected the entrance Piazza at St. Peter's Basilica.

A. Bernini
B. Hadrian
C. Agrippa
D. Vitruvius
Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus
64/62 BC 12 BC 24 January 76 10 July 138
Roman consul, statesman, general and Roman emperor from 117 to 138
architect known for building Hadrian's Wall,
close friend, son-in-law, and lieutenant to which marked the northern limit of
Octavian Britannia
responsible for the construction of some rebuilt the Pantheon and
of the most notable buildings in the constructed the Temple of Venus
history of Rome and for important and Roma
military victories, most notably at the considered by some to have been a
Battle of Actium in 31 BC against the humanist, and he is regarded as the
forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra. third of the Five Good Emperors.
The sacred enclosure found in the highest part of a
Greek city is called:
Temenos is often physically marked by a
Peribolos fence or wall (e.g. Delphi) as a
A. Pteroma structural boundary.
B. Temenos
In ancient Greek and Roman architecture,
C. Peribolas
D. Corps de Logis Peribolos
a court enclosed by a wall,
especially one surrounding a sacred
area such as a temple, shrine, or
altar.

Peribolos walls (which may also be


referred to as temenos walls) were
sometimes composed of stone posts
and slabs supported by porous sills.
The sacred enclosure found in the highest part of a
Greek city is called:

A. Pteroma
B. Temenos
C. Peribolas
D. Corps de Logis

Pteromata
enclosed space of a stoa,
portico, or peristyle
including the stylobate
and the space to the
solid wall behind the
portico
The sacred enclosure found in the highest part of a
Greek city is called:

A. Pteroma
B. Temenos
C. Peribolas
D. Corps de Logis

Corps de logis

principal block of a large, usually


classical, mansion or palace

contains the principal rooms,


state apartments and an entry
An ancient Greek Portico, a long colonnaded shelter
used in public places.

A. Antefix
B. Pteroma
C. Anthemion
D. Stoa
An ancient Greek Portico, a long colonnaded shelter
used in public places.

A. Antefix
B. Pteroma Antefix
Latin: Antefigere
C. Anthemion
D. Stoa
is a vertical block which
terminates the covering tiles of
the roof of a tiled roof.

In grand buildings the face of


each stone ante-fix was richly
carved, often with the
anthemion ornament.
An ancient Greek Portico, a long colonnaded shelter
used in public places.

A. Antefix In Ancient Greek and Ancient


B. Pteroma Roman uses it is also known as the
C. Anthemion anthemion (from the Greek
D. Stoa , a flower).

It is found in most artistic media,


but especially as an architectural
ornament, whether carved or
painted, and painted on
ceramics.

It is very often a component of


the design of a frieze or border.
Built by the Franciscan priest Fr.
Blas dela Madre, this church in
Rizal whose design depicts the
heavy influence of Spanish
Baroque, was declared a national
treasure.

A. Angono Church
B. Antipolo Church
C. Jala-jala
D. Morong Church

St. Jerome Parish Church


Built by the Franciscan priest Fr.
Blas dela Madre, this church in
Rizal whose design depicts the
heavy influence of Spanish
Baroque, was declared a national
treasure.

A. Angono Church
B. Antipolo Church
C. Jala-jala Church
D. Morong Church
Roman apartment blocks.

A.Villa
B.Domus In Roman architecture, an insula
(Latin for "island," plural insulae)
C.Insulae
D.Thalamus a kind of apartment building that
housed most of the urban citizen
population of ancient Rome, including
ordinary people of lower- or middle-
class status (the plebs) and all but the
wealthiest from the upper-middle class
(the equites).

The term was also used to mean a city


block.
Roman apartment blocks.

A.Villa
B.Domus
C.Insulae
D.Thalamus
Roman apartment blocks.
In ancient Roman architecture
A.Villa
B.Domus villa was originally a country
C.Insulae house built for the lite.
D.Thalamus
Roman apartment blocks.

A.Villa
B.Domus
C.Insulae
D.Thalamus

In ancient Rome,

the domus was the type of house occupied by the upper classes
and some wealthy freedmen during the Republican and Imperial
eras
could be found in almost all the major cities throughout the
Roman territories
A type of Roman wall facing with a net-like effect.

A. Opus Mixtum
B. Opus Incertum
C. Opus Recticulatum
D. Opus Quadratum

Roman concrete,
also called opus caementicium,

Opus reticulatum (also known as reticulated work)

a form of brickwork used in ancient Roman architecture


consists of diamond-shaped bricks of tuff, referred to as
cubilia, placed around a core of opus caementicium.
A type of Roman wall facing with a net-like effect.

A. Opus Mixtum
B. Opus Incertum
C. Opus Recticulatum
D. Opus Quadratum

Opus mixtum, or Opus vagecum and Opus compositum

an ancient Roman construction technique


consist in a mix of opus reticulatum and at the angles and
the sides of opus latericium
consist of opus vittatum and opus testaceum
A type of Roman wall facing with a net-like effect.

A. Opus Mixtum
B. Opus Incertum
C. Opus Recticulatum
D. Opus Quadratum

Opus incertum (irregular work)


an ancient Roman construction technique, using irregularly
shaped and randomly placed uncut stones or fist-sized tuff
blocks inserted in a core of opus caementicium.
A type of Roman wall facing with a net-like effect.

A. Opus Mixtum
B. Opus Incertum
C. Opus Recticulatum
D. Opus Quadratum

Opus quadratum

an ancient Roman construction technique, in which squared


blocks of stone of the same height were set in parallel
courses, most often without the use of mortar.
The Latin author Vitruvius describes the technique.
Mexican Architect/Engineer who introduced thin shell construction.

A. Carlos Rodriguez
B. Felix Outerino Candela
C. Luis Soria y Mata
D. Francisco Sanchez

L'Oceanogrfic (El Oceanogrfico)


City of Arts and Sciences
Valencia, Spain, with Calatrava
Mexican Architect/Engineer who introduced thin shell construction.

A. Carlos Rodriguez
B. Felix Outerino Candela
Arturo Soria y Mata
C. Luis Soria y Mata
D. Francisco Sanchez (1844-1920)

an internationally important Spanish


urban planner whose work remains highly
inspirational today

most well known for his concept of the


Linear City (Ciudad Lineal) for application
to Madrid and elsewhere

studied the civil engineer career


(Ingeniero de Caminos), but he didn't
finish it.
The open court in an Italian palazzo.

A. Dipteral
B. Cortel
C. Prytaneion
D. Tumuli

Palazzo style
refers to an architectural style of the 19th
and 20th centuries based upon the palazzi
(palaces) built by wealthy families of the
Italian Renaissance.
The open court in an Italian palazzo.

A. Dipteral
B. Cortel
C. Prytaneion
D. Tumuli

tumulus
a mound of earth and stones raised dipteral
over a grave or graves. Having a double row of columns
Tumuli are also known as barrows, on all sides, as certain Greek
burial mounds or kurgans, and may be temples.
found throughout much of the world.
The open court in an Italian palazzo.
Prytaneion
A. Dipteral seat of the Prytaneis (executive)
B. Cortel seat of government in ancient
C. Prytaneion Greece
D. Tumuli The term is used to describe any of a
range of ancient structures where
officials met (normally relating to the
government of a city) but the term is
also used to refer to the building where
the officials and winners of the Olympic
games met at Olympia.

The Prytaneion normally stood in


centre of the city, in the agora. The
building contained the holy fire of
Hestia, the goddess of the hearth, and
symbol of the life of the city.
Architects of the Hagia Sophia.
(St. Sophia,Constantinople)

A. Cossutius and Mnesicles


B. Callicrates and Ictinus
C. Anthemius and Isidorus
D. Theron and Libon

Byzantine architecture

Hagia Sophia was a Greek


Orthodox Christian patriarchal
basilica, later an imperial
mosque, and now a museum in
Istanbul, Turkey.
The ornamental pattern work in stone, filling the
upper part of a Gothic window.

A. Cavetto
B. Tracery
C. Embrasures
D. Crenel
The ornamental pattern work in stone, filling the
upper part of a Gothic window.

A. Cavetto
B. Tracery
C. Embrasures
D. Crenel

embrasure
Usual number of stories for a Chinese pagoda.

A. 10
B. 11
C. 12
D. 13

Most have between three and 13 storeys


(almost always an odd number) and the
classic gradual tiered eaves.
Usual number of stories for a Chinese pagoda.

A. 10
B. 11
C. 12
D. 13

Liuhe Pagoda (Six Harmonies Pagoda)


Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China
built in 1165 AD during the Song
Dynasty
The sleeping room of the 'megaron'.

A. Thalamus
B. Domus
C. Balneum
D. Insulae

Megaron plural megara


great hall in ancient Greek
palace complexes
It was a rectangular hall, fronted
by an open, two-columned porch,
and a more or less central, open
hearth vented though an oculus
in the roof above it and
surrounded by four columns.
A type of Roman wall facing which is made of small stone
laid in a loose pattern roughly resembling polygonal work.

A. Opus Tesselatum
B. Opus Mixtum
C. Opus Recticulatum
D. Opus Incertum
The fortified high area or citadel of an ancient Greek City.

A. Parthenon
B. Apotheca
C. Acropolis
D. Pantheon
The fortified high area or citadel of an ancient Greek City.

A. Parthenon
B. Apotheca
C. Acropolis
D. Pantheon

Parthenon
Apothca former temple, on the Athenian
repository, storehouse, warehouse Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the
goddess Athena, whom the people of
Athens considered their patron
Construction began in 447 BC when the
Athenian Empire was at the peak of its
power
The fortified high area or citadel of an ancient Greek City.

A. Parthenon
B. Apotheca
C. Acropolis
D. Pantheon

Pantheon

former Roman temple, now a church, in


Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple
commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during
the reign of Augustus.

Apollodorus of Damascus
The dry or sweating room in the Thermae.

A. Unctuaria
B. Tepidarium
C. Calidarium
D. Sudatorium

In ancient Rome, thermae (from Greek


thermos, "hot") and balneae (from Greek
balaneion) were facilities for
bathing. Thermae usually refers to the large
imperial bath complexes, while balneae were
smaller-scale facilities, public or private, that
existed in great numbers throughout Rome.
The dry or sweating room in the Thermae.

A. Unctuaria
B. Tepidarium
C. Calidarium
D. Sudatorium

Unctuaria
anointing
massaging, oiling
The dry or sweating room in the Thermae.

A. Unctuaria
Tepidarium
B. Tepidarium warm (tepidus) bathroom of the
C. Calidarium Roman baths heated by a
D. Sudatorium hypocaust or underfloor heating
system.

The specialty of a tepidarium is


the pleasant feeling of constant
radiant heat which directly
affects the human body from
the walls and floor.

Caldarium (also called a


calidarium, cella caldaria or cella
coctilium)
a room with a hot plunge bath,
used in a Roman bath complex.
Architect of the National Library, Philippines.

A. Felipe Mendoza
B. Jose Herrera
C. Juan Nakpil
D. Cesar Concio
Architect of the National Library, Philippines.

A. Felipe Mendoza
B. Jose Herrera
C. Juan Nakpil
D. Cesar Concio
A roman house with a central patio.

A. Domus
B. Villa
C. Atrium House
D. Thalamus
In early Christian churches, the bishop took the central
place at the end of the church called ___.

A. Nave
B. Narthex
C. Apse
D. Naos
A kindred type to the theater.

A. Epidauros
B. Pinacotheca
C. Odeion
D. Podium
First elected U.A.P. president.

A. Juan Nakpil
B. Felipe Mendoza
C. Jose Herrera
D. Cesar Concio
Also called a 'Honeysuckle' ornament.

A. Apotheca
B. Acroterion
C. Anthemion
D. Antefix

Verwandte Interessen