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Doc 9375-AN/913

Volume 1

INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION

DANGEROUS GOODS
TRAINING MANUAL

VOLUME 1

USING THE TECHNICAL INSTRUCTIONS


FOR THE SAFE TRANSPORT OF
DANGEROUS GOODS

Approved by the Secretary General


and published under his authority

FOURTH EDITION 2010


Doc 9375-AN/913
Volume 1

INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION

DANGEROUS GOODS
TRAINING MANUAL

VOLUME 1

USING THE TECHNICAL INSTRUCTIONS


FOR THE SAFE TRANSPORT OF
DANGEROUS GOODS

Approved by the Secretary General


and published under his authority

FOURTH EDITION 2010


Published in separate English, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish editions by the
INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION
999 University Street, Montral, Quebec, Canada H3C 5H7

For ordering information and for a complete listing of sales agents


and booksellers, please go to the ICAO website at www.icao.int

Third Edition 1993


Fourth Edition 2010

Doc 9375, Dangerous Goods Training Manual


Volume I, Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Order Number: 9375P1
ISBN 978-92-9231-515-3

ICAO 2010

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a


retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, without prior
permission in writing from the International Civil Aviation Organization.
AMENDMENTS

Amendments are announced in the supplements to the Catalogue of ICAO


Publications; the Catalogue and its supplements are available on the ICAO
website at www.icao.int. The space below is provided to keep a record of
such amendments.

RECORD OF AMENDMENTS AND CORRIGENDA

AMENDMENTS CORRIGENDA

No. Date Entered by No. Date Entered by

(iii)
FOREWORD

Introduction

Many thousands of dangerous goods shipments are carried every day of the year aboard aircraft. The majority of these
dangerous goods are correctly prepared for transport and arrive safely at their destination.

Unfortunately, incidents and accidents involving dangerous goods do happen. Such incidents and accidents may result
in the contamination or destruction of cargo, the contamination of aircraft cargo holds, or they may even threaten the
aircraft itself and the lives of those on board. Often when such accidents have occurred, investigation has shown that the
dangerous goods involved did not meet the current legal requirements.

What are the legal requirements?

It is reassuring to note that the legal requirements governing the safe transport of dangerous goods by air are essentially
consistent throughout the world. This consistency is achieved through the adoption into the laws of each State of a
document produced by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) called the Technical Instructions for the Safe
Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (the Instructions).

The ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel, made up of technical experts from ICAO member States, is responsible for
developing and maintaining the technical accuracy of this document.

Note. For more information about the work of the Dangerous Goods Panel refer to this website:
http://www.icao.int/anb/FLS/DangerousGoods/.

It is important that those who prepare dangerous goods for air transport, those who transport them and the government
organizations who oversee such activities, have a comprehensive working knowledge of the requirements laid out in
these Instructions.

This self-study training manual may be used together with the Instructions to facilitate the understanding and use of that
text.

Note. This training manual is based on the 20092010 edition of the Instructions and its Addenda and
Corrigenda.

Goal of this self-study training manual

The Dangerous Goods Training Manual has been designed to address the training needs of State employees who will
be or are involved in the administration of ICAOs Technical Instructions. In progressing through each unit, you will be
able to relate the requirements to practical situations by following examples and going through exercises.

After careful study of this training manual you should be able to determine when a consignment of dangerous goods has
been prepared, handled, stored and transported in accordance with the Instructions.

(v)
(vi) Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Although each unit relates mainly to a particular aspect of the Instructions, reference is made, when necessary, to other
units and other parts of the Instructions. This enables you to appreciate the linkages within the training manual and
within the Instructions.

Training manual structure

There are thirteen (13) units to this training manual. The following is a listing of these units and includes each of their
individual goals:

Unit Title Goal

Unit 1 General philosophy, organization and State the philosophy of the Instructions.
contents of the International Civil Aviation Navigate through the Instructions.
Organization Technical Instructions Evaluate whether the provisions concerning training,
limitations of dangerous goods in aircraft, transport of
dangerous goods by post, and dangerous goods security of
the Instructions, have been correctly applied.

Unit 2 Hazard class definitions and classification Explain the characteristics of the nine classes of dangerous
procedures goods and the components of a dangerous goods
description.

Unit 3 Use of the Dangerous Goods List Evaluate whether relevant information concerning an item of
Table 3-1 dangerous goods has been correctly extracted from Part 3 of
the Instructions.

Unit 4 Packing requirements Evaluate whether dangerous goods have been packed in
accordance with the provisions of Part 4 and Part 6 of the
Instructions.

Unit 5 Package marking and labelling Evaluate whether the labelling and marking requirements of
Part 5 of the Instructions have been correctly applied.

Unit 6 Dangerous goods transport document and Evaluate whether the documentation provisions of Part 5 of
other relevant documentation the Instructions have been correctly applied.

Unit 7 Operators and cargo acceptance Evaluate whether the operator responsibilities identified in
Part 7 of the Instructions have been correctly applied.

Unit 8 Infectious substances Evaluate whether an infectious substance has been correctly
classified, prepared for transport and transported in
accordance with the Instructions.

Unit 9 Radioactive material Evaluate whether a radioactive material has been correctly
classified, prepared for transport and transported in
accordance with the Instructions.

Unit 10 Dangerous goods in limited quantities and Evaluate whether the limited quantities and excepted
dangerous goods in excepted quantities quantities provisions of Part 3 of the Instructions have been
correctly applied.

Unit 11 Provisions for passengers and crew Evaluate whether the carry-on or checked baggage
provisions in Part 8 of the Instructions have been correctly
applied.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Foreword (vii)

Unit 12 Emergency procedures Evaluate if the emergency response measures in Part 7 of


the Instructions are in place and are correctly applied.
Evaluate whether appropriate emergency response
information can be correctly extracted from the Emergency
Response Guidance for Aircraft Incidents Involving
Dangerous Goods (ICAO Doc 9481).

Unit 13 Answers to exercises

At the beginning of each of these units you will find the following statement:

Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the
Instructions to facilitate understanding of that text.

It is placed there to emphasize that this self-study training manual is to be used solely for guidance in locating
information in the Instructions. If there is a discrepancy between what is found in the self-study training manual and what
is found in the Instructions, the text of the Instructions prevails.

Each unit contains the following:

Unit title
Table of contents
Training subject matter and category of personnel
Goal
Introduction
Guidance material and exercises based on the elements of the Instruction under study
(Note. Individual headings will be assigned based on the topic.)
Summary

Within the text of each unit you will also find boxes which include:

Excerpts from the Instructions in italics, preceded by the Instruction reference number, for example,

5;1 Note. It is the shippers responsibility to ensure that all of the applicable air transport
requirements are met.

Checklists, such as,

Acceptance Procedures Checklist Yes No Reference in the


(To be used only by trained acceptance staff.) Instructions
1. Document . Are there two copies of the document? 7;1.2.1 a)

Summary of Instruction requirements, for example,

Type of aircraft Explosives permitted on Segregation requirements


board aircraft
Passenger aircraft Only Not Applicable
Division 1.4 S
(viii) Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Notes are also included to draw your attention to certain provisions:

Example:

Note. For ease of reference a numerical list of UN numbers with their proper shipping name is provided in
Attachment 1; Chapter 1.

Before starting this self-study training manual

Before starting this self-study training manual be sure you have:

a copy of the 20092010 edition of the Instructions and its Addenda and Corrigenda;
a highlighting pencil so you can highlight important points;
a pen or pencil for answering questions; and
blank paper for notes.

IMPORTANT NOTE

When answering Exercise and Unit Test questions be sure to indicate with your answer the reference number in
the Instructions that led you to your answer.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Mr. Daniel J. Sylvestre, for permission to reprint his photographs on pages 4-3, 4-20, 4-21, 4-24, 5-5, 5-6, 5-7, 5-8, 5-13,
11-7, 11-8, 11-9 and 11-10.

______________________
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................... (v)

Unit 1. General Philosophy, Organization and Contents of the


International Civil Aviation Organization Technical Instructions .......................................................... 1-1
Unit 2. Hazard Class Definitions and Classification Procedures ..................................................................... 2-1
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1..................................................................................... 3-1
Unit 4. Packing Requirements ........................................................................................................................ 4-1
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling .......................................................................................................... 5-1
Unit 6. Dangerous Goods Transport Document and Other Relevant Documentation..................................... 6-1
Unit 7. Operators and Cargo Acceptance ....................................................................................................... 7-1
Unit 8. Infectious Substances ......................................................................................................................... 8-1
Unit 9. Radioactive Material ............................................................................................................................ 9-1
Unit 10. Dangerous Goods in Limited Quantities and Dangerous Goods in Excepted Quantities .................... 10-1
Unit 11. Provisions for Passengers and Crew .................................................................................................. 11-1
Unit 12. Emergency Procedures ....................................................................................................................... 12-1
Unit 13. Answers to Exercises .......................................................................................................................... 13-1

______________________

(ix)
UNIT 1

General Philosophy, Organization and Contents of the


International Civil Aviation Organization
Technical Instructions
Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 1 ......................................................................... 1-2
B. Goal Unit 1 .................................................................................................................................................. 1-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 1-3
D. General Philosophy Foreword and Part 1 ................................................................................................... 1-3
E. Numbering System Foreword ..................................................................................................................... 1-4
F. User Tools Foreword and Table of Contents .............................................................................................. 1-5
G. Training Part 1;4 ......................................................................................................................................... 1-8
H. Prohibitions and Exceptions (Limitations) Part 1;1 and 1;2 ......................................................................... 1-11
I. Dangerous Goods Security Part 1;5 ........................................................................................................... 1-14
J. Dangerous Goods Packages opened for inspection by State Authorities Part 1;1.3 .................................. 1-15
K. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 1-15

1-1
1-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 1

Subject Matter: General philosophy and limitations


Category of personnel: All

B. GOAL UNIT 1

After study of this unit, the student should be able to:

a) state the philosophy of the Instructions;

b) navigate through the Instructions; and

c) evaluate whether the provisions concerning training, limitations of dangerous goods in aircraft, transport of
dangerous goods by post, and dangerous goods security of the Instructions have been correctly applied.

With reference to the Instructions the student will be able to:

a) explain the purpose of the Instructions;

b) state the numbering system for the Instructions;

c) locate the Foreword and each part and attachment in the Instructions;

d) state how often the Instructions are amended;

e) identify the location of meanings for abbreviations and symbols used in the Instructions;

f) identify the location of definitions for specific words and terms used in the Instructions;

g) state which type of measurement units are to be used when describing a consignment of dangerous goods;

h) convert measurements to and from the SI System;

i) explain how the Instructions maintain compatibility with the other modes of transport;

j) identify the location of the list of State and operator variations;

k) explain the purpose of the State and operator variations;

l) identify the location of the training requirements in the Instructions;

m) state how often training is to be renewed;

n) state when testing is required;

o) demonstrate how to determine if an individuals training is relevant and current;

p) demonstrate how to determine which dangerous goods may go in air mail;


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 1. General philosophy, organization and contents of the ICAO Technical Instructions 1-3

q) demonstrate how to determine if a prohibition or exception applies to a dangerous goods article or substance;
and

r) identify where in the Instructions the contents of a Security Plan are specified.

C. INTRODUCTION

Foreword The broad principles governing the international transport of dangerous goods by air are contained in
ICAOs Annex 18 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation The Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air.
The Instructions amplify the basic provisions of Annex 18 and contain all the detailed instructions necessary for the
safe international transport of dangerous goods by air.

This unit focuses on the provisions of the Foreword and Part 1 of the Instructions. It is designed to provide you with an
overview of the:

general philosophy behind the Instructions;


training requirements for those responsible for the safe transport of dangerous goods by air;
text and page numbering system used in the Instructions;
user tools provided to assist in the understanding and application of the Instructions;
prohibitions and exceptions affecting the transport of dangerous goods by air;
method of achieving intermodal compatibility;
purpose of State and operator variations;
conditions under which a security plan should be developed and what it should contain; and
responsibilities of State officials involved in the opening for inspection of packages containing dangerous
goods.

Examples and exercises are used throughout the text to relate the requirements of the Instructions to practical situations.
The test at the end of this unit will provide you with useful feedback on how you have mastered the material.

D. GENERAL PHILOSOPHY FOREWORD AND PART 1

Dangerous goods can be carried safely by air transport providing certain principles are adopted. These principles, which
are included in the Instructions, are intended to facilitate transport while giving a level of safety such that dangerous
goods can be carried without placing an aircraft or its occupants at risk, providing all the requirements are fulfilled. They
try to ensure that should an incident occur it cannot lead to an accident (Foreword).
1-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

1;1.2 GENERAL TRANSPORT REQUIREMENTS

Except as otherwise provided for in the International Civil Aviation Organization Technical Instructions for the
Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (Instructions), no person may offer or accept dangerous goods for
international civil transport by air unless those goods are properly classified, documented, certificated, described,
packaged, marked, labelled and in the condition for shipment required by these Instructions. If a person performs a
function required by these Instructions on behalf of the person who offers the dangerous goods for transport by air or
on behalf of the operator, that person must perform that function in accordance with the requirements of these
Instructions. No person may transport dangerous goods by air unless those goods are accepted, handled and
transported in accordance with these Instructions. No person may label, mark, certify or offer a packaging as meeting
the requirements of these Instructions unless that packaging is manufactured, fabricated, marked, maintained,
reconditioned or repaired as required by these Instructions. No person shall carry dangerous goods or cause
dangerous goods to be carried aboard an aircraft in either checked or carry-on baggage or on his/her person, unless
permitted by 8;1.1.2.

Note. When dangerous goods intended for air transport are carried by surface transport to or from an
aerodrome, any other applicable national or modal transport requirements should be met in addition to those that are
applicable for the goods when carried by air.

Note. The ICAO Technical Instructions are updated and reissued every two years. You must ensure you are
using the current edition of the document together with any addenda or corrigenda that may have been issued within
that two-year period. See the following website for a listing of applicable addenda and corrigenda:
http://www.icao.int/anb/FLS/DangerousGoods/.

Intermodal compatibility

ICAO is responsible for maintaining the compatibility of the provisions of the Instructions with the provisions of other
modal (rail, road and marine) requirements. It does this by aligning the Instructions with the Recommendations of the
United Nations Subcommittee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods and the provisions of the International
Atomic Energy Agency.

E. NUMBERING SYSTEM FOREWORD

To make it easier to find specific provisions, the Instructions are divided into eight (8) parts with the addition of a
Foreword at the beginning of the document and five (5) attachments at the end. Each part is divided into chapters, and
chapters are divided into paragraphs and subparagraphs.

Where a number such as 3.2 appears at the beginning of a paragraph, the 3 refers to the chapter and the 2 refers to
the paragraph number.

Note. The paragraph number does not indicate the part from which it comes.

If the above example is located in Part 2, a reference will be shown as 2;3.2 or Part 2; Chapter 3, Paragraph 2.

The page numbering system helps to identify the part and the chapter to which the page belongs.

Example: 1-4-3 means Part 1, Chapter 4, Page 3.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 1. General philosophy, organization and contents of the ICAO Technical Instructions 1-5

Many of the chapters contain tables and figures, and the numbering system helps to identify the part in which the table
or figure appears and its numeric sequence in that part.

Example: Table 3-1 is the first table within Part 3.

The alphabetical index in Attachment A5, Index and List of Tables and Figures, should be studied and will be a useful
guide to finding specific topics in the body of the Instructions.

Note. Throughout the Instructions, the use of the word "must" indicates a mandatory requirement to comply with
the particular provision. Where a provision is optional or only recommended, the word "should" is used.

F. USER TOOLS FOREWORD AND TABLE OF CONTENTS

Four (4) user tools are provided in the Instructions to assist in the understanding and application of its requirements.
They include:

1. Table of Contents for the Instructions;

2. Table explaining abbreviations and symbols used in the Instructions;

3. List of definitions used in the Instructions; and

4. Table of formulas used to convert measurement to and from SI Units.

1. The Table of Contents identifies the parts, chapters, paragraphs and attachments found in the Instructions. It is
located on pages (ix) to (xiv) at the front of the Instructions.

EXERCISE 1-1

Apply a tab to the first page of each of the eight (8) parts and five (5) attachments of the Instructions listed below:

Part 1 General includes scope and applicability, limitations of dangerous goods in aircraft, general information,
training requirements, dangerous goods security, general provisions concerning Class 7.

Part 2 Classification of Dangerous Goods includes characteristics for the nine classes of dangerous goods, and
the definitions of Proper Shipping Name, UN Number and Packing Group as well as the criteria for their application
and the Precedence of Hazard Table.

Part 3 Dangerous goods list, special provisions and limited and excepted quantities.

Part 4 Packing instructions.

Part 5 Shippers responsibilities.

Part 6 Packaging nomenclature, marking, requirements and tests.

Part 7 Operators Responsibilities

Part 8 Provisions concerning passenger and crew

Attachment A1 List of proper shipping names

Attachment A2 Glossary of terms.


1-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Attachment A3 Notified variations from the Instructions includes both State and operator variations.

Attachment A4 Reformatted packing instructions applicable from 1 January 2011.


Note. This is a temporary Attachment and the number of attachments will go back to four in the 2011-2012
edition of the Instructions.

Attachment A5 Index and list of tables and figures.

EXERCISE 1-2

Referring to the Table of Contents in the Instructions, indicate in which part(s) and chapter(s) the following
information is found:

1. Training

2. Classification of dangerous goods

3. Limitation of dangerous goods on aircraft

4. Shippers responsibilities

5. Packing Instructions

6. Documentation

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

2. The Table explaining Abbreviations and Symbols used in the Instructions is located on pages (vi) to (vii) of the
Foreword to the Instructions. This is where an explanation can be found for such abbreviations as n.o.s. and Bq.

EXERCISE 1-3

Referring to the table for abbreviations and symbols found in the Foreword to the Instructions, state the meaning of
the following abbreviations and symbols:

1. n.o.s.

2. G

3. m

4. L

5. Bq

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

3. The List of Definitions, where words and terms used in the Instructions are defined, is located on pages 1-3-1 to
1-3-7 of the Instructions. (1;3.1).

Note. The Instructions contain other definitions (i.e. the word vibrations is defined in Part 4; Introductory Notes,
the term self-reactive substances is defined in Part 2;4, the term patient specimens is defined in Part 2;6). Every part
must be read carefully to ensure all definitions are identified.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 1. General philosophy, organization and contents of the ICAO Technical Instructions 1-7

EXERCISE 1-4

Referring to 1;3.1 of the Instructions, identify the word or words from Column IV that best match each of the
definitions in Column II:

I II III IV

1. A provision in these Instructions which excludes a specific Dangerous goods


item of dangerous goods from the requirements normally
applicable to that item.

2. The mass or volume of the dangerous goods contained in Exception


a package excluding the mass or volume of any packaging
material, except in the case of explosive articles and of
matches where the net mass is the mass of the finished
article excluding packagings.

3. Packagings for which an outer packaging is required for Flash point


transport.

4. The lowest temperature of a liquid at which flammable Net quantity


vapour is given off in a test vessel in sufficient
concentration to be ignited in air when exposed
momentarily to a source of ignition.

5. Articles or substances which are capable of posing a risk Overpack


to health, safety, property or the environment and which
are shown in the list of dangerous goods in these
Instructions, or which are classified according to these
Instructions.

6. An enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or Appropriate National


more packages and to form one handling unit for Authority
convenience of handling and stowage.

7. Any authority designated, or otherwise recognized, by a Inner Packaging


State to perform specific functions related to provisions
contained in these Instructions.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

4. The Conversion Tables provide formulas for converting measurements to and from SI Units. They are located on
pages 1-3-8 and 1-3-9 of the Instructions. For example, the formula for converting Fahrenheit to Celsius is:

Subtract 32F from the Fahrenheit temperature and multiply by 5/9.

By applying this formula, we find that 75F is equal to 23.9C.

Note. SI units (kilograms, litres and kilopascals) are to be used when transporting dangerous goods. (1;3.2.1)

1;3.2.2 It is recognized that there are in existence many packagings which were designed and constructed for use
with non-SI quantity limitations and that such packagings will continue to be used for some time to come. Table 1-1
therefore contains a list of authorized non-SI equivalents for quantity limitations expressed in SI units. It is stressed
that these are not precise equivalents but are nevertheless acceptable based upon the likely availability of packaging.
1-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 1-5

Referring to Part 1;3 and Table 1-2 and 1-3 answer the following questions:

1. State the primary units of measurement used in the Instructions.

2. Convert 10 pounds to kilograms

3. Convert 20 feet into metres

4. Convert 15 imperial gallons into litres

5. Convert 1 400 pounds per square inch into kilopascals

6. Convert 32F into Celsius

G. TRAINING PART 1;4

The Instructions require all relevant employees to be trained.

General

1;4.2.1 Personnel must receive training in the requirements commensurate with their responsibilities.

Shipper training requirement

The requirement to train shipper employees is reinforced in Part 5 of the Instructions.

5;1.4 Before a consignment of dangerous goods is offered for air transport, all relevant persons involved in its
preparation must have received training to enable them to carry out their responsibilities, as detailed in Part 1. Where
a shipper does not have trained staff, the relevant persons may be interpreted as applying to those employed to act
on the shippers behalf and to undertake the shippers responsibilities in the preparation of the consignment.
However, such persons must be trained as required by Part 1, Chapter 4.

Operator training requirement

The requirement to train operator employees is reinforced in Part 7 of the Instructions.

7;4.9 An operator must ensure training is provided in accordance with the detailed requirements of 1;4 to all
relevant employees, including those of agencies employed to act on the operators behalf, to enable them to carry out
their responsibilities with regard to the transport of dangerous goods, passengers and their baggage, cargo, mail and
stores.

Successful application of the Instructions relies on the content and frequency of this training.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 1. General philosophy, organization and contents of the ICAO Technical Instructions 1-9

Content

Prior to performing any of the duties specified in the Instructions, an individual must undergo function-specific
(i.e. detailed training in the requirements applicable to the function for which the individual is responsible) training. Such
training must include a general familiarization with the provisions of the Instructions as well as any safety-related training
to address the hazards of the specific dangerous goods, their safe handling and relevant emergency response
procedures. (1;4.2.1).

Table 1-4

Table 1-4 of Part 1;4 identifies the specific aspects of training for operators carrying dangerous goods as cargo and
is presented in a matrix format.

The top of this matrix lists the numbers 1 12. Each number is explained in the KEY following the Table. The number
1 is assigned in the KEY to shippers and persons undertaking the responsibilities of shippers.

The left-hand side of the matrix lists the aspects of transport of dangerous goods by air with which they should be
familiar, as a minimum. The first aspect on the left is General Philosophy.

An X appearing at the intersection of one of the numbers and one of the aspects in the table indicates a training
requirement for that group.

For example, the location of the Xs under column 1 indicates that shippers and persons undertaking the
responsibilities of shippers should be familiar with the following:

general philosophy;
limitations;
general requirements for shippers;
classification;
list of dangerous goods;
packing requirements;
labelling and marking;
dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation;
recognition of undeclared dangerous goods;
provisions for passengers and crew; and
emergency procedures.

Table 1-5

Table 1-5 contains the content of training courses for operators not carrying dangerous goods as cargo and can be
read in the same manner as Table 1-4.

The Xs under column 10 of this Table indicate that flight crew members and load planners should be familiar with
the following:

general philosophy;
limitations;
labelling and marking;
recognition of undeclared dangerous goods;
provisions for passengers and crew; and
emergency procedures.
1-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Security awareness training (1;5.2)

As security of dangerous goods shipments is as important as safety, employee dangerous goods training should also
include the:

nature of security risks;


method of recognizing security risks;
methods to address and reduce such risks;
actions to be taken in the event of a security breach; and
to the extent applicable, awareness of security plans relevant to the individuals responsibilities.

Note. Security awareness training is subject to renewal every 24 months (1;5.2.3).

Frequency

Recurrent training must follow every 24 months (1;4.2).

If recurrent training is completed within the final three months of validity of previous training, the period of validity
extends from the date on which the recurrent training was completed until 24 months from the expiry date of that
previous training. (1;4.2.3)

For example:

If the date of initial training was 6 April 2007 and the date of recurrent training was 10 February 2009, the next training
session is required by 6 April 2011.

Note. Initial dangerous goods and security awareness training is not necessary for a new employee with previous
training that is both relevant and verifiable (1;4.2.2 and 1;5.2).

Testing

1;4.2.4 states that once training is complete a test must be undertaken to confirm understanding.

Note. The test can be taken orally as there is no requirement that it be written.

Training record

To be able to prove to a national authority that training has been completed in accordance with the Instructions, a
training record must be kept which includes:

a) the name of the person trained;

b) the most recent training completion date;

c) a description, copy or reference to training materials used to meet the training requirements;

d) the name and address of the organization providing the training; and

e) evidence which shows the person has satisfactorily completed the test.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 1. General philosophy, organization and contents of the ICAO Technical Instructions 1-11

Note. This record is to be kept for a minimum of 36 months from the most recent training completion date. (1;4.2.5)

EXERCISE 1-6

Referring to Table 1- 4 in the Instructions:

1. State what subject matter should be addressed


for shippers, but not for packers.

2. State what training, in addition to that required for


shippers, should be given to operators and
ground handling agents staff accepting
dangerous goods.

3. How often must training be undertaken?

H. PROHIBITIONS AND EXCEPTIONS (LIMITATIONS) PART 1;1 AND 1;2

Part 1;1 and 1;2 of the Instructions should be studied carefully as they include information on:

dangerous goods forbidden for transport by air under any circumstances;


exceptions for dangerous goods of the operator;
transport of dangerous goods by post.

Note. See Part 3 of the Instructions for provisions concerning dangerous goods in excepted quantities and
dangerous goods packed in limited quantities, and Unit 10 of this training manual for training material on that subject.

Dangerous goods forbidden for air transport 1;2.1

1;2.1 Any article or substance which, as presented for transport, is liable to explode, dangerously react, produce a
flame or dangerous evolution of heat or dangerous emission of toxic, corrosive or flammable gases or vapours under
conditions normally encountered in transport must not be carried on aircraft under any circumstance.

Some specific articles or substances that are forbidden for transport are shown by name in the Dangerous Goods List
Table 3-1 with the word FORBIDDEN indicated in the adjacent column(s). If an article or substance is not specifically
named in Table 3-1, a check must always be made to determine whether or not it poses any of the hazards identified in
1;2.1. If these hazards are present, the article or substance is forbidden for transport.

Note. See Part 3 of the Instructions for provisions concerning the use of the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1,
and Unit 3 of this training manual for training material on that subject.
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Exemptions/Exceptions

State exemptions

1;1.1.2 In cases of extreme urgency, or when other forms of transport are inappropriate, or full compliance with the
prescribed requirements is contrary to public interest, the States concerned may grant exemptions from the
provisions of the Instructions provided that in such cases every effort is made to achieve an overall level of safety in
transport, which is equivalent to the level of safety provided by these Instructions. The States concerned are the
States of Origin, transit, overflight and destination of the consignment, and the State of the Operator. For the State of
overflight, if none of the criteria for granting an exemption are relevant, an exemption may be granted based solely on
whether it is believed that an equivalent level of safety in air transport has been achieved.

Operator exceptions

1;2.2.1 The provisions of these Instructions do not apply to the following:

a) articles and substances which would otherwise be classified as dangerous goods but which are required to be
aboard the aircraft in accordance with the pertinent airworthiness requirements and operating regulations or that
are authorized by the State of the Operator to meet special requirements;

b) aerosols, alcoholic beverages, perfumes, colognes, safety matches and liquefied gas lighters carried aboard an
aircraft by the operator for use or sale on the aircraft during the flight or series of flights, but excluding non-
refillable gas lighters and those lighters liable to leak when exposed to reduced pressure;

c) dry ice intended for use in food and beverage service aboard the aircraft.

Replacements for articles or substances identified in 1;2.2.1 a), b) and c) must be transported in accordance with the
Instructions.

If an operator intends to transport any dangerous goods article or substance listed in 1;2.2.1 a) that has been removed
for replacement, it must be done in accordance with the Instructions. However, the operator may pack such articles or
substances into specially designed containers which meet the appropriate packaging requirements for the dangerous
goods items in the container.

General exceptions

1;1.1.3.1 Except for 7;4.2, these Instructions do not apply to dangerous goods carried on an aircraft where the
dangerous goods are:
a) to provide, during flight, medical aid to a patient when those dangerous goods:
1) have been placed on board with the approval of the operator; or
2) form part of the permanent equipment of the aircraft when it has been adapted for specialized use;
providing that:
1) gas cylinders have been manufactured specifically for the purpose of containing and transporting that
particular gas;
2) equipment containing wet cell batteries is kept and, when necessary, secured in an upright position to
prevent spillage of the electrolyte;
Note. For dangerous goods that passengers are permitted to carry as medical aid, see 8;1.1.2.
b) to provide, during flight, veterinary aid or a humane killer for an animal;
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 1. General philosophy, organization and contents of the ICAO Technical Instructions 1-13

c) for dropping in connection with agricultural, horticultural, forestry or pollution control activities;
d) to provide, during flight, aid in connection with search and rescue operations;
e) vehicles carried in aircraft designed or modified for vehicle ferry operations and all of the following requirements
are met:
1) authorization has been given by the appropriate authorities of the States concerned, and such authorities
have prescribed specific terms and conditions for the particular operators operation;
2) vehicles are secured in an upright position;
3) fuel tanks are so filled as to prevent spillage of fuel during loading, unloading and transit; and
4) adequate ventilation rates are maintained in the aircraft compartment in which the vehicle is carried;
f) required for the propulsion of the means of transport or the operation of its specialized equipment during
transport (e.g. refrigeration units) or that are required in accordance with the operating regulations (e.g. fire
extinguishers) (see 2.2).

1;1.1.3.2 Provision must be made to stow and secure dangerous goods transported under 1.1.3.1 a), b), c) and d)
during take-off and landing and at all other times when deemed necessary by the pilot-in-command.

1;1.1.3.3 The dangerous goods must be under the control of trained personnel during the time when they are in use
on the aircraft.

1;1.1.3.4 Dangerous goods transported under 1.1.3.1 a), b), c) and d) may be carried on a flight made by the same
aircraft before or after a flight for the purposes identified above, when it is impracticable to load or unload the
dangerous goods immediately before or after the flight, subject to the following conditions:
a) the dangerous goods must be capable of withstanding the normal conditions of air transport;
b) the dangerous goods must be appropriately identified (e.g. by marking or labelling);
c the dangerous goods may only be carried with the approval of the operator;
d) the dangerous goods must be inspected for damage or leakage prior to loading;
e) loading must be supervised by the operator;
f) the dangerous goods must be stowed and secured in the aircraft in a manner that will prevent any movement in
flight which would change their orientation;
g) the pilot-in-command must be notified of the dangerous goods loaded on board the aircraft and their loading
location. In the event of a crew change, this information must be passed to the next crew;
h) all personnel must be trained commensurate with their responsibilities;
i) the provisions of 7;4.2 and 7;4.4 apply.

Transport by post 1;2.3

Only the following dangerous goods are acceptable for shipment by post:

a) patient specimens as defined in 2;6.3.1.4 and provided they are classified, packed and marked in accordance
with 2;6.3.2.3.6;

b) infectious substances assigned to Category B (UN 3373) only and solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) when used as
a refrigerant for UN 3373 (see Packing Instruction 650); and

c) radioactive material, the activity of which does not exceed one-tenth of that listed in Table 2-15.

Note. Be sure to check with the national postal authority for any additional restrictions it may have imposed on the
transport of dangerous goods in the mail.
1-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

I. DANGEROUS GOODS SECURITY PART 1;5

Security plans

Safety and security is everybodys business.

Operators, shippers and others involved in the transport of high consequence dangerous goods (See Table 1-6 for an
indicative list of such dangerous goods.) should adopt, implement and comply with a Security Plan. This plan should
include:

1;5.3.2
.
a) specific allocation of responsibilities for security to competent and qualified persons with appropriate authority to
carry out their responsibilities;

b) records of dangerous goods or types of dangerous goods transported;

c) review of current operations and assessment of vulnerabilities, including inter-modal transfer, temporary transit
storage, handling, and distribution, as appropriate;

d) clear statement of measures including training policies (including response to higher threat conditions, new
employee/employment verifications, etc.), operating practices (e.g. access to dangerous goods in temporary
storage proximity to vulnerable infrastructure, etc.), equipment and resources that are to be used to reduce
security risks;

e) effective and up-to-date procedures for reporting and dealing with security threats, breaches of security or
security incidents;

f) procedures for the evaluation and testing of security plans and procedures for periodic review and update of the
plans;

g) measures to ensure the security of transport information contained in the plan; and

h) measures to ensure that the security of the distribution of transport documentation is limited as far as possible.
(Such measures must not preclude provision of the transport documentation required by Part 5, Chapter 4 of
these Instructions.)

Operators, shippers and others with responsibility for the safe transport of dangerous goods are encouraged to:

cooperate with each other and with appropriate authorities;


exchange threat information;
apply appropriate security measures;
respond to security incidents.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 1. General philosophy, organization and contents of the ICAO Technical Instructions 1-15

J. DANGEROUS GOODS PACKAGES OPENED FOR INSPECTION BY


STATE AUTHORITIES PART 1;1.3

Any package opened during an inspection must, before being forwarded to the consignee, be restored by qualified
persons to a condition that complies with these Instructions.

K. SUMMARY

The Instructions establish comprehensive rules to govern the safe transport of dangerous goods throughout the globe.
To facilitate the movement of dangerous goods from one type of transport to another every effort is made to ensure that
the rules are consistent between modes.

Many types of dangerous goods can be transported safely when they comply with the provisions of the Instructions, but
there will always be dangerous goods that because of their unique characteristics are considered too dangerous for
transport. On the other hand there are circumstances where certain dangerous goods or shipments of dangerous goods
may be excepted from specific provisions of the Instructions.

Training in the Instructions is essential to knowing exactly what, when, where and how these rules apply.

This unit provides you with the tools needed to successfully navigate the text of the Instructions, and the following units
provide guidance in understanding the remaining requirements and evaluating their application.

Note. Guidance material on the radioactive material requirements found in 1;6 has been included in Unit 9 of this
training manual.

______________________
UNIT 2

Hazard Class Definitions and Classification Procedures


Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 2 ......................................................................... 2-2
B. Goal Unit 2 .................................................................................................................................................. 2-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 2-3
D. Components of a Dangerous Goods Description Part 2 Introductory Chapter............................................ 2-3
E. Determining the Description (Class or Division, Packing Group, UN number, Proper Shipping Name)
of Specific Dangerous Goods Part 2;1 to 2;9 .............................................................................................. 2-5
F. Transport of Samples Part 2 Introductory Chapter ..................................................................................... 2-22
G. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 2-23

2-1
2-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 2

Subject Matter: Classification


Category of personnel:
shippers and persons undertaking the responsibilities of shippers
packers
staff of freight forwarders involved in processing dangerous goods
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting dangerous goods
security staff who are involved with the screening of passengers and their baggage and cargo, mail and
stores, e.g. security screeners, their supervisors and staff involved in implementing security procedures.

B. GOAL UNIT 2

After study of this unit, the student should be able explain the characteristics of the nine classes of dangerous goods and
the components of a dangerous goods description.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) list, by number and description, the nine classes of dangerous goods and, where appropriate, their divisions;

b) state the number of packing groups and describe what each number represents;

c) state the packing group provisions for Classes 3, 4 and 8 and Divisions 5.1 and 6.1;

d) explain the purpose of a UN number;

e) explain the purpose of a proper shipping name;

f) state what is found in Table 3-1;

g) state who is responsible for ensuring the appropriate description of the dangerous goods is determined prior to
transport;

h) explain the meaning of words and terms used to describe the hazards of the nine classes of dangerous goods,
e.g. flash point, self-reactive, liquefied;

i) demonstrate how to determine if the Table of Precedence has been correctly used;

j) state the four types of proper shipping names found in the Instructions;

k) demonstrate how to determine the correct proper shipping name for a substance, mixture, solution or article not
listed by its specific name in Table 3-1; and

l) demonstrate how to determine if the provisions concerning mixtures or solutions consisting of a dangerous
substance and one or more non-dangerous substances have been correctly applied.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-3

C. INTRODUCTION

Correctly identifying the description of an item of dangerous goods is the essential building block for its preparation for
transport by air. Once the description has been determined the appropriate packaging, marking, labeling, handling,
storage and transporting requirements of the Instructions can be applied.

This unit starts with a clear explanation of what this description includes then provides an overview of how one arrives at
the description for a specific item of dangerous goods.

Also included in this unit is an overview of how samples to be transported for testing to determine classification are to
be described and prepared for transport.

Note. It takes professional knowledge to be able to apply the classification criteria in Part 2 of the Instructions.
This knowledge is obtained through additional training.

D. COMPONENTS OF A DANGEROUS GOODS DESCRIPTION


PART 2 INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER

General

Determining the description of an item of dangerous goods is the critical first step in correctly preparing a shipment for
transport. Such a description should consist of four pieces of information:

1. Class(es) or Division(s) number;


2. Packing Group (where applicable);
3. UN Number; and
4. Proper Shipping Name.

An explanation of each follows.

1. Class or Division number

The UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods establish a numbering system which sorts the
different hazards of dangerous goods into nine (9) classes:

Class 1: Explosives (Class 1, Explosives are also assigned Compatibility Groups. More on this later in this
unit.)

Class 2: Gases

Class 3: Flammable liquids

Class 4: Flammable solids; substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances which, in contact with
water, emit flammable gases

Class 5: Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides


2-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Class 6: Toxic and infectious substances

Class 7: Radioactive material

Class 8: Corrosive substances

Class 9: Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles

Classes 1, 4, 5 and 6 are further divided into divisions. For example, Class 5 is divided into Division 5.1 and Division 5.2.
Note that when referring to a division the word Class is replaced by the word Division.

Note. A dangerous goods article or substance may have the characteristics of one or more classes or divisions. It
is the shippers responsibility to determine which is the primary hazard and which is the secondary or subsidiary
hazard(s) (5;1).

EXERCISE 2-1

Referring to Part 2 Introductory Chapter of the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. State the class title and the division title for


Division 5.1.

2. State the class title and the division title for


Division 1.4.

3. State the class title and the division title for


Division 6.2.

4. State the class title for Class 8.

5. State the class title for Class 3.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

2. Packing Group

The packing group is used to describe the appropriate level of packaging required for the particular hazards of a
dangerous good. There are three packing groups (Introductory Chapter 2.4):

Packing Group I: Substances presenting high danger


Packing Group II: Substances presenting medium danger
Packing Group III: Substances presenting low danger.

The Instructions provide specific criteria for determining the packing group for dangerous goods meeting the criteria of
Classes 3, 4 (other than self-reactive substances) and 8, and Divisions 5.1 and 6.1 (Parts 2;3, 2;4, 2;5, 2;6 and 2;8).

Note. Some substances in Class 9 and liquids in Division 5.1 have been assigned to packing groups by
experience rather than through application of technical criteria.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-5

Classes 1, 2 and 7 and Divisions 4.1 self-reactive substances, 5.2 and 6.2 have no packing group assigned.

3. UN Number

The UN number is the four-digit number assigned in the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods
that is used to identify a substance or article or a particular group of substances or articles (Introductory Chapter 3.2).

Note. One proper shipping name in Table 3-1 is identified by an ID number instead of a UN number. That is
ID 8000, which is assigned to Consumer Commodities.

4. Proper Shipping Name

The proper shipping name is the name assigned in the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods to
identify a substance or article or a particular group of substances or articles.

Note. See Paragraph 3;1.2 of the Instructions for a detailed explanation of the term proper shipping name and
Unit 3, Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, for related training material.

The blue pages of the Instructions (The Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1) lists over 3 000 dangerous goods articles or
substances alphabetically by proper shipping name and includes their respective UN number, primary class or division
and, where applicable, subsidiary risk and packing group.

Note. The shipper is always held responsible for the correct identification of the class(es)/division(s), packing
group, UN number and proper shipping name of a dangerous goods article or substance.

E. DETERMINING THE DESCRIPTION (CLASS OR DIVISION, PACKING GROUP, UN NUMBER,


PROPER SHIPPING NAME) OF SPECIFIC DANGEROUS GOODS PART 2;1 TO 2;9

The following steps can be used as a guide to assist in determining the appropriate description for an article or
substance believed to be dangerous.

Step 1 Assign to the substance or article (or, where required, have assigned by the appropriate national
authority,) the class(es) and/or division(s) and, where applicable, packing group Parts 2;1 to 2;9

Step 2 For substances or articles with more than one hazard determine the precedence of hazard Part 2
Introductory Chapter

Step 3 Assign the appropriate UN number and proper shipping name Part 2 Introductory Chapter.

An explanation of each follows.

Step 1 Assign to the substance or article (or, where required, have assigned by the appropriate national
authority,) the class(es) and/or division(s) and, where applicable, packing group Parts 2;1 to 2;9

Where the proper shipping name, UN number and packing group are unknown, the shipper must refer to Parts 2;1
through 2;9 of the Instructions to determine whether any of the class(es) and/or division(s) and packing group described
in those chapters apply.
2-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Notes.

These chapters may include reference to other documents. When this happens the relevant text in these
documents must be taken into consideration during the classification process.
Certain dangerous goods are subject to classification by the appropriate national authority.

Compliance with the prohibitions established in Paragraph 1;2.1 of the Instructions is critical.

1;2.1 Any article or substance which, as presented for transport, is liable to explode, dangerously react, produce a
flame or dangerous evolution of heat or dangerous emission of toxic, corrosive or flammable gases or vapours under
conditions normally encountered in transport must not be carried on aircraft under any circumstance.

The following tables provide an overview of the information found in Parts 2;1 to 2;9. The related label for each
class/division is also shown.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-7

Class 1 Explosives Part 2;1

This class is divided into six divisions: Divisions 1.1 to 1.6.

DIVISION 1.1 DIVISION 1.2 DIVISION 1.3 DIVISION 1.4 DIVISION 1.5 DIVISION 1.6

DESCRIPTION

Substances and Substances and Substances and Substances and Very insensitive Extremely
articles which have a articles which articles which have a articles which present substances which insensitive articles
mass explosion have a projection fire hazard and no significant hazard have a mass which do not have
hazard (a mass hazard but not a either a minor blast The effects are largely explosion hazard. a mass explosion
explosion is one mass explosion hazard or a minor confined to the (2;1.3.1 e)) hazard.
which affects almost hazard. projection hazard or package and no (2;1.3.1 f))
the entire load (2;1.3.1 b)) both, but not a mass projection of fragments
virtually explosion hazard. of appreciable size or
instantaneously). (2;1.3.1 c)) range is to be
(2;1.3.1 a)) expected. An external
fire must not cause
virtually instantaneous
explosion of almost
the entire contents of
the package.
(2;1.3.1 d))

COMPATIBILITY GROUP

For handling and stowage purposes, explosives are to be assigned to one of thirteen compatibility groups depending on the nature of
the danger. The compatibility group of an explosive is identified by the letter immediately following the division number. See Table 2-2
of the Instructions for a detailed description of each compatibility group. Table 2-3 of the Instructions combines each division number
with the compatibility group theyve been assigned.

Note. This is the only class where compatibility groups are assigned.

LABELS

1.4 1.5 1.6


** ** ** *** *** ***
* * * * * *

* Place for class * Place for class * Place for class * Place for class * Place for class * Place for class
number number number number number number
** Place for division ** Place for ** Place for *** Place for *** Place for *** Place for
and compatibility division and division and compatibility compatibility compatibility
group compatibility compatibility group group group
group group

PACKING GROUP

Class 1 packagings must meet the test requirements of 6;4.1 for Packing Group II subject to 6;1.1.17 and 6;1.2.7. However, metal
packagings meeting the test criteria of Packing Group I may be used. (4;3.1)

In Addendum No. 3 to the 2009/2010 edition of the Instructions, further restrictions have been placed on the
classification of Division 1.4S explosives. See below:
2-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

2;1.4.2.1 Certain Division 1.4S explosives, identified by Special Provision A165 in Table 3-1, are subject to Test
Series 6 (d) of Part I of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria (see ST/SG/AC.10/36/Add.2) to demonstrate that any
hazardous effects arising from functioning are confined within the package. Evidence of a hazardous effect outside
the package includes:

a) denting or perforation of the witness plate beneath the package;

b) a flash or flame capable of igniting such as a sheet of 80 3 g/m paper at a distance of 25 cm from the
package;

c) disruption of the package causing projection of the explosives contents; or

d) a projection which passes completely through the packaging (a projection or fragment retained or stuck in the
wall of the packaging is considered as non hazardous).

The appropriate national authority may wish to take into account the expected effect of the initiator when assessing
the results of the test, if these are expected to be significant when compared to the articles being tested. If there are
hazardous effects outside the package, then the product is excluded from Compatibility Group S.

Note. Classification of all new explosives must be approved by the appropriate authority of the State of
manufacture and is based on the type of explosive substance, its explosive effect and the manner in which the material
is packaged. (2;1.5.1 and 2;1.5.2)

Following the classification of an explosive substance or article the information in Table 3-1 will indicate if it is eligible for
transport by air. Most are not.

Note. See Part 3 of the Instructions for a detailed explanation of the use of the dangerous goods list Table 3-1
and Unit 3 of this manual, Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, for related training material.

Class 2 Gases Part 2;2

This class is divided into three divisions: Divisions 2.1 to 2.3.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-9

DIVISION 2.1 DIVISION 2.2 DIVISION 2.3


Flammable gases Non-flammable, non-toxic gases Toxic gases

DESCRIPTION

Any gas which, when mixed with air Any non-flammable, non-toxic Most toxic gases are forbidden for
in certain proportions, forms a compressed gas, e.g. carbon carriage by air.
flammable mixture, e.g. butane, dioxide, liquid nitrogen. (2;2.2.1 b)) (Note. Gases meeting the
hydrogen or refrigerated liquefied above criteria owing to their
gas. (2;2.2.1 a)) corrosivity are to be classified as
toxic with a subsidiary corrosive
risk.) (2;2.2.1 c))

LABELS

2 2
*

PACKING GROUP

No packing group is assigned to Class 2 gases.

EXERCISE 2-2

Referring to Paragraphs 2;2.1 to 2;2.5 of the Instructions, answer the following questions:

In the following four (4) spaces list the four possible physical states of Class 2 gases.

1.

2.

3.
2-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

4.

5. State whether the following meets the definition of


Class 2. Explain your answer.

Empty, uncleaned cylinder of nitrogen compressed


with an actual pressure at 20C of 150 kPa.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Class 3 Flammable liquids Part 2;3

CLASS 3
Flammable liquids

DESCRIPTION

Liquids having a closed-cup flash point of 60C or below or a flash point not more than 65.6C in an open-cup test,
e.g. gasoline, paint and alcohol. (2;3.1)

LABEL

PACKING GROUP

Criteria for determining the packing group for Class 3 are found in 2;3.2.

Once a liquid has been determined to be flammable by definition, it is assigned a packing group based on both its flash
point and initial boiling point. The criteria for assigning packing groups to a flammable liquid are outlined in Table 2-4.
The criteria for placing viscous substances, with a flash point 23 C, in Packing Group III are outlined in 2;3.2.2 and
2;3.2.3.

EXERCISE 2-3

Referring to Part 2;3 answer the following questions:

1. What is the packing group for a liquid with a flash point


60C and an initial boiling point 125C?

2. What is the packing group for a liquid with a flash point


25C and an initial boiling point 34C?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-11

3. What is the packing group for a liquid with a flash point


67C and an initial boiling point 178C?

4. When assigning a packing group to a Class 3


flammable liquid what two things are taken into
consideration?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Class 4 Flammable solids; substances liable to spontaneous combustion;


substances which, on contact with water, emit flammable gases Part 2;4

This class is divided into three divisions: Divisions 4.1 to 4.3.

DIVISION 4.1
Flammable solids, self-reactive DIVISION 4.2 DIVISION 4.3
and related substances and Substances liable to spontaneous Substances which, in contact with
desensitized explosives combustion water, emit flammable gases

DESCRIPTION

Solids which, under conditions Substances which are liable to Substances where, by interaction
encountered in transport, are readily spontaneous heating under normal with water, spontaneous ignition may
combustible or may cause or conditions encountered in transport, take place or which give off
contribute to fire through friction; or to heating up in contact with air, flammable gases at a rate greater
self-reactive substances* which are and being then liable to catch fire, than 1 L/kg of the substance per
liable to undergo a strongly e.g. white or yellow phosphorus, hour, e.g. calcium carbide, sodium.
exothermic reaction even without the unstabilized fish meal. (2;4.1.1 b)) (These substances are often
presence of Oxygen; desensitized described as water-reactive.)
explosives** which may explode if (2;4.1.1 c))
not diluted sufficiently, e.g. matches,
nitronaphtalene and self-reactive
substances. (2;4.1.1 a))

LABELS

* * *

PACKING GROUP

Criteria for determining the packing Criteria for determining the packing Criteria for determining the packing
group for Division 4.1 are found in group for Division 4.2 are found in group for Division 4.3 are found in
2;4.2.2.3. 2;4.3.3. 2;4.4.3.
*

All self-reactive substances of Division 4.1 are assigned to one of twenty generic entries in accordance with the
classification principles and flow chart described in the UN Recommendations, 2.4.2.3.3. (Addendum No. 3 to the
2009/2010 edition of the Instructions Part 2 Introductory Chapter 3.3)
2-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

** Certain substances are desensitized by water or other liquids to eliminate their explosive hazard. Such is the case
with ammonium picrate. As UN 0004 it is a Division 1.1 explosive, and as UN 1310 it is a Division 4.1. The
difference between the two classifications is based on the amount of water present, which affects the nature of the
hazard.

See Table 2-6 of the Instructions for a list of currently assigned self-reactive substances in packages. Only the listed
substances are permitted for transport, however some are forbidden for air transport. Classification of self-reactive
substances not listed in Table 2-6 and assignment to a generic entry must be made by the appropriate authority of the
State of origin on the basis of a test report. Only after approval are these substances permitted for transport. In most
cases a copy of the statement of approval must accompany the shipment.

Division 4.2 includes two substances:

2;4.3.1.1
a) pyrophoric substances: substances, including mixtures and solutions (liquid or solid), which even in small
quantities ignite within 5 minutes of coming into contact with air. These substances are the most liable to
spontaneous combustion and are called pyrophoric substances; and

b) self-heating substances: other substances which in contact with air without energy supply are liable to self-
heating. These substances will ignite only when in large amounts (kilograms) and after long periods of time
(hours or days) and are called self-heating substances.

Pyrophoric liquids and solids must be assigned to Packing Group I.


Self-heating substances must be assigned to Packing Group II or III depending on the test results.

Division 4.3 substances

Certain substances in contact with water emit flammable gases which can form explosive mixtures with air. Such
mixtures are easily ignited by all ordinary sources of ignition, for example, naked lights, sparking hand tools or
unprotected light bulbs. The resulting blast wave and flames may endanger people and the environment. (2;4.4.1.2)

Class 5 Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides Part 2;5

This class is divided into two divisions: Division 5.1 and 5.2.

DIVISION 5.1 DIVISION 5.2


Oxidizing Substances Organic Peroxides

DESCRIPTION

Substances which, in themselves are not necessarily Organic substances which contain the bivalent 00
combustible, may generally, by yielding oxygen, cause or structure and may be considered derivatives of hydrogen
contribute to the combustion of other material. Such peroxide, where one or both of the hydrogen atoms have
substances may be contained in an article. e.g. been replaced by organic radicals. Organic peroxides
ammonium nitrate fertilizer, calcium chlorate. are thermally unstable substances, which may undergo
(2;5.1 a)) exothermic, self-accelerating decomposition. In addition,
they may have one or more of the following properties:
i) be liable to explosive decomposition;
ii) burn rapidly;
iii) be sensitive to impact or friction;
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Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-13

iv) react dangerously with other substances;


v) cause damage to the eyes.
(2;5.1 b))

LABELS

5.1 5.2 5.2

PACKING GROUP

Criteria for determining the packing group for Division 5.1 Organic peroxides do not have packing groups assigned,
Oxidizing Solids are found in 2;5.2.2.1.4. but, unless otherwise provided in these Instructions, the
packaging used for substances of Division 5.2 must meet
Packing Group II requirements. (4;7.1)

All organic peroxides of Division 5.2 are assigned to one of twenty generic entries in accordance with the
classification principles and flow chart described in the UN Recommendations, 2.5.3.3. (Addendum No. 3 to the
2009/2010 edition of the Instructions Part 2 Introductory Chapter 3.4)

See Paragraph 2;5.3.2.4 of the Instructions for the list of currently assigned organic peroxides. Only the listed
substances are permitted for transport however some are forbidden for air transport. The classification of organic
peroxides not listed in 2;5.3.2.4 must be made by the appropriate authority of the State of Origin on the basis of a test
report.

Note. Most Division 5.2 substances will react dangerously with a wide variety of other substances. For these
reasons, many organic peroxides may be carried only when desensitized by organic liquids or solids, inorganic solids or
water. The purpose is to reduce the sensitivity of the substance to a safe limit.

EXERCISE 2-4

Read subparagraph 2;5.1 b) and state the five properties a substance in Division 5.2 may have in addition to the
criteria outlined in the basic definition.

1.

2.

3.
2-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

4.

5.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 2-5

Referring to Table 2-7 determine the correct UN number for the following organic peroxides:

1. Dicumyl peroxide, 75% concentration

2. Organic peroxide, solid, sample

3. Ethyl 3,3-di-(tert-amylperoxy)butyrate, 50 % concentration, with a Diluent


type A of 35%

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Class 6 Toxic and infectious substances Part 2;6

Note. As Unit 8 deals specifically with the preparation, handling and transport of Division 6.2, the following is for
information only.

This class is divided into two divisions: Division 6.1 and 6.2.

DIVISION 6.1 DIVISION 6.2


Toxic Substances Infectious Substances

DESCRIPTION

Substances liable either to cause death or injury or to Substances known to contain, or reasonably expected to
harm human health if swallowed, if inhaled or by skin contain, pathogens. Pathogens are defined as micro-
contact, e.g. arsenic, some disinfectants and most organisms (including bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae,
pesticides. (2;6.1 a)) parasites, fungi) and other agents such as prions, which
can cause disease in humans or animals. (2;6.1 b))

LABELS

* 6
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-15

PACKING GROUP

Criteria for determining the packing group for No packing group is assigned to Division 6.2, Infectious
Division 6.1 are found in 2;6.2.2. Substances.

EXERCISE 2-6

Referring to 2;6 of the Instructions, fill in the blank with a word or words from Column III that best match each of the
definitions in Column II:

I II III

Cultures
1. __________________________ are substances which are known to Infectious substances
contain, or are reasonably expected to contain, pathogens. Pathogens Patient specimens
are defined as micro-organisms (including bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae, LD50 (median lethal dose) for
parasites, fungi) and other agents such as prions, which can cause acute oral toxicity
disease in humans or animals.

2. ___________________________ are those collected directly from


humans or animals, including, but not limited to, excreta, secreta, blood
and its components, tissue and tissue fluid swabs, and body parts being
transported for purposes such as research, diagnosis, investigational
activities, and disease treatment and prevention.

3. _______________________________ is the statistically derived single


dose of a substance that can be expected to cause death within 14 days
in 50 per cent of young adult albino rats when administered by the oral
route. The LD50 value is expressed in terms of mass of test substance
per mass of test animal (mg/kg).

4. ____________________________ are the result of a process by which


pathogens are intentionally propagated. This definition does not include
patient specimens as defined in 6.3.1.4.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


2-16 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Class 7 Radioactive material Part 2;7

Note. As Unit 9 deals specifically with the preparation, handling and transport of Class 7, the following is for
information only.

This class has no divisions, but it does have categories, an overview of which is provided below.

Radioactive material, Radioactive material, Radioactive material,


Category I White Category II Yellow Category III Yellow

DESCRIPTION

Maximum radiation level at any point Maximum radiation level at any point Maximum radiation level at any point
on external surface not more than on external surface more than on external surface more than
0.005 mSv/h on the package 0.005 mSv/h but not more than 0.5 mSv/h but not more than
surface. No transport index indicated 0.5 mSv/h and a Transport Index of 2 mSv/h and a Transport Index of
(Table 5-2). more than 0 but not more than 1 more than 1 but not more
(Table 5-2). than 10
OR
Maximum radiation level at any point
on external surface more than 2
mSv/h but not more than 10 mSv/h
and a Transport Index of more than
10 (This Category III - Yellow
radioactive material must be
transported under exclusive use and
special arrangement.
(Table 5-2).

LABELS

RADIOACTIVE RADIOACTIVE II RADIOACTIVE


CO N TEN TS.. .. ... ... .. ... ... .. .. CONTENTS...................... CO N T EN TS.. ... .. ... ... .. ... ... ..
AC TIVI TY... .. ... ... .. ... .. ... .. ACTIVITY....................... A C T IVI TY... ... .. ... ... .. ... ... ..

TRANSPORT INDEX TR AN S PO R T I N D EX

7 7 7

PACKING GROUP

No packing group specified.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-17

Class 8 Corrosive substances Part 2;8

CLASS 8
Corrosive Substances

DESCRIPTION

Substances which, by chemical action, will cause severe damage when in contact with living tissue or, in the case of
leakage, will materially damage, or even destroy, other goods or the means of transport, e.g. battery acids, mercury.
(2;8.1)

LABEL

PACKING GROUP

Criteria for determining the packing group for Class 8 are found in Paragraph 2;8.2.

Class 9 Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles Part 2;9

CLASS 9
Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles

DESCRIPTION

Substances or articles which present a danger that are not covered by the other classes. These include
environmentally hazardous substances (aquatic environment), elevated temperature substances, Genetically
Modified Micro-organisms, magnetized material and aviation regulated solids or liquids which have narcotic, noxious
or other properties such that, in the event of spillage or leakage on an aircraft, extreme annoyance or discomfort
could be caused to crew members so as to prevent the correct performance of assigned duties. This class includes
internal combustion engines, self-inflating life-saving appliances and dry ice. (2;9.1 and 2;9.2)

LABEL

PACKING GROUP

Some substances in Class 9 have been assigned to packing groups by experience rather than through application of
technical criteria. Most of these substances are assigned to Packing Group III.
2-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 2-7

Listed below are characteristics for four dangerous goods. Referring to Parts 2;1 to 2;9 of the Instructions, find the
class or division into which these characteristics fall. Write the class or division number and name in the spaces
provided.

Characteristics Class or division number Class or division name

1. Liquid gives off a flammable vapour


at 60C closed cup.

2. Solid may cause or contribute to


fire through friction.

3. Inorganic yields oxygen which


contributes to the combustion of other
materials.

4. Liquid causes visible necrosis of


skin tissue at site of contact when
tested on the intact skin tissue of an
animal for a period of 2 minutes.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 2-8

The data sheets of some products give the dangerous goods related information below. Insert the corresponding
class or division number and the packing group in the space provided.

Packing group, if
Characteristics Class or division number applicable

1. Causes full thickness destruction of intact skin


tissue within an observation period of up to
60 minutes starting after an exposure time of
3 minutes or less.

2. Reacts vigorously with water at ambient


temperatures and demonstrates generally a
tendency for the gas produced to ignite
spontaneously.

3. Liquid having an LD50 value (oral application) of


400 mg/kg.

4. Substances or mixtures dangerous to the aquatic


environment not otherwise classified under these
Instructions, but classified by the shipper as
environmentally hazardous substances.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-19

Step 2 For substances or articles with more than one hazard determine
the precedence of hazard Part 2 Introductory Chapter

If after applying the provisions of Chapters 2.1 to 2.9 it is determined that the substance, mixture or solution (not
specifically named in Table 3-1) to be offered for transport has more than one hazard, the Precedence of Hazard Table
(Table 2-1) is used to determine which class or division takes precedence, or in other words, is the primary hazard. The
correct packing group (i.e. the most restrictive one) is also shown at the intersection.

The Precedence of Hazard Table only includes the following classes and divisions:

Class 3, 4 or 8; or
Division 5.1 or 6.1

Table 2-1 is presented as a matrix where both the top row and the left hand column list the pertinent classes/divisions
and packing groups and, where applicable, adjacent to these entries appear further descriptive information: i.e.,

liquid (l)
solid (s)
toxic by inhalation (i), dermal (d) or oral (o).

Where, in the matrix, an entry in the top row intersects with an entry in the left hand column the class/division number
and packing group shown becomes the primary class/division and packing group.

For example, if a mixture which has the characteristics of a Division 4.2, Packing Group II substance and a Division 6.1,
Packing Group I (dermal toxicity) substance, the primary risk of the mixture will be Division 6.1 and the mixture must be
assigned to Packing Group I.

EXERCISE 2-9

Referring to Table 2-1 state the primary hazard and packing group for each of the following:

1. Class 3, Packing Group II and Division 6.1 Packing


Group II.

2. Class 8, Packing Group II liquid and Division 6.1


Packing Group II inhalation.

3. Division 4.2, Packing Group III and Division 6.1


Packing Group II.

4. Class 3, Packing Group I and Class 8,


Packing Group I liquid and Division 6.1,
Packing Group I dermal.

5. Division 5.1, Packing Group III and Class 8,


Packing Group II liquid.

Check your answer with those in Unit 13.

The following classes and divisions have not been included in Table 2-1 because their hazard always takes precedence
(Part 2 Introductory Chapter 4.1):
2-20 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

a) Class 1;
b) Class 2;

2;2.3 Gases and gas mixtures with hazards associated with more than one division take the following precedence:
a) Division 2.3 takes precedence over all other divisions;
b) Division 2.1 takes precedence over Division 2.2.

c) liquid desensitized explosives of Class 3;


d) self-reactive substances and solid desensitized explosives of Division 4.l;
e) pyrophoric substances of Division 4.2;
f) Division 5.2;
g) Division 6.1 with a Packing Group I inhalation toxicity. Except for substances or preparations meeting the
criteria of Class 8 having an inhalation toxicity of dusts and mists (LC50) in the range of Packing Group I, but
toxicity through oral ingestion or dermal contact only in the range of Packing Group III or less, which must be
allocated to Class 8;
h) Division 6.2; and
i) Class 7.

Part 2 Introductory Chapter 4.2 Apart from radioactive material in excepted packages (where the other hazardous
properties take precedence), radioactive material having other hazardous properties must always be classified in
Class 7 and the subsidiary risk must also be identified.

Magnetized material

Part 2 Introductory Chapter 4.3 An article which, apart from its other hazards, also meets the criterion for a
magnetized material, must be identified in accordance with the provisions of this section and in addition as a
magnetized material.

Step 3 Assign the appropriate UN number and


Proper Shipping Name Part 2 Introductory Chapter

Armed with the primary and, where applicable, secondary or subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and packing group, the
most appropriate UN number and shipping name must be chosen from the alphabetical list of dangerous goods in
Table 3-1. This list contains four types of entries:

1. Single entries for well-defined substances or articles.

Specific dangerous goods are listed by name in Table 3-1, e.g. Acetone, UN 1090.

Note. If a substance, mixture, solution or article is listed by name, the listed name must be used.

2. Generic entries for a well-defined group of substances or articles, e.g. Adhesives, UN 1133.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-21

3. Specific n.o.s. entries covering a group of substances or articles of a particular chemical or technical
nature, e.g. Nitrates, inorganic, n.o.s., UN 1477.

It is physically impossible to list all possible mixtures, although individual hazardous ingredients of dangerous goods
mixtures are often listed.

4. General n.o.s. entries covering a group of substances or articles meeting the criteria of one or more classes
or divisions, e.g. Flammable solid, organic, n.o.s., UN 1325

As an aid to choosing the most appropriate n.o.s. or generic name, all the n.o.s. entries and the main generic
entries of Table 3-1 grouped by hazard class or division are listed in Attachment A1, Chapter 2 of the Instructions. A
substance may only be assigned to an entry of type 3, if it cannot be assigned to an entry of type 2 and only to an
entry of type 4 if it cannot assigned to an entry of type 2. or 3.

Note. An asterisk following a proper shipping name in Table 3-1 indicates that the technical name must be added.
See Subparagraph 3;1.2.7 of the Instructions for a detailed explanation of the use of Generic or not otherwise specified
(n.o.s.) names and Unit 3, Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, for related training material.

Classification of mixtures or solutions

Paragraphs 2;3.5 to 2;3.9 of Addendum No. 3 to the 2009-2010 edition of the Instructions provide direction on the
classification of mixtures or solutions.

EXERCISE 2-10

Referring to Addendum No. 3 of the 2009/2010 edition of the Instruction Part 2;3 answer the following questions:

In the following four spaces list when a mixture or solution of one predominant substance identified by name in
Table 3-1 and one or more substances
not subject to the Instructions, and/or
with traces of one or more substances listed in Table 3-1 are not assigned the proper shipping name of the
predominant substance.

1.

2.

3.
2-22 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

4.

5. A mixture of an item of dangerous goods listed in


Table 3-1 and a substance not subject to the
Instructions is not subject to the Instructions if it no
longer meets the criteria for any class.

True ______ False ______

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

F. TRANSPORT OF SAMPLES

Part 2 Introductory Chapter Paragraphs 5.1 to 5.3 of the Instructions provide direction on the transport of samples.

EXERCISE 2-11

Referring to Part 2 Introductory Chapter 5.1 to 5.3 of the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. A shipper can disregard the Instructions when


transporting a substance for testing.

True ______ False ______

Explain your answer.

2. Name two (2) cases where a sample of dangerous


goods assigned a proper shipping name is not to
be offered for transport by air?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 2. Hazard class definitions and classification procedures 2-23

3. When shipping samples of dangerous goods what


word must be added to the proper shipping name if
it is not already present?

4. In what sort of packaging must a dangerous goods


sample be transported?

5. What is the maximum permitted net mass per


package containing a dangerous goods sample?

6. May the dangerous goods sample be packed with


other goods?

Yes _____ No _____

7. Is a technical name required when an n.o.s. entry


is used to transport a sample?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

3;1.1.5 Where there is any doubt about whether a non-listed article or substance is permitted for transport by air, or
under what conditions, the shipper must consult an appropriate specialized agency.

G. SUMMARY

The class or division number, packing group (where applicable), proper shipping name and UN number make up
the four key elements of a dangerous goods description. It is this description that determines what packaging, marking,
labeling, handling, storage and transport requirements are to be in place for any one specific item of dangerous goods.
That is why it is so important that the classification process is done correctly.

Part 2 of the Instructions provides all of the detail necessary for correctly assigning a description to an article or
substance believed to be dangerous goods. It describes the characteristics of the nine classes of dangerous goods and
the testing procedures for determining if a substance or article meets the class criteria.

It is important to emphasize that the application of the testing criteria used to determine the classification of a substance
or article as dangerous goods requires further technical training.

______________________
UNIT 3

Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1


Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 3 ......................................................................... 3-2
B. Goal Unit 3 .................................................................................................................................................. 3-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 3-2
D. The Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 ........................................................................................................... 3-3
E. Locate the description of the dangerous goods in Columns 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 of Table 3-1
(i.e. proper shipping name, UN number, primary class or division and subsidiary class(es)
or division(s) and packing group (where applicable)) ...................................................................................... 3-4
F. Extract from Columns 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 of Table 3-1 the relevant information
required to prepare an item of dangerous goods for air transport ................................................................... 3-11
G. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 3-18

3-1
3-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 3

Subject Matter: List of dangerous goods (Table 3-1)


Category of personnel:
shippers and persons undertaking the responsibilities of shippers
packers
staff of freight forwarders involved in processing dangerous goods
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting dangerous goods
flight crew members and load planners.

B. GOAL UNIT 3

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether relevant information concerning an item of
dangerous goods has been correctly extracted from Part 3 of the Instructions.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state what information can be found in Table 3-1;

b) demonstrate how to extract information from Table 3-1;

c) demonstrate how to extract information from Attachment 1, Chapter 1 of the Instructions (List of UN numbers
with associated proper shipping names);

d) demonstrate how to extract information regarding State variations from Table 3-1 and Attachment 3, Chapter 1
of the Instructions;

e) demonstrate how to extract information regarding special provisions from Table 3-1 and Part 3;3 of the
Instructions;

f) demonstrate how to determine if an article or substance is forbidden for air transport and under what
circumstances;

g) state where to find in the Instructions the labeling requirements;

h) state where to find in the Instructions the excepted quantity and limited quantity provisions; and

i) state where to find in the Instructions the packing instructions.

C. INTRODUCTION

Table 3-1 of the Instructions (the blue pages) is an alphabetical list of the names of approximately 3 000 of the most
common dangerous goods. This list:

identifies certain dangerous goods which are forbidden for transport by air; and

provides relevant information for use in safely preparing those dangerous goods that are permitted for air
transport.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-3

Entry into this table is through the dangerous goods description (i.e. the proper shipping name and UN number and the
class(es)/division(s) and packing group (where applicable)), established in the course of applying the provisions of Part 2
of the Instructions.

Remember there are four types of entries in Table 3-1 (Part 2 Introductory Chapter 3.2):

a) Single entries for well-defined substances or articles, e.g. Acetone, UN 1090;

b) Generic entries for a well-defined group of substances or articles, e.g. Adhesives, UN 1133;

c) Specific n.o.s. entries covering a group of substances or articles of a particular chemical or technical nature,
e.g. Nitrates, inorganic, n.o.s., UN 1477; or

d) General n.o.s. entries covering a group of substances or articles meeting the criteria of one or more classes or
divisions, e.g. Flammable solid, organic, n.o.s., UN 1325.

Note. A substance is to be assigned to an entry of type c), as defined in 3.2, only if it cannot be assigned to an
entry of type b), and to an entry of type d) if it cannot be assigned to an entry of type b) or c).

The layout of and information found in Table 3-1 are described in this unit.

D. THE DANGEROUS GOODS LISTTABLE 3-1

Table headings

The following is a copy of the headings found in Table 3-1. Read Part 3;2 of the Instructions for an explanation of each
heading.

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Part 3;2 of the Instructions also includes an explanation of the abbreviations and symbols used in Table 3-1.

Abbreviation Column Meaning

n.o.s. 1 Not otherwise specified.

L 11 and 13 Litre(s).

kg 11 and 13 Kilogram(s).

G 11 and 13 Gross mass of package as prepared for transport.

* 1 Entry which requires the addition of a technical name.


3-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Note. A more detailed explanation of the type and number of


technical names to be used can be found in Subparagraph 3;1.2.7.

1 Entry for which there is an explanation in Attachment 2.

This symbol indicates changed text.

+ This symbol indicates new or relocated text.

> This symbol indicates deleted text.

Find examples in Table 3-1 where these abbreviations and symbols are used.

Steps for using the information found in Table 3-1

There are two easy steps to using Table 3-1:

1. Locate the description of the dangerous goods in Columns 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 of Table 3-1 (i.e. proper shipping
name, UN number, primary class or division and subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and packing group (where
applicable)); and

2. Extract from Columns 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 the relevant information required to prepare an item of
dangerous goods for air transport.

These two steps are examined in detail in the following pages.

E. LOCATE THE DESCRIPTION OF THE DANGEROUS GOODS IN COLUMNS 1, 2, 3, 4 AND 8


OF TABLE 3-1 (i.e. PROPER SHIPPING NAME, UN NUMBER, PRIMARY CLASS OR
DIVISION AND SUBSIDIARY CLASS(ES) OR DIVISION(S) AND
PACKING GROUP (WHERE APPLICABLE))

a) Locate the Proper Shipping Name Column 1

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

The name of the article or substance which is used to identify an item of dangerous goods is called the proper shipping
name. Proper shipping names appear in Column 1 of Table 3-1 and are arranged alphabetically. You can tell them apart
from other information in that column because they are in bold type.

e.g. Gasoline
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-5

Column 1 Rules of alphabetization

Where names comprise more than one word, they have been alphabetized as if they were a single word. In deciding the
correct order, numbers and the terms n.o.s., alpha-, beta-, meta-, omega-, sec-, tert-, a-, b-, m-, N-, n-, O-, o- and p-
have been ignored. Similarly, the word see and any words following it have been ignored. The following extract from
the table demonstrates how this rule applies:

Name

Nitrochlorobenzenes, see
Chloronitrobenzenes

3-Nitro-4-chlorobenzotrifluoride

Nitrocresols, liquid

Column 1 Abbreviations and symbols (n.o.s., *, and )

The abbreviation n.o.s. and the symbols * and are also found in Column 1. Read the table of abbreviations and
symbols in subparagraph 3;2.1.2 for an explanation.

Column 1 Other information

As well as the name of the article or substance, Column 1 of Table 3-1 may include other text, in lightface type, which
helps to define the substance precisely. In the example below the words slabs, ingots or rods describe the three
possible physical states of Cerium.

Cerium, slabs, ingots or rods

Note. The information in lightface type is not considered a mandatory part of the proper shipping name. This is
important to remember when we examine the application of the package marking and documentation provisions of
Part 5 of the Instructions.

Also included in Column 1 are other names in lightface type by which certain articles or substances are known. Adjacent
to these names is a cross reference to the proper shipping name which must be used, preceded by the word see. For
example:

Signals, distress, ship, water-activated, see Contrivances, water activated, etc.


Aminobenzene, see Aniline.

In such entries where the abbreviation etc. appears in light type immediately following the proper shipping name (e.g.
Accumulators, electric, see, Batteries, etc.), further analysis must be done to determine which of the entries starting with
that part of the proper shipping name is the appropriate one to use.

Where more than one proper shipping name is shown (e.g. Self-inflating passenger restraint systems (air bags) for
motor vehicles, see Life-saving appliances, self-inflating (UN 2990) or Air bag inflators or Air bag modules or
Seat-belt pretensioners (UN 3268)), further analysis must be done to determine the appropriate entry.
3-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Note. Unless otherwise indicated, the word solution in a proper shipping name means one or more named
dangerous goods dissolved in a liquid that is not otherwise subject to these Instructions (Paragraph 3;2.1 Column 1).

There are four situations where additional words are to be added to the proper shipping name. They are:

1. When an * appears in Column 1 the technical name of the dangerous goods is required. (3;1.2.7)

2. The word molten must be added when a substance which is a solid is offered for transport in the molten state
(e.g. Alkylphenol, solid, n.o.s., molten), unless it is already included in bold letters in the proper shipping
name, as is the case for the proper shipping name Sulphur, molten. (3;1.2.4)

3. The word stabilized must be added for a substance which without stabilization would be forbidden from
transport due to the possibility it could react dangerously while in transport (e.g. Toxic liquid, organic, n.o.s.,
stabilized), except for self-reactive substances and organic peroxides and unless it is already included in
boldface characters in the proper shipping name. (3; 1.2.5)

4. The word mixture or solution must be added where one or more items of dangerous goods is part of a mixture
or solution if not already present in the proper shipping name. (3;1.3.2)

EXERCISE 3-1

Referring to Table 3-1, write the proper shipping name for the following:

1. 2-Aminobenzotrifluoruride

2. N,N-Dimethyl-4-nitrosoanline

3. Naphtha

4. Power devices, explosive

5. Red phosphorus

6. Shaped charges

7. Tear gas grenades

8. Vinylbenzene

9. White arsenic

10. White spirit

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-7

b) Locate the UN Number Column 2

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Along with the proper shipping name, the UN number is the other method of identifying a particular article or substance
during transport. This number is found adjacent to its proper shipping name in Column 2 of Table 3-1.

Note. For ease of reference a numerical list of UN numbers with their respective proper shipping name is
provided in Attachment 1; Chapter 1 of the Instructions. Find the proper shipping name for UN number 1550 in
Attachment 1, then locate that proper shipping name in Table 3-1. (Answer: Antimony lactate)

In some cases, articles or substances with the same proper shipping name may be subject to different transport
requirements because of such factors as their physical state (e.g. solid or in solution), concentration or purity. In these
cases, although the proper shipping name may be the same, the UN number may be different. A careful check must be
made to ensure the most appropriate proper shipping name and UN number are used.

Note. The proper shipping name Consumer Commodities does not have a UN number assigned to it. It is
identified as ID 8000.

EXERCISE 3-2

Referring to Table 3-1 write the UN number adjacent to proper shipping name for the following:

1. Ammonia solution, relative density between 0.880 and 0.957 at 15C in water, with more
than 10% but not more than 35% ammonia

2. Ammonia solution, relative density less than 0.880 at 15C in water, with more than 50%
ammonia

3. Ammonia solution, relative density less than 0.880 at 15C in water, with more than 35%
but not more than 50% ammonia

4. Arsenical pesticide, liquid, flammable, toxic*, flash point less than 23C

5. Arsenical pesticide, liquid, toxic, flammable*, flash point not less than 23C

6. Toxic by inhalation liquid, n.o.s.* with an inhalation toxicity lower than or equal to
200ml/m3 and saturated vapour concentration greater than or equal to 500 LC50

7. Toxic by inhalation liquid, corrosive, n.o.s.* with an inhalation toxicity lower than or
equal to 1 000 ml/m3 and saturated vapour concentration greater than or equal to 10 LC50

8. Alkali metal alloy, liquid, n.o.s.

9. Barium peroxide

10. Cyclobutane

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


3-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 3-3

Referring to Table 3-1 write the proper shipping name and UN number for the following alternative names:

Alternative name Proper Shipping Name UN Number

1. Barium superoxide

2. Barium binoxide

3. Lighter flints

4. Tetraethyl lead

5. Cement

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 3-4

Referring to Attachment 1 and Table 3-1 write the proper shipping name for the following UN numbers:

1. UN 0029

2. UN 1055

3. UN 1872

4. UN 1203

5. UN 1263

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 3-5

Referring to Part 3;2 of the Instructions answer the following questions:

1. Which parts of the proper shipping names have


been ignored when alphabetizing Table 3-1?

2. How are alternative shipping names shown in


Table 3-1?

3. Which columns of Table 3-1 show the proper


shipping name and UN number?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-9

4. Where in the Instructions is the numerical list of


UN numbers with associated proper shipping
names found?

5. What is the only proper shipping name without


a UN number and what number does it use.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

c) Locate the (Primary) Class or Division and Subsidiary Risk Columns 3 and 4

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Column 3 (Primary) Class or Division

Column 3 lists the primary hazard class or division for an item of dangerous goods.

Note. The word primary before the word Class is used to indicate the most significant hazard of the dangerous
goods.

Check that the primary class or division matches the hazards of the article or substance. For example, an adhesive
which is corrosive should not be shipped as Adhesives, Class 3 just because that is the only Adhesives listed. In
such cases, further research is required into the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number.

Column 4 Subsidiary Risk

Some articles or substances have hazards which match the criteria for more than one class or division. In such cases,
one risk is considered to be the primary hazard (see Column 3) and the additional (secondary, tertiary) hazards are
known as subsidiary risks and are shown in Column 4.

Find the proper shipping name and UN number for:

Pesticides, liquid, flammable, toxic, n.o.s.


Ethyldichlorosilane

and identify the primary class or division and subsidiary class(es) or division(s).

Answer:
Pesticides, liquid, flammable, toxic, n.o.s., UN 3021, Class 3 with one subsidiary risk of Division 6.1, and
Ethyldichlorosilane, UN 1183, Division 4.3, with subsidiary risks of Classes 3 and 8.
3-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

FORBIDDEN

When the word FORBIDDEN is written across Column 2 and Column 3 of Table 3-1 it identifies specific articles or
substances that are considered to be so dangerous they are absolutely forbidden for transport by air under any
circumstances, as provided in 1;2.1 of the Instructions. To reinforce this message the name in Column 1 is not a proper
shipping name and is consequently not shown in bold print, and there is no information in any of the other columns.

The following example shows Hyponitrous acid to be forbidden under any circumstances for transport by air:

Name UN No. Class or division

1 2 3

Hyponitrous acid FORBIDDEN

Note. The word FORBIDDEN will also appear in Table 3-1 in relation to the transport of an item of dangerous
goods on passenger aircraft and/or cargo aircraft.

d) Locate the UN Packing Group Column 8

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Packing Group numbers I, II, and/or III are found adjacent to certain proper shipping names in Column 8.

Note. Column 8 is empty where no packing group has been assigned.

Although the UN packing group forms part of the description of the dangerous goods, it is located in Column 8 because
it is visually easier to match the appropriate packing information under the headings Passenger Aircraft and Cargo
Aircraft with the appropriate packing group.

The packing group, as with the proper shipping name, UN number and class(es)/division(s), is determined through the
application of the provisions of Part 2 of the Instructions. In Table 3-1 the packing groups are listed adjacent to their
proper shipping name in Column 8.

When applicable, one or more packing groups may be assigned to a single proper shipping name. When more than one
packing group is assigned it is often because the composition of the substance is not precisely described by its proper
shipping name.

In the example given below for Flammable liquid, n.o.s.* the three packing groups have been assigned to address
differences in flash points and boiling points.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-11

Name UN No. Class or Subsidiary Labels State Special UN


division risk variations provisions packing
group

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Flammable liquid, 1993 3 Liquid flammable A3 I


n.o.s.* II
III

Note. Different packing groups for the same proper shipping name may require different packing instructions and
Maximum net quantity per package be used.

EXERCISE 36

Referring to Part 2 of the Instructions, state the flash point (closed cup) and initial boiling point of the three packing
groups for a flammable liquid:

Packing Group Flash point (closed cup) Initial boiling point

1. I

2. II

3. III

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

F. EXTRACT FROM COLUMNS 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 AND 13 OF TABLE 3-1


THE RELEVANT INFORMATION REQUIRED TO PREPARE AN ITEM OF
DANGEROUS GOODS FOR AIR TRANSPORT

a) Identify the labeling requirements Column 5

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

The required labeling for a dangerous goods entry is shown in Column 5, e.g.

Name UN No. Class or division Subsidiary risk Labels

1 2 3 4 5

Potassium 2257 4.3 Danger if wet


3-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

The following label, found in Part 5;3 of the Instructions (Figure 5-13), would be applied to a package of Potassium, UN
2257 to represent the Danger if wet hazard:

Note 1. Pictures of both the hazard labels and handling labels are found in Part 5;3 of the Instructions along with
requirements concerning their application.

Note 2. Special provisions found in Column 7 adjacent to a proper shipping name may require a subsidiary label
that is not specified in Column 4 for that entry, e.g. Special Provisions A78, A150 and A104.

EXERCISE 3-7

Referring to Table 3-1, identify the class or division, subsidiary risk and label or labels for the following substances
and their corresponding UN numbers:

Name UN No. Class or Subsidiary Labels


division risk

1 2 3 4 5

1. Cadmium compound 2570

2. Chloromethyl ethyl ether 2354

3. Chlorosilanes, toxic, corrosive, 3362


flammable, n.o.s.

4. Radioactive material, excepted 2910


package limited quantity of
material

5. Cosmetics, n.o.s. ID 8000

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

There may be one or more labels required as in Example 1, 2, 3 and 5 or none as in Example 4.

Note. See Part 5 of the Instructions for provisions concerning labelling and Unit 5 for associated training material.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-13

b) Identify the State Variation(s), if any Column 6

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

ICAO Member States adopt these Instructions into their domestic regulations. They are required to notify ICAO of those
cases where they have adopted provisions different from those contained in the Instructions. These State variations are
listed in Attachment A3.

An alphanumeric (i.e. containing letters and numbers) reference in Column 6 of Table 3-1 refers you to a State variation
in Attachment 3; Chapter 1 of the Instructions.

For example, where State variation CA 13 appears in Column 6 adjacent to the proper shipping name
Environmentally hazardous substance, liquid, n.o.s.*, reference to Attachment 3; Chapter 1 will reveal that CA
stands for Canada and CA 13 in Table A-1 of the Attachment states:

CA 13 Section 2.43 of the Canadian Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations establishes the Canadian
classification criteria for miscellaneous products, substances or organisms that may not be listed as
dangerous goods in these Instructions but are a marine pollutant and an environmentally hazardous
substance.

Note. See the Foreword to the Instructions for an explanation of State variations. Operators may also impose
more restrictive measures for the transport of dangerous goods on board their aircraft. These Operator variations are
listed in Attachment A3.

c) Identify the Special Provision(s), if any Column 7

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Column 7 provides you with an alphanumeric reference to a special provision in Part 3;3 of the Instructions.

For example, where the special provision A4 appears in Column 7 adjacent to proper shipping name Thiocarbamate
pesticide, liquid, flammable, toxic*, flash point less than 23C, UN 2772, reference to Part 3;3 will reveal the following
special provision:

A4 Liquids having a vapour inhalation toxicity of Packing Group I are forbidden on both passenger and cargo
aircraft.
Liquids having a mist inhalation toxicity of Packing Group I are forbidden on a passenger aircraft. They may be
3-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

carried on cargo aircraft providing they are packed in accordance with the packing instructions for the Packing
Group I substance and the maximum net quantity per package does not exceed 5 L.

Note. Special provisions must always be taken into consideration as they may relate to classification, packing and
the conditions of transport.

EXERCISE 3-8

Referring to Table 3-1 identify the State variations and special provisions for the following proper shipping names and
their corresponding UN numbers.

Sub-
Class or sidiary State Special
Name UN No. division risk Labels variations provisions

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1. Nitromethane 1261 3 Liquid


flammable

2. Alkaloid salts, 3140 6.1 Toxic


liquid, n.o.s.*

3. Cresols, liquid 2076 6.1 8 Toxic &


Corrosive

4. Dangerous 3363 9 Miscellaneous


Goods in
apparatus

5. Fire
extinguishers
with compressed
or liquefied gas
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-15

6. Ethyl isocyanate 2481 3 6.1 Liquid


flammable &
Toxic

7. Refrigerating 2857 2.2 Gas non-


machines flammable
containing
non-flammable,
non-toxic gases or
ammonia solutions
(UN 2672)

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 3-9

Referring to Part 3;3 and Attachment 3 Chapter 1 of the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. Which of the State variations in Exercise 3-7 prohibits the carriage of Methyl
propionate, UN 1248?

2. Which of the special provisions in Exercise 3-7 states that this item of
dangerous goods may only be transported on passenger aircraft with the prior
approval of the appropriate authority of the State of Origin under the written
conditions established by that authority?

3. Which country is referred to when the letters IR appear in the State variations?

4. Which country is referred to when the letters AU appear in the State variations?

5. What is shown in Column 7 of Table 3-1 when no special provision has been
applied to the entry?

6. Which of the special provisions in Exercise 3-7 states that refrigerating


machines and refrigerating machine components are considered not subject to
these Instructions if containing less than 12 kg of a gas in Division 2.2 or if
containing less than 12 L ammonia solution (UN 2672)?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


3-16 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

d) Identify the Excepted Quantity provisions Column 9

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Certain classes and quantities of dangerous goods (other than articles) are considered safe enough to be exempt from
the Instructions provided they are transported in compliance with the excepted quantity provisions of Part 3;5. Column 9
of Table 3-1 provides an alphanumeric reference to the provisions of this chapter.

Note. See Part 3;5 of the Instructions for an explanation of the excepted quantity provisions and Unit 10 for
associated training material.

e) Identify the Packing Instructions and Maximum Net Quantity per Package provisions for:

Passenger Aircraft Columns 10 to 11, and


Cargo Aircraft Columns 12 to 13

Name UN Class or Sub- Labels State Special UN Excepted Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft
No. division sidiary varia- provi- packing quantity
risk tions sions group Packing Max. net Packing Max. net
instruction quantity instruction quantity
per per
package package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Columns 10 and 11

These columns apply to the transport of the dangerous goods when going by passenger aircraft.

Column 10 Column 10 identifies the relevant packing instruction number listed in Part 4 for transport on
Packing passenger aircraft.
Instructions
For some proper shipping name entries, an alternative packing instruction is shown prefixed with
the letter Y. Such packing instructions are for limited quantities of dangerous goods.

Note. When a dangerous goods article or substance is forbidden for transport by passenger
aircraft the word FORBIDDEN will either appear across Columns 2 and 3 or 10 and 11 of
Table 3-1. (3;2.1.1 Note 1)

Column 11 The quantity in kilograms (kg) or litres (L) found adjacent to the packing instruction in Column 11
Max. net identifies the maximum net quantity of the article or substance allowed in each package.
quantity per
package Where the letter G follows the quantity limit, the quantity shown is the gross mass of the package
as prepared for transport (i.e. the dangerous goods plus the packaging). (3;2.1.1 and 3;2.1.2)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 3. Use of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 3-17

Turn to Table 3-1 and find the packing instruction and maximum net quantity per package for the following:

Passenger aircraft
Max. net
Class Sub- State Special UN quantity
UN or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Diethylamine 1154 3 8 Liquid US 4 II E2 306 1L
flammable Y306 0.5 L
&
Corrosive
Lithium 3091 9 Miscel- US 2 A88 II E0 968 2.5 kg G
Metal laneous US 3 A99
Batteries A154
(including lithium A164
alloy batteries)

Notes.
See Part 4 of the Instructions for the provisions concerning packing instructions and Unit 4 for associated
training material.
Certain of these packing instructions will be replaced by new packing instructions that will come into effect
1 January 2011. These new packing instructions are currently found in Attachment 4 of the 2009/2010 edition
of the Instructions.
See Part 3;5 of the Instructions for an explanation of the limited quantity provisions and Unit 10 for associated
training material.

EXERCISE 3-10

Referring to Table 3-1 indicate whether the following dangerous goods are FORBIDDEN for transport by air in a
passenger aircraft:

1. Natural gas, compressed with high


methane content.

2. Triazine, pesticide, solid, toxic*.

3. Trimethylol nitromethane trinitrate.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Columns 12 13

These columns apply to the transport of the dangerous goods when going by cargo aircraft.

Column 12 Column 12 identifies the relevant packing instruction listed in Part 4 for transport on a cargo
Packing aircraft.
Instructions
Note. When a dangerous goods article or substance is forbidden for transport by cargo
aircraft the word FORBIDDEN will appear across Columns 2 and 3 or Columns 12 and 13 of
Table 3-1. (3;2.1.1 Note 1).
3-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Column 13 The quantity in kilograms (kg) or litres (L) found adjacent to the packing instruction in Column 13
Max. net identifies the maximum net quantity of the article or substance allowed in each package.
quantity per
package Where the letter G follows the quantity limit, the quantity shown is the gross mass of the package
as prepared for transport (i.e. the dangerous goods plus the packaging). (3;2.1.1 and 2.1.2)

EXERCISE 3-11

Referring to Table 3-1 of the Instructions, state the Packing Instructions and Maximum net quantity per package
provisions for passenger aircraft and cargo aircraft for the following dangerous goods entries:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. Max.
net net
Class Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantiy instruction package instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Aerosols, 1950 2.2 8 Gas non- A145 E0
non- flammable A153
flammable, &
corrosive, Corrosive
containing
substances
in Class 8,
Packing
Group III
Chloropicrin 1581 2.3 AU A2
and methyl CA 7
bromide GB 3
mixture with IR 3
more than NL 1
2% US 3
chloropicrin
Isopropyl 2406 3 Liquid II E2
isobutyrate Flammable
Sodium 1819 8 Corrosive A3 II E2
aluminate
solution III E1
Zinc Powder 1436 4.3 4.2 Danger A3 I E0
if wet
& II E2
Spontan-
eous III E1
Combus-
tion

G. SUMMARY

Understanding what information can be extracted from Table 3-1 and how to use it is an important step in determining
whether an item of dangerous goods has been appropriately prepared for transport by air.
______________________
UNIT 4

Packing Requirements
Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding and use of that text.

Table of Contents

A. Training subject matter and category of personnel Unit 4 ........................................................................... 4-2


B. Goal Unit 4 ................................................................................................................................................. 4-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 4-3
D. Words, terms and codes Parts 1 and 4 and Part 6;1 .................................................................................. 4-4
E. Packaging and performance test requirements Part 6;1, 6;3 and 6;4 ......................................................... 4-10
F. Packing instructions Part 4 and Attachment 4 ............................................................................................ 4-11
G. General packing requirements Part 4;1 and 4;2 ......................................................................................... 4-15
H. Marking of packagings, other than inner packagings Part 6;2 .................................................................... 4-22
I. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 4-28
Appendix 4-1. Checklist for the identification of the new packing instructions
in the 20092010 edition of the Instructions ....................................................................................................... 4-31
Appendix 4-2. Sample of new packing instruction ................................................................................................. 4-33

4-1
4-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 4

Subject Matter: Packing requirements


Category of personnel:
shippers and persons undertaking the responsibilities of shippers
packers
staff of freight forwarders involved in processing dangerous goods
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting dangerous goods.

B. GOAL UNIT 4

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether dangerous goods have been packed in
accordance with the provisions of Part 4 and Part 6 of the Instructions.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state when a word or term has a definition unique to the Instructions;

b) state the meaning of the packaging codes used in the Instructions;

c) state where to find packaging and performance tests requirements of the various types of packagings;

d) demonstrate how to use the information in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 to identify specific packing
instructions;

e) demonstrate how to extract information from the packing instructions;

f) demonstrate how to assign the general packing requirements to any given packaging;

g) demonstrate how to interpret the prescribed marking requirements for packagings, other than inner packagings;

h) demonstrate how to pack compatible dangerous goods together in the same outer packaging; and

i) demonstrate how to choose the most appropriate packagings for a dangerous goods article or substance.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-3

C. INTRODUCTION
4-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

4;1.1.1 Dangerous goods must be packed in good quality packagings, which must be strong enough to withstand
the shocks and loadings normally encountered during transport, including removal from a pallet, unit load device or
overpack for subsequent manual or mechanical handling. Packagings must be constructed and closed so as to
prevent any loss of contents when prepared for transport, which may be caused under normal conditions of transport,
by vibration, or by changes in temperature, humidity or pressure (resulting from altitude, for example). Packagings
(including inner packagings and receptacles) must be closed in accordance with the information provided by the
manufacturer. No dangerous residue must adhere to the outside of packages during transport. These provisions
apply, as appropriate, to new, reused, reconditioned or re-manufactured packagings.

This unit will provide you with a step-by-step approach to aid in identifying the most suitable packagings for an item of
dangerous goods.

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words, terms and codes used with respect to packagings. (Part 1;3,
Part 4; Introductory Notes, and Part 6;1)

Step 2 Familiarize yourself with the manufacturing requirements for the various types of packagings, Part 6;1
and 6;3, and the packaging performance tests, Part 6;4.

Step 3 Using the information in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 and the packing instructions found in
Part 4 (and, for purpose of this unit, Attachment 4), identify suitable packagings for the proper shipping name,
UN number and packing group entry in Table 3-1. (Table 3-1, Part 4 and Part 6;3)

Step 4 Evaluate which of the general packing requirements relate to the chosen packaging and determine if
they have been met. (Part 4;1 and 4;2)

Step 5 Confirm the prescribed markings for the packagings. (Part 6;2)

Note. When dangerous goods are offered for transport in overpacks, unit load devices, salvage packagings,
empty packagings or, in the case of radioactive material, freight containers be sure to check for additional or specific
requirements related to their safe transport.

D. WORDS, TERMS AND CODES PARTS 1 AND 4, AND PART 6;1

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words, terms and codes used with respect to packagings.

Words and terms Part 1;3 and Part 4 Introductory Notes

As was discussed in Units 1, 2 and 3 of this manual, the definitions for words and terms used in the Instructions are
primarily found in Part 1;3, but may be located in other parts to assist in the understanding of that part. This is true for
the packing requirements. Part 1;3 provides the majority of the definitions relevant to the packing activity, but additional
definitions are also found in Part 4; Introductory Notes.

The following is a series of exercises that will help you to locate definitions for words or terms relevant to the packing
activity.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-5

EXERCISE 4-1

Referring to Part 1;3 of the Instructions, write in the adjacent space the word or term best suited to the definition
provided below:

1. The complete product of the packing operation, consisting of the packaging and
its contents prepared for transport.

2. One or more receptacles and any other components or materials necessary for
the receptacles to perform their containment and other safety functions.

3. An enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or more packages and to


form one handling unit for convenience of handling and stowage.

4. A combination of packagings for transport purposes, consisting of one or more


inner packagings secured in an outer packaging in accordance with the relevant
provisions of Part 4.

5. Packagings consisting of an outer packaging and an inner receptacle so


constructed that the inner receptacle and the outer packaging form an integral
packaging. Once assembled, it remains thereafter an integrated single unit; it is
filled, stored, transported and emptied as such.

6. Packagings for which an outer packaging is required for transport.

7. Receptacles which require an outer packaging in order to perform their


containment function.

8. Packagings which do not require any inner packaging to perform their


containment function during transport.

9. Any type of freight container, aircraft container, aircraft pallet with a net or
aircraft pallet with a net over an igloo.
Note 1. An overpack is not included in this definition.
Note 2. A freight container for radioactive material is not included in this
definition (see 2;7.1.3).

10. Special packagings into which damaged, defective, leaking or nonconforming


dangerous goods packages, or dangerous goods that have spilled or leaked,
are placed for purposes of transport for recovery or disposal.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 4-2

Referring to Part 1;3, list and describe five words or terms that are associated with a type of packaging permitted for
air transport, e.g. cylinders:

1.
4-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

2.

3.

4.

5.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 4-3

Referring to the Introductory Notes of Part 4, answer the following questions:

1. Which of the notes tells us that for packing purposes there are
three packing groups assigned to most dangerous goods based on
the degree of danger they present?

2. List the three packing groups and state the meaning of each.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-7

3. Which of the notes tells us that certain classes/divisions must be


considered as a Packing Group II, unless otherwise indicated?

4. What are those classes/divisions that must be considered as a


Packing Group II, unless otherwise indicated?

5. In the Introductory Notes to Part 4, the Instructions draw particular


attention to three effects on package use and design, what are
they?

6. Which note deals with the carriage of oxygen for aquatic animals?

7. Which note deals with the transport of dangerous goods in portable


tanks?

8. Which note deals with the transport of lamps fuelled by UN 1223


Kerosene or UN 3295 Hydrocarbons, liquid, n.o.s., carried by
a passenger?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Codes Part 6;1

Codes consisting of letters and numbers provide an internationally recognized short form description for each type of
inner and outer packagings in air transport. For example, instead of writing out steel drums, non-removable head in full,
the shorter form or code for this type of packaging is 1A1.

You will find these codes for packagings, other than inner packagings, used in both the packing instructions in Part 4
and in the marking requirements, Part 6;2.

Packagings, other than inner packagings

The coding system for packagings, other than inner packagings, is quite simple. It is:

NUMBER CAPITAL LETTER NUMBER

NUMBER (only where necessary)


NUMBER
CAPITAL LETTER The third entry in the code only appears
Describes the kind of packagings
Describes the material (6;1.2.6) where there is further information as to
(6;1.2.5)
the kind of packagings (6;1.2.2)

1 = Drum A = Steel (all types and surface For example:


2 = Reserved treatments) 1A1 1 denotes a drum,
3 = Jerrican B = Aluminium A indicates it is steel, and
4 = Box C = Natural wood 1 indicates it has a non-removable
5 = Bag D = Plywood head
6 = Composite packagings F = Reconstituted wood 4H1 4 denotes a box,
4-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

G = Fibreboard H indicates it is a plastic material,


H = Plastic material and 1 indicates it Is expanded
L = Textile plastic.
M = Paper, multiwall
N = Metal (other than steel or
aluminium)
P = Glass, porcelain or stoneware
(not used in these Instructions)

Note. For composite packagings there will be two capital letters in the code. The first indicates the material of the
inner receptacle and the second the material of the outer packaging. (6;1.2.3)

Table 6-2 of the Instructions lists the code for each type of packaging, other than inner packagings, and links each to
their respective packaging requirements in Part 6. For example, adjacent to the entry for Fibre drums, you will find the
code 1G and the reference to the related construction and design requirements in 6;3.1.6.

Code and, where Maximum capacity Maximum net mass


Kind applicable, category Paragraph (L) (kg)

1G
Fibre drum Non-removable head 3.1.6* 450 400

*As Table 6-2 is found in Part 6, the reference shown under the heading Paragraph will omit the 6; before the 3.1.6.

6;3.1.6, spells out the manufacturing requirements of a fibre drum, which are:

6;3.1.6.1 The body of the drum must consist of multiple plies of heavy paper or fibreboard (without corrugations)
firmly glued or laminated together and may include one or more protective layers of bitumen, waxed kraft paper,
metal foil, plastic material, etc.

6;3.1.6.2 Heads must be of natural wood, fibreboard, metal, plywood, plastic or other suitable material and may
include one or more protective layers of bitumen, waxed kraft paper, metal foil, plastic material, etc.

6;3.1.6.3 The body and heads of the drum and their joins must be of a design appropriate to the capacity of the
drum and to its intended use.

6;3.1.6.4 The assembled packaging must be sufficiently water-resistant so as not to delaminate under normal
conditions of transport.

Also adjacent to each packaging in the table is a listing of the Maximum capacity in litres and Maximum net mass in
kilograms.

Note. For air transport, the maximum quantity allowed per package is often much lower than the maximum
quantity per package permitted for the other modes of transport.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-9

For example:

Code and, where Maximum capacity Maximum net mass


Kind applicable, category Paragraph (L) (kg)

Plywood boxes 4D 3.1.9 400

Composite
packaging 6HA1 (plastic receptacle
(plastic material) with outer steel drum) 3.1.18 250 400

EXERCISE 4-4

Referring to Part 6;1 write in the space adjacent to the description the code for each and the appropriate reference to
the manufacturing requirements for that packaging, and its maximum net mass (kg):

Maximum net
Description Code Paragraph mass (kg)

1. Drum, fibreboard

2. Box, steel

3. Bag, plastic (Woven plastic bag),without inner liner or coating

4. Drum, steel, removable head

5. Jerrican, aluminium, non-removable head

6. Box, natural wood, with siftproof walls

7. Box, aluminium

8. Jerrican, plastic, non-removable head

9. Box, reconstituted wood

10. Bag, textile, water-resistant

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Letters T or U or V or W

The letters T or U or V or W may also follow the packaging, other than inner packaging code (6;1.2.7). They indicate the
following:

T a salvage packaging (6;4.8)


U a special packaging (6;6.4)
V a special packaging (6;4.1.7)
W it is considered equivalent to the design type. (6;1.1.2)

Note. Wherever packing instructions ask for a particular outer packaging (e.g. 4G, 1A1) a packaging with the
letters V, U or W can be used as long as it conforms to the same requirements and is appropriately marked. (4;2.6)
4-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Inner packagings (6;1.3)

Note. Although references to the letters IP remain in Part 6 of the Instructions, these codes do not appear in the
new packing instructions that will come into effect on 1 January 2011. (For information regarding a transition period for
the new packing instructions, see Section F of this unit.)

Table 6-3 contains an index of inner packaging codes and lists the paragraph number which contains the requirements
for inner packagings together with, where applicable, individual performance tests (e.g. aerosols). For example:

Code Kind Paragraph

IP.1 Earthenware, glass or wax 3.2.1*

* As Table 6-3 is found in Part 6, the reference shown under the heading Paragraph will omit the 6; before the 3.2.1.

The letters IP. indicate inner packaging and the number indicates the kind of inner packaging. In this case the number
1 indicates the IP can be earthenware, glass or wax. Paragraph 3.2.1 refers to the Part 6 requirement for this type of
inner packaging, which states:

6;3.2.1 Packagings must be well constructed. The materials of which these packagings and closures are made
must be of good quality and, where in contact with the substance or article, not liable to react with it. Closures must
be sufficiently tight to prevent leaking and sifting. Stoppers or corks must be held securely in position with wire,
adhesive tape, or other positive means. Packagings having necks with moulded screw-threads must have threaded-
type caps having a resilient liner completely resistant to the contents.

Note. When the letters IP are used in reference to radioactive material packaging, they refer to Industrial
Packaging. See Part 4;9 of the Instructions for an explanation of industrial packaging, and Unit 9 for associated training
material.

In certain instances there can be a capital letter added to the code; this letter represents the type of material of the inner
packaging as is the case for IP.3A metal cans, tins or tubes, where the A stands for aluminium. It can also be used to
represent unique design and testing requirements for that inner packaging. See 6;3.2.7 where the IP.7A metal
receptacles (aerosols), non-refillable testing requirements indicate these metal receptacles must:

have a minimum wall thickness of 0.20 mm; and


not burst below 1 860 kPa gauge pressure.

E. PACKAGING AND PERFORMANCE TEST REQUIREMENTS PART 6;3 AND 6;4

Step 2 Familiarize yourself with the manufacturing requirements of the various types of packagings in
Part 6;1 and 6;3 and the packaging performance tests in Part 6;4.

Using the information provided in Part 6;1, 6;3 and 6;4, we can now identify the packaging and, where appropriate,
performance requirements of all the listed packagings, either single, combination or composite. Exercise 4-5 will provide
you with practice in extracting information from those requirements.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-11

EXERCISE 4-5

Referring to Part 6 of the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. The body and head of a 1B1 packaging


must be constructed of what?

2. Name the two methods of closing seams


required for a 1A1 packaging designed to
contain 40 L or less of liquids.

3. Fastenings on a 4C1 packaging must be


resistant to what?

4. Name one way a 5L2 packaging can be


made siftproof?

5. Must joins and closures of a 5M2 packaging


be waterproof?

6. Name four types of packaging performance


tests.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

F. PACKING INSTRUCTIONS PART 4 AND ATTACHMENT 4

Step 3 Using the information in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, and the packing instructions found in
Part 4 (and for the purpose of this unit, Attachment 4), identify the suitable packagings for the proper shipping
name, UN number and packing group entry in Table 3-1.

Note. Following an extensive technical review by the ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel, new packing instructions will
come into effect with the 2011-2012 Instructions. (Shipments prepared on or before 31 December 2010 in accordance
with the old packing instructions should be accepted for transport until 31 March 2011.)
4-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Where applicable, it is these new packing instructions that will be referred to in this unit.

See Appendix 4-1 of this unit for an explanation on how to match the dangerous goods listed in Table 3-1 with their
respective new packing instructions.

Editorial Note. Packing Instructions 215 to 217, 374 to 376, 495 to 497, 873 to 875 and 965 to 970 are presented in
the new format which will be adopted in the 2011-2012 edition of these Instructions (see Attachment 4).

In Unit 3 of this document we discussed how to identify the packing instruction and maximum net quantity per package
requirements for an entry in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1. The highlighted text in the following example will
help to refresh your memory.

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Gasoline 1203 3 Liquid A100 II E2 353 5L 364 60 L
flammable Y341 1L

As indicated in the above table, the packing instruction and maximum net quantity per package requirements for
Gasoline, UN 1203, are as follows:

Limited Quantity Packing Instruction is Y341 (new packing instruction) with a maximum net quantity per
package of 1 L;

Passenger Aircraft Packing Instruction is 353 (new packing instruction) with a maximum net quantity per
package of 5 L;

Cargo Aircraft Packing Instruction is 364 (new packing instruction) with a maximum net quantity per package of
60 L.

Note. Remember some entries in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 may:

1) have more than one packing group. Be sure to determine which packing group applies so that you can
correctly identify the appropriate packing instruction and maximum net quantity per package.

2) be FORBIDDEN for air transport or FORBIDDEN for transport on a passenger aircraft or a passenger and
cargo aircraft (See 3;2.1.1 for an explanation of the use of the word FORBIDDEN).

3) have either a State variation or special provision that affects the type of packagings to be used.

Generally speaking most of the packing instructions have a common look. See Appendix 4-2 for an example of a new
packing instruction.

The common look follows this pattern:

1. The packing instruction is headed by the packing instruction number or numbers to which it applies, for
example,
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-13

a) Packing Instruction 680 (new packing instruction); or


b) Packing Instructions 858 860 (new packing instruction).

2. Next is a record of the type of aircraft suitable for the transport of dangerous goods assigned this packing
instruction, for example,

a) passenger aircraft; or
b) cargo aircraft only; or
c) limited quantities passenger and cargo aircraft; or
d) passenger and cargo aircraft for specific dangerous goods (e.g. UN 1888 only). The applicable packing
group(s) may also be shown here with the UN number.

3. The next section, General requirements, establishes the connection between the packing instruction and the
general packing requirements of Part 4;1.

A complete review of that Chapter is required, unless otherwise indicated in the packing instruction, to
determine which of its provisions apply.

The link to the limited quantity requirements in Part 3;4 is also included, where applicable.

4. The table following the General requirements is divided into two headings Combination packagings and
Single packagings. Entry to this table is through the left-hand column either by:

a) packing instruction number and packing group, (e.g. 672, I); or


b) UN number and proper shipping name (e.g. UN 3356, Oxygen generator, chemical).

Under the heading Combination packagings are found the details on:

a) the acceptable inner packaging;


b) inner packaging quantity (per receptacle);
c) total quantity per package; and
d) in some cases, total gross mass per package.

Note. This table is sometimes followed by footnotes.

Under the heading Single packagings is found the net quantity of the substance per package or the word No,
which indicates single packagings are not permitted for that entry.

5. Additional packing requirements for combination packagings are immediately after the table.

6. The next table is headed by the words Outer packagings of combination packagings. This contains
information on the types of outer packagings that can be used in a combination packaging, for example,

Boxes Drums

Aluminium (4B) Aluminium (1B2)


Fibreboard (4G) Fibre (1G)
Natural Wood (4C1, 4C2) Other metal (1N2)

Note. Remember that the meanings of the codes and their respective requirements are located in Part 6.
4-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

7. Then come the Additional Packing Requirements for single packagings.

8. Lastly, the suitable Single Packagings for Packing Group I, II or III substances are identified.

For example, in Packing Instruction 350-355 the suitable single packagings are:

Single packagings for Packing Group III (PI 354 or PI 355)

Composites Cylinders Drums Jerricans

All (see 6;3.1.18) See 4;2.7 Aluminium (1B1, 1B2) Aluminium (3B1, 3B2)
Other metal (1N1, 1N2) Plastic (3H1, 3H2)
Plastic (1H1, 1H2) Steel (3A1, 3A2)
Steel (1A1, 1A2)

Note. Variations on this format can be found depending on the application of the packing instruction to a specific
item or class of dangerous goods.

EXERCISE 4-6

Referring to Part 4 of the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. When do the new packing instructions for Classes 3, 4, 5,


8, and 9 and Division 6.1 come into effect?

2. What is the packing instruction number for UN 3265,


Corrosive liquid, acidic, organic, n.o.s.*, Packing
Group II when it is to be transported on a passenger
aircraft?

3. What is the total gross mass per package for UN 3241,


2-Bromo-2-nitropropane-1, 3-diol permitted as a limited
quantity in Packing Instruction Y457?

4. Name three outer packagings that are acceptable for the


transport of self-reactive substances in combination
packagings, Packing Instruction 459.

5. To what type of aircraft do Packing Instructions 448-449


apply?

6. Is the use of single packagings permitted for Packing


Instruction 362?

7. What is the maximum quantity per glass receptacle in a


combination packaging for Packing Instruction Y343,
Packing Group III?

8. What is the total quantity per package for Packing


Instruction Y343, Packing Group I, II or III?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-15

9. In Packing Instruction 373 for UN 1228 (Packing


Group II), what is the quantity per inner packaging (per
receptacle) when being offered for transport on a
passenger aircraft?

10. State the additional packing requirements for combination


packagings of Packing Group I found in Packing
Instruction 854?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

G. GENERAL PACKING REQUIREMENTS PART 4;1 AND 4;2

Step 4 Evaluate which of the general packing requirements relate to the chosen packaging and determine if
they have been met. (Part 4;1 and 4;2)

The majority of packing instructions refer to Part 4;1 (General packing requirements) in total or to specific sections of
Part 4;1. It is the responsibility of the individual applying the provisions of the packing instructions to ensure that all of the
appropriate requirements of Part 4;1 are met.

Note. The following packing instructions, or parts thereof, do not make reference to Part 4;1. This is because all of
the appropriate packing requirements from Part 4;1 have been specified within the packing instruction.

Packing
Instruction Proper Shipping Name or description

202 Open cryogenic receptacles

214 Storage systems containing hydrogen absorbed in


metal hydride (UN 3468)

650 Biological Substances, Category B (UN 3373)

963 Consumer Commodities (ID 8000)

The following is a guide to locating information in Part 4;1 General packing requirements. Be sure to read the entire
chapter.

References Part 4;1 Summary

4;1.1.1 Dangerous goods must be packed in good quality packagings, constructed and
closed in accordance with the instructions from the manufacturer to prevent loss of
contents. No dangerous goods residue is permitted on the outside of the package.

4;1.1.2 General requirements for new, remanufactured, reused or reconditioned packagings.

4; 1.1.3 Compatibility requirements between the item of dangerous goods and all
components of the packagings.
4-16 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

References Part 4;1 Summary

Note. It is important to note that it is the shippers responsibility to ensure


compatibility between the packaging and the dangerous goods it is to contain. Only
the shipper knows the specific product formulation.

4;1.1.4 Closure requirements.

4; 1.1.5 Filling requirements for packagings of liquids.

4; 1.1.6 and 4; 1.1.6.1 Pressure differential requirements for packagings of liquids.

4; 1.1.7 to 4; 1.1.8 Requirements regarding the packing of dangerous goods with other dangerous or
non-dangerous goods. (See below for an explanation of this text.)

4; 1.1.9 Requirements regarding the packing, securing, cushioning and orientation of inner
packaging in an outer packaging.

4; 1.1.9.1 Types and sizes of inner packagings permitted in an outer packaging without
additional testing.

4; 1.1.10 to 4; 1.10.2 Absorbent material requirements.

4;1.1.11 Prohibition of the use of packagings that generate heat through friction or alter the
stability of its contents.

4;1.1.12 Venting prohibition.

4;1.1.13 Package orientation for combination packagings containing liquid dangerous goods.

4;1.1.14 Minimum packaging size.

4;1.1.15 Treatment of an empty packaging that has contained dangerous goods.

4;1.1.16 Liquids allowed (depending on vapour pressure) in packagings marked with the
hydraulic test pressure.

Note. Essentially what the paragraph says is the shipper must find out the
vapour pressure of the liquid at 50 or 55C and then add 50 per cent which then
gives the minimum hydraulic pressure mark that must appear in the UN mark.

4;1.1.17 Requirements regarding solids that may become liquid at temperatures encountered
during transport. (Also see 4;2.5.)

4;1.1.18 Leakproofness test requirements for packaging intended to contain liquids.

4;1.1.19 Closure requirements for packagings intended to contain wetted or diluted


substances.

4;1.1.20 Period of use for plastic drums and jerricans.

4;1.2 Performance test requirements for specification packagings detailed in the packing
instructions.

4;1.3 Transitional packaging arrangements for radioactive material. (See Unit 9 for a
consolidation of the radioactive material requirements.)

4;1.4 Salvage packagings requirements.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-17

The following is a guide to locating information in Part 4;2 General. Be sure to read the entire chapter.

References Part 4;2 Summary

4;2.1 Introduction to the packing instructions.

4;2.2 Reference to the location of the packing instructions in the Dangerous Goods List
Table 3-1.

4;2.3 Information to be found in the packing instructions.

4;2.4 Reference to Part 6, compatibility requirements and alternatives to glass


receptacles.

4;2.5 Packagings not to be used for substances that become liquid during transport.

4;2.6 Use of outer packagings with V, U or W in their identification code.

4;2.7 4;2.7.9 Requirements for cylinders to be used to contain liquids or solids.

4;2.8 Requirements for alternative packagings approved by the appropriate authority of


the State of Origin.

4;2.9 Transport requirements for large articles that cannot be packaged in accordance
with Part 6;1 to 6;4.

Dangerous goods packed with other substances (4;1.1.7 and 4;1.1.8)

Inner packagings of dangerous goods with different dangerous or non-dangerous goods may be packed together in the
same outer packagings provided they meet the requirements of 4;1.1.7 and 4;1.1.8, which are shown below. In this
context, outer packagings are not to be confused with overpacks.

4;1.1.7 Dangerous goods must not be packed together in the same outer packaging with dangerous or other goods
if they react dangerously with each other and cause:

a) combustion and/or evolution of considerable heat;

b) evolution of flammable, toxic or asphyxiant gases;

c) the formation of corrosive substances; or

d) the formation of unstable substances.

1.1.8 Subject to 1.1.7 an outer packaging may contain more than one item of dangerous goods provided that:

a) the inner packaging used for each item of dangerous goods and the quantity contained therein complies with the
relevant part of the packing instruction applicable to that item;

b) the outer packagings used are permitted by all the packing instructions applicable to each item of dangerous
goods;

c) the package as prepared for shipment meets the specification performance tests for the most restrictive packing
group of a substance or article contained in the package;
4-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

d) the dangerous goods do not require segregation according to Table 7-1, unless otherwise provided for in these
Instructions; and

e) the quantities of different dangerous goods contained in one outer packaging must be such that Q does not
exceed the value of 1, where Q is calculated using the formula:

n1 n2 n3
Q= + + +
M1 M2 M3

where n1, n2, etc. are the net quantities of the different dangerous goods and M1, M2, etc. are the maximum net
quantities for these different dangerous goods according to Table 3-1 for passenger or cargo aircraft as
applicable. However, the following dangerous goods do not need to be taken into account in the calculation of
the Q value:

1) carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), UN 1845;

2) those where columns 11 and 13 of Table 3-1 indicate No limit;

3) those with the same UN number, packing group, and physical state (i.e. solid or liquid), providing they are
the only dangerous goods in the package and the total net quantity does not exceed the maximum net
quantity according to Table 3-1.

4) those where columns 11 and 13 of Table 3-1 indicate a maximum gross mass per package.

f) for packages containing dangerous goods where the letter G follows the quantity shown in column 11 or 13 of
Table 3-1, the gross mass of the completed package does not exceed the lowest applicable gross mass.

An outer packaging containing Division 6.2 (Infectious Substances) may contain material for refrigeration, or freezing
or packaging material such as absorbent material.

Note For packages containing radioactive material, see 9.1.3.

Example: One outer packaging for transport by passenger aircraft contains inner packagings of:

2 L of Phenylhydrazine, UN 2572, Packing Group II; and


0.5 L of Arsenic acid, liquid, UN 1553, Packing Group I.

According to the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, the maximum permissible quantities and packing instructions for
these substances are:

Phenylhydrazine, 5L, Packing Instruction 654 (new packing instruction).


Arsenic acid, liquid, 1 L, Packing Instruction 652 (new packing instruction).

In this case Q = 2/5 + 0.5/1 = 0.9.

The total quantity offered, i.e., 2.5 L, is therefore acceptable since Q does not exceed 1.

Note. The outer packaging used must be acceptable under both packing instructions and, the package as
prepared for shipment, must meet the performance test for the most restrictive Packing Group of the various substances,
in this case Packing Group I.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-19

Example: One outer packaging contains inner packagings of different substances. It completely meets the requirements
of 4;1.1.7 and 4; 1.1.8 and is intended for transport by passenger aircraft. Follow the example using the Dangerous
Goods ListTable 3-1.

Maximum
permissible
quantity
Packing passenger
UN No. Name Class or Division Packing Group Instruction Quantity Offered aircraft
1594 Diethyl sulphate 6.1 II 1L 5L
1266 Perfumery 3 II 3L 5L
products
1264 Paraldehyde 3 III 36 L 60 L

i) Assume that these dangerous goods will not cause a dangerous reaction.
ii) The total quantity of all the substances offered is 40 L. Applying the formula we determine:

Q = 1/5 + 3/5 +36/60 = 1.4

The package is not acceptable because Q exceeds 1.

Application Exercise: General Packing Requirements

Example: The following demonstrates how the general requirements apply to a newly manufactured 1A1 steel drum,
single packaging to contain:

Alcohols, n.o.s., UN 1987,


Class or division: Class 3
Packing Group: III
Packing Instruction:
Passenger aircraft 355 (new packing instruction) (Permits 1A1 steel drums as single packagings for
Packing Group III)
Cargo aircraft 366 (new packing instruction) (Permits 1A1 steel drums as single packagings for Packing
Group III)
Maximum net quantity per package:
Passenger aircraft 60 L
Cargo aircraft 220 L

References Part 4;1 Applicable requirements

4;1.1.2 The drum must:


be of good quality;
be strong enough to withstand the shocks and loadings normally encountered
during transport, including removal from a pallet, unit load device or overpack;
be constructed and closed to prevent any loss of contents due to normal
conditions of transport (e.g., vibration, temperature, humidity and pressure);
be closed in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturer; and
have no dangerous residue on the outside.

Protection against abrasion due to dragging or pushing should be provided if it is to


be loaded on a narrow bodied aircraft.
4-20 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

References Part 4;1 Applicable requirements

The drum must comply with the applicable requirements for packaging (6;3.1) and
the packaging performance tests requirements (Part 6;4). (This can be confirmed by
the manufacturers specification markings on the drum; but if in doubt, check.)

4; 1.1.3 4; 1.1.4 The drum must be compatible with the dangerous goods, and proof of this must be
provided to the competent authority upon request.

The closure device must be able to be correctly and completely closed to prevent
any loss of contents due to normal conditions of transport. This must be easy to
check.

4; 1.1.5 The drum must not be completely filled with Alcohol n.o.s.; room for expansion
during transport must be allowed. (Liquids must not completely fill a packaging at a
temperature of 55C.)

4; 1.1.6 and 4; 1.1.6.1 The drum must be capable of withstanding without leakage an internal pressure
which produces a pressure differential of not less than 75 kPa, or a pressure related
to the vapour pressure of the liquid to be conveyed, whichever is the greater. (This
can be confirmed by the manufacturers specification markings on the drum; but if in
doubt, check.)

4; 1.1.7 to 4; 1.1.8 N/A. Different dangerous goods will not be packed together inside the drum.

4; 1.1.9 N/A. No more than one item of dangerous goods will be in the drum.

4; 1.1.9.1 N/A. This is not a combination packaging.

4; 1.1.1 to 4; 1.10.2 N/A. This is not a combination packaging.

4;1.1.11 Nature and thickness of the drum material must not generate heat through friction
that would alter dangerously the chemical stability of its contents.

4;1.1.12 N/A. There is no venting.

4;1.1.13 N/A. Does not apply to a single packaging.

4;1.1.14 The drum must be big enough to display all required labels and markings.

4;1.1.15 When dangerous goods have been removed from the drum it must continue to be
treated as full unless all dangerous residue is removed.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-21

References Part 4;1 Applicable requirements

4;1.1.16 Hydraulic pressure test required.

4;1.1.17 N/A In liquid state.

4;1.1.18 Must meet the leakproofness test (6;4.4.2).

Note. The package user should have a copy of the approval and the test
report. For liquid packagings there should be evidence that the manufacturer is
doing 100% leak testing of production.

4;1.1.19 N/A. Does not contain wetted or diluted substances.

4;1.1.20 N/A. Is not a plastic drum or jerrican.

4;1.2 Must meet the test requirements of the packing group for this substance. (This can
be confirmed by the manufacturers specification markings on the drum, but if in
doubt, check.)

4;1.3 N/A. Not radioactive material.

4;1.4 N/A. Not a salvage packaging.

References Part 4;2 Applicable requirements

4;2.1 N/A. Introduction to the packing instructions.

4;2.2 See Table 3-1 to identify the applicable packing instruction.

4;2.3 Information on how to read the packing instructions.

4;2.4 Drum must conform to the requirements of Part 6 and must be compatible with the
substance.

4;2.5 N/A . 1A1 Drum not listed.

4;2.6 N/A. Does not bear any of these additional marks.

4;2.7 4;2.7.9 N/A. Not a cylinder.

4;2.8 N/A. Not an alternative packaging.

4;2.9 N/A. Not a large or robust article.


4-22 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

H. MARKING OF PACKAGINGS, OTHER THAN INNER PACKAGINGS PART 6;2

Step 5 Confirm the prescribed marking for the packaging. (Part 6;2).

The following notes introduce the text on Marking of packagings, other than inner packagings and are important to
understanding the purpose of the marks:

Note 1. The marking indicates that the packaging which bears it corresponds to a successfully tested design
type and that it complies with the provisions of Part 6;3 and6;4 which are related to the manufacture, but not to the
use, of the packaging. In itself, therefore, the mark does not necessarily confirm that the packaging may be
used for any particular substance.

Note 2. The marking is intended to be of assistance to packaging manufacturers, reconditioners, packaging


users, operators and appropriate authorities. In relation to the use of a new packaging, the original marking is a
means for its manufacturer(s) to identify the type and to indicate those performance test regulations that have been
met.

Note 3. The marking does not always provide full details of the test levels, etc., and these may need to be
taken further into account.

Packagings, other than inner packagings, intended for the transport of dangerous goods by air must bear markings
which are:

durable;
legible; and
readily visible. (6;2.1)

Location and size of markings (6;2.1.1)

Height of letters,
Package size Location on packaging numbers and symbols

> 30 kg gross mass Original marking or duplicate on top or side Minimum 12 mm

30 L or 30 kg capacity Anywhere as long as they comply with 6;2.1 Minimum 6 mm

5 L or 5 kg Anywhere as long as they comply with 6;2.1 Appropriate size


Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-23

The prescribed marking is used to indicate the packaging complies with the relevant requirements of Part 6;3 to 6;4 and
consists of the following elements:

Reference Marking element Explanation of each element of the following


number two marks:

1A1/Y1.4/150/04
n
NL/VL824

1A2/Y50/S/04
n
USA/MM5

a) UN packaging symbol n or UN
n
or with embossed metal packagings the
capital letters UN.

b) The packaging code. 1A1 (Drum, steel, non-removable head)


n
Refer to Table 6-2 of the Instructions for an
index of the applicable codes. 1A2 (Drum, steel, removable head)
n

c) 1) X, Y or Z 1A1/Y (Packing Group II and III)


n
This indicates the packing group for which
the design type has been successfully tested.

X for Packing Groups I, II and III.


Y for Packing Groups II and III.
Z for Packing Group III only.

c) 2) A) Liquids
Relative density rounded off to the first 1A1/Y1.4 (Relative density for which design
n
decimal for which the design type is tested. type tested.)
For single packagings intended to carry
liquids.
When the relative density does not exceed
1.2, this number may be omitted.

c) 2) B) Solids or combination packagings 1A2/Y50 (Maximum gross mass for which


n
Maximum gross mass in kg for which the design type is tested.)
design type is tested.

d) 1) Liquids single packagings Liquids n 1A1/Y1.4/150 (Hydraulic test


Hydraulic test pressure which the packaging pressure which the packaging was shown to
was shown to withstand in kPa, rounded withstand.)
down to the nearest 10 kPa.

d) 2) Solids or combination packagings Solids n 1A2/Y50/S (solids)


S
4-24 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

e) The last two digits of the year the packaging Liquids 1A1/Y1.4/150/04 (Year of
n
was manufactured. manufacture)

Solids n 1A2/Y50/S/04 (Year of manufacture)


Packagings of types 1H1, 1H2, 3H1 and
3H2 must also be appropriately marked with 10
11
12
1
2

9 3

the month of manufacture; this may be 8


7
6
5
4

marked on the packaging in a different place


from the remainder of the marking.

f) Distinguishing sign for motor vehicles in Liquids n 1A1/Y1.4/150/04


international traffic for State authorizing the NL
allocation of the mark.
Solids n 1A2/Y50/S/04
USA

g) The name of the manufacturer or other Liquids n 1A1/Y1.4/150/04


identification of the packaging specified by NL/VL824
the appropriate national authority.
Solids n 1A2/Y50/S/04
USA/MM5

Note. Each marking must be applied in sequence and must be clearly separated by a slash or space, so as to be
easily identifiable. (6;2.1.7)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-25

The following examples provides an explanation for the packaging markings:


12
11 1

/4H2/Z250/S/08/DK/XXX
n /1H2/Y100/S/06 /KSA/XXX
10 2

9 3

n 8
7
6
5
4

a) a)
n n
Certifies this packaging Certifies this packaging complies with the
complies with the relevant relevant requirements of Parts 1 to 6
requirements of Parts 1 to 6

4H2 b) 1H2 b)

Packaging Code for: Packaging Code for:


Solid plastic boxes plastic or metal drums, removable head

Z c) 1) Y c) 1)

Z for Packing Group III only Y for Packing Groups II and III

250 c) 2) B) 100 2) B)

For packagings intended to For packagings intended to contain


contain solids or inner solids or inner packagings: the maximum
packagings: the maximum gross gross mass, in kilograms, at which
mass, in kilograms, at which the design type has been tested;
the design type has been tested
S d) 2) S d) 2)

For packagings intended to For packagings intended to contain


contain solids or inner solids or inner packagings: the letter S;
packagings: the letter S;
08 e) 06 e)
12
11 1
10 2

The last two digits of the year 9

8 4
3
The last two digits of the year during
7 5

during which the packaging was which the packaging was manufactured.
6

manufactured. Packagings of types 1H1, 1H2, 3H1 and


3H2 must also be appropriately marked
with the month of manufacture; this may
be marked on the packaging in a
different place from the remainder of the
marking.

DK f) KSA f)

The State authorizing the The State authorizing the allocation of


allocation of the mark, indicated the mark, indicated by the distinguishing
by the distinguishing sign for sign for motor vehicles in international
motor vehicles in international traffic Saudi Arabia
traffic Denmark
4-26 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

12
11 1

/4H2/Z250/S/08/DK/XXX
n /1H2/Y100/S/06 /KSA/XXX
10 2

9 3

n 8
7
6
5
4

XXX g) XXX g)

The name of the manufacturer The name of the manufacturer or other


or other identification of the identification of the packaging specified
packaging specified by the by the appropriate national authority.
appropriate national authority.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
4G Y50 S 09 GB 4568
n

4 Box Y PG II/III S solids or Year of Country of approval


G- Fibreboard 50KG inner packagings manufacture
Note. When S appears in This may not be the
column 4 the number after X, Y or country of
Z is always kg manufacture
1A1 Y1.3 150 09 AUS gh376
n

Y PG II/III Hydraulic
1.3 relative pressure test
density
Note. If Note. This is This last
relative density NOT the vapour element will
is 1.2 or less pressure of the vary from
then no number substance. For country to
need appear 150 kPa, as a country.
after X, Y or Z rough guide the
limit of substance
vapour pressure
is 100 kPa, i.e., a
50% safety
margin is built in.

Part 6;2 also contains specific marking provisions for:

new metal drums of a capacity greater than 100 L; (6;2.1.2)


reconditioned packaging; (6;2.1.3)
re-manufactured metal drums; (6;2.1.4 and 6; 2.1.8 and 6;2.1.9)
metal drums made from material designed for repeated use; (6;2.1.5)
packagings manufactured from recycled plastic. (6;2.1.6)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-27

EXERCISE 47

Referring to the marking provisions in Part 6;2, answer the following questions and adjacent to each answer indicate
the reference number from the Instructions:

1. Are the marks specified in Part 6;2 required to be


shown on inner packagings?

2. What is the alternative mark for the UN


packaging symbol and when can it be
n
used?

3. Is 6A1 a code which designates the type of


packaging? Explain your answer.

4. Is 6HH2 a code which designates the type of


packaging? Explain your answer.

5. What does the letter Y stand for when it appears


in the packaging mark following the packaging
code?

6. What does this indicate?


12
11 1
10 2

9 3

8 4
7 5
6

7. How is the State authorizing the allocation of the


mark indicated in the mark?

8. What three markings must a reconditioner apply


in sequence on a reconditioned packaging?

9. What additional mark must appear on packaging


manufactured with recycled plastic material?

10. Can the package marking be hidden by a label


which provides information on the content of the
packaging?
4-28 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

When applying the package specification mark, reference should also be made to the provisions of 5;2.4.4 of the
Instructions where the following requirement is found:

5;2.4.4.1 Each outer or single packaging used for dangerous goods, for which specification packaging is required in
Part 4, must bear the markings appropriate to the contents as specified in Part 6, Chapter 2.

5;2.4.4.2 Markings must be stamped, printed or otherwise marked on the package to provide adequate
permanency.

I. SUMMARY

Step 6 Choose the most appropriate packaging for the dangerous goods and mark and load it.

The following checklist consolidates all of the previous steps.

A. Using the Dangerous Good ListTable 3-1

1. Identify the proper shipping name, UN number and packing group.


2. Determine whether the article or substance is FORBIDDEN for air transport.
3. Identify the related State variations and special provisions, if any, and determine how they apply.
4. Determine whether the article or substance is permitted on passenger and/or cargo aircraft. Choose which type
of aircraft to be used.
5. Determine the appropriate packing instruction number.

B. Using packing instructions Part 4 and, for the purpose of this unit, Attachment 4

1. Locate the packing instruction number in Part 4 and, for the purpose of this unit, Attachment 4.
2. Based upon the quantity to be shipped, and availability of the acceptable packagings identified in the packing
instruction, choose the type of packaging to use.
3. Ensure that the type of packaging chosen meets and is packed in accordance with all of the general packing
requirements of Part 4;1 and the quantity limitations of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 and the
appropriate packing instruction.
4. Confirm compliance with all State variations and special provisions.

Note. It is the exclusive responsibility of the shipper to ensure that the inner packagings used are permitted in the
relevant packing instruction and that the general packing requirements (quantity limitations, cushioning, absorbent
material, etc.) have been complied with.

C. Using packaging nomenclature, marking, requirements and tests Part 6

1. Ensure that the correct specification marking has been applied to the packaging (other than the inner
packagings) of combination packagings.

The checklist outlined above is illustrated in the following example:


Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-29

Example: 30 L of Isobutyl acetate is to be transported in one package.

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity instruction package instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Isobutyl 1213 3 Liquid A100 II E2 305 5L 307 60 L
acetate Flammable Y305 1L

A. Using the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1

1. Identify the proper shipping name, UN number and packing group.

proper shipping name (Column 1 of Table 3-1) is: Isobutyl acetate.


UN number (Column 2 of Table 3-1) is: UN 1213.
packing group (Column 8 of Table 3-1) is: II.

2. Determine whether the article or substance is FORBIDDEN for air transport.

The word FORBIDDEN does not appear adjacent to the proper shipping name (Columns 2 and 3, or Columns 10
and 11, or 12 and 13 in Table 3-1), therefore it is not forbidden from air transport.

3. Identify the related State variations and special provisions, if any, and determine how they apply.

No State variations (Column 6 of Table 3-1) or special provisions (Column 7 of Table 3-1) are indicated adjacent to
the proper shipping name in Table 3-1, therefore none apply.

4. Determine whether the article or substance is permitted on passenger and/or cargo aircraft. Choose which type
of aircraft to be used.

Not acceptable for transport on passenger aircraft. Isobutly acetate may be transported on both passenger
and cargo aircraft, but as it is in one package of 30 L it is not eligible to be transported on a passenger
aircraft which has a maximum net quantity per package of 5 L.

Acceptable for transport on cargo aircraft. The 30 L package is acceptable for transport on a cargo aircraft
because the maximum net quantity per package for cargo aircraft is 60 L.

5. Determine the appropriate packing instruction number.

The packing instruction in Column 12 is 364 (new packing instruction).

B. Using packing instructions Part 4 and, for the purpose of this unit, Attachment 4.

1. Locate packing instruction in Part 4 and, for the purpose of this unit, Attachment 4.

Refer to Packing Instruction 364 in Attachment 4 of the Instructions.

2. Based upon the quantity to be shipped, and availability of the acceptable packagings identified in the packing
instruction, choose the type of packagings to use.
4-30 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Note that this packing instruction permits either combination packagings or single packagings. If the 30 L are to
be transported in a single packaging, any of the composites, cylinders, drums, jerricans listed under the
heading Single Packagings for Packing Group II may be used. If the 30 L are to be transported in a
combination packaging, any of the inner packagings (glass, plastic or metal) listed may be used in combination
with any of the suitable outer packagings.

In the following example the maximum net quantity per package of 60 L will not be exceeded:

twelve plastic inner packagings of 5 L each inside a 4C1 wooden box; or


twelve glass inner packagings of 2.5 L each inside a 1B2 aluminium drum.

3. Ensure that the type of packaging chosen meets and is packed in accordance with all of the general packing
requirements of Part 4;1 and the quantity limitations of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 and the packing
instruction.

Whichever packaging is used, the shipper must be satisfied that the packaging meets the appropriate
requirements of Part 4 and 6 of the Instructions. The shipper must also ensure that all of the appropriate
general packing requirements of Part 4;1 have been met.

4. Confirm compliance with all State variations and special provisions.

No State variations (Column 6 of Table 3-1) or special provisions (Column 7 of Table 3-1) are indicated
adjacent to the proper shipping name in Table 3-1, therefore none apply.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-31

Appendix 4-1.

CHECKLIST FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE NEW PACKING INSTRUCTIONS


IN THE 20092010 EDITION OF THE INSTRUCTIONS

To determine the appropriate packing instruction for each of the affected dangerous goods listed in Table 3-1 follow
these steps:

Step 1: Referring to Table 3-1, identify the proper shipping name, UN number and packing group for the article or
substance of dangerous goods.

For example: The proper shipping name, UN number and packing group entry for Gasoline in Table 3-1 is as follows:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft

Max. net Max. net


Class Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Gasoline 1203 3 Liquid A100 II E2 353 5L 364 60 L
Flammable Y341 1L

Step 2: Referring to Table A-3 Packing instruction numbers in Attachment 4 of the Instructions, locate the UN number
(UN No.) and packing group (PG) you have chosen from Table 3-1. Table A-3 shows two columns per page, each
column is divided into eight (8) sections:

Sections 1 and 2 show the UN Nos. in numerical order and their respective packing groups;
Sections 3 and 4 show the current packing instruction and new packing instruction for limited quantities;
Sections 5 and 6 show the current packing instruction and new packing instruction for passenger aircraft;
Sections 7 and 8 show the current packing instruction and new packing instruction for cargo aircraft.

For example: The entry point for Gasoline is UN No. 1203, Packing Group II.

UN PG Limited Quantity Passenger Cargo


No.
Current New Current New Current New
1203 II Y305 Y341 305 353 307 364

The new packing instructions for Gasoline are:

limited quantity Y341


passenger aircraft 353
cargo aircraft 364.

Note. When the letter F appears in any of the sections of Table A-3 it indicates that the item of dangerous goods
is FORBIDDEN for transport under that section.

Step 3: Referring to the second part of Attachment 4 of the Instructions, locate the appropriate packing instruction by
matching the new packing instruction number identified in Table A-3 with the number shown at the top of the packing
instructions.
4-32 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

For example: If gasoline is to be transported by passenger aircraft, the introduction to the new packing instruction would
look like this:

Packing Instructions 350 355

Passenger aircraft

General requirements

Part 4, Chapter 1 requirements must be met, including:

1) Compatibility requirements

Substances must be compatible with their packagings as required by 4;1.1.3.


Metal packagings must be corrosion resistant or be protected against corrosion for substances
with a Class 8 subsidiary risk.

2) Closure requirements

Closures must meet the requirements of 4;1.1.4.

Note. Certain of the new packing instructions will be headed with a range of numbers, for example Packing
Instructions 360-366. The new cargo aircraft packing instruction for Gasoline is 364; therefore Packing Instruction
360-366 would apply.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Insructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 4. Packing requirements 4-33

Appendix 4-2.

SAMPLE OF NEW PACKING INSTRUCTION

1.

Packing Instruction 350 355

2.

Passenger aircraft

3.

General requirements

Part 4, Chapter 1 requirements must be met, including:

1) Compatibility requirements
Substances must be compatible with their packagings as required by 4;1.1.3.
Metal packagings must be corrosion resistant or be protected against corrosion for substances with a Class 8
subsidiary risk.
2) Closure requirements
Closures must meet the requirements of 4;1.1.4

4.

COMBINATION PACKAGINGS

Inner Inner packaging Total SINGLE


Packing packaging quantity quantity PACKAGINGS
Packing Instruction Group (see 6;3.2) (per receptacle) per package

350 Glass 0.5 L

I Plastic Forbidden 0.5 L No

Metal 0.5 L

351 Glass 0.5 L

I Plastic Forbidden 1L No

Metal 1.0 L

352 Glass 1.0 L

II Plastic 1.0 L 1L No

Metal 1.0 L

353 Glass 1.0 L

II Plastic 5.0 L 5L No

Metal 5.0 L

354 Glass 2.5 L


III 5L 5L
Plastic 5.0 L
4-34 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Metal 5.0 L

355 Glass 2.5 L

III Plastic 10.0 L 60 L 60 L

Metal 10.0 L

5.

ADDITIONAL PACKING REQUIREMENTS FOR COMBINATION PACKAGINGS

Packing Group I
Inner packagings must be packed with absorbent material and placed in a rigid leakproof receptacle before
packing in outer packagings.

Packing Group III


Packagings must meet the Packing Group II performance requirements if the substance has a Class 8
subsidiary risk.

6.

OUTER PACKAGINGS OF COMBINATION PACKAGINGS (see 6;3.1)

Boxes Drums Jerricans

Aluminium (4B) Aluminium (1B2) Aluminium (3B2)


Fibreboard (4G) Fibre (1G) Plastic (3H2)
Natural wood (4C1, 4C2) Other metal (1N2) Steel (3A2)
Plastic (4H1, 4H2) Plastic (1H2)
Plywood (4D) Plywood (1D)
Reconstituted wood (4F) Steel (1A2)
Steel (4A)

7.

ADDITIONAL PACKING REQUIREMENTS FOR SINGLE PACKAGINGS

Packing Group III


Packagings must meet the Packing Group II performance requirements if the substance has a Class 8
subsidiary risk.

8.

SINGLE PACKAGINGS FOR PACKING GROUP III (PI 354 OR PI 355)

Composites Cylinders Drums Jerricans

All (see 6;3.1.18) See 4;2.7 Aluminium (1B1, 1B2) Aluminium (3B1, 3B2)
Other metal (1N1, 1N2) Plastic (3H1, 3H2)
Plastic (1H1, 1H2) Steel (3A1, 3A2)
Steel (1A1, 1A2)

______________________
UNIT 5

Package Marking and Labelling


Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 5 ......................................................................... 5-2
B. Goal Unit 5 .................................................................................................................................................. 5-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 5-2
D. Package markings Part 5;2 ......................................................................................................................... 5-3
E. Labelling Part 5;3 ........................................................................................................................................ 5-10
F. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 5-22

5-1
5-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 5

Subject Matter: Labelling and marking


Category of personnel: All

B. GOAL UNIT 5

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether the labelling and marking requirements of Part 5
of the Instructions have been correctly applied.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state the purpose of package markings and labeling;

b) state the marks that must appear on a specification package;

c) demonstrate when and where to apply the package markings;

d) demonstrate, by using Table 3-1, how to identify the labels required for an item of dangerous goods;

e) state where to locate in the Instructions the class hazard and handling labels;

f) demonstrate the ability to decide when markings and label(s) are not correctly displayed; and

g) demonstrate when, how and where to apply package marking and class hazard and handling labels on a
package or, where applicable, overpack.

C. INTRODUCTION

5;1 Note. It is the shippers responsibility to ensure that all of the applicable air transport requirements are met.

Correct marking and labelling of dangerous goods packages is an important element in the safe transport process.
Markings and labels fulfill the following general purposes:

a) to indicate the contents of the package;

b) to indicate that the packaging meets approved standards;

c) to provide safe handling and stowage information;

d) to indicate the nature of the hazard or hazards; and

e) to identify the name and address of the shipper and consignee.

Note. Refer to 1;3.1 of the Instructions for a definition of the word consignee.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-3

Marking and labelling requirements are dealt with in Part 5;2 and 5;3 of the Instructions. This unit may be used as a
guide to understanding those provisions and is divided into:

Package markings
principle markings
additional markings
application of markings
language

Labelling
single hazard
multiple hazards
two or more dangerous goods in the same outer packaging
application of labels
label specifications
handling labels
overpacks and unit load devices.

Note. The shipper is responsible for the correct classification and preparation for transport of an item of
dangerous goods. Shippers are not relieved of any of these responsibilities even if they use an agent to do these
activities on their behalf.

EXERCISE 5-1

In the following examples state who is responsible for ensuring the dangerous goods are properly classified,
documented, certificated, described, packaged, marked, labelled and in the condition for shipment required by the
Instructions

1. Company X hires consultant Y to prepare a shipment of


dangerous goods, which Company X will then offer for transport.

2. Company X is providing the dangerous goods to a Freight


Forwarder Y who will give them to an air operator.

3. An air operator is sending a load of gasoline to its base in


northern Canada.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

D. PACKAGE MARKINGS PART 5;2

1. Principle markings

There are three standard package markings required on packages of dangerous goods. They are used to:
5-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

1) identify the content of the package through the display of the proper shipping name, and technical name,
where applicable, and UN number. (5;2.4.1.)
Example: Corrosive liquid, acidic, organic, n.o.s. (caprylyl chloride), UN 3265.

Note. Additional descriptive text found in the entries in column 1 of the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1 are not
part of the proper shipping name but may be used in addition to the proper shipping name. (3;1.2.1)

2) identify the name and address of the shipper and the consignee (receiver) of the dangerous goods.
(5;2.4.2).

Example:

Shipper: Consignee:
Mr. Smith Ms. Jones
ABC Company XYZ Company
123 Maple Street 567 Maplethorp Road
New York, New York London, England
10171 MJ24 8BB

3) indicate the packaging meets approved standards. (5;2.4.4)

Note. See Part 6;2, Marking of Packagings other than Inner Packagings, of the Instructions for the provisions
concerning package specification markings, and Unit 4 of this training material.

Example: n /1A1/Z/1.4/150/06/GB/XXX

UN packaging symbol certifies the packaging complies with


n
the relevant requirements of the Instructions

1A1 Steel drum with a non-removable head

Z Packing Group III only

1.4 relative density for which the design type has been tested

150 hydraulic test pressure in kPa, which the packaging was


shown to withstand

06 the last two digits of the year during which the packaging was
manufactured

GB State authorizing the allocation of the mark (See


distinguishing signs for Motor Vehicles in International Traffic.)

XXX the name of the manufacturer or other identification specified


by the appropriate national authority
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-5

2. Additional markings

Other marks may be required depending on the type of dangerous goods within the package, the type of package and
the mode of transport to be used. The following chart summarizes these additional marking requirements and identifies
the appropriate references within the Instructions:

Subject Required additional markings

Explosives (5;2.4.3) Net quantity of explosives


Gross mass of package
Note. Commercial or military names may supplement proper
shipping name
5-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Radioactive material (5;2.4.5) (See Unit 9 for a consolidation of the radioactive material provisions
found in the Instructions.)

Refrigerated liquefied gas (5;2.4.6) Arrows to indicate upright position, or Package Orientation
(Check 2;2.1.2 c) for a definition of label (Figure 5-26).
refrigerated liquefied gas.) Words KEEP UPRIGHT placed around the package at 120
intervals or on each side.
Words DO NOT DROP HANDLE WITH CARE.

Dry ice (5;2.4.7) Net mass of dry ice


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-7

Biological substances, Category B Proper shipping name Biological substance, Category B, if packed in
(5;2.4.8) accordance with Packing Instruction 650.
(Check 2;6.3.2.2.2 for a definition of
Biological substances, Category B.)

Environmentally hazardous substance


liquid, n.o.s or solid n.o.s. (UN 3077 and
3082), except for single packagings and
combination packagings containing inner
packagings with:
contents of 5 L or less for liquids; or
contents of 5 kg or less for solids.
(5;2.4.9)
(Check 2;9.2.1 a) for a definition of
environmentally hazardous substances.) (Figure 5-2) adjacent to the proper shipping name and UN number

Overpack (5;2.4.10) (Check 1;3.1 for a Word Overpack with the proper shipping name and UN number
definition of the word overpack.) Special handling instructions which appear on interior packages,

unless markings and labels representative of all dangerous goods are


visible.
5-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Limited quantity packages (5;2.4.11) (See Part 3;5 of the Instructions for an explanation of the limited
quantity provisions and Unit 10 for associated training material.)

Other modes of transport (5;2.4.12) Markings required by international or national transport regulations, as
long as their colour, design or shape does not conflict with the marking
required by the Instructions.

Oxygen generator, chemical in Statement Aircrew protective breathing equipment (smoke hood)
protective breathing equipment in accordance with Special Provision A 144 adjacent to the proper
transported in accordance with Special shipping name.
Provision A 144. (5;2.4.13)

Salvage packagings (5;1.5) Proper shipping name and UN number


Word Salvage

Note. Always check the relevant special provision(s) and packing instruction as they may contain additional
package markings requirements.

Examples:

Special Provision A87: Articles which are not fully enclosed by packaging, crates or other means that prevent
ready identification are not subject to the marking requirements of 5;2 or the labelling requirements of 5;3. (See
Battery-powered equipment, UN 3171)

Packing Instruction 137: For UN 0059, 0439, 0440 and 0441, when the shaped charges are packed singly, the
conical cavity must face downwards and the package marked THIS SIDE UP. (See Charges, explosive,
commercial without detonator, UN 0444, Division 1.4D)

3. Application of markings

The instructions for the application of markings can be found in 5;2.2.1 and are as follows:

5;2.2.1 All markings must be so placed on the packagings that they are not covered or obscured by any part of or
attachment to the packaging or any other label or marking.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-9

5;2.2.2 All package markings required by 2.1:

a) must be durable and printed or otherwise marked on, or affixed to, the external surface of the package;

b) must be readily visible and legible;

c) must be able to withstand open weather exposure without a substantial reduction in effectiveness;

d) must be displayed on a background of contrasting colour; and

e) must not be located with other package markings that could substantially reduce their effectiveness.

Note. For unpackaged articles the marking must be displayed on the article, on its cradle or on its handling,
storage or launching device. (5;2.4.1.1)

EXERCISE 5-2

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. Name the package markings normally found on a


specification package of dangerous goods.

2. What additional mark is required for a single packaging of


25 L of UN 3077? Indicate where the mark is to be
located.

3. Under what conditions may the marks required by


international or national transport regulations appear on a
package of dangerous goods?
5-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

4. The proper shipping name and UN number are printed in


black on a black background. Is this acceptable?

5. Name one place the markings must be displayed on an


unpackaged article.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

4. Language

Where the markings are required on a package they should be in English as well as the language(s) which may be
required by the State in which the package originates. (5;2.5)

E. LABELLING PART 5;3

There are two types of labels found in the Instructions.

The class hazard label, which is used to provide an immediate indication of the risk posed by the dangerous
goods.

The handling label, which is used to provide information on proper handling and stowage.

Note. Part 5;3 establishes most of the labelling requirements, but additional requirements may be found in the
special provisions and packing instructions. Always check.

Examples:

Special Provision A104: A toxic subsidiary risk label, although not required by these Instructions, may be
applied. (See Methanol UN 1230)

Packing Instruction 208: Note. Labelling, marking, dangerous goods transport document and information to
pilot-in-command are not required. (See Articles, pressurized, hydraulic containing non-flammable gas,
UN 3164, Division 2.2)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-11

1. Class hazard label

Class hazard labels are required for all articles or substances in Classes 1 to 9, unless otherwise indicated. Column 5
of the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1 specifies the labels required for each entry.

5;3.2.1 The labels required to be displayed on packages of dangerous goods are identified in the Dangerous Goods
List for articles and substances specifically listed by name and for articles and substances not specifically listed by
name which are covered by generic or n.o.s. entries.

Turn to Part 5 of the Instructions to see the labels for the nine Classes and, where applicable, their Divisions. (Figures 5-
3 to 5-23)

i) Single hazard

You will note that for some entries in Column 5 of Table 3-1 only one label is required, as in the examples given below
for Acetaldehyde, UN 1841 and Isobutanol, UN 1212.

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Class Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Acetaldehyde 1841 9 Miscellaneous A48 III E1 956 200 kg 956 200 kg
ammonia
Isobutanol 1212 3 Liquid III E1 355 60 L 366 220 L
flammable 10 L

Acetaldehyde ammonia, UN 1841, Class 9 requires a Miscellaneous label.

Isobutanol, UN 1212, Class 3 requires a Flammable Liquid label.

3
5-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

ii) Multiple hazards

Some articles or substances present more than one hazard and require more than one label. In these cases Column 5
of Table 3-1 will list each of the required labels, separating them with an &. The following extracts from Table 3-1 show
two examples of substances requiring more than one label:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Class Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Ethyldichlorosilane 1183 4.3 3 Danger if I E0 FORBIDDEN 480 1L
8 wet &
Liquid
flammable
&
Corrosive
Oxygen 1072 2.2 5.1 Gas non- US 18 E0 200 75 kg 200 150 kg
compressed flammable
& Oxidizer

Ethyldichlorosilane, UN 1183, Primary Division 4.3, Subsidiary Classes 3 and 8 requires a Danger if wet label and
Flammable liquid label and Corrosive label.

* * *

The asterisk in the bottom half of the diamond must be replaced with the appropriate class number.

Oxygen compressed, UN 1072, Primary Division 2.2, Subsidiary Division 5.1 requires a Gas non-flammable label and
an Oxidizer label.

2 5.1
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-13

Note. Remember to always check the relevant special provision(s) and packing instruction(s) to determine if
additional labelling requirements exist.

iii) Two or more dangerous goods in the same outer packaging 5;1.7

Note the following requirement for the labelling of packages which contain two or more dangerous goods:

5;1.7 MIXED PACKING

When two or more dangerous goods are packed within the same outer packaging, the package must be labelled and
marked as required for each substance. Labels need not be applied for a subsidiary risk if the hazard is already
represented by a primary risk label.

EXERCISE 5-3

Referring to the Instructions, name the labels required for the following list of dangerous goods:

1. Benzidine, UN 1885

2. Pyridine, UN 1282

3. Propadiene, stabilized, UN 2200

4. Projectiles with bursting charge, UN 0344

5. Rubidium, UN 1423

6. Batteries, wet, filled with acid, electric storage,


UN 2794

7. Methanol, UN 1230

8. Ammunition, smoke with or without burster, expelling


charge or propelling charge, UN 0303 (containing
Class 8 corrosive smoke-producing substances)
5-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

9. Potassium phosphide, UN 2012

10. Perchloric acid with not more than 50% acid, by mass,
UN 1802

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

iv) Application of Labels 5;3.2

There are nine simple rules to the application of labels. Label(s) must:

1. Be able to withstand all sorts of weather without reduction in effectiveness. (5;3.1.3)

2. Be on a contrasting background or must have a dotted or solid line outer boundary. (5;3.2.7 a))

3. Be located on the same surface of the package near the proper shipping name, if the package dimensions are
adequate.(5;3.2.7 b)) (Radioactive material is the only class of dangerous goods which requires the presence
of two labels. See Unit 9 for a consolidation of the radioactive material provisions found in the Instructions.)

4. Be placed on the packaging so that they are not covered or obscured by any part of or attachment to the
packaging or any other label or marking. (5;3.2.7 c))

5. When primary and subsidiary risk labels are required, be displayed next to each other. (5;3.2.7 d))

6. In the case of hazard warning labels, be affixed at an angle of 45 (diamond shaped), unless the package
dimensions are inadequate. (5;3.2.7 e))

7. Not be folded. (5;3.2.8)

8. Not overlap itself. (5;3.2.8)

9. Be firmly affixed to or printed on the package. Exception: Strong tags can be used to display a label(s) that
does not fit onto an irregularly shaped package. (5;3.2.9)

Note. Paragraph 5;3.2 also contains additional labelling instructions for:

Class 8 with a subsidiary risk of Division 6.1 (5;3.2.2)


Division 4.2 with a subsidiary risk of 4.1 (5;3.2.2)
Organic peroxides which meet the criteria for Class 8, Packing Group I or II (5;3.2.3)
Infectious substances with other dangerous goods (5;3.2.4) (See Unit 8 for a consolidation of the infectious
substances provisions found in the Instructions.)
Radioactive materials (5;3.2.5 and 5;3.2.6) (See Unit 9 for a consolidation of the radioactive material
provisions found in the Instructions.)
Magnetized material (5;3.2.10).
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-15

EXERCISE 5-4

Referring to the Instructions, indicate if the following labels are acceptable:

1.

2.

3.
5-16 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

4.

5.

6.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-17

v) Label Specifications 5;3.4 and 5;3.5

Carefully study all labels that are illustrated in Figures 5-3 to 5-31.

Read the class hazard label specifications found in Part 5;3.5.

EXERCISE 5-5

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. What words should appear in the bottom part of the


infectious substance label?

2. What number is shown in the bottom half of the oxidizing


substance label?

3. What is the background colour for the Explosive Class 1,


Division 6 label?

4. What does *** stand for in the bottom half of the


Explosive Class 1, Division 4 label?

5. What appears in the top half of the miscellaneous


dangerous goods label?

6. What are the minimum dimensions of a label?

7. Where may a manufacturers name appear on a label?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

2. Handling labels 5;3.2.11 and 5;3.5.2

The following list identifies all required handling labels. Read the reference found adjacent to each of the labels listed
below:
5-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Magnetized material label (5;3;2.10, Column 5 of Table 3-1 Figure 5-24)

Cargo aircraft only label (5;3.2.11 a) Figure 5-25)

The cargo aircraft only label as contained in the 2007-2008 edition of the Instructions may continue to be used until
31 December 2012.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-19

Package orientation label (5;3.2.11 b) Figure 5-26 or ISO Standard 780-1997)


Note. No arrows other than those for package orientation are permitted on a package. (5;2.3)

Cryogenic liquid label (5;3.2.11 c) Figure 5-28)

CONTAINS
CRYOGENIC LIQUID

Keep away from heat label (5;3.2.11 d) Figure 5-29)


5-20 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Excepted packages of radioactive material label (5;3.2.11 e) Figure 5-30)

Radioactive Material, Excepted Package


This package contains radioactive material, excepted package and
is in all respects in compliance with the applicable international and
national governmental regulations.

Lithium battery label (5;3.5.2.2 Figure 5-31)

CAUTION!

IF DAMAGED

DO NOT LOAD OR TRANSPORT


PACKAGE IF DAMAGED

For more information, call xxx.xxx.xxxx

Colour: red on a contrasting background * Place for Lithium ion battery and/or
Dimensions: 120 110 mm Lithium metal battery
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 5. Package Marking and Labelling 5-21

Read the handling label specifications found in Part 5;3.5.2.

EXERCISE 5-6

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. What handling labels(s) is required for a package of


Potassium, UN 2257, Division 4.3?

2. What handling labels(s) is required for a package of


Lithium ion batteries packed in accordance with
Section II of Packing Instruction 965?

3. What handling labels(s) is required for a


combination packaging containing one bottle of 300
ml of flammable liquid?

4. What handling labels(s) is required for a package of


Nitrogen, refrigerated liquid, UN 1977?

5. What handling labels(s) is required for a package of


Self-reactive solid type E* UN 3228, Division 4.1?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

3. Overpacks and unit load devices

The requirements for the labelling of overpacks are found in 5;3.3.1 and 5;3.3.2 of the Instructions.

5;3.3.1 An overpack must be labelled as required for packages by Chapter 3, for each item of dangerous goods
contained in the overpack unless labels representative of all dangerous goods in the overpack are visible.

5;3.3.2 An overpack containing single packages with end closures containing liquid dangerous goods must be
labelled with either the Package Orientation label (Figure 5-26), or pre-printed package orientation labels meeting
the same specification as either Figure 5-26 or ISO Standard 780-1997, unless such labels are affixed to the package
and are visible from the outside of the overpack. Such labels must be affixed to or printed on at least two opposite
vertical sides of the overpack with the arrows pointing in the direction required to indicate the orientation of the
overpack required to ensure that end closures are upward, notwithstanding that such single packages may also have
side closures.
5-22 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

The marking requirements of a unit load device are found in Part 7, Operators Responsibilities, of the Instructions
(7;1.4.2 and 7;2.7).

7;1.4.2 When an operator accepts a unit load device or other type of pallet containing consumer commodities, dry
ice or magnetized material as permitted by 1.4.1, the operator must attach an identification tag as required by 2.7.1 to
the unit load device.

7;2.7.1 Each unit load device containing dangerous goods which require a class hazard label must clearly display
on its exterior an indication that dangerous goods are contained within the unit load device, unless those hazard class
labels are themselves visible.

7;2.7.2 This indication must be provided by attaching to the unit load device an identification tag having a border of
prominent red hatchings on both sides and the minimum dimensions of 148 mm 210 mm. The primary and
subsidiary hazard class(es) or division(s) numbers of such dangerous goods must be clearly marked on this tag.

7;2.7.3 If the unit load device contains packages bearing the Cargo aircraft only label, either that label must be
visible or the tag must indicate that the unit load device can be loaded only on a cargo aircraft.

7;2.7.4 The tag must be removed from the unit load device immediately after the dangerous goods have been
unloaded.

F. SUMMARY

Knowledge of the markings and labelling requirements is critical to the safe handling, storage, loading and transport of
dangerous goods. They are universally recognized and provide a quick visual indication as to the:

contents of the package;


certification of the packaging;
safe handling and stowage requirements;
nature of the hazard or hazards; and
name and address of the shipper and consignee.

______________________
UNIT 6

Dangerous Goods Transport Document and


Other Relevant Documentation
Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 6 ......................................................................... 6-2
B. Goal Unit 6 .................................................................................................................................................. 6-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 6-2
D. Contents of the Dangerous Goods Transport Document Part 5;4 .............................................................. 6-4
E. Transfer of the dangerous goods document from the shipper to the operator ................................................. 6-15
F. Dangerous Goods Transport Document Design.............................................................................................. 6-15
G. Additional Documents ..................................................................................................................................... 6-16
H. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 6-20
Appendix 6-1. Dangerous goods transport document checklist ............................................................................. 6-22

6-1
6-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 6

Subject Matter: Dangerous good transport document and other relevant documentation
Category of personnel:
shippers and the persons undertaking the responsibilities of shippers
staff of freight forwarders involved in processing dangerous goods
staff of freight forwarders involved in processing cargo, mail and stores (other than dangerous goods)
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting dangerous goods
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting cargo, mail and stores (other than dangerous
goods).

B. GOAL UNIT 6

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether the documentation provisions of Part 5 of the
Instructions have been correctly applied.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state the components of a dangerous goods transport document;

b) demonstrate how to extract the Dangerous Goods Description from Table 3-1 of the Instructions;

c) state what information is required on the dangerous goods transport document;

d) state when additional documents are required;

e) state the two ways the dangerous goods transport document can be transmitted to the operator;

f) describe the physical appearance of the dangerous goods transport document; and

g) demonstrate how to complete a dangerous goods transport document given minimal information about a
consignment of dangerous goods.

C. INTRODUCTION

5; 1 Note. It is the shippers responsibility to ensure that all of the applicable air transport requirements are met.

The proper completion of transport documentation is an essential component of the safe transport process and this
responsibility must not be taken lightly. In signing the dangerous goods transport document, the shipper certifies that the
dangerous goods are:

a) correctly classified; (See Part 2 Classification of Dangerous Goods, and Unit 2 of this manual for training
material on that part.)

b) not forbidden for transport by air; (See Part 3 Dangerous Goods List, Special Provisions, and Unit 3 of this
manual for training material on that part.)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-3

c) correctly described as shown in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1; (See Part 3 Dangerous Goods List,
Special Provisions, and Unit 3 of this manual for training material on that part.)

d) packed within the prescribed quantity limits and according to the applicable general packing requirements and
packing instructions; (See Part 4 Packing Requirements, and Unit 4 of this manual for training material on
that part.)

e) in compliance with any applicable special provisions and State variations; (See Part 3 Dangerous Goods List,
Special Provisions, and Unit 3 of this manual for training material on that part.)

f) in correctly marked and labelled packages; (See Part 5 Shippers Responsibilities, and Unit 5 of this manual
for training material on marking and labelling) and

g) correctly documented.

Note. Most States incorporate the Instructions as part of their legislation and there are legal penalties for
violations.

EXERCISE 6-1

Referring to Part 1;3 of the Instructions, write the word or term in the adjacent column that most accurately reflects
the definition provided:

1. Any authority designated, or otherwise recognized, by a State to perform


specific functions related to provisions contained in these Instructions.

2. An authorization issued by the appropriate national authority for:


a) transport of those entries listed in Table 3-1 as forbidden on passenger
and/or cargo aircraft to which Special Provision A1,
A2 or A109 has been assigned in column 7; or
b) other purposes as specified in these Instructions.
Note. Unless otherwise indicated, approval is only required from the State of
Origin.

For the transport of Class 7 material:


Multilateral approval. The approval by the relevant competent authority of the
country of origin of the design or shipment, as applicable, and also, where the
consignment is to be transported through or into any other country, approval by
the competent authority of that country. The term through or into specifically
excludes over, i.e. the approval and notification requirements must not apply
to a country over which radioactive material is carried in an aircraft, provided
that there is no scheduled stop in that country.
Unilateral approval. The approval of a design which is required to be given by
the competent authority of the country of origin of the design only.

3. Any person, organization or government which is entitled to take delivery of a


consignment.

4. One or more packages of dangerous goods accepted by an operator from one


shipper at one time and at one address, receipted for in one lot and moving to
one consignee at one destination address.
6-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

5. Outer packagings with incomplete surfaces.


Note. For air transport, crates may not be used as outer packagings of
composite packagings.

6. An authorization issued by an appropriate national authority providing relief


from the provisions of these Instructions.
Note. The requirements for exemptions are given in 1;1.1.2.

7. The maximum net mass of contents in a single packaging or maximum


combined mass of inner packagings and the contents thereof expressed in
kilograms.

8. The mass or volume of the dangerous goods contained in a package excluding


the mass or volume of any packaging material, except in the case of explosive
articles and of matches where the net mass is the mass of the finished article
excluding packagings.

9. A person, organization or enterprise engaged in or offering to engage in an


aircraft operation.

10. An enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or more packages and to
form one handling unit for convenience of handling and stowage.
Note. A unit load device is not included in this definition.

11. The complete product of the packing operation, consisting of the packaging
and its contents prepared for transport.

12. One or more receptacles and any other components or materials necessary for
the receptacles to perform their containment and other safety functions.

13 An aircraft that carries any person other than a crew member, an operators
employee in an official capacity, an authorized representative of an appropriate
national authority or a person accompanying a consignment or other cargo.

14. Special packagings into which damaged, defective, leaking or nonconforming


dangerous goods packages, or dangerous goods that have spilled or leaked,
are placed for purposes of transport for recovery or disposal.

15. The four-digit number assigned by the United Nations Committee of Experts on
the Transport of Dangerous Goods to identify a substance or a particular group
of substances.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

D. CONTENTS OF THE DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORT DOCUMENT PART 5;4

Read through 5;4, then follow the checklist below, which will assist you in understanding what information is required to
appear in the dangerous goods transport document and where it can be obtained.

Note. Always check the applicable special provision, State variation or packing instruction assigned to an item of
dangerous goods to determine if any additional documentation requirements apply.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-5

Dangerous Goods Transport Document Checklist

A checklist is useful in any procedure to make sure no steps are missed. The following Dangerous Goods Transport
Document Checklist can be used to assist with the completion/examination of the dangerous goods transport
document. To help explain the various components of a dangerous goods transport document, the checklist has been
divided into five sections:

Section 1 Name and address of shipper and consignee


Section 2 Dangerous goods description
Section 3 Additional information about the dangerous goods
Section 4 Additional requirements
Section 5 Certification

Note. See Appendix 6-1 at the end of this unit for a consolidated copy of the checklist.

The elements of each section are described below with examples and exercises provided to enhance your
understanding.

Dangerous goods transport document checklist Section 1: Name and address of shipper and consignee

Section 1 of the checklist is to be used to clearly identify the name and location of the person or organization shipping
the dangerous goods and the name and location of the person or organization receiving the dangerous goods.

Section 1 Name and address of shipper and consignee X Reference in the Instructions

1. Shippers name and address. 5;4.1.3

2. Consignees name and address. 5;4.1.3

Dangerous goods transport document checklist Section 2: Dangerous goods description

Section 2 of the checklist is to be used to clearly describe the dangerous goods. The following sequence of
information in this section must be maintained on the document to ensure that handlers and emergency response
personnel can quickly identify an item of dangerous goods regardless of the form used. (5;4.1.4.2)

Section 2 Dangerous goods description


(Information in this section must appear in the order specified
below.) X Reference in the Instructions

3. UN number preceded by the letters UN or ID 8000. Column 2 Table 3-1


5;4.1.4.1 a)

4. Proper shipping name and, where required or applicable: 3;1.2.4


3;1.2.5
the technical name(s) or, where applicable chemical group 3;1.2.7
name, in brackets following the proper shipping name. Column 1 Table 3-1
(Important: Read all of 3;1.2.7 for clarification of this 5;4.1.4.1 b)
requirement.) 5;4.1.4.3 a), b), c) and d)
in the case of explosives, the commercial or military name may Note 2 and Note 3 of 5;4.1.4.2
be added following the proper shipping name.
the words Empty uncleaned or Residue last contained before
or after the proper shipping name.
6-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

the word waste preceding the proper shipping name, unless


already included in the proper shipping name.
the word molten added to the proper shipping name. (Additional
reference is found in 3;1.2.4.)
the word stabilized added to the proper shipping name.
(Additional reference is found in 3;1.2.5.)

Note. Additional descriptive text in the entries in Column 1 of


the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1 may be used with the proper
shipping name.

5. Primary Class or Division and, for explosives, the Compatibility Column 3 Table 3-1
Group. (The words Class or Division may appear before the 5;4.1.4.1 c)
primary class or division.)

6. Subsidiary hazard Class(es) or Division(s) in brackets, where Column 4 Table 3-1


applicable. (The words Class or Division may appear before the 5;4.1.4.1 d)
subsidiary class or division.)

7. Packing Group, where applicable. (The letters PG may appear Column 8 Table 3-1
before the packing group.) 5;4.1.4.1 e)

Note. It is important to remember that the UN number, proper shipping name and class(es) or division(s) assigned
to an item of dangerous goods listed in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 of the Instructions are recognized
throughout the world.

The following extracts from the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, show where to find each of the elements of the
dangerous goods description (See highlighted column.):

UN number

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Acetic acid 2790 8 Corrosive II E2 851 1L 855 30 L
solution, not Y840 0.5 L
less than 50%
but not more
than 80%
acid, by mass
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-7

Proper shipping name (text in bold)

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Flammable 1325 4.1 Solid A3 II E2 445 15 kg 448 50 kg
solid, flammable Y441 5 kg
organic, III E1 446 25 kg 449 100 kg
n.o.s.* Y443 10 kg

Primary class or division

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Oxidizing 1479 5.1 Oxidizer A3 I E0 557 1 kg 561 15 kg
solid, n.o.s.*
II E2 558 5 kg 562 25 kg
Y544 2.5 kg
III E1 559 25 kg 563 100 kg
Y546 10 kg

Subsidiary class(es) or division(s) (Note. If Column 4 is empty, there is no subsidiary class(es) or division(s).)

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Propylamine 1277 3 8 Liquid II E2 352 1L 363 5L
flammable Y340 0.5 L
& Corrosive
6-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Packing group (Note. If Column 8 is empty, there is no packing group.)

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Toxic liquid, 2810 6.1 Toxic A3 I E5 1L 658 30 L
organic A4
n.o.s.* A137 II E4 654 5L 662 60 L
Y641 1L
III E1 655 60 L 663 220 L
Y642 2L

EXERCISE 6-2

Referring to Table 3-1 and Part 5;4 of the Instructions, list, in the appropriate order, the dangerous goods description
that would appear on a dangerous goods transport document for each of the following dangerous goods descriptions:

Description Information to appear in the dangerous goods transport document.

1. UN 1740
Packing Group II

2. UN 1759
Packing Group II

3. UN 2478
Packing Group II

4. UN 2486
Packing Group II

5. UN 2814
Infectious substance
affecting humans (suspected
Category A)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-9

6. UN 3356
(Protective breathing
equipment (PBEs) shipped by
operator to replace ones used
by aircrew. Total number two,
Size small, Condition
serviceable, in original
manufacturers unopened inner
packaging.)

7. UN 0012

8. Empty package of Picric Acid,


wetted, with not less than 30%
water by mass

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 6-3

Referring to Table 3-1 and Part 5;4 of the Instructions, indicate in the space provided whether the following two
descriptions are acceptable for inclusion in a dangerous goods transport document.

1. UN 1950
Aerosols, non-flammable, corrosive, containing
substances in Class 8
Division 2.2
(Class 8)

2. UN 1950
Aerosols
Division 2.2
(Class 8)

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Dangerous goods transport document checklist Section 3: Additional information about the dangerous
goods

Additional information clarifying the nature of the contents of a dangerous goods consignment is also required on the
dangerous goods transport document. This information appears after the dangerous goods description as identified in
Section 2 of the checklist.

Each element of Section 3 of the checklist represents various scenarios regarding the type of consignment of dangerous
goods, the number of packages and the quantity. When preparing/examining a document the scenario that matches with
the particular dangerous goods consignment must be used.
6-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Section 3 Additional information about the dangerous goods X Reference in the Instructions

8. For a consignment of one item of dangerous goods indicate: 5;4.1.5.1

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note. The
packaging specification code may only appear on a dangerous
goods transport document as a supplement to the description of
the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume or
mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L

For a consignment of dangerous goods with different proper


shipping names, UN numbers or packing groups indicate for
each the:

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note. The
packaging specification code may only appear on a dangerous
goods transport document as a supplement to the description of
the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume or
mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L
UN 1299, Turpentine, 3, PG III, 1 fibreboard box, 1 L

9. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous goods 5;4.1.5.1


and the same quantity per package you may replace the net
quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-11

10. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous goods, 5;4.1.5.1
but different quantities per package you may replace the net
quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package of


each separate quantity.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 10 fibreboard
boxes X 10 L

11. For a consignment of empty, uncleaned packages you may replace 5;1.6
the net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the: 5;4.1.5.1 a)
5;4.1.4.3 b)
number and type of packagings.

Example:
UN 1263, Residue last contained Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box

12. For a consignment of chemical kits or first aid kits you may 5;4.1.5.1 b)
replace the net quantity per package with the:

the total net mass of dangerous goods.

(Note. Where the kits contain solids and/or liquids, the net mass of
liquids within the kits is to be calculated on a 1 to 1 basis of their
volume, i.e. 1 litre equal to 1 kilogram.)

Example:
UN 3316, Chemical kit, 9, 1 Fibreboard box, 1 L

13. For a consignment of dangerous goods in machinery or 5;4.1.5.1 c)


apparatus replace the net quantity per package with the:

individual total quantities of dangerous goods in solid, liquid or


gaseous state, contained in the article.

Example:
UN 3363, Dangerous Goods in Apparatus, 9, 1 wooden box X
Liquid 0.5 L, Solid 1 kg
6-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

14. For a consignment of dangerous goods contained in a salvage 5;1.5


packaging replace the net quantity of dangerous goods per package 5;4.1.5.1 d)
with an: 5;4.1.5.3

estimate of the quantity of dangerous goods.

Note. The words Salvage package must be shown at the end of


the description.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 Aluminium Drum, 1 L, Salvage
Package

15. For a consignment of a substance of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:

net mass or volume for the substance.

Example:
UN3291, Medical waste, n.o.s., 6.2, PG II, 1 fibreboard box X 45 kg

16. For a consignment of an article of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:

gross mass, followed by the letter G.

Example:
UN 3166, Vehicle, flammable liquid powered, 9, 55 kg G

(Note. In this example the article is not in a package, therefore no


information regarding the kind of package is shown on the dangerous
goods transport document.)

17. For a consignment of limited quantities (See Part 3;4 of the 5;4.1.5.2
Instructions for provisions concerning limited quantities and Unit 10
for associated training material.)

18. Chemical oxygen generators shipped in accordance with Special 5;4.1.5.4


Provision A 144:

add the statement Aircrew protective breathing equipment


(smoke hood) in accordance with Special Provision A 144.

Example:
UN 3356, Oxygen generator, chemical, 5.1, PG II, 1 fibreboard box X
2 kg G, Aircrew protective breathing equipment (smoke hood) in
accordance with Special Provision A 144
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-13

19. For a consignment of self-reactive substances or organic 2;4.2.3.2.5


peroxides where approval is required: 2;5.3.2.5
5;4.1.5.5
add a statement indicating that such an approval has been
issued.

Note. A copy of the classification approval and conditions of


transport for non-listed organic peroxides and self-reactive
substances must be attached to the dangerous goods transport
document.

Example:
UN 3110, Organic Peroxide type F, solid
(Phthalimidoperoxyhexanoic acid 88%), 5.2, 1 fibreboard box X 5 kg,
approval C-OPS/KV/2008-06-01 attached

20. For a consignment of Samples of new formulations of an Organic 2;5.3.2.6


Peroxides not listed in 2; 5.3.2.4 (Table 2-7) or a self-reactive 2;4.2.3.2.6
substance not listed in Table 2-6: 5;4.1.5.5.2

add a statement indicating that a sample of a new formulation of


an organic peroxide or a self-reactive substance is being
transported.

Example:
UN 3224, Self-reactive solid, Type C (sample of a new
formulation), 4.1, 1 plywood box X 0.5 kg

21. For a consignment of infectious substances or controlled 5;4.1.5.6


substances (See Unit 8 of this manual a consolidation of the
infectious substance requirements.)

22. For a consignment of radioactive material (See Unit 9 of this 5;4.1.5.7


manual for a consolidation of the radioactive material requirements.)

Dangerous goods transport document checklist Section 4: Additional requirements

Section 4 of the dangerous goods transport document checklist is to be used to further describe the packaging of the
dangerous goods consignment and identify any of the special handling instructions or authorizations.

Section 4 Additional requirements X Reference in the Instructions

23. The designation for the applicable packing instruction. 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 351 (See new
packing instruction assigned this substance for carriage on
passenger aircraft.)
6-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

24. When applicable, reference to Special Provision A1, A2 or A109 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)


(except for radioactive material).
Note. Read the provisions of A1, A2 and A109 and take time to
review their meaning.

25. A statement the shipment is within the limitations for either 5;4.1.5.8.1 b)
passenger and cargo aircraft or cargo-only aircraft, as appropriate. (Read the Note in the
Instructions located at the end of
this reference.)

26. When applicable, special handling information. 5;4.1.5.8.1 c)

27. When applicable, an indication that an overpack has been used. 5;4.1.5.8.1 d)

Note. Read the definition for overpack found in Part 1;3 of the
Instructions.

28. When applicable, the Q value rounded up to the first decimal place. 5;4.1.5.8.1 e)
3;4.3.3 or 4;1.1.8 e)

29. When an explosive is being shipped in accordance with Packing 5;4.1.5.8.2


Instruction 101, the State of authorizations distinguishing sign for
motor vehicles in international traffic following the words:

Packaging authorized by the competent authority of

Note. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_international_license_plate_codes
#U)
for a listing of the international vehicle registration codes, but be
aware that this is not a complete list and some countries do not use
what they register.

30. When a self-reactive substance of Division 4.1 or an organic peroxide 5;4.1.5.8.3


of Division 5.2 or substance with similar properties are being shipped,
a statement indicating:

the packages must be protected from direct sunlight and all


sources of heat and be placed in adequately ventilated areas.

Dangerous goods transport document checklist Section 5: Certification

Section 5 of the checklist is to be used to certify the consignment has been correctly prepared for air transport and to
identify the person responsible for the consignment and the date.

Section 5 Certification X Reference in the Instructions

31. The following statement: 5;4.1.6.1 and


Note. The word placarded is
I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment are fully and not essential for shipments by
accurately described above by the proper shipping name, and are air.
classified, packaged, marked and labelled/placarded, and are in all
respects in proper condition for transport according to applicable
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-15

international and national governmental regulations. I declare that all


of the applicable air transport requirements have been met.

32. The signature of the shipper and the date. 5;4.1.6.1


5;4.1.6.2
Note 1. Signatures on faxed documents are acceptable in some
States. Always verify with the appropriate national authority.

Note 2. When transmitting the dangerous goods transport


document electronically the name of the shipper, typed in upper case,
replaces the hand written signature required on a paper document
(5;4.1.6.2).

E. TRANSFER OF THE DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORT DOCUMENT


FROM THE SHIPPER TO THE OPERATOR

Part 5;4 Note. These Instructions do not preclude the use of electronic data processing (EDP) and electronic data
interchange (EDI) transmission techniques as an alternative to paper documentation, unless otherwise indicated.

Transmission of the dangerous goods transport document to the operator can be done in one of two ways:

1. through two correctly completed and signed paper copies (5;4.1.1.2).

2. with the agreement of the operator, through an electronic copy (EDP or EDI). When an electronic copy is used
the data should be immediately reproducible in paper form when the need arises. A printed copy of the
electronic document should maintain the appropriate sequence to the information. (5;4.1.1.3) Note. The
name of the shipper, typed in upper case, replaces the hand written signature required on a paper document
(5;4.1.6.2).

5;4.1.6.2 Where the original consignment details are provided to an operator, by EDP or EDI techniques, and
subsequently the consignment is transshipped to an operator that requires a paper dangerous goods transport
document, the paper document must indicate Original Received Electronically and the name of the signatory must
be shown in capital letters.

F. DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORT DOCUMENT DESIGN

The dangerous goods transport document can be in any form, however an IATA form entitled Shippers Declaration is
often used.

There are four important things to note about the appearance and content of the dangerous good transport document:

1. Representation of When a dangerous goods transport document is used for both dangerous and non-
dangerous and non- dangerous goods, the dangerous goods must be listed first. (5;4.1.2.2)
dangerous goods on
the same document
6-16 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

2. Information on the The dangerous goods transport document must be easy to identify, legible and
document and durable. (5;4.1.2.4)

3. Documents with more If the dangerous goods transport document is made up of more than one page, the
than one page pages must be consecutively numbered (5;4.1.2.3).

4. Language English should be used on the dangerous goods transport document in addition to the
language(s) that may be required by the State in which the consignment originates.
(5;4.1.6.3)

G. ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS

These include:

a) air waybill;
b) document of approval; and
c) document of exemption.

a) The aviation industry often uses an air waybill to assist in the tracking of a consignment through the aviation
system. When the air waybill is used for a consignment of dangerous goods, it must include:

a statement indicating that the dangerous goods are described on an accompanying dangerous goods
transport document, e.g. Dangerous goods as per attached dangerous goods transport document; and

if the consignment is for cargo aircraft only, a statement to that effect, e.g. Cargo aircraft only.

b) A copy of a document of approval must accompany the dangerous goods transport document for:

Dangerous goods subject to Special Provisions A1, A2 or A109. The approval must show the quantity
limitations, the packing requirements and, in the case of A2, the labelling requirements.

Portable tanks. Copy of the document(s) of approval (Read Note 6, Introductory Notes, Part 4 of the
Instructions for information on portable tanks.)

Packagings alternative to those prescribed in a particular packing instruction, as authorized by 4;2.8.


(Read 4;2.8)

Organic peroxides and self-reactive substances subject to 2;5.3.2.5 and 2;4.2.3.2.5. (Read 2;5.3.2.5 and
2;4.2.3.2.5)

c) A copy of a document of exemption granted by States of Origin, transit and destination, where applicable, must
accompany the dangerous goods transport document for Dangerous goods shipped under exemption. (Read
1;1.1.2)

Note. There are documentation requirements for radioactive material excepted packages in 5;4.4 of the
Instructions which are incorporated into the consolidated training material for radioactive material found in Unit 9 of this
manual.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-17

EXERCISE 6-4

In the box provided, complete a dangerous goods transport document for the following consignment of dangerous
goods to go by passenger aircraft. Indicate if any additional documents are required and describe them.

UN number 1790
Proper Shipping Name Hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution with not more than 20 per cent hydrogen
cyanide
Division 6.1
Shipper XYZ Co., 123 Right St., Anywhere, Canada, XYZ 123
Consignee ABC Co., 456 Left St., Someplace, India, XXX YYY 123
Number of packages 1
Kind of packaging Cylinder
Net quantity per package 1 L
Packing Instruction 652
Handling information Handle with care
Shippers name and date Mr. Smith, 1 January 3000

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


6-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 6-5

1. In the box provided, complete a dangerous goods transport document for the following consignment of two
separate items of dangerous goods to go by cargo aircraft. Indicate if any additional documents are required and
describe them.

UN number 1950
Proper Shipping Name Aerosols, non-flammable
Division 2.2
Shipper XYZ Co., 123 Left St., Anywhere, Canada, XYZ 123
Consignee ABC Co., 456 Right St., Someplace, India, XXX YYY 123
Number of packages 1
Kind of packaging Fibreboard box (4G)
Net quantity per package 45 kg
Packing Instruction 204
Handling information N/A
Shippers name and date Mr. Smith, January 1, 3000

with:

UN number 1950
Proper Shipping Name Aerosols, flammable (engine starting fluid)
Division 2.1
Shipper XYZ Co., 123 Left St., Anywhere, Canada, XYZ 123
Consignee ABC Co., 456 Right St., Someplace, India, XXX YYY 123
Number of packages 1
Kind of packaging Fibreboard box (4G)
Net quantity per package 50 kg
Packing Instruction 203
Handling information N/A
Shippers name and date Mr. Smith, 1 January 3000
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-19

2. If the shipper decides to send the operator an electronic version of the dangerous goods transport document
describe how this affects the Shippers signature.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

EXERCISE 6-6

In the box provided, complete a dangerous goods transport document for the following consignment of empty
packages that have not been cleaned of their dangerous residue. It is being offered for transport by passenger
aircraft. Indicate if any additional documents are required and describe them.

UN number 2683
Proper Shipping Name Ammonium sulphide solution
Primary Class 8
Subsidiary Class/Division 3, 6.1
Packing Group: II
Shipper XYZ Co., 123 Right St., Anywhere, Canada, XYZ 123
Consignee ABC Co., 456 Left St., Someplace, India, XXX YYY 123
Number of packages 1
Kind of packaging Reconstituted wood box (4F)
Net quantity per package 500 ml
Packing Instruction 851
Handling information N/A
Shippers name and date Mr. Smith, 1 January 3000
6-20 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Check your answer with those in Unit 13.

H. SUMMARY

Documentation is one of three communication tools (i.e. marking, labelling and documentation) used to convey specific
information about a dangerous goods consignment. Those in the aviation system use this information to ensure that
each consignment of dangerous goods is safely accepted, handled, stored, loaded and transported.

Should an incident or accident occur which involves dangerous goods the information provided on the documents plays
a critical role in ensuring that appropriate emergency response action is carried out.

Part 5;4 of the Instructions clearly states that the responsibility for ensuring the accuracy of the information on the
documentation lies with the shipper.

This unit provides an overview of the Part 5;4 requirements and offers a Dangerous Goods Transport Document
Checklist which can be used as a guide for checking the completeness and accuracy of a dangerous goods transport
document:

Section 1 Name and address of shipper and consignee


Section 2 Dangerous goods description
Section 3 Additional information about the dangerous goods
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-21

Section 4 Additional requirements


Section 5 Certification

It also provides an overview of the provisions concerning transfer of the dangerous goods document from the shipper to
the operator, the design of the document, and additional documents.
6-22 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Appendix 6-1.

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORT DOCUMENT CHECKLIST

Section 1 Name and address of shipper and consignee X Reference in the Instructions

1. Shippers name and address 5;4.1.3

2. Consignees name and address 5;4.1.3

Section 2 Dangerous goods description (Information in


this section must appear in the order specified below.)

3. UN number preceded by the letters UN or ID 8000. Column 2 Table 3-1


5;4.1.4.1 a)

4. Proper shipping name and, where required or applicable: 3;1.2.4


3;1.2.5
the technical name(s) or, where applicable chemical group 3;1.2.7
name, in brackets following the proper shipping name, Column 1 Table 3-1
(Important: Read all of 3;1.2.7 for clarification of this 5;4.1.4.1 b)
requirement.) 5;4.1.4.3 a), b), c) and d)
in the case of explosives, the commercial or military name Note 2 and Note 3 of 5;4.1.4.2
may be added following the proper shipping name.
the words Empty uncleaned or Residue last contained
before or after the proper shipping name,
the word Waste preceding the proper shipping name, unless
already included in the proper shipping name
the word molten added to the proper shipping name,
(Additional reference is found in 3;1.2.4.)
the word stabilized added to the proper shipping name,
(Additional reference is found in 3;1.2.5.)

Note. Additional descriptive text in the entries in Column 1


of the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1 may be used with the
proper shipping name.

5. Primary Class or Division and, for explosives, the Compatibility Column 3 Table 3-1
Group. (The words Class or Division may appear before the 5;4.1.4.1 c)
primary class or division.)

6. Subsidiary hazard Class(es) or Division(s) in brackets. (The Column 4 Table 3-1


words Class or Division may appear before the subsidiary 5;4.1.4.1 d)
class or division.)

7. Packing Group, where applicable. (The letters PG may appear Column 8 Table 3-1
before the packing group.) 5;4.1.4.1 e)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-23

Section 3 Additional information about the dangerous


goods

8. For a consignment of one item of dangerous goods indicate: 5;4.1.5.1

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note.
The packaging specification code may only appear on a
dangerous goods transport document as a supplement to the
description of the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume
or mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L

For a consignment of dangerous goods with different proper


shipping names, UN numbers or packing groups indicate for
each the:

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note.
The packaging specification code may only appear on a
dangerous goods transport document as a supplement to the
description of the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume
or mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L
UN 1299, Turpentine, 3, PG III, 1 fibreboard box, 1 L

9. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous 5;4.1.5.1


goods and the same quantity per package you may replace the
net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L

10. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous 5;4.1.5.1


goods, but different quantities per package you may replace
the net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:
6-24 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package of


each separate quantity.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 10
fibreboard boxes X 10 L

11. For a consignment of empty, uncleaned packages you may 5;1.6


replace the net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the: 5;4.1.5.1 a)
5;4.1.4.3 b)
number and type of packagings.

Example:
UN 1263, Residue last contained Paint, 3, PG II 1 fibreboard box

12. For a consignment of Chemical kits or First aid kits you may 5;4.1.5.1 b)
replace the net quantity per package with the:

the total net mass of dangerous goods.

(Note. Where the kits contain solids and/or liquids, the net mass
of liquids within the kits is to be calculated on a 1 to 1 basis of
their volume, i.e. 1 litre equal to 1 kilogram.)

Example:
UN 3316, Chemical kit, 9, 1 Fibreboard box, 1 L

13. For a consignment of dangerous goods in machinery or 5;4.1.5.1 c)


apparatus replace the net quantity per package with the:

individual total quantities of dangerous goods in solid, liquid


or gaseous state, contained in the article

Example:
UN 3363, Dangerous Goods in Apparatus, 9, 1 wooden box X
Liquid 0.5 L, Solid 1 kg

14. For a consignment of dangerous goods contained in a salvage 5;1.5


packaging replace the net quantity of dangerous goods per 5;4.1.5.1 d)
package with an: 5;4.1.5.3

estimate of the quantity of dangerous goods.

Note. The words Salvage package must be shown at the end


of the description.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 Fibreboard box, 1 L, Salvage
Package

15. For a consignment of a substance of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-25

net mass or volume for the substance.

Example:
UN3291, Medical waste, n.o.s., 6.2, PG II, 1 fibreboard box X
45 kg

16. For a consignment of an article of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:

gross mass, followed by the letter G

Example:
UN 3166, Vehicle, flammable liquid powered, 9, 55 kg G

(Note. In this example the article is not in a package, therefore


no information regarding the kind of package is shown on the
dangerous goods transport document.)

17. For a consignment of limited quantities (See Part 3;4 for 5;4.1.5.2
provisions concerning limited quantities and Unit 10 associated
training material.)

18. Chemical oxygen generators shipped in accordance with 5;4.1.5.4


Special Provision A 144:

add the statement Aircrew protective breathing equipment


(smoke hood) in accordance with Special Provision A 144

Example:
UN 3356, Oxygen generator, chemical, 5.1, PG II, 1 fibreboard
box X 2 kg G, Aircrew protective breathing equipment (smoke
hood) in accordance with Special Provision A 144.

19. For a consignment of self-reactive substances or organic 2;4.2.3.2.5


peroxides where approval is required: 2;5.3.2.5
5;4.1.5.5
add a statement indicating that such an approval has been
issued.

Note. A copy of the classification approval and conditions of


transport for non-listed organic peroxides and self-reactive
substances must be attached to the dangerous goods transport
document.

Example:
UN 3110, Organic Peroxide type F, solid
(Phthalimidoperoxyhexanoic acid 88%), 5.2, 1 fibreboard box x 5
kg, approval C-OPS/KV/2008-06-01 attached
6-26 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

20. For a consignment of Samples of new formulations of an 2; 5.3.2.6


Organic Peroxide not listed in 2;5.3.2.4 (Table 2-7) or a self- 2;4.2.3.2.6
reactive substance not listed in Table 2-6: 5;4.1.5.5.2

add a statement indicating that a sample of a new formulation


of an organic peroxide or a self-reactive substance is being
transported.

Example:
UN 3224, Self-reactive solid, Type C (sample of a new
formulation), 4.1, 1 plywood box X 0.5 kg

21 For a consignment of Infectious substances or controlled 5;4.1.5.6


substances (See Unit 8 of this manual for a consolidation of the
infectious substance requirements.)

22 For a consignment of Radioactive Material (See Unit 9 of this 5;4.1.5.7


manual for a consolidation of the radioactive material
requirements.)

Section 4 Additional requirements

23. The designation for the applicable packing instruction. 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 351 (See new
packing instruction assigned this substance for carriage on
passenger aircraft.)

24. When applicable, reference to Special Provision A1, A2 or A109 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)


(except for radioactive material).

25. A statement the shipment is within the limitations for either 5;4.1.5.8.1 b)
passenger and cargo aircraft or cargo-only aircraft, as
appropriate.
(Read the Note in the Instructions located at the end of this
reference.)

26. When applicable, special handling information. 5;4.1.5.8.1 c)

27. When applicable, an indication that an overpack has been used. 5;4.1.5.8.1 d)

28. When applicable, the Q value rounded up to the first decimal 5;4.1.5.8.1 e)
place. 3;4.3.3 or 4;1.1.8 e)

29. When an explosive is being shipped in accordance with Packing 5;4.1.5.8.2


Instruction 101, the State of authorizations distinguishing sign for
motor vehicles in international traffic following the words:

Packaging authorized by the competent authority of

Note. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_international_license_plate_co
des#U)
for a listing of the international vehicle registration codes, but be
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 6. Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant documentation 6-27

aware that this is not a complete list and some countries do not
use what they register.

30. When a self-reactive substance of Division 4.1 or an organic 5;4.1.5.8.3


peroxide of Division 5.2 or substance with similar properties are
being shipped, a statement indicating

the packages must be protected from direct sunlight and all


sources of heat and be placed in adequately ventilated areas.

Section 5 Certification

31. The following statement: 5;4.1.6.1 and


Note. The word placarded is
I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment are fully not essential for shipments by air.
and accurately described above by the proper shipping name, and
are classified, packaged, marked and labelled/placarded, and are
in all respects in proper condition for transport according to
applicable international and national governmental regulations. I
declare that all of the applicable air transport requirements have
been met.

32. The signature of the shipper and the date. 5;4.1.6.1


5;4.1.6.2
Note 1. Signatures on faxed documents are acceptable in some
States. Always verify with the competent State authority.

Note 2. When transmitting the dangerous goods transport


electronically the name of the shipper, typed in upper case,
replaces the hand written signature required on a paper document
(5;4.1.6.2).

______________________
UNIT 7

Operators and Cargo Acceptance


Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 7 ......................................................................... 7-2
B. Goal Unit 7 .................................................................................................................................................. 7-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 7-3
D. Acceptance Procedures Part 7;1 ................................................................................................................ 7-7
E. Storage and Loading Part 7;2 ..................................................................................................................... 7-14
F. Inspection and Decontamination Part 7;3 ................................................................................................... 7-21
G. Provision of Information Part 7;4 and Provisions concerning Passengers and Crew Part 7;5................ 7-23
H. Provisions to Aid in Recognition of Undeclared Dangerous Goods Part 7;6 ............................................... 7-27
I. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 7-27
Appendix 7-1. Acceptance Procedures Checklist ................................................................................................. 7-28

7-1
7-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 7

Subject Matter: Acceptance procedures and inspection and decontamination


Category of personnel:
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting dangerous goods

Subject Matter: Storage and loading procedures


Category of personnel:
staff of freight forwarders involved in the handling, storage and loading of cargo, mail or stores
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting dangerous goods
operators and ground handling agents staff involved in the handling, storage and loading of cargo, mail or
stores and baggage
flight crew members and load planners

Subject Matter: Provision of information


Category of personnel:
all operator employees and, where applicable, ground handling agents staff

Subject Matter: Provisions concerning passengers and crew


Category of personnel:
all

Subject Matter: Provisions to aid in recognition of undeclared dangerous goods


Category of personnel:
all

B. GOAL UNIT 7

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether the operator responsibilities identified in Part 7 of
the Instructions have been correctly applied.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state where to find meanings for words and terms used in the Instructions;

b) state where to find in the Instructions information pertinent to the application of the Part 7 requirements;

c) state where to locate the acceptance procedures in the Instructions;

d) state the elements of the acceptance procedure checklist;

e) demonstrate how to conduct an acceptance check on an item of dangerous goods in accordance with the
Instructions;

f) demonstrate how to complete an identification tag for a unit load device;

g) demonstrate how to segregate dangerous goods in accordance with the Instructions;

h) demonstrate how to load and secure a consignment of dangerous goods in accordance with the Instructions;
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-3

i) state when to conduct an inspection for damaged or leaking packages, overpacks or unit load devices
containing dangerous goods;

j) state where to locate the provision of information requirements in the Instructions;

k) state what information is provided to passengers and how it is done;

l) state what information is provided to operator employees and how it is done;

m) state what information is provided to the pilot-in-command and how it is done;

n) state what information is provided to emergency response services during an accident or incident involving
dangerous goods and when it is done; and

o) state the reporting requirements for dangerous goods accidents and incidents and for undeclared and
misdeclared dangerous goods.

C. INTRODUCTION

An operator has many responsibilities crucial to the safe transport of dangerous goods. These include the responsibility
to make sure any dangerous goods:

entering the aviation system are presented in accordance with the Instructions;
are properly handled and stowed either on the ground or in the aircraft; and
are free from any damage that would jeopardize the integrity of the packaging or the safety of other cargo.

In addition to the above, the operator must also make sure the organization is in a state of readiness and capable of
dealing with any incident or accident involving dangerous goods.

Training is the first step in being able to successfully carry out all of these responsibilities. The operator must train all
relevant employees, including those of agencies acting on the operators behalf, in accordance with Table 1-4 (Content
of training courses for operators carrying dangerous goods as cargo) and Table 1-5 (Content of training courses for
operators not carrying dangerous goods as cargo) of the Instructions. (7;4.9)

Note. Operators must also give written instructions to their employees to enable them to correctly perform their
dangerous goods-related responsibilities. (7;4.2)

This unit is designed to supply the training necessary to meet the operators responsibilities specified in each of the
chapters of Part 7 of the Instructions. (Table 1-4 establishes which employees receive training on which of the chapters.)

Exercise 7-1 will help you learn much of the vocabulary necessary to understand the Instructions associated with the
provisions in Part 7, Operators Responsibilities. Remember, if in doubt about the meaning of a word or term, always
check Part 1;3 or Attachment 2 of the Instructions.

Note. If the Instructions do not provide a definition for a word or term, then the dictionary definition applies.
7-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 7-1

Referring to the Part 1;3, identify the word or words that best match the definition provided below:

1. A person, organization or enterprise engaged in or offering to


engage in an aircraft operation.

2. Articles or substances which are capable of posing a risk to


health, safety, property or the environment and which are
shown in the list of dangerous goods in the Instructions, or
which are classified according to the Instructions.

3. The complete product of the packing operation, consisting of the


packaging and its contents prepared for transport.

4. An enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or more


packages and to form one handling unit for convenience of
handling and stowage.

5. Any type of freight container, aircraft container, aircraft pallet


with a net or aircraft pallet with a net over an igloo.

6. An aircraft that carries any person other than a crew member,


an operators employee in an official capacity, an authorized
representative of an appropriate national authority or a person
accompanying a consignment or other cargo.

7. The four-digit number assigned by the United Nations


Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods to
identify a substance or a particular group of substances.

8. The outer protection of a composite or combination packaging


together with any absorbent materials, cushioning and any other
components necessary to contain and protect inner receptacles
or inner packagings.

9. Any property carried on an aircraft other than mail, stores and


accompanied or mishandled baggage.

10. Any aircraft, other than a passenger aircraft, which is carrying


goods or property.

11. The specific movement of a consignment from origin to


destination.

12. An occurrence associated with and related to the transport of


dangerous goods by air which results in fatal or serious injury to
a person or major property damage.

13. An occurrence other than a dangerous goods accident


associated with and related to the transport of dangerous goods
by air, not necessarily occurring on board an aircraft, which
results in injury to a person, property damage, fire, breakage,
spillage, leakage of fluid or radiation or other evidence that the
integrity of the packaging has not been maintained. Any
occurrence relating to the transport of dangerous goods which
seriously jeopardizes an aircraft or its occupants.
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-5

14. A person or organization who offers the service of arranging the


transport of cargo by air.

15. The State in which the operators principal place of business is


located or, if there is no such place of business, the operators
permanent residence.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Exercise 7-2 assists you in determining where to find the relevant linkages with the other parts of the Instructions.

EXERCISE 7-2

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. Which part of the Instructions contains the provisions concerning the


dangerous goods transport document found?

2. Which part of the Instructions contains the provisions concerning


package specification marks?

3. Which parts of the Instructions contain the provisions concerning


hazard and handling labels?

4. Which parts of the Instructions contain the provisions concerning


packing instructions?

5. Which part of the Instructions contains the provisions concerning


excepted quantities?

6. Which part of the Instructions contains the characteristics of the nine


classes of dangerous goods given?

7. Is Consumer commodity a proper shipping name?

8. Does Dry ice have the same UN number as Carbon dioxide, solid?

9. Do the training requirements of Table 1-5 apply to those who carry


dangerous goods as cargo?

Yes _____ No _____

10. Which table contains the Content of training courses for operators
carrying dangerous goods as cargo?

11. In which part of the Instructions is there an explanation for Proper


Shipping Names?

12. In which part of the Instructions is the maximum net quantity per
package given for each proper shipping name?

13. In which part of the Instructions is there a list of dangerous goods


permitted in passenger or crew baggage?
7-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

14. What hazard does Division 6.2 represent?

15. What hazard does Class 7 represent?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Operator exceptions

1;2.2.1 The provisions of these Instructions do not apply to the following:

a) articles and substances which would otherwise be classified as dangerous goods but which are required to be
aboard the aircraft in accordance with the pertinent airworthiness requirements and operating regulations or that are
authorized by the State of the Operator to meet special requirements;

b) aerosols, alcoholic beverages, perfumes, colognes, safety matches and liquefied gas lighters carried aboard an
aircraft by the operator for use or sale on the aircraft during the flight or series of flights, but excluding non-refillable
gas lighters and those lighters liable to leak when exposed to reduced pressure;

c) dry ice intended for use in food and beverage service aboard the aircraft.

General exceptions

1;1.1.3.1 Except for 7;4.2, these Instructions do not apply to dangerous goods carried on an aircraft where the
dangerous goods are:

a) to provide, during flight, medical aid to a patient when those dangerous goods:
1) have been placed on board with the approval of the operator; or
2) form part of the permanent equipment of the aircraft when it has been adapted for specialized use; providing
that:
1)
gas cylinders have been manufactured specifically for the purpose of containing and transporting that
particular gas;
2) equipment containing wet cell batteries is kept and, when necessary, secured in an upright position to
prevent spillage of the electrolyte;
Note. For dangerous goods that passengers are permitted to carry as medical aid, see 8;1.1.2.
b) to provide, during flight, veterinary aid or a humane killer for an animal;
c) for dropping in connection with agricultural, horticultural, forestry or pollution control activities;
d) to provide, during flight, aid in connection with search and rescue operations;
e) vehicles carried in aircraft designed or modified for vehicle ferry operations and all of the following requirements
are met:
1) authorization has been given by the appropriate authorities of the States concerned, and such authorities
have prescribed specific terms and conditions for the particular operators operation;
2) vehicles are secured in an upright position;
3) fuel tanks are so filled as to prevent spillage of fuel during loading, unloading and transit; and
4) adequate ventilation rates are maintained in the aircraft compartment in which the vehicle is carried;
f) required for the propulsion of the means of transport or the operation of its specialized equipment during
transport (e.g. refrigeration units) or that are required in accordance with the operating regulations (e.g. fire
extinguishers) (see 2.2).
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-7

1.1.3.2 Provision must be made to stow and secure dangerous goods transported under 1.1.3.1 a), b), c) and d)
during take-off and landing and at all other times when deemed necessary by the pilot-in-command.

1.1.3.3 The dangerous goods must be under the control of trained personnel during the time when they are in use
on the aircraft.

1.1.3.4 Dangerous goods transported under 1.1.3.1 a), b), c) and d) may be carried on a flight made by the same
aircraft before or after a flight for the purposes identified above, when it is impracticable to load or unload the
dangerous goods immediately before or after the flight, subject to the following conditions:
a) the dangerous goods must be capable of withstanding the normal conditions of air transport;
b) the dangerous goods must be appropriately identified (e.g. by marking or labelling);
c) the dangerous goods may only be carried with the approval of the operator;
d) the dangerous goods must be inspected for damage or leakage prior to loading;
e) loading must be supervised by the operator;
f) the dangerous goods must be stowed and secured in the aircraft in a manner that will prevent any
movement in flight which would change their orientation;
g) the pilot-in-command must be notified of the dangerous goods loaded on board the aircraft and their loading
location. In the event of a crew change, this information must be passed to the next crew;
h) all personnel must be trained commensurate with their responsibilities;
i) the provisions of 7;4.2 and 7;4.4 apply.

D. ACCEPTANCE PROCEDURES PART 7;1

Note. An operator can refuse to transport any item of dangerous goods or impose requirements in addition to
those of the Instructions.

Dangerous goods come in a variety of shapes and sizes and enter the aviation system from a variety of sources.
Acceptance procedures conducted by the operator prior to those goods entering this system create the restrictions
necessary for the careful scrutiny of these shipments. These procedures ensure that only those safe for transport get on
board an aircraft.

This section provides the tools needed to ensure Instruction-based acceptance procedures are understood to enable
their proper application.

Acceptance checklist

Prior to accepting a package, overpack, unit load device or other type of pallet containing dangerous goods or a freight
container containing radioactive material, an operator must conduct an acceptance check. Operators are required to use
a checklist to assist in this process. A sample checklist, based on the acceptance procedures of Part 7 of the
Instructions, is provided below:

Note 1. See Appendix 7-1 for a copy of the Acceptance Procedures Checklist.

Note 2. The document referred to in this checklist is the Dangerous Goods Transport Document.
7-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Acceptance Procedures Checklist Yes No Reference in the Instructions


(to be used only by trained acceptance staff.)

1. Document. Are there two copies of the document? 7;1.2.1 a)


5;4

OR

2. Document . Has the information on the consignment been 7;1.2.1 b)


provided electronically? 5;4

OR

3. Document . Has the information been provided by permitted 7;1.2.1 c)


alternative documentation?

4. Information on document. Does the documentation/ 7;1.3.1 a)


electronic data include all of the required information? 5;4

5. Match quantity shown on document with type of aircraft. 7;1.3.1 b)


Is the quantity of dangerous goods shown on the document Table 3-1
within the limits of the type of aircraft to be used (i.e.
passenger or cargo)?

6. Visibility of marking. Is the marking on the package, 7;1.3.1 c)


overpack or freight container visible? 5;2

7. Match markings to document information. Do the 7;1.3.1 c)


markings on the package, overpack or freight container
agree with the information provided in the document?

8. Packaging specification marking. Is the letter (X,Y or Z ) 7;1.3.1 d)


in the packaging specification marking, and does it Table 3-1
designate the packing group for which the design type was 6;2
tested appropriate for the dangerous goods contained in the
package? (Note. Overpacks do not show specification
marking.)

9. Overpack. When the dangerous goods are in an overpack, 7;1.3.1 e)


are the proper shipping name(s), UN number(s), label(s) and 5;2
special handling instructions clearly visible or, if not, are they 5;3
reproduced on the overpack?

10. Labelling. Do the label(s) conform to the labelling 7;1.3.1 f)


requirements of Part 5;3? 5;3

11. Outer packaging. Does the description of the outer 7;1.3.1 g)


packaging in the document match the outer packaging Part 4
offered for transport and is it allowed in the packing Packing Instructions
instruction?

12. Segregation. Does the package or overpack contain 7;1.3.1 h) and Table 7-1
dangerous goods that should be segregated?
(See below for more information on segregation.)

13. Damage. Is the package, overpack, freight container or unit 7;1.3.1 i)


load device leaking?
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-9

14. Damage. Is there any indication that the package, overpack, 7;1.3.1 i)
freight container or unit load device has been damaged to
the extent that its integrity is affected?

15. Overpack. If the overpack contains packages with the label 7;1.3.1 j)
Cargo Aircraft Only:
Are the packages arranged so that they are clearly
visible and easily accessible?
OR
Does 7;2.4.1 allow them to be inaccessible?
OR
Is there only one package contained in the overpack?

16. Freight container. Does the freight container contain only 7;1.4.1 a), b), c) and d)
radioactive material? (see 6;7.1)

17. Unit load device or pallet. Does the unit load device or 7;1.4.1 b, c) and d)
pallet contain only:
Consumer Commodities (Packing Instruction 910)
OR
Dry Ice as a refrigerant (Packing Instruction 904)
OR
Magnetized Material?

Note 1. Unlike the shipper, the operator is permitted


to place other dangerous goods in a unit load device.

Note 2. Be sure to check Attachment 4 of the


Instructions to identify the new packing instructions assigned
to consumer commodities and dry ice.

Should a checkmark appear under the No column adjacent to any of the entries in the checklist, the
dangerous goods consignment is to be rejected.

7;1.1.2 Cargo acceptance staff should seek confirmation from shippers about the contents of any item of cargo
where there are suspicions that it may contain dangerous goods, with the aim of preventing undeclared dangerous
goods from being loaded on an aircraft as general cargo.

7;1.3 Note 1. Minor discrepancies, such as the omission of dots and commas in the proper shipping name
appearing on the transport document or on package markings, or minor variations in hazard labels which do not
affect the obvious meaning of the label, are not considered as errors if they do not compromise safety and should not
be considered as reason for rejecting a consignment.

Note 2. Where packages are contained in an overpack or freight container, as permitted by 1.4, the checklist
should establish the correct marking and labelling of such an overpack or other type of pallet or freight container and
not the individual packages contained in them. Where packages are contained in a unit load device, as permitted by
1.4.1, the checklist should not require the checking of packages individually for the correct marking and labelling.

Note 3. An acceptance check is not required for dangerous goods in excepted quantities and radioactive
material in excepted packages.
7-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

7;2.4.1.2 Note When transporting goods in a non-pressurized cargo hold, there will be a large pressure
differential at high altitudes. Packages that are filled at a normal atmospheric pressure may not be capable of
withstanding this pressure differential. Confirmation of the suitability of the packaging from the shipper may be
required.

In addition to these general rules, operators must make sure the following rules that apply to a unit load device and
specific dangerous goods are also met while the dangerous goods are in their care.

Unit load device. Unless the class/division hazard label(s) is already visible from the outside of a unit load device or
pallet, it is the operators responsibility to attach an identification tag which clearly displays the primary and subsidiary
hazard class(es)/division(s) number for the goods it contains. The description of this tag is given in subparagraph 7;2.7.2.
(7;1.4.2 and 7;2.7)

Note. The tag must be removed from the unit load device immediately after the dangerous goods are unloaded.
(7;2.7.4)

Infectious substances. The operator must arrange for the quickest possible routing of consignments of infectious
substances. Care should be taken to ensure monitoring of substances if trans-shipment is necessary. (See Unit 8 of this
manual for a consolidation of the infectious substance provisions of the Instructions.)

Undeliverable consignments of radioactive material. The operator must place any undeliverable consignments of
radioactive material in a safe location and must inform the appropriate competent authority as soon as possible to
request instructions for further action. (See Unit 9 of this manual for a consolidation of the radioactive material provisions
of the Instructions.)

The following three exercises will help to refresh your memory of the documentation, labelling and packing requirements
found in the Instructions.

EXERCISE 7-3

Referring to Part 5;4, answer the following questions:

1. In what order does the dangerous goods description


appear on the dangerous goods transport document?

2. Is the following dangerous goods description correct:

Acetyl chloride/3/(8)/UN 1717/II.


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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-11

If not, what should it be?

3. Write in the adjacent space the correct dangerous


goods description, in the correct order for Pyrrolidine.

4. Is the following description of quantity acceptable for


inclusion in a dangerous goods transport document
accompanying a single package for cargo aircraft
shipment?

UN 1149, Dibutyl Ethers, Class 3, PG III,


1 Aluminium Drum (1B1) X 220 L

5. When certifying on the transport document that a


dangerous goods consignment is acceptable for
transport by air is the following certification complete:

I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment


are fully and accurately described above by the proper
shipping name, and are classified, packaged, marked
and labelled/placarded, and are in all respects in
proper condition for transport according to applicable
international and national governmental regulations.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Note. See Part 5, Shippers Responsibilities, for the provisions concerning documentation, and Unit 6 of this
manual for associated training material.
7-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 7-4

Referring to Part 5;3, answer the following questions:

1. Describe the hazard label(s) required for a package of:

Ferrous arsenate, UN 1608.

2. Describe the hazard label(s) required for a package of:

Lead perchlorate solution, UN 3408.

3. Where is the subsidiary label located?

4. Combination packagings containing liquid dangerous goods


must indicate that the closures of the inner packagings are
upward by displaying what handling label? (Note there are
two exceptions to this rule, see 4;1.1.13.)

5. A package displays a companys logo of three horizontal


arrows on one side of a dangerous goods package. Is this
acceptable?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Note. See Part 5, Shippers Responsibilities, for the provisions concerning labelling, and Unit 5 of this manual for
associated training material.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-13

EXERCISE 7-5

Referring to Part 4 of the Instructions, indicate whether the following outer packagings are acceptable. (Refer to the
appropriate new Packing Instructions found in Attachment 4 of the Instructions.) Explain your answer:

1. Nitrocellulose, with not more than 12.6% nitrogen, by


dry mass, mixture without plasticizer, without
pigment, UN 2557.
Combination packaging
inner packaging plastic bag, and
outer packaging Fibreboard box (4G).
Total net quantity per package 1 kg.
Combination packaging is designed to prevent
pressure buildup that could cause an explosion.

2. Potassium, UN 2257 in a single packaging for cargo


aircraft only:
Steel box (4A).

3. Self-heating solid, toxic, inorganic, n.o.s. UN 3191,


Packing Group III.
Passenger aircraft.
Single packaging
Plastic (3H1).

4. Hydrazine selenate.
Single Packaging
Steel Drum non-removable head (1A1).

5. Regulated medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291.


State solid.
Single packaging
Plywood box (4D).

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Note. See Part 4, Packing Requirements and Part 6, Packaging Nomenclature, Marking, Requirements and Tests
for the provisions concerning packaging, and Unit 4 of this manual for associated training material.
7-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

E. STORAGE AND LOADING PART 7;2

Introduction

Barring any unforeseen circumstances, during the operators possession of a dangerous goods consignment seven
things happen. The goods are:

1. stored on the ground after acceptance;


2. inspected for damage or leakage prior to loading on board an aircraft; (7;3.1)
3. loaded onto an aircraft;
4. on board an aircraft during flight;
5. unloaded from an aircraft;
6. inspected for damage or leakage following unloading (7;3.1); and
7. stored on the ground until pickup, delivery or use.

In all these situations it is important for operator staff to be able to quickly and correctly identify the dangerous goods in
order to correctly handle, load and store them and, should the need arise, respond to any incident or accident in which
they are involved.

Documentation

The dangerous goods transport document provides the best source of detailed information on the consignment.

As learned in Unit 6 of this manual, there are two forms in which the document can be provided, either by hard copy
(paper) or electronically. The following summarizes the operators responsibilities for each format:

Paper One (1) copy must accompany the consignment to final destination.
One (1) copy must be retained by the operator at a readily accessible location on the ground
until the dangerous goods have arrived at final destination.
Once the consignment has arrived at destination the document must be stored, with any written
acceptance checklist and written information to the pilot-in-command, for a minimum of three (3)
months.
(Note. Individual States may require the operator to store these documents for longer periods
of time.)
(7;1.2.2 and 7;4.10)

OR

Electronic The electronic information must be available to the operator at all times during transport to final
destination.
It must be possible to print the electronic information immediately in the correct order specified in
Part 5;4.
The requirement to store electronic data is the same as that for the paper documents.
(7;1.2.3 and 7;4.10)

Other important tools for use in the correct identification of an item of dangerous goods include:

a) Hazard labels;
b) Package markings; and
c) Handling labels.
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-15

a) Hazard labels

Hazard labels provide a visual signal as to the hazard presented by the dangerous goods

For example, this label indicates the package contains a corrosive hazard:

b) Package marking

Package markings reveal the:

proper shipping name and UN number of the contents of a dangerous goods package (For example: Corrosive
liquid, acidic, organic, n.o.s. (caprylyl chloride), UN 3265);
name and address of the shipper and consignee; and
packaging specification marks.

(See Part 5, Shippers Responsibilities, and Part 6, Packaging Nomenclature, Marking, Requirements and Testing for
the provisions concerning package marking, and Unit 5 of this manual for associated training material)

c) Handling labels

Handling labels provide safe handling and stowage information for certain dangerous goods. The following is a listing of
the handling labels that may be on a package of dangerous goods:
7-16 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

(See Part 5, Shippers Responsibilities, of the Instructions for provisions concerning labelling, and Unit 5 of this manual
for associated training material.)

Handling label Message Additional information

Package Orientation Combination packaging or Note. Single packagings with end closures containing
Label overpack containing liquid liquid dangerous goods must be loaded and stowed
dangerous goods is present, aboard an aircraft with those closures upwards,
keep arrows pointing up. notwithstanding that such single packages may also
have side closures.
(4;1.1.13)
(5;3.2.11 b))
(5;3.3.2)

Cargo Aircraft Only Keep these dangerous goods (5;3.2.11 a))


Label off of passenger aircraft.

Magnetized Material Magnetized material present, (5;3.2.10)


Label keep away from aircraft (See 7;2.10 for instructions on the loading of magnetized
compass detector unit. material.)
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-17

Cryogenic Liquid Refrigerated liquefied gas (5;3.2.11 c))


Label present, may cause cold burn
injuries if spilled or leaked.

CONTAINS
CRYOGENIC LIQUID

Keep away from heat Self-reactive substances of (5;3.2.11 d))


Label Division 4.1 or Division 5.2 (See 7;2.13 for instructions on the handling of self-
present, keep away from heat. reactive substances and organic peroxides.)

Radioactive Material, Radioactive material, excepted (5;3.2.11 e))


Excepted Package package present and is in
Label compliance with the applicable
international and national
governmental regulations.

Radioactive Material, Excepted Package


This package contains radioactive material, excepted package and
is in all respects in compliance with the applicable international and
national governmental regulations.

Lithium Battery Label Lithium metal or/and ion (5;3.5.2.2)


batteries packed in
accordance with Section II
CAUTION!
Packing Instruction 965 to 970
IF DAMAGED
present, do not load or
DO NOT LOAD OR TRANSPORT
transport package if damaged.
PACKAGE IF DAMAGED

For more information, call xxx.xxx.xxxx

Colour: red on a contrasting background * Place for Lithium ion battery and/or
Dimensions: 120 110 mm Lithium metal battery

Note. It is the operators responsibility to replace any labels that are lost, detached or illegible. Before applying a
new label the operator must check the dangerous goods transport document to make sure the correct label(s) has been
chosen. (7;2.6)
7-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Segregation

Unforeseen accidents involving dangerous goods packages do occur during the handling and stowage process. Part of
risk management is to ensure that should a dangerous goods package be damaged and leakages occur, the resulting
hazard will not be increased through contact with other incompatible dangerous goods.

All of the tools we have learned about so far (i.e. documentation, labelling and marking) provide those responsible for
the safe handling and stowage of dangerous goods with the information they require to keep incompatible dangerous
goods segregated. (Segregation means they may not be stowed next to or in contact with each other or in a position
which would allow interaction in the event of leakage of the contents. (Table 7-1))

The rules on segregation are found in:

Table 7-1 for the segregation requirements for Classes 1, 2, 3 and 8 and Divisions 4.2, 4.3, 5.1 and 5.2. Be
sure to read this table carefully.
Subparagraphs 7;2.2.2.1 to 7;2.2.2.5 for the segregation requirements affecting explosives which are
summarized in the following table.

Type of aircraft Explosives permitted on board Segregation requirements


aircraft
(Division number and
compatibility group)

Passenger aircraft Only: Division 1.4 S are the only explosives permitted on
Division 1.4 S passenger aircraft. (7;2.2.2.1) No segregation
requirements apply. (Table 7-1)

Cargo aircraft Only: Compatibility Group S may be stowed with


Division 1.3 C or G explosives in all compatibility groups. 7;2.2.2.3.
Division 1.4 B, C, D, E, G, Explosives of different compatibility groups may be
or S stowed together, except for Divisions 1.4 B and 1.3.
(7;2.2.2.4 and 7;2.2.2.5)

Division 1.4 B and 1.3 in separate unit load devices


must be separated on board aircraft by loading other
cargo between them with a minimum separation distance
of 2 m.

Division 1.4 B and 1.3 not in a unit load device must be


separated from each other on board the aircraft by
loading them into different, non-adjacent loading positions
with other cargo between them, with a minimum
separation distance of 2 m.

Note 1. Both the primary and the subsidiary hazard of an item of dangerous goods must be taken into
consideration when applying the segregation requirements. (7;2.2.1)

Note 2. Packages containing dangerous goods with multiple hazards in the class or divisions which require
segregation in accordance with Table 7-1 need not be segregated from other packages bearing the same UN number.
(Table 7-1))
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-19

Prior to applying these segregation rules, always check to be sure you have a match between the information you see
on the dangerous goods transport document and the information that is provided on the package (i.e. labels and the
marks). Once you are satisfied that you know the contents of the dangerous goods package you can use the Instructions
to decide which goods to separate.

EXERCISE 7-6

Referring to Table 7-1 and Sub-paragraphs 7;2.2.2.1 to 7:2.2.2.5, state whether the following packages of dangerous
goods require segregation. Explain your answer:

1. Refrigerant Gas R 500, UN 2602


and
Nitrogen compressed, UN 1066 (more than 1 g)

Yes ____ No ____

2. Hydrogen peroxide and peroxyacetic acid


mixture with acid(s), water and not more than 5%
peroxyacetic acid, stablilized, UN 3149
and
Dimethyl disulphide, UN 2381

Yes ____ No ____

3. Dimethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical, UN 1163


and
Lithium ferrosilicon, UN 2830

Yes ____ No ____

4. Detonator assemblies, non-electric for blasting,


UN 0361
and
Cartridges, signal, UN 0054

Yes ____ No ____

5. Alkali metal alcoholates, self-heating,


corrosive, n.o.s.* UN 3206
and
Boron trifluoride dimethyl etherate, UN 2965

Yes ____ No ____

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


7-20 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Loading and securing requirements

To further enhance safety while the dangerous goods are in the operators care, the Instructions lay out four additional
restrictions regarding the stowage of dangerous goods on board an aircraft. These are:

Location Restriction

Passenger aircraft No dangerous goods bearing the Cargo aircraft only label permitted on board the
aircraft. (5;3.2.11 a))

The flight deck or aircraft No dangerous goods permitted on the flight deck or in a cabin occupied by
cabin occupied by passengers, unless they are subject to:
passengers exceptions for dangerous goods of the operator (1;2.2.1);
carry-on baggage provisions in the passenger and crew provisions (8;1). (See
Part 8, Provisions Concerning Passengers and Crew, of the Instructions, and
Unit 12 of this manual for associated training material.); or
radioactive material, excepted packages (2;7.2.4.1.1).

Main deck cargo Dangerous goods permitted only in a Class B or a Class C main deck cargo
compartment of a passenger compartment of a passenger aircraft.
aircraft

Cargo aircraft For dangerous goods, other than Class 3, Packing Group III, with no subsidiary risk,
Class 6, Class 7 and Class 9, stow in a:

Class C cargo compartment (7;2.4.1.1 a));


or
unit load device equipped with a fire detection/suppression system equal to that
of a Class C cargo compartment (7;2.4.1.1 b));
or
in such a manner that in the event of an emergency a crew member or other
authorized person must be able to access the packages or overpacks in order
to handle them and, where necessary and practical, separate them from other
cargo. (7;2.4.1.1 c))

Note. Definitions for the five (5) classes of cargo compartments are found in Section 1, General Information, of
the Emergency Response Guidance for Aircraft Incidents Involving Dangerous Goods (Doc 9481 AN/928).

Once the decision has been taken about the type of aircraft and the location on board the aircraft, the dangerous goods
are ready for loading. It is during this phase that the operator has to be particularly careful to ensure:

damage to the dangerous goods does not occur during handling and loading (7;2.4.3);
damage to the dangerous goods does not occur as the result of movement of other cargo (7;2.4.3), and
the dangerous goods consignment is adequately secured during transport to prevent any movement (7;2.4.2) .

7;3.1.1 It is the operators responsibility to ensure that a package or overpack containing dangerous goods is not
loaded onto an aircraft or into a unit load device unless it has been inspected immediately prior to loading and found
free from evidence of leakage or damage.

7;3.1.2 A unit load device must not be loaded aboard an aircraft unless the device has been inspected and found
free from any evidence of leakage from or damage to any dangerous goods contained therein.
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-21

Class/division-specific handling and loading requirements

The following class/division(s) of dangerous goods have their own unique loading requirements:

Class 6 (Toxic and Category A infectious substances) (read 7;2.8)


Class 7 Radioactive material (read 7;2.9)
Class 9:
magnetized material (read 7;2.10)
dry ice (read 7;2.11)
polymeric beads, expandable (read 7;2.12)
Self-reactive substances and organic peroxides (read 7;2.13).

Note. Remember that Unit 8 of this manual consolidates all of the infectious substance requirements found in the
Instructions, and Unit 9 consolidates all of the radioactive material requirements found in the Instructions.

F. INSPECTION AND DECONTAMINATION PART 7;3

Accidents do occur, so it is important to be ready. Being alert for and limiting the risk associated with a leaking or
damaged package of dangerous goods on board an aircraft is vital to safety.

An operator is required to inspect all dangerous goods packages and overpacks for leakage or damage:

prior to loading the aircraft:


If baggage or cargo is contaminated with a substance believed to be dangerous goods, the operator must
not put the baggage or cargo on board the aircraft.
Upon verification that the contamination is the result of undeclared dangerous goods, the operator must
isolate the baggage or cargo and take appropriate steps to nullify the hazard before transport. (7;3.3)

and
upon unloading the aircraft or unit load device:
Should a damaged or leaking package or overpack of dangerous goods be found during the unloading
process, it is important that the aircraft in which it arrived also be inspected and, if damage or
contamination is found, appropriate action be taken to remedy the damage and remove any contamination.
(7;3.1.3)

Note. Read 7;3.1.4 Infectious Substances, Division 6.2, and 7;3.2 Radioactive Material, Class 7 for additional
specific requirements regarding inspection and decontamination.
7-22 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 7-7

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. What certification requirements does a cargo hold on the main deck


of a passenger aircraft have to meet before dangerous goods can be
stored in it for transport?

a) Class A or B,
b) Class A or C
c) Class B or C
d) Class A, B or C
e) None of the above.

2. Are dangerous goods ever permitted in an aircraft cabin occupied by


passengers? If yes, explain when.

3. A Class A cargo or baggage compartment is one in which:


1) The presence of a fire would be easily discovered by a crew
member while at his or her station; and
2) Each part of the compartment is easily accessible in flight.
Is it acceptable to load an overpack containing a Class 8 substance
labeled Cargo Aircraft Only into a Class A cargo compartment of a
cargo aircraft?

Explain your answer.

4. What four classes of dangerous goods are not subject to the Class C
cargo compartment stowage requirements on board a cargo aircraft?

List them by class and packing group, where appropriate.

5. A package appears to be damaged on board an aircraft. What action


must the operator take?
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-23

6. A leaking package of flammable liquids has been removed from an


aircraft and safely disposed of. What action must the operator take?

7. An operator discovers that a label on a package of corrosive liquids


has been torn and is missing the class number. What action must the
operator take?

8. Is it the shipper or the operator who is responsible for putting an


identification tag on a unit load device which shows the primary and
subsidiary hazard class(es) or division(s) numbers of the dangerous
goods contained inside?

9. Are there special provisions in Part 7 of the Instructions that are


applicable to the carriage of radioactive material? If yes, where are
they located in the Instructions?

10. Name two other dangerous goods that are subject to special
handling or stowage requirements in Part 7 of the Instructions.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

G. PROVISION OF INFORMATION PART 7;4 AND


PROVISIONS CONCERNING PASSENGERS AND CREW PART 7;5

One of the best ways for an operator to tackle the challenges that go with the safe transport of dangerous goods is to
make sure that everyone has the information they need to do their job. In addition to the training requirements found in
Table 1-4 and Table 1-5 of the Instructions, Part 7;4 sets out a four-point framework to make this happen:
7-24 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

1) Public awareness. Inform the public, both passengers and those offering goods for transport by air, about the
transport of dangerous goods requirements. (7;5.1)

2) Employee instruction. Create and distribute an employee instruction manual (e.g. operations manual, cargo
handling manual, passenger handling manual) which specifies responsibilities with regard to the transport of
dangerous goods. (7;4.2 and 7;4.7)

3) Emergency response. Provide employees with the right information to be used to ensure appropriate
emergency response procedures are in place should an incident or accident occur involving dangerous goods.
(7;4.1, 7;4.3, 7;4.6 and 7;4.8)

4) Reporting. Report a dangerous goods accident or incident and undeclared or misdeclared dangerous goods
for purposes of investigation and prevention of future occurrences.

The following table summarizes the requirements for each of these, dividing the summary of requirements into three
parts:

1) Who is responsible for giving the information;


2) What is the information and who is to receive it; and
3) Where is the information located or when is it provided.

Public awareness

Information to passengers Who: Operator.


(7;5.1) What: Inform passengers of the types of dangerous goods that are forbidden for
air transport.
Where: On passenger tickets or through other available means.

Who: Operator, operators handling agent or airport operator.


What: Post notices for passengers of the types of dangerous goods that are
forbidden for air transport.
Where: airport ticket issuance location;
passenger check-in location; and
aircraft boarding area.

Information at cargo Who: Operator or operators handling agent.


acceptance areas (7;4.7) What: Post notices for people offering goods for transport about the transport of
dangerous goods.
Where: At each acceptance point for cargo.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-25

Employee instruction

Information to Employees Who: Operator.


(7;4.2) What: Provide an instruction manual (i.e. operations manual or other appropriate
document) to employees and ground handling agents which explains
how to carry out their responsibilities with respect to the transport of
dangerous goods. The manual must include as a minimum instructions on:
action to be taken in case of an emergency involving dangerous goods;
(See 7;4.6.3)
details of the location and numbering system of cargo compartments;
maximum quantity of dry ice permitted in each compartment; and
if radioactive material is to be transported, the loading requirements.
(see 7;2.9)
Where: Located in areas available to affected employees.

Emergency response

Emergency response Who: Operator.


information (7;4.8) What: Provide to the pilot-in-command written information for use in emergency
response to accidents and incidents involving dangerous goods in air
transport (i.e. ICAO Emergency Response Guidance for Aircraft Incidents
Involving Dangerous Goods (Doc 9481)).
When: For consignments for which a dangerous goods transport document is
required.

Information to the pilot-in- Who: Operator.


command (7;4.1) What Provide to pilot-in-command specific written or printed information,
concerning the dangerous goods to be carried as cargo. (A dedicated form
must be used.)
When and Where:
Provide to pilot-in-command before departure and readily available to the
pilot-in-command during flight.

Information provided by the Who: Pilot-in-command.


pilot-in-command in case of What: Provide the appropriate air traffic services unit with the proper shipping
in-flight emergency (7;4.3) name and/or UN number, the class/division and, for Class 1, the
compatibility group, any identified subsidiary risk(s), the quantity and the
location on board the aircraft, or a telephone number where a copy of the
information provided to the pilot-in-command can be obtained.
When: As soon as the situation permits during an in-flight emergency.

Information by the operator Aircraft accident or serious incident involving dangerous goods
in case of an aircraft Who: Operator.
accident or incident (7;4.6) What: Provide information to responding emergency services and, as soon as
possible, appropriate authorities of the State of the Operator and the
State in which the event occurred about the dangerous goods on board,
as shown on the copy of the information provided to the pilot-in-command.
When: Without delay.
7-26 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Aircraft incident where dangerous goods are on board.


Who: Operator.
What: Provide information to responding emergency services and, as soon as
possible, appropriate authorities of the State in which the incident
occurred about the dangerous goods on board, as shown on the copy of
the information provided to the pilot-in-command.
When: If requested to do so and without delay.

Reporting

Reporting of dangerous Who: Operator.


goods accidents and What: Provide required information to appropriate authorities of the State of the
incidents (7;4.4) Operator and the State in which the event occurred.
When: As required by the State(s).

Reporting of undeclared or Cargo:


misdeclared dangerous Who: Operator.
goods (7;4.5) What: Provide required information to appropriate authorities of the State of the
Operator and the State in which the event occurred.
When: Undeclared or misdeclared dangerous goods found in cargo.

Passenger Baggage:
Who: Operator.
What: Provide required information to appropriate authorities of State in which
event occurred.
When: Dangerous goods are found in baggage that are not permitted by Part 8.

Note. The terms accident, serious incident and incident are as defined in Annex 13 Aircraft Accident and
Incident Investigation of the International Civil Aviation Organization.

EXERCISE 7-8

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. Name two ways in which an operator can inform a


passenger about which dangerous goods are
forbidden for air transport.

2. Where does the operator provide employees with


details of the location and numbering system of cargo
compartments?

3. Does a dedicated form have to be provided to the


pilot-in-command identifying the dangerous goods on
board?

4. Who must the operator inform of an aircraft accident


involving dangerous goods?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-27

5. Name one publication that can be used by the pilot-in-


command to assist in dealing with an emergency
involving dangerous goods.

6. Does the operator have to report undeclared


dangerous goods found in cargo to the appropriate
authorities of the State of the Operator and the State
in which the event occurred?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

H. PROVISIONS TO AID IN RECOGNITION OF UNDECLARED


DANGEROUS GOODS PART 7;6

Cargo acceptance staff and passenger acceptance staff are the operators front line defense against undeclared
dangerous goods entering the aviation system. For this reason they must be trained (7;4.9 and 7;5.2) and have readily
available to them information that will enable them to identify such goods. This can be done through:

a) a document listing descriptions of items which may contain dangerous goods. (See 7;6).

b) a poster showing dangerous goods related labels, marks, etc.

c) a document listing those dangerous goods that passengers may carry. (If the dangerous goods are not listed in
this document they may not be transported by passengers or crew members.) (See 8;1.1.2)

When in doubt both the cargo acceptance staff and passenger acceptance staff should seek confirmation that no
dangerous goods are present in the cargo or bag. (7;5.2.2)

Remember: An operator can refuse to transport any baggage or cargo.

I. SUMMARY

The safety of our aviation system relies on the training of operator employees and their ability to correctly apply the
requirements of the Instructions.

Trained operator employees play an essential role in preventing undeclared or misdeclared dangerous goods from
entering the aviation system. They work to ensure that only those dangerous goods that can pass the rigorous
acceptance check are accepted.

Trained operator employees also make sure that those dangerous goods that have been accepted are appropriately
handled, stored and loaded while in the system, with an educated eye looking out for damaged or leaking packages or
overpacks.

Trained operator employees are ready and able to take the appropriate action to address any incident or accident
involving dangerous goods.
7-28 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Appendix 7-1.

ACCEPTANCE PROCEDURES CHECKLIST

Acceptance Procedures Checklist Yes No Reference in the


(to be used only by trained acceptance staff.) Instructions

1. Document . Are there two copies of the document? 7;1.2.1 a)


5;4

OR

2. Document. Has the information on the consignment been provided 7;1.2.1 b)


electronically? 5;4

OR

3. Document. Has the information been provided by permitted 7; 1.2.1. c)


alternative documentation?

4. Information on document. Does the documentation/electronic data 7;1.3.1 a)


include all of the required information? 5;4

5. Match quantity shown on document with type of aircraft. Is the 7;1.3.1 b)


quantity of dangerous goods shown on the document within the limits Table 3-1
of the type of aircraft to be used (i.e. passenger or cargo)?

6. Visibility of marking. Is the marking on the package, overpack or 7;1.3.1 c)


freight container visible? 5;2

7. Match markings to document information. Do the markings on the 7;1.3.1 c)


package, overpack or freight container agree with the information
provided in the document?

8. Packaging specification marking: Is the letter (X,Y,Z ) in the 7;1.3.1 d)


packaging specification marking, and does it designate the packing Table 3-1
group for which the design type was tested appropriate for the 6;2
dangerous goods contained in the package? (Note. Overpacks do
not show specification marking.)

9. Overpack. When the dangerous goods are in an overpack, are the 7;1.3.1 e)
proper shipping name(s), UN number(s), label(s) and special handling 5;2
instructions clearly visible or, if not, are they reproduced on the 5;3
overpack?

10. Labelling. Do the label(s) conform to the labelling requirements of 7;1.3.1 f)


Part 5; 3? 5;3

11. Outer packaging. Does the description of the outer packaging in the 7;1.3.1 g)
document match the outer packaging offered for transport and is it Part 4
allowed in the packing instruction? Packing Instructions

12. Segregation. Does the package or overpack contain dangerous 7;1.3.1 h) and Table
goods that should be segregated? 7-1
(See below for more information on segregation.)

13. Damage. Is the package, overpack, freight container or unit load 7;1.3.1 i)
device leaking?
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Unit 7. Operators and cargo acceptance 7-29

14. Damage. Is there any indication that the package, overpack, freight 7;1.3.1 i)
container or unit load device has been damaged to the extent that its
integrity is affected?

15. Overpack. If the overpack contains packages with the label Cargo 7;1.3.1 j)
Aircraft Only:
Are the packages arranged so that they are clearly visible and
easily accessible?
OR
Does 7;2.4.1 allow them to be inaccessible?
OR
Is there only one package contained in the overpack?

16. Freight container. Does the freight container contain only radioactive 7;1.4.1 a), b), c) and
material? (see 6;7.1) d)

17. Unit load device or pallet. Does the unit load device or pallet contain 7;1.4.1 b, c) and d)
only:
Consumer Commodities (Packing Instruction 910);
OR
Dry Ice as a refrigerant (Packing Instruction 904);
OR
Magnetized Material?

Note 1. Unlike the shipper, the operator is permitted to place


other dangerous goods in a unit load device.

Note 2. Be sure to check Attachment 4 of the Instructions to


identify the new packing instructions assigned to consumer
commodities and dry ice.

Should a checkmark appear under the No column adjacent to any of the entries in the checklist, the
dangerous goods consignment is to be rejected.

______________________
UNIT 8

Infectious Substances
Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 8 ......................................................................... 8-2
B. Goal Unit 8 .................................................................................................................................................. 8-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 8-2
D. Classification ................................................................................................................................................... 8-6
E. Exceptions and Prohibitions ............................................................................................................................ 8-10
F. Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1 ................................................................................................................ 8-13
G. Packing Instructions ........................................................................................................................................ 8-15
H. Marking and Labelling ..................................................................................................................................... 8-29
I. Overpacks ....................................................................................................................................................... 8-35
J. Empty Packaging ............................................................................................................................................ 8-36
K. Documentation ................................................................................................................................................ 8-36
L. Transport of Infectious Substances ................................................................................................................. 8-39
M. Post ................................................................................................................................................................. 8-44
N. Security ........................................................................................................................................................... 8-44
O. Provisions to Aid Recognition of Undeclared Dangerous Goods..................................................................... 8-45
P. Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 8-45
Appendix 8-1. Example of Packing and Marking for Exempt Human Specimens and
Exempt Animal Specimens .................................................................................................................................... 8-48
Appendix 8-2. Example of Packing, Marking and Labelling of Category A Infectious Substances ...................... 8-49
Appendix 8-3. Example of Packing and Marking for Category B Infectious Substances ..................................... 8-50

8-1
8-2 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 8

Subject Matter: Infectious substances General requirements for shippers, Classification, List of dangerous
goods, Packing requirements, Labelling and marking, Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant
documentation, Acceptance procedures, Storage and loading procedures.
Category of personnel: any involved in the handling, offering for transport or transporting of infectious
substances.

B. GOAL UNIT 8

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether an infectious substance has been correctly
classified, prepared for transport and transported in accordance with the Instructions.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state the meaning of words and terms used in the infectious substance provisions;

b) demonstrate how to determine if the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number have been chosen for
an infectious substance;

c) demonstrate how to distinguish a medical article or substance that is subject to a partial or complete exception
from the Instructions;

d) demonstrate how to determine if an infectious substance is prohibited from air transport;

e) demonstrate how to determine if a patient specimen is appropriately prepared for transport;

f) demonstrate how to extract the infectious substance description and transport information from Table 3-1;

g) demonstrate how to identify whether the provisions affecting the packaging, marking, labeling and documenting
of infectious substances have been correctly applied; and

h) demonstrate how to determine if a package or overpack of infectious substance has been correctly accepted,
loaded and stored.

C. INTRODUCTION

Note. Before beginning this unit, the student must have completed Units 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11 and 12.

This unit deals exclusively with infectious substances. The following nine steps will help to identify and understand the
provisions associated with the classification of infectious substances and the preparation for and the air transport of such
material.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-3

Action

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the provisions dealing with the handling, offering
for transport or transport of infectious substances.

Step 2 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions.

Step 3 Determine the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number.

Step 4 Identify any exceptions or prohibitions.

Step 5 Locate the proper shipping names and UN numbers for infectious substances in Table 3-1 and identify
the relevant information required to prepare an infectious substance for transport.

Step 6 Choose the appropriate package.

Step 7 Mark and label the package and overpack, where applicable.

Step 8 Prepare the documentation for the shipment.

Step 9 Transport infectious substance by air.

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the provisions concerning
infectious substances.

Exercise 8-1 will help you learn much of the vocabulary necessary to understand the Instructions associated with the
transport of infectious substances.

EXERCISE 8-1

Referring to Parts 1 and 2 of the Instructions, identify the word or words that best match the definition or description
provided below:

1. An injury which is sustained by a person in an accident and which:


a) requires hospitalization for more than 48 hours, commencing
within seven days from the date the injury was received; or
b) results in a fracture of any bone (except simple fractures of
fingers, toes or nose); or
c) involves lacerations which cause severe haemorrhage, nerve,
muscle or tendon damage; or
d) involves injury to any internal organ; or
e) involves second or third degree burns, or any burns affecting
more than five per cent of the body surface; or
f) involves verified exposure to infectious substances or injurious
radiation.

2. Those dangerous goods which have the potential for misuse in a


terrorist incident and which may, as a result, produce serious
consequences such as mass casualties or mass destruction.

3. Substances which are known to contain, or are reasonably


expected to contain, pathogens. Pathogens are defined as micro-
organisms (including bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae, parasites, fungi)
and other agents such as prions, which can cause disease in
humans or animals.
8-4 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

4. Products derived from living organisms which are manufactured


and distributed in accordance with the requirements of appropriate
national authorities, which may have special licensing
requirements, and are used either for prevention, treatment or
diagnosis of disease in humans or animals, or for development,
experimental or investigational purposes related thereto. They
include, but are not limited to, finished or unfinished products such
as vaccines.

5. The result of a process by which pathogens are intentionally


propagated. This definition does not include patient specimens as
defined in 6.3.1.4.

6. Specimens collected directly from humans or animals, including,


but not limited to, excreta, secreta, blood and its components,
tissue and tissue fluid swabs, and body parts being transported for
purposes such as research, diagnosis, investigational activities,
and disease treatment and prevention.

7. Wastes derived from the medical treatment of animals or humans


or from bio-research.

8. An infectious substance which is transported in a form that, when


exposure to it occurs, is capable of causing permanent disability,
life-threatening or fatal disease in otherwise healthy humans or
animals.

9. An infectious substance which does not meet the criteria for


inclusion in Category A.

10. The outer protection of a composite or combination packaging


together with any absorbent materials, cushioning and any other
components necessary to contain and protect inner receptacles or
inner packagings.

11. Containment vessels for receiving and holding substances or


articles, including any means of closing.

12. One or more receptacles and any other components or materials


necessary for the receptacles to perform their containment and
other safety functions.

13. Any authority designated, or otherwise recognized, by a State to


perform specific functions related to provisions contained in these
Instructions.

14. A combination of packagings for transport purposes, consisting of


one or more inner packagings secured in an outer packaging in
accordance with the relevant provisions of Part 4.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-5

15. Liquids, or mixtures of liquids, or liquids containing solids in solution


or suspension (for example, paints, varnishes, lacquers, but not
including substances otherwise classified on account of their
dangerous characteristics) which give off a flammable vapour at
temperatures of not more than 60C, closed-cup test, or not more
than 65.6C, open-cup test, normally referred to as the flash point.

16. A person, organization or enterprise engaged in or offering to


engage in an aircraft operation.

17. One or more packages of dangerous goods accepted by an


operator from one shipper at one time and at one address,
receipted for in one lot and moving to one consignee at one
destination address.

18. Any type of freight container, aircraft container, aircraft pallet with a
net or aircraft pallet with a net over an igloo.

19. The complete product of the packing operation, consisting of the


packaging and its contents prepared for transport.

20. Any person, organization or government which is entitled to take


delivery of a consignment.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Step 2 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions

Exercise 8-2 assists you in determining where to find the relevant linkages with other parts of the Instructions.

EXERCISE 8-2

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. In what part of the Instructions are the testing


requirements for packagings for infectious substances of
Category A found?

2. Where in the Instructions are the classification


requirements for infectious substances located?

3. Name two locations where definitions for terminology used


in the infectious substances provisions can be found in the
Instructions.

4. In what part of the Instructions are the documentation


requirements found?

5. Where are the proper shipping name and UN number for


infectious substances listed in the Instructions?

6. In what part of the Instructions are the marking and


labeling requirements found?
8-6 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

7. In what part of the Instructions are the packing instructions


found?

8. In what part of the Instructions are the operator


acceptance procedures found?

9. In what part of the Instructions are the operator storage


and loading requirements found?

10. In what part of the Instructions are the operator inspection


for damage or leakage requirements found?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

D. CLASSIFICATION

Step 3 Determine the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number

Always remember:

Note. It is the shippers responsibility to ensure that all of the applicable air transport requirements are met. (5;1)

5;1.4 Before a consignment of dangerous goods is offered for air transport, all relevant persons involved in its
preparation must have received training to enable them to carry out their responsibilities, as detailed in Part 1. Where
a shipper does not have trained staff, the relevant persons may be interpreted as applying to those employed to act
on the shippers behalf and to undertake the shippers responsibilities in the preparation of the consignment.
However, such persons must be trained as required by Part 1, Chapter 4.

The first question that must be answered when faced with an unknown substance believed to be infectious is:

1. Does the substance meet the definition of infectious substances found in 2;6.3.1.1?

2;6.3.1.1 Substances which are known to contain, or are reasonably expected to contain, pathogens. Pathogens
are defined as micro-organisms (including bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae, parasites, fungi) and other agents such as
prions, which can cause disease in humans or animals.

YES NO

The substance is to be considered as a Division 6.2. Determine if any of the classification criteria in Part 2 of
(2;6.3.2.1) the Instructions apply and take the appropriate action.

The second question is:

2. If the substance is considered to be infectious, do the characteristics of the substance correspond with the
criteria for:

Category A; or
Category B?
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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-7

2;6.3.2.2.1 Category A: An infectious substance which is transported in a form that, when exposure to it occurs, is
capable of causing permanent disability, life-threatening or fatal disease in otherwise healthy humans or animals.
Indicative examples of substances that meet these criteria are given in Table 2-10.

Note. An exposure occurs when an infectious substance is released outside of the protective packaging
resulting in physical contact with humans or animals.

2;6.3.2.2.2 Category B: An infectious substance which does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Category A.
Infectious substances in Category B must be assigned to UN 3373.

Category A

If the infectious substance matches the description of Category A, the next question is:

3. Which of the two possible proper shipping names and UN numbers should the infectious substance be
assigned?

Description Proper shipping name and UN number

Category A infectious substances which cause disease Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814
in humans or in both humans and animals.
(2;6.3.2.2.1 a))
Note. See Table 2-10 for an indicative list of these
substances.

Category A infectious substances which cause disease Infectious substance, affecting animals only, UN 2900
only in animals. (2;6.3.2.2.1 a))
Note. See Table 2-10 for an indicative list of these
substances.

Note 2. Table 2-10 is not exhaustive. Infectious substances, including new or emerging pathogens, which do
not appear in Table 2-10 but which meet the same criteria must be assigned to Category A. In addition, if there is
doubt as to whether or not a substance meets the criteria it must be included in Category A.
Note 3. In Table 2-10, the micro-organisms written in italics are bacteria, mycoplasma, rickettsiae or fungi.
(2;6.3.2.2.1)

2;6.3.2.2.1 b) Assignments to UN 2814 or UN 2900 must be based on the known medical history and symptoms of
the source human or animal, endemic local conditions, or professional judgement concerning individual
circumstances of the source human or animal.

Category B

If the infectious substance does not match the description of Category A, it is to be considered a Category B substance
and the next question is:

4. What is the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number for these infectious substances?

Category B is an infectious substance that does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Category A.
8-8 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

The proper shipping name and UN number for this substance is Biological substances, Category B, UN 3373.
(2;6.3.2.2.2)

The last question is:

5. Are there other proper shipping names that may be applied to infectious substances? If there are, when are
they to be used?

There are four other proper shipping names used solely for medical or clinical wastes (e.g. solids, liquids, sharps and
laboratory waste that is potentially infected). (2;6.3.5)

2;6.3.1.5 Medical or clinical wastes are wastes derived from the medical treatment of animals or humans or from
bio-research.

It should be emphasized these four proper shipping names must not be used for medical or clinical wastes containing
Category A infectious substances. Such wastes must be assigned to UN 2814 or UN 2900, as appropriate.

Only medical or clinical wastes containing infectious substances in Category B may be assigned UN 3291. (2;6.3.5.1)

Note. For waste Category A infectious substances, the proper shipping name must be preceded by the word
Waste, e.g. Waste Infectious substances affecting humans, UN 2814. (5;4.1.4.3 c))

The four proper shipping names are:

Proper Shipping Name UN Number

Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s.

Medical waste, n.o.s.

Biomedical waste, n.o.s.


UN 3291
Regulated medical waste, n.o.s.

Note.
Toxins, extracted from living sources, solid, n.o.s.* UN 3462 and Toxins, extracted from living sources, liquid,
n.o.s.* UN 3172 have been assigned A43, which states toxins from plant, animal or bacterial sources which contain
infectious substances, or toxins that are contained in infectious substances, must be classified as Division 6.2.
Genetically modified micro organisms, UN 3245 and Genetically modified organisms, UN 3245 have been
assigned A47, which states genetically modified micro-organisms and genetically modified organisms, which meet the
definition of an infectious substance and the criteria for inclusion in Division 6.2 in accordance with 2;6, must be
transported as UN 2814, UN 2900 or UN 3373, as appropriate.

The following flowchart will assist in determining the correct classification of an infectious substance.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-9

Substance for
classification

Have any pathogens present been neutralized/inactivated?

Is it known not to contain infectious substances?

Yes to any Are any micro-organisms present non-pathogenic for humans/animals?

Is it a dried bloodspot/faecal occult blood?

Is it an environmental sample e.g. food and water that is not considered


to pose a significant health risk?

Is it for transplant/transfusion?

No to all

Yes Does it meet the definition


of a Category A substance?

No

Is it a patient specimen for Is it medical or clinical wastes Yes


Yes which there is only a reasonably believed to have a
minimal likelihood that low probability of containing
pathogens are present? infectious substances*?

No No

Not subject to the UN 2814 Infectious


UN 3291, Clinical waste
provisions of the ICAO substance, affecting
Subject to Exempt unspecified, n.o.s.; or
Technical Instructions humans: or
human (or animal) UN 3373 Biological Biomedical waste, n.o.s.;
unless meeting the UN 2900 Infectious
specimen substance, category B or Medical waste, n.o.s.;
criteria for another substance, affecting
provisions or Regulated medical
hazard class animals
waste, n.o.s.
or division (as appropriate)

*Decontaminated medical or clinical wastes that previously contained infectious substances are not subject to the Instructions
unless they meet the criteria for inclusion in another class.
8-10 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

E. EXCEPTIONS AND PROHIBITIONS

Step 4 Identify any exceptions or prohibitions

Exceptions (2;6.3.2.3)

To eliminate any possible confusion for health care professionals, the Instructions clearly identify those substances that
are not considered fully regulated infectious substances. These exceptions are of two kinds:

1. Complete Exception, meaning the Instructions do not apply to their transport.


2. Partial Exception, meaning certain conditions apply.

1. Complete Exception

The following is a list of those eligible for a Complete Exception:

Substances which do not contain infectious substances or substances which are unlikely to cause disease in
humans or animals. (2;6.3.2.3.1)

Substances containing micro-organisms which are non-pathogenic to humans or animals. (2;6.3.2.3.2)

Substances in a form that any present pathogens have been neutralized or inactivated such that they no longer
pose a health risk. (2;6.3.2.3.3)

Environmental samples (including food and water samples) which are not considered to pose a significant risk
of infection. (2;6.3.2.3.4)

Dried blood spots, collected by applying a drop of blood onto absorbent material, or faecal occult blood
screening tests and blood or blood components that have been collected for the purposes of transfusion or for
the preparation of blood products to be used for transfusion or transplantation and any tissues or organs
intended for use in transplantation. (2;6.3.2.3.5)

Biological products which are manufactured and packaged in accordance with the requirements of appropriate
national authorities and transported for the purposes of final packaging or distribution, and use for personal
health care by medical professionals or individuals. (2;6.3.3 a))
Note. Some licensed biological products may present a biohazard only in certain parts of the world.
In that case, appropriate national authorities may require these biological products to be in compliance with
local requirements for infectious substances or may impose other restrictions.

Decontaminated medical or clinical wastes that previously contained infectious substances, unless they meet
the criteria for inclusion in another class. (6.3.5.3)

Note. As with all classification activities, a check must be made to determine if the substance meets the criteria
for inclusion in another class.

2. Partial Exception

Patient specimens are the only substances which may be subject to a partial exception under the condition there is a
minimum likelihood that pathogens are present. Specific marking and packaging conditions apply to patient specimens
where there is minimal likelihood that pathogens are present.
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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-11

Note. If a patient specimen is known to contain pathogens, then it must be appropriately classified as a
Category A or B infectious substance.

2;6.3.1.4 Patient specimens are those collected directly from humans or animals, including, but not limited to,
excreta, secreta, blood and its components, tissue and tissue fluid swabs, and body parts being transported for
purposes such as research, diagnosis, investigational activities, and disease treatment and prevention.

2;6.3.2.3.6 Note. In determining whether a patient specimen has a minimum likelihood that pathogens are
present, an element of professional judgement is required to determine if a substance is exempt under this
paragraph. That judgement should be based on the known medical history, symptoms and individual circumstances
of the source, human or animal, and endemic local conditions. Examples of specimens which may be transported
under this paragraph include blood or urine tests to monitor cholesterol levels, blood glucose levels, hormone levels,
or prostate specific antibodies (PSA); tests required to monitor organ function such as heart, liver or kidney function
for humans or animals with non-infectious diseases, or therapeutic drug monitoring; tests conducted for insurance or
employment purposes and are intended to determine the presence of drugs or alcohol; pregnancy tests; biopsies to
detect cancer; and antibody detection in humans or animals in the absence of any concern for infection (e.g.
evaluation of vaccine induced immunity, diagnosis of autoimmune disease, etc.).

Conditions of patient specimens complying with the partial exception

Patient specimens falling under the partial exception have only two unique conditions associated with their safe transport
by air. They will be examined in full here.

A. Package marking
B. Package design and construction

A. Package marking requirement for patient specimens

2;6.3.2.3.6 . the specimen is transported in a packaging which will prevent any leakage and which is marked with
the words Exempt human specimen or Exempt animal specimen, as appropriate.

B. Patient specimen packaging

2;6.3.2.3.6 The packaging must meet the following conditions:

a) The packaging must consist of three components:

i) a leakproof primary receptacle(s);


ii) a leakproof secondary packaging; and
iii) an outer packaging of adequate strength for its capacity, mass and intended use, and with at least one
surface having minimum dimensions of 100 mm 100 mm;

b) For liquids, absorbent material in sufficient quantity to absorb the entire contents must be placed between the
primary receptacle(s) and the secondary packaging so that, during transport, any release or leak of a liquid
substance will not reach the outer packaging and will not compromise the integrity of the cushioning material;

c) When multiple fragile primary receptacles are placed in a single secondary packaging, they must be either
individually wrapped or separated to prevent contact between them.
8-12 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Appendix 8-1 of this unit provides a diagram of the components of a patient specimen package.

Note. If other dangerous goods are present with patient specimens, the relevant provisions of the ICAO Technical
Instructions apply to those goods.

Prohibitions (2:6.3.6)

2;6.3.6.1 A live animal that has been intentionally infected and is known or suspected to contain an infectious
substance must not be transported by air unless the infectious substance contained cannot be consigned by any
other means. Infected animals may only be transported under terms and conditions approved by the appropriate
national authority.

2;6.3.6.2 Unless an infectious substance cannot be consigned by any other means, live animals must not be used
to consign such a substance.

Exercise 8-3 will assist you in applying what you have learned about the classification of infectious substances and
exceptions and prohibitions.

EXERCISE 8-3

Referring to Part 2;6 of the Instructions, identify the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number for the
following substances.

1. A blood sample known or reasonably suspected to contain


EBOLA VIRUS.

2. A culture of FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE virus.

3. A blood sample taken from a patient known or suspected to


have a Category B pathogen, such as HEPATITIS B or HIV.

4. Culture of BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS.

5. Laboratory stock culture of a pathogen in Category B, e.g.


INFLUENZA VIRUS.

6. Specimen having contained a Category A or B infectious


substance, treated so as to inactivate or neutralize the
pathogens such that they no longer pose a health risk.
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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-13

7. Patient specimens other than those known or reasonably


suspected to contain a Category A infectious substance
e.g. those sent for testing for Cholesterol (blood), diabetes
(urine), bowel cancer (faecal).

8. A container of waste needles used to take blood samples


from patients (There is no indication that a Category A
infectious substance is present.).

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

F. DANGEROUS GOODS LISTTABLE 3-1

Step 5 Locate the proper shipping names and UN numbers for infectious substances in Table 3-1 and identify
the relevant information required to prepare an infectious substance for transport.

The list of proper shipping names and UN numbers for infectious substances has been determined through the
application of the requirements of Part 2 of the Instructions. The next step is to extract from Table 3-1 all of the relevant
information related to these proper shipping names and UN numbers.

As you have already had experience locating information in Table 3-1, Exercise 8-4 will be used as a refresher as well
as a means of identifying the information pertinent to infectious substances.

EXERCISE 8-4

Fill in the blanks in the following excerpt from Table 3-1:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity instruction package instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Infectious 6.2
substance,
affecting
animals only
8-14 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Infectious 6.2
substance,
affecting
humans

Biological 6.2
substance,
Category B
Biomedical 6.2
waste, n.o.s.
Clinical waste, 6.2
unspecified,
n.o.s.
Medical waste, 6.2
n.o.s.
Regulated 6.2
medical
waste, n.o.s.
Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Upon the correct completion of this table you now have enough information to proceed to the next step.

Note. Both the State variations and the special provisions may affect the conditions of transport. Always be sure
to check. For example the special provisions for the infectious substance entries in Table 3-1 are:

A81 The quantity limits shown in columns 11 and 13 do not apply to body parts, organs or whole bodies.

A117 Wastes transported under UN 3291 are wastes derived from the medical treatment of humans or animals or
from bio-research, where there is a relatively low probability that infectious substances are present. Waste infectious
substances which can be specified must be assigned to UN 2814 or UN 2900. Decontaminated wastes which
previously contained infectious substances may be considered as not subject to these Instructions unless the criteria
of another class or division are met.

A140 (318) For the purposes of documentation, the proper shipping name must be supplemented with the technical
name (see 1.2.7). Technical names need not be shown on the package. When the infectious substances to be
transported are unknown, but suspected of meeting the criteria for inclusion in category A and assignment to
UN 2814 or UN 2900, the words suspected category A infectious substance must be shown, in parentheses,
following the proper shipping name on the transport document, but not on the outer packagings.
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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-15

G. PACKING INSTRUCTIONS

Step 6 Choose the appropriate package

The following excerpt from Table 3-1 lines up the three Packing Instructions (602, 622 and 650) with their respective
proper shipping name and identifies the maximum net quantity per package for passenger and cargo aircraft.

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft

Max. net Max. net


Class quantity quantity
UN or Packing per Packing per
Name No. division instruction package instruction package

1 2 3 10 11 12 13

Infectious substance, affecting 2900 6.2 602 50 mL or 50 g 602 4 L or 4 kg


animals only

Infectious substance, affecting 2814 6.2 602 50 mL or 50 g 602 4 L or 4 kg


humans

Biological substance, Category B 3373 6.2 See 650 See 650

Biomedical waste, n.o.s. 3291 6.2 622 No limit 622 No limit

Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s. 3291 6.2 622 No limit 622 No limit

Medical waste, n.o.s. 3291 6.2 622 No limit 622 No limit

Regulated medical waste, n.o.s. 3291 6.2 622 No limit 622 No limit

It should be noted that for:

UN 2900 and UN 2814 the maximum net quantity per package for:

Passenger aircraft is 50 mL or 50 g
Cargo aircraft is 4 L or 4 kg.

UN 3373 the maximum net quantity per package is stipulated in Packing Instruction 650 (For liquids: The outer
packaging must not contain more than 4 L. This quantity excludes ice, dry ice or liquid nitrogen when used to
keep specimens cold. For solids: Except for packages containing body parts, organs or whole bodies, the
outer package must not contain more than 4 kg. This quantity excludes ice, dry ice or liquid nitrogen when used
to keep specimens cold.)

UN 3291 there is no limit for either passenger or cargo aircraft .


8-16 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Packing Instruction 602

Note. This packing instruction applies to UN 2814 and UN 2900.

Packagings meeting the requirements of 6;6 and approved accordingly consisting of:

a) Inner packagings comprising:

1) leakproof primary receptacle(s);

2) a leakproof secondary packaging;

3) other than for solid infectious substances, an absorbent material in sufficient quantity to absorb the entire
contents placed between the primary receptacle(s) and the secondary packaging; if multiple fragile primary
receptacles are placed in a single secondary packaging, they shall be either individually wrapped or
separated so as to prevent contact between them;

b) A rigid outer packaging. The smallest external dimension must be not less than 100 mm.

Additional requirements:

c) Inner packagings containing infectious substances must not be consolidated with inner packagings containing
unrelated types of goods. Complete packages may be overpacked in accordance with the provisions of 1;3.1 and
5;2.4.10. Such an overpack may contain dry ice.

d) Other than for exceptional consignments, e.g. whole organs, which require special packaging, the following
additional requirements must apply:

1) Substances consigned at ambient temperatures or at a higher temperature. Primary receptacles must be of


glass, metal or plastics. Positive means of ensuring a leakproof seal must be provided, e.g. a heat seal, a
skirted stopper or a metal crimp seal. If screw caps are used, they must be secured by positive means, e.g.
tape, paraffin sealing tape or manufactured locking closure;

2) Substances consigned refrigerated or frozen. Ice, dry ice or other refrigerant must be placed around the
secondary packaging(s) or, alternatively, in an overpack with one or more complete packages marked in
accordance with 6;6.3. Interior supports must be provided to secure secondary packaging(s) or packages in
position after the ice or dry ice has dissipated. If ice is used, the outer packaging or overpack must be
leakproof. If dry ice is used, the outer packaging or overpack must permit the release of carbon dioxide gas.
The primary receptacle and the secondary packaging must maintain their integrity at the temperature of the
refrigerant used;

3) Substances consigned in liquid nitrogen. Plastic primary receptacles capable of withstanding very low
temperature must be used. The secondary packaging must also be capable of withstanding very low
temperatures and, in most cases, will need to be fitted over the primary receptacle individually. Provisions
for the consignment of liquid nitrogen must also be fulfilled. The primary receptacle and the secondary
packaging must maintain their integrity at the temperature of the liquid nitrogen;

4) Lyophilized substances may also be transported in primary receptacles that are flame-sealed glass
ampoules or rubberstoppered glass vials fitted with metal seals.

e) Whatever the intended temperature of the consignment, the primary receptacle or the secondary packaging must
be capable of withstanding, without leakage, an internal pressure producing a pressure differential of not less
than 95 kPa and temperatures in the range 40C to +55C.
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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-17

f) Alternative packagings for the transport of animal material may be authorized by the competent authority in
accordance with the provisions of 4;2.8.

g) A quantity of 30 ml or less of dangerous goods included in Class 3, 8 or 9 may be packed in each primary
receptacle containing infectious substances provided these substances meet the requirements of 3;5.

Note. The capability of a packaging to withstand an internal pressure without leakage that produces the
specified pressure differential should be determined by testing samples of primary receptacles or secondary
packagings. Pressure differential is the difference between the pressure exerted on the inside of the receptacle or
packaging and the pressure on the outside. The appropriate test method should be selected based on receptacle or
packaging type. Acceptable test methods include any method that produces the required pressure differential
between the inside and outside of a primary receptacle or a secondary packaging. The test may be conducted using
internal hydraulic or pneumatic pressure (gauge) or external vacuum test methods. Internal hydraulic or pneumatic
pressure can be applied in most cases as the required pressure differential can be achieved under most
circumstances. An external vacuum test is not acceptable if the specified pressure differential is not achieved and
maintained. The external vacuum test is a generally acceptable method for rigid receptacles and packagings but is
not normally acceptable for:

flexible receptacles and flexible packagings;

receptacles and packagings filled and closed under an absolute atmospheric pressure lower than 95 kPa.

Special packing provisions

a) Shippers of infectious substances must ensure that packages are prepared in such a manner that they arrive at
their destination in good condition and present no hazard to persons or animals during transport.

b) The definition in 1;3, and the general packing requirements of 4;1, apply to infectious substances packages.

c) An itemized list of contents must be enclosed between the secondary packaging and the outer packaging. When
the infectious substances to be transported are unknown, but suspected of meeting the criteria for inclusion in
Category A, the words suspected Category A infectious substance must be shown in parentheses following the
proper shipping name on the itemized list of contents inside the outer packaging.

d) Before an empty packaging is returned to the shipper, or sent elsewhere, it must be disinfected or sterilized to
nullify any hazard, and any label or marking indicating that it had contained an infectious substance must be
removed or obliterated.
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Exercise 8-5 will assist you in locating information in Packing Instruction 602.

EXERCISE 8-5

Referring to Packing Instruction 602, answer the following questions.

1. Packing Instruction 602 applies only to UN numbers:


UN 2814, and
UN 2900.

True ___ False ___

2. The packaging mark

n 4G/Class 6.2/06/S/SP-9989-ERIKSSON

is an acceptable package marking for a fibreboard box containing infectious substances. The box was
manufactured in 2006 by a company whose identification mark specified by the competent authority is SP-
9989-ERIKSSON. The State authorizing the allocation of the mark was Sweden.

True ___ False ___

3. What is missing from this statement:

An inner package is comprised of:

1) leakproof primary receptacle(s);

3) other than for solid infectious substances, an absorbent material in sufficient quantity to absorb the entire
contents placed between the primary receptacle(s) and the secondary packaging; if multiple fragile primary
receptacles are placed in a single secondary packaging, they shall be either individually wrapped or separated
so as to prevent contact between them;

4. The smallest dimension of a rigid outer packaging must be not less than 50 mm.

True ___ False ___

5. Can inner packagings of infectious substances be consolidated with inner packagings of unrelated types of
goods?

Yes ___ No ___

6. May an overpack be used for complete packages of infectious substances?

Yes ___ No ___

7. When infectious substances are transported at ambient temperatures the primary receptacles must be only of
plastic.

True ___ False ___


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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-19

8. A screw cap used on the primary receptacles referred to in Question 7 that has been taped with paraffin sealing
tape meets the requirements for a leakproof seal.

True ___ False ___

9. When infectious substances are transported frozen with dry ice, the dry ice must be placed around the
secondary packaging(s) or in an overpack with one or more complete packages marked in accordance with
6;6.3.

True ___ False ___

10. It is sufficient support to have the secondary packagings of a frozen infectious substance resting on the dry ice
within the rigid outer packaging.

True ___ False ___

Explain your answer.

11. When substances are transported in liquid nitrogen the primary receptacles and the secondary packaging must
be capable of withstanding very low temperatures.

True ___ False ___

12. Both the primary receptacle and secondary packaging must be capable of withstanding without leakage an
internal pressure producing a pressure differential of not less than 95 kPa.

True ___ False ___

13. Small quantities of dangerous goods of Class 3, 8 or 9


may be packed in each primary receptacle containing
infectious substances. Under what condition may this be
done?

14. What is the heading of Part 3;5 of the Instructions?

15. Do the general packing requirements of Part 4;1 apply


to infectious substances packed in accordance with
Packing Instruction 602?

16. Where must an itemized list of contents of a package of


infectious substance packed in accordance with Packing
Instruction 602 be placed?
8-20 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

17. If the name of the infectious substance to be transported


is unknown but suspected of meeting the criteria of
Category A, what words must be shown in brackets
following the proper shipping name?

18. Name two things that must happen before an empty


packaging last containing infectious substances is
returned to the shipper.

Check your answer with those in Unit 13.

Note. Remember that the General Packing Requirements, 4;1 and the requirements for packaging of infectious
substances of Category A, 6;6 of the Instructions must be met. Specific infectious substance requirements include:

4;1.1.8 Subject to 1.1.7 an outer packaging may contain more than one item of dangerous goods provided that: An
outer packaging containing Division 6.2 (Infectious Substances) may contain material for refrigeration, or freezing or
packaging material such as absorbent material.

4;1.1.13 Combination packagings containing liquid dangerous goods, excluding flammable liquids in inner
packagings of 120 mL or less, or infectious substances in primary receptacles not exceeding 50 mL, must be packed
so that the closures on the inner packagings are upward and the upright position of the package must be indicated on
it by the Package orientation label shown in 5;3.2.11 b). The words This side up or This end up may also be
displayed on the top cover of the package.

Packing Instruction 622

Note. This packing instruction applies to Biomedical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291, Clinical waste, unspecified,
n.o.s., UN 3291, Medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291 or Regulated medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291.

The general packing requirements of 4;1 must be met.

Consignments must be prepared in such a manner that they arrive at their destination in good condition and present
no hazard to persons or animals during transport.

Consignments must be packed in steel drums (1A2), aluminium drums (1B2), plywood drums (1D), fibre drums (1G),
plastic drums (1H2), steel jerricans (3A2), plastic jerricans (3H2), wooden boxes (4C1, 4C2), plywood boxes (4D),
reconstituted wood boxes (4F) or fibreboard boxes (4G). Packagings must meet Packing Group II requirements.
The packaging tests may be those appropriate for solids when there is sufficient absorbent material to absorb the
entire amount of liquid present and the packaging is capable of retaining liquids.

In all other circumstances, the packaging tests must be those appropriate for liquids.

Packagings intended to contain sharp objects such as broken glass and needles must be resistant to puncture and
retain liquids under the performance test conditions for the packaging.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-21

Exercise 8-6 will assist you in locating information in Packing Instruction 622.

EXERCISE 8-6

Referring to Packing Instruction 622, answer the following questions.

1. Do the general packing requirements of 4;1 apply?

Yes ___ No ____

2. Name three packages acceptable for the containment


of infectious substances using Packing Instruction 622.

3. What packing group must the packages identified


above meet?

4. Under what conditions may a packaging designed to


carry liquid undergo packaging tests for solids?

5. If a packaging is to carry sharp objects it must be resistant to puncture and retain liquids under the
performance test conditions for the packaging.

True ___ False ___

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Note. Remember that the General Packing Requirements, 4;1 of the Instructions must be met.
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Packing Instruction 650

Note. This packing instruction applies to Biological Substances, n.o.s., UN 3373.

Packaging 1) The packaging must be of good quality, strong enough to withstand the shocks and loadings
normally encountered during transport, including transhipment between transport units and
between transport units and warehouses as well as any removal from a pallet or overpack for
subsequent manual or mechanical handling. Packagings must be constructed and closed to
prevent any loss of contents that might be caused under normal conditions of transport by
vibration or by changes in temperature, humidity or pressure.

2) The packaging must consist of three components:


a) a primary receptacle;
b) a secondary packaging; and
c) a rigid outer packaging.

3) Primary receptacles must be packed in secondary packagings in such a way that, under
normal conditions of transport, they cannot break, be punctured or leak their contents into the
secondary packaging. Secondary packagings must be secured in outer packagings with
suitable cushioning material. Any leakage of the contents must not compromise the integrity
of the cushioning material or of the outer packaging.

Marking 4) For transport, the mark illustrated below must be displayed on the external surface of the
outer packaging on a background of a contrasting colour and must be clearly visible and
legible. The mark must be in the form of a square set at an angle of 45 (diamond-shaped)
with each side having a length of at least 50 mm, the width of the line must be at least 2 mm,
and the letters and numbers must be at least 6 mm high.

UN3373

The proper shipping name Biological substance, Category B in letters at least 6 mm high
must be marked on the outer packaging adjacent to the diamond-shaped mark.

Dimension of 5) At least one surface of the outer packaging must have a minimum dimension of 100 mm
package 100 mm.

Testing 6) The completed package must be capable of successfully passing the drop test in 6;6.5.3 as
specified in 6;6.5.2 of the Instructions except that the height of the drop must not be less than
1.2 m. Following the appropriate drop sequence, there must be no leakage from the primary
receptacle(s) which must remain protected by absorbent material, when required, in the
secondary packaging.
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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-23

Liquids

Primary receptacle/ 7) For liquid substances:


Secondary packaging a) The primary receptacle(s) must be leakproof and must not
contain more than 1 litre;
b) The secondary packaging must be leakproof;
c) If multiple fragile primary receptacles are placed in a single
secondary packaging, they must be either individually
wrapped or separated to prevent contact between them;
d) Absorbent material must be placed between the primary
receptacle(s) and the secondary packaging. The absorbent
material must be in quantity sufficient to absorb the entire
contents of the primary receptacle(s) so that any release of
the liquid substance will not compromise the integrity of the
cushioning material or of the outer packaging;
e) The primary receptacle or the secondary packaging must be
capable of withstanding, without leakage, an internal
pressure of 95 kPa (0.95 bar);

Outer package

Quantity limit f) The outer package must not contain more than 4 litres.

Refrigerant (Ice, This quantity excludes ice, dry ice or liquid nitrogen when used to
dry ice or liquid keep specimens cold.
nitrogen) excluded
from total quantity.

Note. The capability of a packaging to withstand an internal pressure without leakage that
produces the specified pressure differential should be determined by testing samples of primary
receptacles or secondary packagings. Pressure differential is the difference between the pressure
exerted on the inside of the receptacle or packaging and the pressure on the outside. The
appropriate test method should be selected based on receptacle or packaging type. Acceptable
test methods include any method that produces the required pressure differential between the
inside and outside of a primary receptacle or a secondary packaging. The test may be conducted
using internal hydraulic or pneumatic pressure (gauge) or external vacuum test methods. Internal
hydraulic or pneumatic pressure can be applied in most cases as the required pressure
differential can be achieved under most circumstances. An external vacuum test is not acceptable
if the specified pressure differential is not achieved and maintained. The external vacuum test is a
generally acceptable method for rigid receptacles and packagings but is not normally acceptable
for:
flexible receptacles and flexible packagings;
receptacles and packagings filled and closed under an absolute atmospheric pressure
lower than 95 kPa.

Solids

Primary receptacle/ 8) For solid substances:


Secondary packaging a) The primary receptacle(s) must be siftproof and must not
exceed the outer packaging mass limit;
b) The secondary packaging must be siftproof;
c) If multiple fragile primary receptacles are placed in a single
secondary packaging, they must be either individually
wrapped or separated to prevent contact between them;
8-24 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Outer package

Quantity limit d) Except for packages containing body parts, organs or whole
bodies, the outer package must not contain more than 4 kg.

Refrigerant (Ice, This quantity excludes ice, dry ice or liquid nitrogen when used to
dry ice or liquid keep specimens cold;
nitrogen) excluded
from total quantity.

If Liquids e) If there is any doubt as to whether or not residual liquid may be present in the primary
suspected receptacle during transport, then a packaging suitable for liquids, including absorbent
materials, must be used.

Refrigerated or frozen specimens: ice, dry ice and liquid nitrogen

Instructions apply 9) Refrigerated or frozen specimens: ice, dry ice and liquid
nitrogen:
a) When dry ice or liquid nitrogen is used to keep specimens
cold, all applicable requirements of these Instructions must
be met.

Placement of When used, ice or dry ice must be placed outside the
refrigerant secondary packagings or in the outer packaging or an
overpack. Interior supports must be provided to secure the
secondary packagings in the original position after the ice or
dry ice has dissipated. If ice is used, the outside packaging
or overpack must be leakproof. If carbon dioxide, solid (dry
ice) is used, the packaging must be designed and
constructed to permit the release of carbon dioxide gas to
prevent a build-up of pressure that could rupture the
packagings;
b) The primary receptacle and the secondary packaging must
maintain their integrity at the temperature of the refrigerant
used as well as the temperatures and the pressures which
could result if refrigeration were lost.

Overpack 10) When packages are placed in an overpack, the package markings required by this packing
instruction must either be clearly visible or the markings must be reproduced on the outside
of the overpack and the overpack must be marked with the word Overpack.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-25

Only 11) Infectious substances assigned to UN 3373 which are packed and marked in accordance
applicable with this packing instruction are not subject to any other requirement in these Instructions
requirements except for the following:
a) the name and address of the shipper and of the consignee must be provided on each
package;
b) the name and telephone number of a person responsible must be provided on a written
document (such as an air waybill) or on the package;
c) classification must be in accordance with 2;6.3.2;
d) the incident reporting requirements in 7;4.4 must be met;
e) the inspection for damage or leakage requirements in 7;3.1.3 and 7;3.1.4; and
f) passengers and crew members are prohibited from transporting infectious substances
either as, or in, carry-on baggage or checked baggage or on their person.
Note. When the shipper or consignee is also the person responsible as referred to in b),
the name and address need be marked only once in order to satisfy the name and marking
provisions in both a) and b).
12) Clear instructions on filling and closing such packages must be provided to the shipper or to
the person who prepares the package (e.g. patient) by packaging manufacturers and
subsequent distributors to enable the package to be correctly prepared for transport.
13) Other dangerous goods must not be packed in the same packaging as Division 6.2 infectious
substances unless they are necessary for maintaining the viability, stabilizing or preventing
degradation or neutralizing the hazards of the infectious substances. A quantity of 30 ml or
less of dangerous goods included in Class 3, 8 or 9 may be packed in each primary
receptacle containing infectious substances provided these substances meet the
requirements of 3;5. When these small quantities of dangerous goods are packed with
infectious substances in accordance with this packing instruction no other requirements in
these Instructions need be met.

Additional 1) Alternative packagings for the transport of animal material may be authorized by the
requirements: competent authority in accordance with the provisions of 4;2.8.

Exercise 8-7 will assist you in locating information in Packing Instruction 650.

EXERCISE 8-7

Referring to Packing Instruction 650 answer the following questions.

1. Packing Instruction 650 applies only to Biological Substances, Category B, UN 3373.

True ___ False ___

2. There are four components to a packaging specified in Packing Instruction 650.

True ___ False ___

Explain your answer.


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3. The packaging must be of good quality, strong enough to withstand the shocks and loadings normally
encountered during transport, including transhipment between transport units and between transport units and
warehouses as well as any removal from a pallet or overpack for subsequent manual or mechanical handling.

True ___ False ___

4. Packagings must be constructed and closed to prevent any loss of contents that might be caused under normal
conditions of transport by vibration or by changes in temperature, humidity or pressure.

True ___ False ___

5. Is it acceptable to pack a primary receptacle in a secondary packaging in such a way that it may break under
normal conditions of transport just as long as the secondary packaging remains intact?

True ___ False ___

6. Any leakage of the contents must not compromise the integrity of the cushioning material or of the outer
packaging.

True ___ False ___

7. Describe the mark that must be displayed on the outer


packaging of a Biological Substance, Category B
package.

8. What proper shipping name must be marked on the


outer packaging adjacent to the mark specified in
question 7 above?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-27

9. At least one surface of the outer packaging of a Biological Substance, Category B package must be 50 mm X
50 mm.

True ___ False ___

Explain your answer.

10. What test must a completed Biological Substance,


Category B package be capable of successfully
passing?

11. Which reference in Packing Instruction 650 specifies the


requirements for packaging containing Biological
Substances, Category B in liquid form?

12. Which reference in Packing Instruction 650 specifies the


requirements for packaging containing Biological
Substances, Category B in solid form?

13. Which reference in Packing Instruction 650 specifies the


requirements for packaging containing refrigerated or
frozen Biological Substances, Category B in ice, dry ice
or liquid nitrogen?

14. If a Biological Substance, Category B package is placed


in a fibreboard overpack, what markings must appear on
the overpack?
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15. In addition to the packaging and marking requirements


of Packing Instruction 650 what are the six additional
provisions of the Instructions that apply?

16. Who must provide the shipper with clear instruction on


the filling and closing of a package prepared in
accordance with Packing Instruction 650?

17. What class of dangerous goods may be packed in a


primary receptacle containing a Biological Substance,
Category B?

Explain the conditions associated with their transport by


air.

18. Under what conditions may alternative packagings be


used?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Note. The questions in Exercises 8-5, 8-6 and 8-7 are not meant to address all of the provisions of Packing
Instructions 602, 622 or 650. It is important to read each of these packing instructions carefully.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-29

As determined earlier in this unit certain infectious substances are subject to exceptions from the Instructions. The
details of these exceptions are specified in the following locations:

Patient specimens for which there is a minimum likelihood that pathogens are present (2;6.3.2.3.6),
and

Biological Substance, Category B Packing Instruction 650.


Note. Packing Instruction 650 contains all applicable references to the Instructions.

Infectious substance, affecting animals only and Infectious substance, affecting humans, packed in accordance
with Packing Instruction 602 and Biomedical waste, n.o.s., Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s., Medical waste, n.o.s.,
Regulated medical waste, n.o.s packed in accordance with Packing Instruction 622 are not entitled to any exceptions.
This means that a package containing such substances must comply with all the relevant marking, labeling and
documentation provisions of Part 5.

H. MARKING AND LABELLING

The next step, Step 7, of this unit examines the marking and labeling requirements for packages and overpacks
containing these substances, and Step 8 examines the documentation requirements.

It should be noted that the information following each of these steps is used to highlight those provisions unique to the
above-mentioned infectious substances. For training material on the overall applicable marking and labeling provisions
refer to Unit 5 Marking and labelling and for documentation refer to Unit 6 Dangerous Goods Transport
Document and other relevant documentation.

Step 7 Mark and label the package and overpack, where applicable

Package marking

There are three standard package markings required on packages of dangerous goods. They are used to:

1) identify the content of the package by showing the:

Proper shipping name, and technical name, where applicable, and


UN number. (Subparagraph 5;2.4.1.)

Example: Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814.

Note. Additional descriptive text in the entries in column 1 of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 are not
part of the proper shipping name but may be used in addition to the proper shipping name.

2) identify the name and address of the shipper and the consignee (receiver) of the dangerous goods.
(Subparagraph 5; 2.4.2).
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Example:

Shipper: Consignee:
Mr. Smith Ms. Jones
ABC Company XYZ Company
123 Maple Street 567 Maplethorp Road
New York, New York London, England
10171 MJ24 8BB

3) indicate by displaying package specification markings the packaging meets approved standards. (6;6.4)

Example:

n 4G/Class 6.2/06/S/SP-9989-/ERIKSSON

Additional markings

Other marks may be required depending on the type of dangerous goods within the package, the type of package and
the mode of transport to be used. The following chart summarizes these additional marking requirements and identifies
the appropriate references within the Instructions:

Subject Required additional markings

Refrigerated liquefied gas (5;2.4.6) Arrows to indicate upright position, or Package Orientation
(Check 2;2.1.2 c) for a definition of label (Figure 5-26).
refrigerated liquefied gas.) Words KEEP UPRIGHT placed around the package at 120
intervals or on each side.
Words DO NOT DROP HANDLE WITH CARE.

Dry ice (5;2.4.7) Net mass of dry ice.

Overpack (5;2.4.10) (Check 1;3.1 for a The word Overpack.


definition of the word overpack.) The proper shipping name(s) and UN number(s).
Special handling instructions which appear on interior packages,
unless markings and labels representative of all dangerous
goods are visible.
Note. Packaging specification markings must never be
repeated on the overpack.

Other modes of transport (5;2.4.12) Markings required by international or national transport


regulations, as long as their colour, design or shape does not
conflict with the marking required by the Instructions.

See Part 5;2, Package Markings, of the Instructions for the provisions concerning markings, and Unit 5 of this manual for
the related training material.

Note. When evaluating the compliance of a shipment of infectious substances packed with other dangerous
goods be sure to take into consideration all of the provisions of the Instructions which apply to those goods.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-31

Package labelling

There are two types of labels specified in the Instructions:

The class hazard label, which is used to provide an immediate indication of the risk posed by the dangerous
goods.

The handling label, which is used to provide information on proper handling and stowage.

Note. Part 5;3 establishes most of the labelling requirements, but additional requirements may be found in the
Special Provisions and Packing Instructions. Always check.

Class hazard label

According to Column 5 of Table 3-1, a package containing the following infectious substances must display the
infectious label. The following table lists all of the proper shipping names for infectious substances requiring this
infectious label.

Proper Shipping Name Label

Infectious substance, affecting animals only, UN 2900

Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814

Biomedical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291


OR
6
Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s., UN 3291
Figure 5-17
OR
The bottom part of the label should bear the
Medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
inscription INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE In
OR
case of damage or leakage immediately
Regulated medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
notify public health authority

5;3.2.4 In addition to the primary hazard label (Figure 5-17), infectious substances packages must bear any other
label required by the nature of the contents. This is not required if a quantity of 30 ml or less of dangerous goods
included in classes 3, 8 or 9 is packed in each primary receptacle containing infectious substances provided these
substances meet the requirements of 3;5.1.2.

See Part 5;3, Labelling, of the Instructions for the provisions concerning labeling, and Unit 5 of this manual for the
related training material.
8-32 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Complete Exercise 8-8 to help you refresh your memory regarding provisions associated with the display of labels.

EXERCISE 8-8

Referring to 5;3.2.7 answer the following questions.

1. A white label may be placed on a white background as long as it has a dotted or solid line outer boundary.

True ___ False ___

2. It is acceptable to place the label on the opposite side of package to the proper shipping name if the package
dimensions are inadequate.

True ___ False ___

3. Where space allows, labels are to be placed on the same surface of the package near the proper shipping name
marking.

True ___ False ___

4. It is acceptable for the primary label to overlap the subsidiary label even if the Class/Division number on the
subsidiary label is no longer visible.

True ___ False ___

5. Labels must be firmly affixed to or printed on the package.

True ___ False ___

6. Cylindrical packages must be of such dimensions that a label will not overlap itself.

True ___ False ___

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-33

Handling labels

The following table summarizes the handling labels that may be required on a package of infectious substances and
their location on the package:

Label When it is required Location

Cargo Aircraft only label When the package containing the dangerous On the same surface of the
(Figure 5-25) goods may only be transported on a cargo package near the hazard labels
aircraft. (5;3.2.11 a) 3))
(5;3.2.11 a) 1))

Package orientation label When required by the provisions of 4;1.1.13 Must be affixed to or
(Figure 5-26) (5;3.2.11 b)) printed on at least two opposite
Note. 4;1.1.13 Combination vertical sides of the package with
packagings containing liquid dangerous the arrows pointing in the correct
goods, excluding flammable liquids in inner direction. The words
packagings of 120 mL or less, or infectious Dangerous goods may be
substances in primary receptacles not inserted on the label below the
exceeding 50 mL, must be packed so that the line. (5;3.2.11 b))
closures on the inner packagings are upward
and the upright position of the package must
be indicated on it by the Package
orientation label shown in 5;3.2.11 b). The
words This side up or This end up may
also be displayed on the top cover of the
package.
8-34 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Label When it is required Location

Cryogenic liquid label For packages containing refrigerated On the package (5;3.2.11 c))
(Figure 5-28) liquefied gases (5;3.2.11 c))

CONTAINS
CRYOGENIC LIQUID

5;3.2.12 Where a text is indicated in Figures 5-1 to 5-31, an equivalent text in another language may be used.

Note. Although other labels may be placed on a package they should not be of a design or placement to conflict
with those prescribed by the Instructions. (5;3.2.13)

EXERCISE 8-9

Referring to Part 5;3, answer the following questions.

1. A package containing 2 L of Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814 may be transported on a


passenger aircraft.

True ___ False ___

2. Four fibreboard boxes (4G), each containing 45 kg of Clinical wastes unspecified, n.o.s. may be transported on
a passenger aircraft.

True ___ False ___

3. A package containing 6 kg of Infectious substance, affecting animals only, UN 2900 may be transported on
a cargo aircraft.

True ___ False ___

4. A package containing 2 kg of Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814 may be transported only on
a cargo aircraft.

True ___ False ___

5. Where in the Instructions are the specifications for handling labels


found?

6. Figures 5-25, 5-26 and 5-28 show the minimum label dimensions.

True ___ False ___


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-35

7. Labels having dimensions not smaller than half of those indicated may be used on packages containing
infectious substances when the packages are of dimensions such that they can only bear smaller labels.

True ___ False ___

8. Name three types of refrigerants used to cool infectious substances


while in transport.

9. Which of the three refrigerants are subject to the Instructions?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

I. OVERPACKS

Required marking of overpacks: Except when the:

The word Overpack. Markings and labels representative of all dangerous


Proper shipping name. goods in the overpack are visible, except as required in
UN number. 3.2.6 and 3.5.1.1 h) to i).
Special handling Instructions appearing on interior (5;2.4.10)
packages for each item of dangerous goods
contained in the overpack.
(5;2.4.10)

Labels appearing on interior packages for each item Labels representative of all dangerous goods in the
of dangerous goods contained in the overpack overpack are visible.
displayed in accordance with the provisions of 5;3. (5;3.3.1)
(5;3.3.1)

Package orientation label for single packages with The package orientation labels are displayed on the
end closures containing liquid dangerous goods. package and are visible from the outside of the
Note. This label must be shown on two opposite overpack.
vertical sides of the overpack with the arrow pointing in (5;3.3)
the direction required to indicate the orientation of the
overpack required to ensure that end closures are
upward, notwithstanding that such single packages may
also have side closures.
(5;3.3)
8-36 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Note. Packaging specification markings must not be reproduced on the overpack. (5;2.4.10)

Marking

Note. Remember these marks and labels must be displayed on an overpack unless the marks and labels on the
interior packages are visible from the outside. (5;2.4.10 and 5;3.3)

Note. For cooling purposes, an overpack may contain dry ice, provided that the overpack meets the
requirements of Packing Instruction 904. (5;1.1)

5;2.4.7 Special marking requirement for dry ice


The net mass of solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) must be marked on any package containing such substance.

J. EMPTY PACKAGING

5;1.6.2 Before an empty packaging which had previously contained an infectious substance is returned to the
shipper, or sent elsewhere, it must be disinfected or sterilized to nullify any hazard, and any label or marking
indicating that it had contained an infectious substance must be removed or obliterated.

K. DOCUMENTATION

Step 8 Prepare the documentation for the shipment

Note. Remember these provisions apply only to the following infectious substances:

Infectious substance, affecting animals only UN 2900

Infectious substance, affecting humans UN 2814

Biomedical waste, n.o.s.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-37

OR
Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s.
OR UN 3291
Medical waste, n.o.s.
OR
Regulated medical waste, n.o.s.

The proper completion of transport documentation is an essential component of the safe transport process, and this
responsibility must not be taken lightly. In signing the dangerous goods transport document, the shipper certifies that the
dangerous goods are:

1) correctly classified;
2) not forbidden for transport by air;
3) correctly identified as shown in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1;
4) packed in accordance with all requirements;
5) in compliance with all applicable special provisions and State variations;
6) in correctly marked and labeled packages, overpacks or freight containers; and
7) correctly documented.

See Part 5;4, Documentation, of the Instructions for the provisions concerning documentation, and Unit 6 of this manual
for the related training material.

Exercise 8-10 will help to refresh your memory regarding the provisions of Part 5;4.

EXERCISE 8-10

Referring to Part 5;4 of the Instructions, answer the following questions.

1. Name two ways in which information related to a dangerous goods


shipment may be given to an operator.

2. A dangerous goods transport document must be on a form prescribed by ICAO.

True ___ False ___

3. When both dangerous and non-dangerous goods are listed on one document, the dangerous goods must be
listed second.

True ___ False ___

4. The information on a dangerous goods transport document must be easy to identify, legible and durable.

True ___ False ___


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5. Referring to Table 3-1 of the Instructions, identify the dangerous goods


description for

4-Methoxy-4-methylpentan-2-one

And state the order it is to appear on the dangerous goods transport


document:

6. List at least three additional pieces of information about a package of


dangerous goods that are generally to be included in the dangerous
goods transport document.

7. Is the following Certification statement for the air transport of a package


of dangerous goods complete:

I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment are fully and
accurately described above by the proper shipping name, and are
classified, packaged, marked and labelled/placarded, and are in all
respects in proper condition for transport according to applicable
international and national governmental regulations.

Yes ___ No ___

8. What information must appear on an air waybill used for a consignment


of dangerous goods?

Check your answer with those in Unit 13.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-39

Only the following additional information is required on the dangerous goods transport document for:

Infectious substances, affecting humans, UN 2814


Infectious substances, affecting animals only, UN 2900.

Information to appear on the Dangerous Goods Transport Document Reference No.

For the purposes of documentation, the proper shipping name must be supplemented with the A140
technical name (see 1.2.7). Technical names need not be shown on the package. When the
infectious substances to be transported are unknown, but suspected of meeting the criteria for
inclusion in category A and assignment to UN 2814 or UN 2900, the words suspected category A
infectious substance must be shown, in parentheses, following the proper shipping name on the
transport document, but not on the outer packagings.

Must include the name and telephone number of a responsible person when a national law or 5;4.1.5.6
international convention prohibits the disclosure of the technical name.

Note. An * following the proper shipping name in Column 1 of Table 3-1 means that the technical name(s) is
required to be displayed in brackets following the proper shipping name. It should be noted that none of the entries for
infectious substances in Table 3-1 shows such an *. The only reference to the use of the technical name for infectious
substances is found in Special Provision A140. This Special Provision is assigned to the two Category A entries
Infectious substances, affecting humans, UN 2814 and Infectious substances, affecting animals, UN 2900. Therefore the
dangerous goods transport document requirements of 5;4.1.5.6 of the Instructions apply only to UN 2814 and 2900.

For UN 3291 Biomedical waste, n.o.s., Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s., Medical waste, n.o.s., and Regulated
medical waste, n.o.s. the following information replaces the requirement to show the quantity on the dangerous goods
transport document:

e) for items where No Limit is shown in column 11 or 13 the quantity must be the net mass or 5;4.1.5.1
volume for substances (e.g. UN 3291).

L. TRANSPORT OF INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES

Step 9 Transport infectious substance by air

Part 7, Operators Responsibilities, details the dangerous goods related responsibilities of an operator with regard to:

acceptance procedures;
storage and loading;
inspection and decontamination;
provision of information;
provisions concerning passengers and crew; and
provisions to aid recognition of undeclared dangerous goods.
8-40 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Exercise 8-11 will help to refresh your memory of these provisions.

EXERCISE 8-11

Referring to Part 7 of the Instructions, answer the following questions.

1. The two documents provided to the operator must be retained by the operator at a location on the ground until
the goods have arrived at final destination.

True ___ False ___

Explain your answer.

2. When the information applicable to the consignment is provided in electronic form, the information must be
available to the operator at all times during transport to final destination.

True ___ False ___

Explain your answer.

3. Which of the following three things are not verified during the
acceptance check. The:

a) Registration of the shipper with the Better Business Bureau of the


State.
b) Proper shipping name, UN number, labels, and special handling
instructions appearing on the interior package(s) are clearly visible
or reproduced on the outside of an overpack.
c) Labelling of the package as required by 5;3.
d) Outer packaging is permitted by the applicable packing instruction.
e) Package is not leaking.

4. The operator must use a checklist when conducting an acceptance check.

True ___ False ___

5. It is appropriate to accept such minor discrepancies such as the omission of dots and commas in the proper
shipping name on the transport document.

True ___ False ___

6. Class 2 dangerous goods may be stowed with Division 1.4S explosives.

True ___ False ___


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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-41

7. Division 4.2 may be stowed with Division 5.1.

True ___ False ___

8. Packages containing dangerous goods with multiple hazards in the class or divisions which require segregation
in accordance with Table 7-1 need not be segregated from other packages bearing the same UN number.

True ___ False ___

9. Shippers may load a unit load device with Class 3 flammable liquids.

True ___ False ___

10. Shippers may load a unit load device with Consumer Commodities prepared according to Packing Instruction
910.

True ___ False ___

11. Which reference in Part 7 of the Instructions states:


Dangerous goods bearing the Cargo aircraft only label
must not be carried on a passenger aircraft.

12. Packages containing liquid dangerous goods must be loaded on board the aircraft in accordance with the
direction provided by the package orientation label.

True ___ False ___

13. Is it acceptable to load a package of dangerous goods bearing the


Cargo Aircraft Only label into a Class B cargo compartment of a cargo
aircraft?

14. Upon discovery of a leaking package of dangerous goods, other than radioactive material or infectious
substances, within an aircraft the operator should remove the package from the aircraft and then arrange for its
safe disposal.

True ___ False ___

15. What reference in Part 7 of the Instructions establishes the provisions


for the action to be taken for leaking or damaged packages of
infectious substances?

16. The operator is responsible for replacing damaged labels.

True ___ False ___

17. What information must be shown on the identification tag of a unit load
device which contains dangerous goods.
8-42 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

18. Which reference in Part 7 of the Instructions lists the things an operator
must take into consideration when transporting dry ice.

19. Whose responsibility is it to ensure that a package or overpack


containing dangerous goods is not loaded onto an aircraft or into a unit
load device unless it has been inspected immediately prior to loading
and found free from evidence of leakage or damage?

20. What must an operator do before a baggage contaminated with


dangerous goods is to be transported by air?

21. Which of the following pieces of information must the pilot-in-command


receive as early as practicable before the departure of the aircraft:

a) the air waybill number (when issued);


b) the proper shipping name (supplemented with the technical
name(s), if appropriate) and UN number or ID number;
c) the class or division and subsidiary risk(s) corresponding to the
subsidiary risk label(s) applied, by numerals;
d) all of the above.

22. When transporting dry ice what information is provided to the pilot-in-
command before departure?

23. The information to the pilot-in-command must be readily available to the pilot-in-command during flight.

True ___ False ___

24. There is no requirement to retain a copy of the information to the pilot-in-command on the ground during the
flight.

True ___ False ___

25. Where should operators put information for their employees to enable
them to carry out their responsibilities with regard to the transport of
dangerous goods?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-43

26. When an in-flight emergency occurs is it sufficient for the pilot-in-


command to provide an air traffic services unit with a telephone number
where a copy of the information provided to the pilot-in-command can
be obtained?

27. Which two States must receive a report from the operator of an
accident involving dangerous goods?

28. Does an operator have to report any undeclared dangerous goods


discovered in cargo?

29. The operator must ensure that at least one copy of the dangerous goods transport document, the acceptance
checklist (when this is in a form which requires physical completion) and the written information to the pilot-in-
command for a consignment of dangerous goods be retained for a minimum period of six months after the flight
on which the dangerous goods were transported.

True ___ False ___

30. Where must the operator display notices warning passengers of the
types of dangerous goods which they are forbidden to transport aboard
an aircraft?

Check your answer with those in Unit 13.

When accepting and handling infectious substances, operator employees must pay particular attention to the following
provisions located in Part 7:

Reference
No. Description

7;1.5 Routing
Regardless of the mode of transport, an operator must ensure infectious substances go by the
quickest possible routing.
If trans-shipment occurs during transit, the operator must ensure special care, expeditious handling
and monitoring of the substance occurs.

7;2.4.1.2 b) Loading on cargo aircraft


Packages or overpacks of infectious substances bearing the cargo aircraft only label are not subject
to the loading provisions of 7;2.4.1.1.
8-44 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

7;2.5 Damaged packages of dangerous goods


7;3.1.4 If any person responsible for the carriage of packages containing infectious substances becomes
aware of damage to or leakage from such a package, that person must:
a) avoid handling the package or keep handling to a minimum;
b) inspect adjacent packages for contamination and put aside any that may have been
contaminated;
c) inform the appropriate public health authority or veterinary authority and provide information
on any other countries of transit where persons may have been exposed to danger;
d) notify the shipper and/or the consignee.

7;2.8 Stowage of toxic and infectious substances


Category A infectious substances must not be carried in the same compartment of an aircraft with
animals, substances marked as or known to be foodstuffs, feeds or other edible substances intended
for consumption by humans or by animals, unless
the category A infectious substances and the foodstuffs or animals are loaded in separate unit
load devices and when stowed aboard the aircraft the unit load devices are not adjacent to each
other, or
category A infectious substances are loaded in one closed unit load device and the foodstuffs or
animals are loaded in another closed unit load device.

M. POST

Two types of infectious substances may be offered for transport in the mail (1;2.3.2):

Patient specimens in accordance with 2;6.3.1.4 and 2;6.3.2.3.6


Biological Substances, Category B, UN 3373 packed in accordance with Packing Instruction 650 (Note. Dry
ice may be used as a refrigerant for UN 3373.)

Note. National authorities may further restrict the types of dangerous goods permitted in their mail system. Always
be sure to check with them.

N. SECURITY

Infectious substances, Category A, (UN Nos. 2814 and 2900) are to be considered high consequence dangerous
goods. (See 1;5.6 of the Instructions.)

Operators, shippers and others involved in the transport of high consequence dangerous goods should adopt,
implement and comply with a Security Plan (1;5.3.2). This plan should include:

1;5.3.2
a) specific allocation of responsibilities for security to competent and qualified persons with appropriate authority to
carry out their responsibilities;
b) records of dangerous goods or types of dangerous goods transported;
c) review of current operations and assessment of vulnerabilities, including inter-modal transfer, temporary transit
storage, handling, and distribution, as appropriate;
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-45

d) clear statement of measures including training policies (including response to higher threat conditions, new
employee/employment verifications, etc.), operating practices (e.g. access to dangerous goods in temporary
storage proximity to vulnerable infrastructure, etc.), equipment and resources that are to be used to reduce
security risks;
e) effective and up-to-date procedures for reporting and dealing with security threats, breaches of security or
security incidents;
f) procedures for the evaluation and testing of security plans and procedures for periodic review and update of the
plans;
g) measures to ensure the security of transport information contained in the plan; and
h) measures to ensure that the security of the distribution of transport documentation is limited as far as possible.
(Such measures must not preclude provision of the transport documentation required by Part 5, Chapter 4 of these
Instructions.)

O. PROVISIONS TO AID RECOGNITION OF UNDECLARED DANGEROUS GOODS

Part 7;6 of the Instructions provides a list of general descriptions often used for items in cargo or passenger baggage
which may contain dangerous goods. Two examples are provided that may be a clue that infectious substances are
present:

diagnostic specimens may contain infectious substances.


samples for testing may contain items meeting any of the criteria for dangerous goods, particularly infectious
substances, flammable liquids, flammable solids, oxidizers, organic peroxides, toxic or corrosive substances.

P. SUMMARY

Nine steps have been identified to assist in the correct identification of infectious substances subject to the Instructions
and their preparation and transport.

Step 1 Based on the definitions found in Part 1 and 2 of the Instructions, this step identifies the meaning of the words
and terms used in the Infectious Substance provisions.

Step 2 Based on the Table of Contents in the Instructions, this step identifies key references that are critical to the
preparation, handling and transport of infectious substances.

Step 3 Based on Part 2 of the Instructions, this step explains how to determine which of the seven (7) proper shipping
names and four (4) UN numbers apply to an infectious substance.

Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814


Infectious substance, affecting animals only, UN 2900
Biological substances, Category B, UN 3373
Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s., UN 3291
Medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
Biomedical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
Regulated medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291

Step 4 Based on Part 2 of the Instructions, this step identifies the seven (7) complete exceptions from the Instructions
and the one (1) partial exception, patient specimens, from the Instructions.
8-46 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Step 5 Based on Part 3 of the Instructions, this step explains how to extract the relevant information required to
prepare an infectious substance for transport.

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity instruction package instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Infectious 2900 6.2 Infectious AU 3 A81 E0 602 50 mL or 50 g 602 4 L or 4 kg
substance, CA 5 A140
affecting CA 10
animals only GB 5
VU 2
Infectious 2814 6.2 Infectious AU 3 A81 E0 602 50 mL or 50 g 602 4 L or 4 kg
substance, CA 5 A140
affecting CA 10
humans GB 5
VU 2
Biological 3373 6.2 None GB 5 E0
substance, See 650 See 650
Category B
Biomedical 3291 6.2 Infectious A117 II E0 622 No limit 622 No limit
waste, n.o.s.
Clinical 3291 6.2 Infectious A117 II E0 622 No limit 622 No limit
waste,
unspecified,
n.o.s.
Medical 3291 6.2 Infectious A117 II E0 622 No limit 622 No limit
waste, n.o.s.
Regulated 3291 6.2 Infectious A117 II E0 622 No limit 622 No limit
medical
waste, n.o.s.

Step 6 Based on Parts 3 and 4 of the Instructions, this step reviews the packaging requirements.

Step 7 Based on Parts 5;2 and 5;3 of the Instructions, this step explains the marking and labeling requirements for
packages and overpacks containing:

Infectious substance, affecting animals only, UN 2900


Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814
Biomedical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s., UN 3291
Medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
Regulated medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291

Step 8 Based on Part 5;4 of the Instructions, this step explains the documentation requirements for consignments of:

Infectious substance, affecting animals only, UN 2900


Infectious substance, affecting humans, UN 2814
Biomedical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
Clinical waste, unspecified, n.o.s., UN 3291
Medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
Regulated medical waste, n.o.s., UN 3291
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-47

Step 9 Based on the provisions of Part 7 of the Instructions, this step provides an overall assessment of an operators
responsibilities with respect to the transport of dangerous goods and specific information regarding the transport of
infectious substances.

Post

Two types of infectious substances may be offered for transport in the mail:

Patient specimens;
Biological Substances, Category B, UN 3373 packed in accordance with Packing Instruction 650.

Security

Infectious substances, Category A (UN 2814 and 2900) are to be considered high consequence dangerous goods and
should be subject to a Security Plan.

Provisions to aid recognition of undeclared dangerous goods

The information in 7;6 is designed to prevent undeclared dangerous goods from entering the transportation system. Two
examples are given where infectious substances may be present in cargo or passenger baggage:

Diagnostic specimens; and


Samples for testing.
8-48 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Appendix 8-1.

EXAMPLE OF PACKING AND MARKING FOR EXEMPT HUMAN SPECIMENS


AND EXEMPT ANIMAL SPECIMENS

Specimen

Absorbent packing
Primary receptacle
material (for liquids)
leakproof or siftproof

Secondary packaging
leakproof or siftproof
(e.g. sealed plastic bag)

Outer packaging

Cross section
The package mark shall be of
Exempt Human Specimen packaging
or
Exempt Animal Specimen, Primary receptacle
as appropriate. leakproof or siftproof

Secondary packaging
leakproof or siftproof
(e.g. sealed plastic bag
or other intermediate
packaging)

Specimen ID

Absorbent
material
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Unit 8. Infectious substances 8-49

Appendix 8-2.

EXAMPLE OF PACKING, MARKING AND LABELLING OF


CATEGORY A INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES

Infectious
substance

Watertight
Absorbent packing material
primary receptacle
(for liquids)
glass, metal or plastic*

*If multiple primary receptacles are


placed in a single secondary
packaging, they must be either
individually wrapped or separated so
as to prevent contact between them.

Cap Cross section


Watertight of
secondary packaging packaging

Package Waterproof tape


Rigid closure must have
orientation a leakproof seal
outer packaging mark

Infectious
Infectious UN package substance
substance certification
label mark
Specimen
ID label
Proper shipping
name and Absorbent
Shipper and packing
UN number consignee material
identification

Note 1. The smallest external dimension of the outer packaging


must not be less than 100 mm.

Note 2. The primary receptacle or the secondary packaging must


be capable of withstanding without leakage an internal pressure
producing a pressure differential of not less than 95 Kpa.
8-50 Dangerous GoodsTraining Manual

Appendix 8-3.

EXAMPLE OF PACKING AND MARKING FOR CATEGORY B INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES

Infectious
substance

*Primary receptacle Absorbent packing


leakproof or siftproof material (for liquids)

Secondary packaging
leakproof or siftproof
(e.g. sealed plastic bag)

Cross section
of
packaging
Primary receptacle
Rigid leakproof or siftproof
outer packaging

Secondary packaging
leakproof or siftproof
(e.g. sealed plastic bag
or other intermediate
Package packaging)
mark
Specimen ID
Name, address and telephone
number of a person responsible.
(This information may instead be
provided on a written document Absorbent
such as an air waybill.) material

*If multiple fragile primary receptacles are


placed in a single secondary packaging,
they must be either individually wrapped
or separated to prevent contact.

Cushioning
material

Note 1. At least one surface of the outer packaging must have a


minimum dimension of 100 mm 100 mm.

Note 2. The primary receptacle or the secondary packaging must


be capable of withstanding without leakage an internal pressure
producing a pressure differential of not less than 95 Kpa.

______________________
UNIT 9

Radioactive Material
Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 9 ......................................................................... 9-2
B. Goal Unit 9 .................................................................................................................................................. 9-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 9-2
D. Classification ................................................................................................................................................... 9-8
E. Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 .................................................................................................................. 9-22
F. Preparation for Transport and Transport ........................................................................................................ 9-24
i. Excepted Packages ................................................................................................................................. 9-27
ii. Other Radioactive Material Parts 2;7, 4;9 and 6;7 ................................................................................. 9-32
G. Radiation Protection Programme Paragraph 1;6.2 ....................................................................................... 9-54
H. Quality Assurance Paragraph 1;6.3 .............................................................................................................. 9-54
I. Security Paragraph 1;6.5 .............................................................................................................................. 9-55
Appendix 9-1. Index of Part 4;9 of the Instructions .............................................................................................. 9-56
Appendix 9-2. Index of Part 6;7 of the Instructions .............................................................................................. 9-57
Appendix 9-3. Dangerous goods transport document checklist ........................................................................... 9-58
Appendix 9-4. Acceptance procedures checklist ................................................................................................. 9-64

9-1
9-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 9

Subject Matter: Radioactive Material General requirements for shippers, Classification, List of dangerous
goods, Packing requirements, Labelling and marking, Dangerous goods transport document and other relevant
documentation, Acceptance procedures, Storage and loading procedures, Security.

Category of personnel: any involved in the handling, offering for transport or transporting of radioactive
material.

B. GOAL UNIT 9

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether a radioactive material has been correctly
classified, prepared for transport and transported in accordance with the Instructions.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state where to find the meaning of words and terms used in the radioactive material provisions;

b) state which radioactive material is excepted and exempted from the provisions of the Instructions;

c) demonstrate how to determine the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number for radioactive material;

d) demonstrate how to extract the radioactive material description and transport information from Table 3-1 of the
Instructions;

e) demonstrate how to identify all of the provisions affecting the packaging of radioactive material;

f) demonstrate how to prepare for transport and transport excepted packages of radioactive material;

g) demonstrate how to prepare all other radioactive material for transport;

h) demonstrate how to accept, load and store radioactive materials, other than excepted packages;

i) describe the content of a radiation protection programme; and

j) state which documents provide rules governing the secure transport of radioactive material.

C. INTRODUCTION

Note. Before beginning this unit the student must have completed Units 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 11 and 12.

1;6.1.1 These Instructions establish standards of safety which provide an acceptable level of control of the
radiation, criticality and thermal hazards to persons, property and the environment that are associated with the
transport of radioactive material. These Instructions are based on the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of
Radioactive Material, (2005 Edition), Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, IAEA, Vienna (2005). Explanatory material
on the 1996 edition of TS-R-1 can be found in Advisory Material for the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of
Radioactive Material, Safety Standard Series No. TS-G-1.1 (ST-2), IAEA, Vienna (2002).
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-3

1;6.1.2 The objective of these Instructions is to protect persons, property and the environment from the effects of
radiation during the transport of radioactive material. This protection is achieved by requiring:

a) containment of the radioactive contents;

b) control of external radiation levels;

c) prevention of criticality; and

d) prevention of damage caused by heat.

These requirements are satisfied firstly by applying a graded approach to the limits of the contents for packages and
aircraft and to the performance standards, which are applied to package designs depending upon the hazard of the
radioactive contents. Secondly, they are satisfied by imposing requirements on the design and operation of packages
and on the maintenance of the packagings, including consideration of the nature of the radioactive contents. Finally,
they are satisfied by requiring administrative controls including, where appropriate, approval by competent authorities.

This unit deals exclusively with radioactive materials. The following six steps will help to identify and understand the
provisions associated with the classification of radioactive material and the preparation for transport and the air transport
of such material.

Action

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the provisions dealing with the handling, offering
for transport or transport of radioactive material.

Step 2 Evaluate whether the radioactive material may be considered excepted from the Instructions.
Step 3 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions.

Step 4 Classify the radioactive material and choose the appropriate proper shipping name and UN number.

Step 5 Locate the proper shipping name and UN number in Table 3-1 and identify the relevant information
required to prepare radioactive material for transport.

Step 6 Identify suitable packaging, then prepare the packaging for transport and transport it. (Parts 1;6, 4;9 and
6;7).

This unit will also examine the provisions in the Instructions related to radioactive material and:

the radiation protection programme;


quality assurance; and
security.

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the provisions concerning
radioactive materials.

There are a number of definitions that apply to the transport of radioactive material by air. These are found both in
Part 1;3 and paragraph 2;7.1 of the Instructions.

Exercise 9-1 will help you to locate definitions for words or terms relevant to the radioactive material provisions.
9-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 9-1

Referring to Parts 1 and 2 of the Instructions, identify the word or words that best match the definition or description
provided below:

1. Any material containing radionuclides where both the activity


concentration and the total activity in the consignment exceed
the values specified in 2;7.2.2.1 to 2;7.2.2.6.

2. The assembly of components necessary to enclose the


radioactive contents completely. It may, in particular, consist
of one or more receptacles, absorbent materials, spacing
structures, radiation shielding and service equipment for filling,
emptying, venting and pressure relief; devices for cooling,
absorbing mechanical shocks, handling and tie-down, thermal
insulation; and service devices integral to the package. The
packaging may be a box, drum or similar receptacle, or may
also be a freight container.

3. Contamination that can be removed from a surface during


routine conditions of transport.

4. Contamination other than non-fixed contamination.

5. The presence of a radioactive substance on a surface in


quantities in excess of 0.4 Bq/cm2 for beta and gamma
emitters and low toxicity alpha emitters, or 0.04 Bq/cm2 for all
other alpha emitters.

6. Uranium-233, uranium-235, plutonium-239, plutonium-241, or


any combination of these radionuclides. Excepted from this
definition are:
a) natural uranium or depleted uranium which is unirradiated;
and
b) natural uranium or depleted uranium which has been
irradiated in thermal reactors only.

7. Natural uranium; depleted uranium; natural thorium; uranium-


235 or uranium-238; thorium-232; thorium-228 and thorium-
230 when contained in ores or physical and chemical
concentrates; or alpha emitters with a half-life
of less than ten days.

8. An article of transport equipment designed to facilitate the


transport of packaged goods by one or more modes of
transport without intermediate reloading, which is of a
permanent enclosed character, rigid and strong enough for
repeated use, and must be fitted with devices facilitating its
handling, particularly in transfer between aircraft and from one
mode of transport to another. A small freight container is that
which has either an overall outer dimension less than 1.5 m,
or an internal volume of not more than 3 m3. Any other freight
container is considered to be a large freight container. For the
transport of Class 7 material, a freight container may be used
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-5

as a packaging.

9. The activity value of special form radioactive material, which is


listed in Table 2-15 or derived in 7.2.2.2 and is used to
determine the activity limits for the requirements of these
Instructions.

10. The activity value of radioactive material, other than special


form radioactive material, which is listed in Table 2-15 or
derived in 7.2.2.2 and is used to determine the activity limits
for the requirements of these Instructions.

11. A solid radioactive material or a solid radioactive material in a


sealed capsule, that has limited dispersibility and is not in
powder form.

12. Either:
a) an indispersible solid radioactive material; or b) a sealed
capsule containing radioactive material.

13. The activity per unit mass of that nuclide. The specific activity
of a material must mean the activity per unit mass of the
material in which the radionuclides are essentially uniformly
distributed.

14. Radioactive material which by its nature has a limited specific


activity, or radioactive material for which limits of estimated
average specific activity apply. External shielding materials
surrounding the LSA material must not be considered in
determining the estimated average specific activity.

15. A number which is used to provide control over radiation


exposure.

16. Thorium containing not more than 107 g of uranium-233 per


gram of thorium-232.

17. A solid object which is not itself radioactive but which has
radioactive material distributed on its surfaces.

18. Uranium containing not more than 2 103 Bq of plutonium per


gram of uranium-235, not more than 9 106 Bq of fission
products per gram of uranium-235 and not more than
5 103 g of uranium-236 per gram of uranium-235.

19. Uranium containing a lesser mass percentage of uranium-235


than in natural uranium.

20. Uranium (which may be chemically separated) containing the


naturally occurring distribution of uranium isotopes
(approximately 99.28 per cent uranium-238, and 0.72 per cent
uranium-235 by mass).

21. Uranium containing a greater mass percentage of uranium-


235 than 0.72 per cent. In all cases, a very small mass
percentage of uranium-234 is present.
9-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

22. Multilateral approval. The approval by the relevant competent


authority of the country of origin of the design or shipment, as
applicable, and also, where the consignment is to be
transported through or into any other country, approval by the
competent authority of that country. The term through or into
specifically excludes over, i.e. the approval and notification
requirements must not apply to a country over which
radioactive material is carried in an aircraft, provided that there
is no scheduled stop in that country.

23. Unilateral approval. The approval of a design which is required


to be given by the competent authority of the country of origin
of the design only.

24. Any body or authority designated or otherwise recognized as


such for any purpose in connection with these Instructions.
Note. This applies to radioactive material only.

25. For the transport of Class 7 material, the assembly of


components of the packaging specified by the designer as
intended to retain the radioactive material during transport.

26. For the transport of Class 7 material, the description of special


form radioactive material, low dispersible radioactive material,
package or packaging which enables such items to be fully
identified. The description may include specifications,
engineering drawings, reports demonstrating compliance with
regulatory requirements, and other relevant documentation.

27. An article of transport equipment designed to facilitate the


transport of packaged goods by one or more modes of
transport without intermediate reloading, which is of a
permanent enclosed character, rigid and strong enough for
repeated use, and must be fitted with devices facilitating its
handling, particularly in transfer between aircraft and from one
mode of transport to another. A small freight container is that
which has either an overall outer dimension less than 1.5 m,
or an internal volume of not more than 3 m3. Any other freight
container is considered to be a large freight container. For the
transport of Class 7 material, a freight container may be used
as a packaging.

28. For the transport of Class 7 material, the radioactive material


together with any contaminated or activated solids, liquids,
and gases within the packaging.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Once you have completed this exercise keep the definitions at hand, so as you go through this unit, you can refer to
them as the need arises.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-7

Step 2 Evaluate whether the radioactive material may be considered excepted from the Instructions.

Before examining the detailed requirements associated with the air transport of radioactive material it is important to
note that in certain situations the radiation and contamination hazards associated with radioactive material are modified
to such an extent that they do not pose a hazard to people or property and are not subject to the Instructions. These
exceptions are listed in 1;6.1.4.

1;6.1.4 These Instructions do not apply to:

a) radioactive material implanted or incorporated into a person or live animal for diagnosis or treatment;

b) radioactive material in consumer products which have received regulatory approval, following their sale to the
end user;

c) natural material and ores containing naturally occurring radionuclides which are either in their natural state or
have only been processed for purposes other than for extraction of the radionuclides, and are not intended to be
processed for use of these radionuclides, provided the activity concentration of the material does not exceed 10
times the values specified in 2;7.2.2.1 b) or calculated in accordance with 2;7.2.2.2 to 7.2.2.6;

d) non-radioactive solid objects with radioactive substances present on any surfaces in quantities not in excess of
the limit specified in the definition of contamination in 2;7.1.

Implanted in a person Consumer product Natural material

If a radioactive material or a radioactive contaminated object is excepted from the Instructions by 1;6.1.4, no special
requirements apply to its transport by air. However, for those that are not excepted it is essential that the Instructions
be studied to determine what requirements must be met before they are permitted on board an aircraft.

These requirements are located throughout the Instructions and understanding the organization of that text is an
important next step.
9-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Step 3 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions.

Exercise 9-2 assists you in determining where to find the relevant linkages with other parts of the Instructions.

EXERCISE 9-2

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. In what Part of the Instructions are the requirements for


the construction, testing and approval of packages and
material of Class 7 found?

2. Where in the Instructions are the classification


requirements for radioactive material located?

3. Name two locations where definitions for terminology


used in the radioactive material provisions can be
found in the Instructions.

4. In what Part of the Instructions are the radioactive


material documentation requirements found?

5. State where the general provisions concerning Class 7


can be found in the Instructions.

6. Where are the proper shipping name and UN number


for radioactive material listed in the Instructions?

7. In what Part of the Instructions are the marking and


labeling requirements found?

8. In what Part of the Instructions are the packing


instructions found?

9. In what Part of the Instructions are the operator


acceptance procedures found?

10. In what Part of the Instructions are the operator


storage and loading requirements found?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

D. CLASSIFICATION

Step 4 Classify the radioactive material and choose the appropriate


proper shipping name and UN number.

What is a radioactive material?

Radioactive material is any material containing radionuclides where both the activity concentration and the total
activity in the consignment exceed the values specified in 7.2.2.1 to 7.2.2.6. (2;7.1.1)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-9

What is a radionuclide?

Radionuclides are atoms which are not physically stable but spontaneously disintegrate to form completely different
atoms. This disintegration is accompanied by an emission of ionizing radiation, and it is this phenomenon which is
known as radioactivity.

How are radioactive materials classified?

2;7.2.1.1 Radioactive material must be assigned to one of the UN numbers specified in Table 2-11 depending on
the activity level of the radionuclides contained in a package, the fissile or non-fissile properties of these
radionuclides, the type of package to be presented for transport and the nature or form of the contents of the
package, or special arrangements governing the transport operation, in accordance with the provisions laid down in
2;7.2.2 to 2;7.2.5.

One component of choosing a proper shipping name and UN number for a radioactive material is the activity level of the
specific radionuclides.

What is meant by the words activity of the radionuclides?

The activity of radioactive material is the average number of atomic transformations (disintegrations) occurring per
second.

The unit of activity is Becquerel (Bq). 1 Bq = 1 disintegration per second.

As the Becquerel is a very small unit, multiples of Becquerel are used.


kiloBq = kBq = 103 Bq
MegaBq = MBq = 106 Bq = 103 kBq
GigaBq = GBq = 109 Bq = 103 MBq
TeraBq = TBq = 1012 Bq = 103 GBq

The basic values for individual radionuclides are given in Table 2-12 Basic radionuclides values for individual
radionuclides of the Instructions.

Note. See 2;7.2.2 to 2;7.2.2.6 for instructions on the classification of individual radionuclides which are not listed
in Table 2-12.

What information is provided in the five columns of Table 2-12?

The following extract from Table 2-12 for the radionuclides Cobalt-60 and Molybdenum-93 indicates what information is
provided in each of the five columns.
9-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Table 2-12. Basic radionuclides values for individual radionuclides

Column 1 Column 2 Column 3 Column 4 Column 5

Radionuclide A1 A2 Activity Activity limit


(atomic (TBq) (TBq) concentration for an exempt
number) for exempt material consignment
(Bq/g) (Bq)

Cobalt (27)
1 1 1 5
Co-60 4 10 4 10 1 10 1 10

Molybdenum
(42)
1 1 3 8
Mo-93 4 10 2 10 1 10 1 10

A1. The activity value of special A2. The activity value * *


form radioactive material, which of radioactive
is listed in Table 2-15 or derived in material, other than
7.2.2.2 and is used to determine special form
the activity limits for the radioactive
requirements of these material, which is
Instructions. listed in Table 2-15
or derived in 7.2.2.2
Special form radioactive and is used to
material. Either: determine the
a) an indispersible solid activity limits for the
radioactive material; or requirements of
b) a sealed capsule containing these Instructions.
radioactive material. (2;7.1.3)

Specific activity of a
radionuclide. The activity per unit
mass of that nuclide. (2;7.1.3)

Specific activity of a material


The specific activity of a material
means the activity per unit mass
of the material in which the
radionuclides are essentially
uniformly distributed. (2;7.1.3)

* In order for a shipper to determine if a material must be classified as radioactive material the shipper must know the
activity concentration of the material (specific activity of the material) as well as the total activity of his consignment. The
Instructions stipulate that only when the activity concentration (the value found in column 4 of Table 2-12) and the
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-11

activity limit of the consignment (the value found in column 5 of Table 2-12) have been exceeded must the material be
considered as radioactive. (See also the definition for radioactive material.)

Example:

To determine if a shipment of Co-60, where an activity concentration of Co-60 is 5 Bq/g and an activity of the
consignment is 150 kBq, is considered radioactive turn to columns 4 and 5 of Table 2-12 to find the activity
concentration for an exempt material of Co-60 and the activity limit for an exempt consignment.

The activity limit for an exempt material of Co-60 is 1 X 101 and the activity limit for an exempt consignment of Co-60 is
1 X 105. Although the activity for this consignment of Co-60 is higher than 100 kBq (i.e. 150 kBq), the activity
concentration (5 Bq/g) is less than the activity concentration for an exempt material, i.e.10 Bq/g, therefore the material
will not be classified as Class 7.

If the activity concentration was 20 Bq/g and the total activity was 150 kBq, then the material would be considered as
Class 7.

Note.
Specific activity of a radionuclide: the activity per unit mass of that nuclide. (2;7.1.3)
Specific activity of a material: the activity per unit mass of the material in which the radionuclides are essentially
uniformly distributed. (2;7.1.3)

EXERCISE 9-3

Referring to Table 2-12, state whether the following shipments are subject to the Instructions.

Shipment Activity concentration Total activity

1. I-125 100 Bq/g 2 MBq

2. Ir-192 20 Bq/g 2 MBq

3. C-14 Not defined 8.3 MBq

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

What if the radionuclide is not listed in Table 2-12?

Most well-known radionuclides are listed in Table 2-12, where the A1 and A2 values are well defined. Be aware these
values are of the utmost importance as they give you the maximum allowed activity for a Type A package. (Further
information on this will be provided at a later point in this unit.)

Where a radionuclide is not listed in Table 2-12, the determination of the radionuclide values requires multilateral
approval, unless Table 2-13 is used. (2;7.2.2.2)
9-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Table 2-13 records the basic radionuclide values for unknown radionuclides or mixtures.

2;7.2.2.3 In the calculations of A1 and A2 for a radionuclide not in Table 2-12, a single radioactive decay chain in
which the radionuclides are present in their naturally occurring proportions, and in which no daughter nuclide has a
half-life either longer than 10 days or longer than that of the parent nuclide, must be considered as a single
radionuclide; and the activity to be taken into account and the A1 or A2 value to be applied must be that
corresponding to the parent nuclide of that chain. In the case of radioactive decay chains in which any daughter
nuclide has a half-life either longer than 10 days or greater than that of the parent nuclide, the parent and such
daughter nuclides must be considered as mixtures of different nuclides.

Note.
See 2;7.2.2.4 for instructions on how to calculate the basic radionuclide values for mixtures of radionuclides.
See 2;7.2.2.5 for instructions on how to determine the radionuclide value when the identity of each radionuclide
is known, but the individual activities of some of the radionuclides are not known.

EXERCISE 9-4

Referring to Table 2-12 or 2-13, state the A1 and A2 values in GBq for the following radionuclides.

1. Lu-177

2. F-18

3. Bi-205

4. Cf-252

5. Unknown gamma emitting nuclide

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Radioactive material has been assigned 25 UN numbers. These UN numbers and their respective proper shipping
name(s) are divided into nine groups and are found in Table 2-11 of the Instructions.

The classification of each of the nine groups is as follows.

1. Excepted packages (1;6.1.5 and 2;7.2.4)

This first group Excepted packages is different from the other eight groups.

2;7.2.4.1.1. Packages may be classified as excepted packages if:

a) they are empty packagings having contained radioactive material;

b) they contain instruments or articles in limited quantities;

c) they contain articles manufactured of natural uranium, depleted uranium or natural thorium; or

d) they contain radioactive material in limited quantities.

2;7.2.4.1.1.2 A package containing radioactive material may be classified as an excepted package provided that the
radiation level at any point on its external surface does not exceed 5 Sv/h.
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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-13

There are seven proper shipping names assigned to the four UN numbers of this group. The following table matches the
proper shipping name with their respective requirements.

Note. Always refer to the Instructions for the complete text of a requirement.

UN number Proper shipping name and Summary of criteria


reference number

UN 2908 Radioactive material, excepted Applies to an empty packaging which had previously
package empty packaging contained radioactive material with an activity not
(2;7.2.4.1.1.5) exceeding the limit specified in column 4 of
Table 2-15*.
The package is well-maintained and securely closed.
The outer surface of any uranium or thorium is
covered with an inactive sheath.
The level of internal non-fixed contamination is
specifically limited.
Any radioactive material labels are no longer visible.

UN 2911 Radioactive material, excepted Applies to radioactive material which is enclosed in or


package instruments is included as a component part of an instrument or
or other manufactured article.
Radioactive material, excepted Radiation level outside the package is specifically
package articles (2;7.2.4.1.1.3) limited.
The instrument or article must be marked
RADIOACTIVE, unless otherwise specified.
The active material is completely enclosed.
The limits specified in Columns 2 and 3 of
Table 2-15* are met for each item and each package.

UN 2909 Radioactive material, excepted Applies to articles manufactured of natural uranium,


package articles depleted uranium or natural thorium and articles in
manufactured from natural which the sole radioactive material is unirradiated
uranium or natural uranium, unirradiated depleted uranium or
Radioactive material, excepted unirradiated natural thorium.
package depleted uranium Outer surface of the uranium or thorium is enclosed in
or an inactive sheath.
Radioactive material, excepted
package natural thorium
(2;7.2.4.1.2)

UN 2910 Radioactive material, excepted Applies to radioactive material with an activity not
package limited quantity of exceeding the limit specified in Column 4 of
material (2;7.2.4.1.1.4) Table 2-15*.
The package must be able to retain its radioactive
contents during transport.
The package displays the mark RADIOACTIVE on
an internal surface to warn anyone who opens it that
radioactive material is present.

* Three of the four UN numbers refer to limits established in Table 2-15 of the Instructions. This table establishes the activity limits for
the physical state of an Excepted Package (i.e. solid, liquid or gas) by Instrument or article and by Materials.
9-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Example:

Question: Ni-63, metal alloy, other form, 0.01 TBq. Can this material be shipped as an excepted package of radioactive
material?

Instructions:

Ni-63, metal alloy, other form is a solid, other form radioactive material (Note. It is not an instrument or
article).

Locate in the left-hand column of Table 2-15 under the heading Physical state of contents the entry for

Solids
Other form

Adjacent to this entry in the right-hand column of Table 2-15, under the heading Materials Package limits is
the limit 10-3 A2.

Referring to Table 2-12, locate the A2 value for Ni-63. The value is 30 TBq.
Note that 10-3 x 30 TBq = 0.03 TBq.

Answer:

0.03 TBq is the maximum allowed activity for an excepted package of Ni-63, solid in other form which means
that we can transport the above-mentioned material as an excepted package of radioactive material (0.01 TBq
<0.03 TBq).

Note. This package may only be classified as an excepted package provided that the radiation level at any
point on its external surface does not exceed 5 Sv/h.

The correct UN number to be used for this material is UN 2910, the proper shipping name is Radioactive
material, excepted package limited quantity of material.

Note. Due to the reduced risk posed by radioactive material, excepted packages, certain exceptions from Part 5
Shippers Responsibilities and Part 7 Operators Responsibilities of the Instructions apply. (More information on the
applicable requirements is provided below in this unit.)

The remaining eight groups are as follows:

2. Low specific activity radioactive material (2;7.2.3.1)

3. Surface contaminated objects (2;7.2.3.2)

4. Type A packages (2;7.2.4.4)

5 Type B(U) package (2;7.2.4.6)

6. Type B(M) package (2;7.2.4.6)


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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-15

7. Type C package (2;7.2.4.6)

8. Uranium hexafluoride (2;7.2.4.5)

9. Special arrangement (2;7.2.5)

Note. Radioactive materials assigned to these eight groups are not entitled to any exceptions and must comply
with all applicable provisions of the Instructions.

Interpretation tools

To begin the classification process for assigning proper shipping names and UN numbers to these eight groups, two
essential tools are needed:

1. definitions for words used in the proper shipping name; and


2. the basic radionuclides values established in:
Table 2-12 for each radionuclide, or
Table 2-13 for mixtures of radionuclides for which relevant data are not available.

Definitions

Each proper shipping name contains a combination of words that distinguishes it from the other proper shipping names
that apply to radioactive material. These words have specific meanings. For example, the proper shipping name
Uranium hexafluoride, fissile is made up of the words:

Uranium hexafluoride which is a binary compound of uranium and fluorine, UF6; it is a grey solid, or heavy
gas, and is used in the uranium enrichment process to produce fuel for nuclear reactors or nuclear weapons.
(Wikipedia)

and

Fissile which includes uranium-233, uranium-235, plutonium-239, plutonium-241, or any combination of these
radionuclides. (2;7.1.3)

Pertinent words found in the proper shipping names have been listed below, and a detailed description of each can be
found by looking up the adjacent reference number:

Word(s) Explanation

Fissile 2;7.1.3 and 2;7.2.3.5 and 6;7.10

Fissile Excepted 2;7.2.3.5 and 6;7.10.2

Special Form radioactive material 2;7.1.3 and 2; 7.2.3.3

Special form fissile 2;7.1.3, 2;7.2.3.5 and 2;7.2.3.3

Low disperable radioactive material 1;3 and 2; 7.2.3.4

Low specific activity 2;7.1.3

Surface Contaminated Object 2;7.1.3


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Word(s) Explanation

Type A package 6;7.6

Type B(U) package 6;7.7

Type B(M) package 6;7.8

Type C package 6;7.9

Special arrangement 1;6.4

Uranium hexafluoride package 6;7.5

Natural, depleted or enriched uranium 2;7.1.3

Using the definitions and the tables in Part 2;7 of the Instructions we are now ready to examine the classification
requirements of the remaining eight groups, starting with low specific activity radioactive material.

2. Low specific activity radioactive material (2;7.2.3.1)

Radioactive material may only be classified as Low specific activity radioactive material if the conditions of 2;7.2.3.1
and 4;9.1 of the Instructions apply.

There are five proper shipping names assigned to this group:

Low specific activity radioactive material (7.2.3.1)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 2912 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-I), non-fissile or fissile excepted (2;7.2.3.1.2 a)).
UN 3321 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-II), non-fissile or fissile excepted (2;7.2.3.1.2 b)).

UN 3322 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-III), non-fissile or fissile excepted (2;7.2.3.1.2 c),
2;7.2.3.1.3, 2;7.2.3.1.4 and 2;7.2.3.1.5.

UN 3324 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-II) fissile.

UN 3325 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-III) fissile.

2; 7.2.4.2.1 Radioactive material may only be classified as LSA material if the conditions of 7.2.3.1 and 4;9.2.1 are
met.

Each proper shipping name of this group has two sections:

a) The first section indicates whether it is an LSA I, II or III.

b) The second section indicates whether it applies to a non-fissile, fissile excepted or fissile radioactive material.

The criteria for assigning LSA I, II or III are as follows:

LSA I
Sub-paragraph 2;7.2.3.1.2 a) lists and describes the radioactive material that has been assigned this proper
shipping name.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-17

LSA II
Sub-paragraph 2;7.2.3.1.2 b) lists and describes the radioactive material that has been assigned this proper
shipping name.

LSA III
Sub-paragraphs 2;7.2.3.1.2 c) and 2;7.2.3.1.3 list and describe the radioactive material that has been assigned
this proper shipping name.
Sub-paragraphs 2;7.2.3.1.4 and 2;7.2.3.1.5 state the LSA III material testing requirements.

For determining if it is fissile excepted or fissile radioactive material, see the definitions provided in the tools above.

3. Surface contaminated objects (2;7.2.3.2)

Radioactive material may only be classified as Surface contaminated objects if the conditions of 2;7.2.3.2 of the
Instructions apply.

There are four proper shipping names assigned to this group.

Surface contaminated objects (7.2.3.2)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 2913 Radioactive material, surface contaminated objects (SCO-I or SCO-II), non-fissile or fissile
excepted.

UN 3326 Radioactive material, surface contaminated objects (SCO-I or SCO-II), fissile.

As with LSA material, each proper shipping name of this group has two sections:

a) The first section indicates whether it is SCO I or II.

b) The second section indicates whether it applies to a non-fissile, fissile excepted or fissile radioactive material.

The criteria for assigning SCO I or II are indicated below:

SCO I (2;7.2.3.2.1 a))


Applies to a solid object with specific limits in place for:
the non-fixed contamination on the accessible surface
the fixed contamination on the accessible surface.
the non-fixed contamination plus the fixed contamination on the inaccessible surface.

SCO II (2;7.2.3.2.1 b))


Applies to a solid object on which either the fixed or non-fixed contamination on the surface exceeds the
applicable limits specified for SCO I, but is limited for:
the non-fixed contamination on the accessible surface
the fixed contamination on the accessible surface
the non-fixed contamination plus the fixed contamination on the inaccessible surface.

For determining if it is fissile excepted or fissile radioactive material, see the definitions provided in the tools above.

Note. The shipper must make available for inspection by the relevant competent authority documentary evidence
of the compliance of the package design with all the applicable requirements.
9-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

4. Type A packages (2;7.2.4.4)

Radioactive material may only be classified as a Type A package if the conditions of 2;7.2.4.4 of the Instructions apply.

2;7.2.4.4.1.1 Type A packages must not contain activities greater than the following:

a) for special form radioactive material A1; or

b) for all other radioactive material A2.

There are four proper shipping names assigned to this group.

Type A packages (7.2.4.4)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 2915 Radioactive material, Type A package, non-special form, non-fissile or fissile excepted.

UN 3327 Radioactive material, Type A package, fissile, non-special form.

UN 3332 Radioactive material, Type A package, special form, non-fissile or fissile excepted.

UN 3333 Radioactive material, Type A package, special form, fissile.

Note. To locate the definitions for the words non-special form, fissile excepted, fissile non-special form, special
form fissile excepted and special form fissile see the references provided at the beginning of Step 4.

Sub-paragraph 2;7.2.4.4 establishes the criteria for the Type A package:

a maximum activity level; and


where mixtures or radionuclides whose identities and respective activities are known, certain conditions are
specified. (2; 7.2.4.4.1.2.)

Note. The shipper must make available for inspection by the relevant competent authority documentary evidence
of the compliance of the package design with all the applicable requirements.

5. Type B(U) package (2;7.2.4.6)

Radioactive material may only be classified as a Type B(U) package if the conditions of 2;7.2.4.6 of the Instructions
apply.

Two proper shipping names and their corresponding UN numbers are in this group.

Type B(U) package (7.2.4.6)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 2916 Radioactive material, Type B(U) package, non-fissile or fissile excepted.

UN 3328 Radioactive material, Type B(U) package, fissile.

Sub-paragraph 2;7.2.4.6.2 establishes what the Type B(U) must not contain. (See Part 6;7 for information on what it
may contain.)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-19

Note. To locate the definitions for the words fissile excepted and fissile see the references provided at the
beginning of Step 4.

6. Type B(M) package (2;7.2.4.6)

Radioactive material may only be classified as a Type B(U) package if the conditions of 2;7.2.4.6 of the Instructions
apply.

Note. A Type B(M) package is a package which does not comply with all requirements for a Type B(U) package.
For that reason multilateral approval is required and the transport is only allowed on CAO.

Two proper shipping names and their corresponding UN numbers appear for Type B(M) packages.

Type B(M) package (7.2.4.6)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 2917 Radioactive material, Type B(M) package, non-fissile or fissile excepted.

UN 3329 Radioactive material, Type B(M) package, fissile.

Sub-paragraph 2;7.2.4.6.3 establishes what the Type B(M) must not contain. (See Part 6;7 for information on what it
may contain.)

Note. To locate the definitions for the words fissile excepted and fissile see the references provided at the
beginning of Step 4.

7. Type C package (7.2.4.6)

Radioactive material may only be classified as a Type C package if the conditions of 2;7.2.4.6 of the Instructions apply.

Two proper shipping names and their corresponding UN numbers appear for Type C packages.

Sub-paragraph 2; 7.2.4.6.4 establishes what the Type C must not contain. (See Part 6;7 for information on what it may
contain.)

Type C package (7.2.4.6)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 3323 Radioactive material, Type C package, non-fissile or fissile excepted.

UN 3330 Radioactive material, Type C package, fissile.

Note. Currently Type C packages are not on the market.

Note. To locate the definitions for the words fissile excepted and fissile see the references provided at the
beginning of Step 4.
9-20 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

8. Uranium hexafluoride (2;7.2.4.5)

Radioactive material may only be classified as uranium hexafluoride if the conditions of 2;7.2.4.5 of the Instructions
apply.

There are two proper shipping names in this group:

Uranium hexafluoride (7.2.4.5)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 2977 Radioactive material, uranium hexafluoride, fissile

UN 2978 Radioactive material, uranium hexafluoride, non-fissile or fissile excepted

Note. Remember to check the explanation of fissile or fissile excepted. (See Part 6;7 for information on uranium
hexafluoride packages.)

Sub-paragraph 2;7.2.4.5.2 establishes what the uranium hexafluoride must not contain.

9. Special arrangement (2;7.2.5 and 1;6.4)

Radioactive material may only be classified as a special arrangement if the conditions of 2;7.2.5 and 1;6.4 of the
Instructions apply.

Note. Definitions for multilateral and lateral approvals can be found adjacent to the word Approval for the
transport of radioactive material in Part 1;3.

There are two proper shipping names in this group.

Special arrangement (7.2.5 and 1;6.4)

UN number Proper shipping name

UN 2919 Radioactive material, transported under special arrangement, non-fissile or fissile excepted.

UN 3331 Radioactive material, transported under special arrangement, fissile.

Note. Remember to check the explanation of fissile excepted, or fissile.

Special arrangement means those provisions approved by the competent authority under which consignments which do
not satisfy all the requirements of the Instructions applicable to radioactive material may be transported. Radioactive
materials can only be transported under special arrangement if:

1) the application of the provisions of Part 7;2 is impractical; and

2) the requisite standards of safety established by these Instructions have been demonstrated through alternative
means.

Radioactive materials which can only be transported under special arrangement must be assigned to one of the two
proper shipping names mentioned above. For international consignments multilateral approval is required.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-21

Note. Special arrangement transport operations may apply to one or a series of consignments.

In certain cases a certificate must be issued by a competent authority before a radioactive material is permitted for
transport. Paragraph 5;1.2.2 of the Instructions clearly states when such certificates are to be issued.

5;1.2.2 Certificates issued by the competent authority

5;1.2.2.1 Certificates issued by the competent authority are required for the following:

a) Designs for:

i) special form radioactive material;


ii) low dispersible radioactive material;
iii) packages containing 0.1 kg or more of uranium hexafluoride;
iv) all packages containing fissile material unless excepted by 6;7.10.2;
v) Type B(U) packages and Type B(M) packages;
vi) Type C packages;

b) Special arrangements;

c) Certain shipments (1.2.1.2).

The certificates must confirm that the applicable requirements are met, and for design approvals, must attribute to the
design an identification mark.

The package design and shipment approval certificates may be combined into a single certificate.

Certificates and applications for these certificates must be in accordance with the requirements in 6;7.22.

5;1.2.2.2 The shipper must be in possession of a copy of each applicable certificate.

5;1.2.2.3 For package designs where a competent authority issued certificate is not required, the shipper must, on
request, make available for inspection by the relevant competent authority, documentary evidence of the compliance
of the package design with all the applicable requirements.

EXERCISE 9-5

State the correct proper shipping name and UN number for the following radioactive materials.

1. Mo-99, 15 TBq, other form.

2. Pd-107, 10 GBq, other form.


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3. A package containing 60 seeds of I-125 with an


activity of 60 MBq per seed.

4. 2 TBq of Gold (Au) (the specific radionuclides are


unknown) in special form.

Check your answers with those of Unit 13.

E. DANGEROUS GOODS LIST TABLE 3-1

Step 5 Locate the proper shipping name and UN number in Table 3-1 and identify the relevant information
required to prepare a radioactive material for transport.

Steps 4 and 5 specify how to classify radioactive material and assign an appropriate proper shipping name and
UN number. Step 5 takes us to the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1.

The proper shipping names and UN numbers for the radioactive material are found in alphabetical order in the table.
Adjacent to these entries can be found pertinent information for use in preparing the radioactive material for transport.
Table 3-1 tells us:

1. What hazard label to display on the package (Column 5);


2. What State variations apply (Column 6);
3. What special provisions apply (Column 7); and
4. Where to find packing information for passenger and cargo aircraft (Columns 10 to 13).
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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-23

Two typical entries for radioactive materials in Table 3-1 look like this:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft

Max. net Max. net


Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Radioactive 2908 7 None A130 See Part 1;6


material,
excepted
package
empty
packaging

Radioactive 2912 7 Radioactive CA 1 A23 See Part 2;7 and Part 4;9
material, low A78
specific A139
activity
(LSA-I), non-
fissile or
fissile
excepted

Note. Be sure to take into consideration any applicable State variations and special provisions when preparing a
radioactive material shipment for transport. The following are examples of how special provisions can affect the
preparation for transport of radioactive material:

Special provision A78 adjacent to most radioactive material entries in Table 3-1 states:

Radioactive material with a subsidiary risk must:

a) be labelled with subsidiary risk labels corresponding to each subsidiary risk exhibited by the material in
accordance with the relevant provisions of 5;3.2; corresponding placards must be affixed to transport units in
accordance with the relevant provisions of 5;3.6;

b) be allocated to Packing Groups I, II or III, as and if appropriate, by application of the grouping criteria
provided in Part 2 corresponding to the nature of the predominant subsidiary risk.

The description required in 5;4.1.5.7.1 b) must include a description of these subsidiary risks (e.g. Subsidiary risk:
3,6.1), the name of the constituents which most predominantly contribute to this (these) subsidiary risk(s) and, where
applicable, the packing group.

Radioactive material with a subsidiary risk of Division 4.2 (Packing Group I) must be transported in Type B packages.
Radioactive material with a subsidiary risk of Division 2.1 is forbidden from transport on passenger aircraft, and
radioactive material with a subsidiary risk of Division 2.3 is forbidden from transport on passenger or cargo aircraft
except with the prior approval of the appropriate authority of the State of Origin under the conditions established by
that authority. A copy of the document of approval, showing the quantity limitations and the packaging requirements,
must accompany the consignment.
9-24 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Example of a radioactive material with a subsidiary risk

A Type A package containing C-14 and H-3 (T) with a total activity of 5 GBq. The chemical form of the substance is
toluene.

As toluene is also classified as a substance of Class 3 PG II the package must also be labelled with a Class 3 hazard
label and the required documents must include a description of this subsidiary risk.

Special Provision A130 adjacent to the Excepted Package entries in Table 3-1 states:

A130. When this material meets the definitions and criteria of other classes or divisions as defined in Part 2, it must
be classified in accordance with the predominant subsidiary risk. Such material must be declared under the proper
shipping name and UN number appropriate for the material in that predominant Class or division, with the addition of
the name applicable to this radioactive material according to column 1 of the Dangerous Goods List, and must be
transported in accordance with the provisions applicable to that UN number. In addition, all other requirements
specified in 1;6.1.5 must apply.

Special Provision A160 adjacent to the Radioactive material Type B(U) and B(M) states:

A160. (337) Type B(U) and Type B(M) packages, must not contain activities greater than the following:
a) For low dispersible radioactive material: as authorized for the package design as specified in the certificate
of approval;

b) For special form radioactive material: 3000 A1 or 100 000 A2, whichever is the lower; or

c) For all other radioactive material: 3000 A2.

The provisions for passenger and cargo aircraft in Columns 10 to 13 are limited to two statements:

For excepted packages the statement is: See Part 1;6.

For all other radioactive packages the statement is: See Part 2;7 and Part 4;9.

Note. A thorough review of the provisions of Part 2;7 has been done above in Step 4 of this unit.

F. PREPARATION FOR TRANSPORT AND TRANSPORT

Step 6 Identify suitable packaging, then prepare the packaging for transport and transport it.
(Parts 1;6, 4;9 and 6;7)

The packaging for the transport of radioactive material must provide for:

Containment
Protection from radiation
Prevention from criticality
Prevention of damage caused by heat.

The quantity of radioactive material in a package must not exceed the limits as discussed above.
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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-25

The following types of packages are used for radioactive material:

Excepted packages
Industrial package Type 1 (Types IP-1 package)
Industrial package Type 2 (Types IP-2 package)
Industrial package Type 3 (Types IP-3 package)
Type A packages
Type B(U) package
Type B(M) package
Type C packages.

Packages containing fissile material or uranium hexafluoride are subject to additional requirements.

Radioactive material, packagings and packages must meet the requirements of Part 6;7.

The non-fixed contamination on the external surfaces of any package, overpack or freight container must be kept as low
as practicable and under routine conditions of transport must not exceed the following limits:

a) 4 Bq/cm for Beta and Gamma emitters and low toxicity emitters; and

b) 0.4 Bq/cm for all other Alpha emitters.

Radioactive material packed with other goods (4;9.1.3)

A package containing radioactive material, other than an excepted package, must not contain any other items except
such articles and documents as are necessary for the use of the radioactive material.

Low specific activity material (LSA) and surface contaminated objects (SCO) may be packed with other items.

Articles and documents (and for LSA and SCO other items) may be included, provided that there is no interaction
between them and the packaging or contents that would reduce the safety of the package.

The following two flow charts will lead you through the references for making a classification decision to those for making
a packaging decision.

Flow Chart 1 Excepted packages.


Flow Chart 2 Other radioactive material.
9-26 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Flow Chart 1. Excepted packages

Part 2;7 establishes the classification criteria for the use of the excepted package proper shipping names
and UN numbers.

Table 3-1 assigns the package hazard label(s), State variation(s) and special provision(s) to be followed
and refers to Part 1;6 for the packing requirements for the excepted package.

Part 1;6 provides specific provisions for the transport of excepted packages and refers to paragraph 6;7.3
for non-fissile material and for fissile material to which an exception applies. It also refers to 2;7.2.3.5 and
6;7.6.2.
Note. The only fissile material permitted for transport in an excepted package is fissile excepted
material as described in 2;7.2.3.5.

Non-fissile material Paragraph 6;7.3 refers to the requirements of 6;7.1 and 2.

Non-fissile material Paragraphs 6;7.1 and 2 provide the general requirements and the additional
requirements for packages transported by air.

Fissile material to which an exception applies Sub-paragraph 2;7.2.3.5 provides the criteria for
determining if the radioactive material is fissile excepted and sub-paragraph 6;7.6.2 states the smallest
overall external dimension of the package must not be less than 10 cm.

Flow Chart 2. Other radioactive material, Parts 2;7 and 4;9

Part 2;7 establishes the classification criteria for the use of these proper shipping names and UN
numbers.

Table 3-1 assigns the package hazard label(s), State variation(s) and special provision(s) to be followed
and refers to Parts 2;7 and 4;9 for the packing requirements.

As indicated in Step 4 of this unit, Part 2;7 establishes the criteria for assigning one of the 25 radioactive
material UN numbers to a radioactive material.

Part 4;9 identifies the eight types of radioactive material packaging and provides direction on their
characteristics and refers to the requirements of Part 6;7.

Part 6;7 states the requirements for the construction, testing and approval of packages and material of
Class 7.

Note. See Appendix 9-1 for an index of the provisions of Part 4;9 and Appendix 9-2 for an index of the provisions
found in 6;7.1 to 23.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-27

Excepted packages

Note. Unlike other radioactive material, excepted packages have been excepted from certain provisions in Part 5
Shippers Responsibilities and Part 7 Operators Responsibilities of the Instructions. All of the applicable
requirements have been included in the following section to help differentiate them from other radioactive material
requirements and to facilitate understanding.

UN number Proper shipping name and reference number

UN 2908 Radioactive material, excepted package empty packaging (2;7.2.4.1.1.5).

UN 2911 Radioactive material, excepted package instruments.


or
Radioactive material, excepted package articles (2;7.2.4.1.1.3).

UN 2909 Radioactive material, excepted package articles manufactured from natural uranium or
Radioactive material, excepted package depleted uranium
or
Radioactive material, excepted package natural thorium (2;7.2.4.1.2).

UN 2910 Radioactive material, excepted package limited quantity of material (2;7.2.4.1.1.4).

Note. Remember there may be one or more proper shipping names for each UN number.

Note. The only fissile material permitted for transport in an excepted package is fissile excepted material as
described in 2;7.2.3.5.

Which provisions of Parts 5, 6 and 7 of the Instructions apply to the transport of excepted packages?

1;6.1.5 Specific provisions for the transport of excepted packages

1;6.1.5.1 Excepted packages which contain radioactive material in limited quantities, instruments, manufactured
articles and empty packages as specified in 2;7.2.4.1.1 are subject only to the following provisions of Parts 5 to 7:

a) the applicable provisions specified in 5;1.1 i), 5;1.4, 5;1.6.3, 5;1.7, 5;2.2, 5;2.4.2, 5;2.4.5.1 a), 5;2.4.5.1 e),
5;3.2.11 b), 5;3.2.11 e), 5;4.1.4.1 a), 5;4.4 and 7;3.2.2;

b) the requirements for excepted packages specified in 6;7.3; and

c) if the excepted package contains fissile material, one of the fissile exceptions provided by 2;7.2.3.5 must
apply and the requirement of 6;7.6.2 must be met.

1;6.1.5.2 Excepted packages must be subject to the relevant provisions of all other parts of these Instructions.

The following table summarizes the Instructions that apply to excepted packages.

General Training
requirements
Shippers employees or agents must be trained in accordance with the requirements of
Part 1;4. (5;1.4)
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Re-use of radioactive material packaging

Only decontaminated radioactive material packages may be used for the storage or transport
of other goods. (5;1.6.3)

Identification of radioactive material packed in the same outer packaging with other
dangerous goods.

When a radioactive material is packed with other dangerous goods in the same outer
packaging, the outer packaging must display the marks and labels required for all dangerous
goods present. (5;1.7)

Packages The package provisions that apply to excepted packages or radioactive material are found in
Paragraphs 6;7.1 and 6;7.2 (see below).

Note. The only fissile material permitted for transport in an excepted package is fissile
excepted material as described in 2;7.2.3.5.

Package marking Each excepted package of radioactive material must comply with 5;2.2.1 and 5;2.2.2 (see
below) and be marked with the:

Name and address of shipper and consignee


The gross mass for packages with a gross mass >50 kg
UN number on the excepted package handling label.

Handling labels No hazard label is required.

Each excepted package of radioactive material must also display the following labels, as
appropriate:

Package orientation label. (Figure 5-26 and 5;3.2.11 b))


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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-29

Note. The requirements for the display of the package orientation label are found in
sub-paragraph 4;1.1.13.

Radioactive material, excepted package handling label. (Figure 5-30 and 5;3.2.11)

Radioactive Material, Excepted Package


This package contains radioactive material, excepted package and
is in all respects in compliance with the applicable international and
national governmental regulations.

Overpacks Unless the markings of the interior packages are visible from the outside of the overpack, the
overpack must:
be marked with the word Overpack;
display one radioactive material excepted package label with the appropriate UN number
(Figure 5-30); and
be marked with any special handling instructions appearing on the internal packages.
(5;1.1 i))
The function of the package must not be impaired by the overpack. (5;1.1)

Documentation Each dangerous goods transport document and air waybill (or similar document) must display
the following information:
UN number on dangerous goods transport document. (5;4.1.4.1)

Each air waybill (or similar document) must display the following information:
Proper shipping name and UN number on air waybill or similar document. (5;4.4)

Operators It is worth emphasizing that an operator is not required to conduct an acceptance check on
acceptance an excepted package of radioactive material. (7;1.3.1 Note 3)
procedures

Operators An operator may remove damaged or leaking packages of excepted packages of radioactive
inspection and material to an acceptable location, but they must not be forwarded until they are repaired,
decontamination reconditioned or decontaminated. (7;3.2.2)
responsibilities
9-30 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Operators loading An operator may carry excepted packages of radioactive material in the aircraft cabin
restrictions on occupied by passengers or on the flight deck. (7;2.1.1)
flight deck and for
passenger cabins

Provisions for Passengers or crew are prohibited from transporting excepted packages of radioactive
dangerous goods material in carry-on or checked baggage or on their person. (8;1.1.1)
carried by
passengers or
crew

6;7.1 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

6;7.1.1 The package must be so designed in relation to its mass, volume and shape that it can be easily and safely
transported. In addition, the package shall be so designed that it can be properly secured in the aircraft during
transport.

6;7.1.2 The design must be such that any lifting attachments on the package will not fail when used in the intended
manner and that, if failure of the attachments should occur, the ability of the package to meet other requirements of
these Instructions would not be impaired. The design must take account of appropriate safety factors to cover snatch
lifting.

6;7.1.3 Attachments and any other features on the outer surface of the package which could be used to lift it must be
designed either to support its mass in accordance with the requirements of 7.1.2 or must be removable or otherwise
rendered incapable of being used during transport.

6;7.1.4 As far as practicable, the packaging must be designed and finished so that the external surfaces are free from
protruding features and can be easily decontaminated.

6;7.1.5 As far as practicable, the outer layer of the package must be designed so as to prevent the collection and the
retention of water.

6;7.1.6 Any features added to the package at the time of transport which are not part of the package must not reduce
its safety.

6;7.1.7 The package must be capable of withstanding the effects of any acceleration, vibration or vibration
resonance, which may arise under routine conditions of transport without any deterioration in the effectiveness of the
closing devices on the various receptacles or in the integrity of the package as a whole. In particular, nuts, bolts and
other securing devices must be designed so as to prevent them from becoming loose or being released
unintentionally, even after repeated use.

6;7.1.8 The materials of the packaging and any components or structures must be physically and chemically
compatible with each other and with the radioactive contents. Account must be taken of their behaviour under
irradiation.

6;7.1.9 All valves through which the radioactive contents could otherwise escape must be protected against
unauthorized operation.

6;7.1.10 The design of the package must take into account ambient temperatures and pressures that are likely to be
encountered in routine conditions of transport.
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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-31

6;7.1.11 For radioactive material having other dangerous properties, the package design must take into account
those properties (see Part 2, Introductory Chapter, 3.1, 3.2 and 4;9.1.5).

6;7.2 ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PACKAGES TRANSPORTED BY AIR


6;7.2.1 The temperature of the accessible surfaces must not exceed 50C at an ambient temperature of 38C with no
account taken of insolation.

6;7.2.2 Packages must be designed so that, if they were exposed to ambient temperatures ranging from 40C to
+55C, the integrity of the containment would not be impaired.

6;7.2.3 Packages containing radioactive material must be capable of withstanding, without leakage, an internal
pressure that produces a pressure differential of not less than maximum normal operating pressure plus 95 kPa.

5;2.2.1 All markings must be so placed on the packagings that they are not covered or obscured by any part of or
attachment to the packaging or any other label or marking.

5;2.2.2 All package markings required by 2.1:

a) must be durable and printed or otherwise marked on, or affixed to, the external surface of the package;

b) must be readily visible and legible;

c) must be able to withstand open weather exposure without a substantial reduction in effectiveness;

d) must be displayed on a background of contrasting colour; and

e) must not be located with other package markings that could substantially reduce their effectiveness.

This concludes the examination of excepted package radioactive material requirements. The remaining text deals with
the remaining regulated radioactive materials.

EXERCISE 9-6

Referring to the Instructions, indicate the marks and labels which must appear on the following packages/overpacks:

1. An empty package of radioactive material


complying with the criteria for excepted packages
of radioactive material.

2. An overpack containing an excepted package of


radioactive material (limited quantity of material)
and 5 kg of dry ice as a cooling agent.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


9-32 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Other radioactive material Parts 2;7, 4;9 and 6;7

UN number Proper shipping name and reference number

UN 2912 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-I), non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3321 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-II), non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3322 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-III), non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3324 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-II) fissile

UN 3325 Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-III) fissile

UN 2913 Radioactive material, surface contaminated objects (SCO-I or SCO-II), non-fissile or fissile
excepted

UN 3326 Radioactive material, surface contaminated objects (SCO-I or SCO-II), fissile

UN 2915 Radioactive material, Type A package, non-special form, non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3327 Radioactive material, Type A package, fissile, non-special form

UN 3332 Radioactive material, Type A package, special form, non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3333 Radioactive material, Type A package, special form, fissile

UN 2916 Radioactive material, Type B(U) package, non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3328 Radioactive material, Type B(U) package, fissile

UN 2917 Radioactive material, Type B(M) package, non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3329 Radioactive material, Type B(M) package, fissile

UN 3323 Radioactive material, Type C package, non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3330 Radioactive material, Type C package, fissile

UN 2919 Radioactive material, transported under special arrangement, non-fissile or fissile excepted

UN 3331 Radioactive material, transported under special arrangement, fissile

UN 2977 Radioactive material, uranium hexafluoride, fissile

UN 2978 Radioactive material, uranium hexafluoride, non-fissile or fissile excepted

The information on the preparation and transport of these radioactive materials is broken into seven sections:

1) Packages
2) Package marking
3) Package labelling and placarding
4) Documentation
5) Additional documentation
6) Notification
7) Operators responsibilities

The approach taken with respect to the remaining UN numbers assigned to radioactive materials is different from the
one taken for excepted packages. These radioactive materials are fully regulated.

Each of the sections below reviews the rules governing the preparation and transport of these radioactive materials.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-33

Note. The summary presented below provides an overview of the radioactive material requirements and can be
used to identify those provisions that apply to a particular package or shipment of radioactive material. Remember to
always check the Instructions for the specific requirements.

PACKAGES

The packaging requirements for these radioactive materials are found in Parts 4;9 and 6;7.

Note. See Appendix 9-1 for an index of the provisions of Part 4;9 and Appendix 9-2 for an index of the provisions
found in 6;7.1 to 23.

The following extract from Part 4;9 of the Instructions identifies the eight types of radioactive packages which may be
used to transport radioactive material.

4;9.1.1 Radioactive material, packagings and packages must meet the requirements of 6;7. The types of packages
for radioactive materials covered by these Instructions are:

a) Excepted package (see 1;6.1.5);

b) Industrial package Type 1 (Type IP-1 package);

c) Industrial package Type 2 (Type IP-2 package);

d) Industrial package Type 3 (Type IP-3 package);

e) Type A package;

f) Type B(U) package;

g) Type B(M) package;

h) Type C package.

Packages containing fissile material or uranium hexafluoride are subject to additional requirements.

Note. Remember that sub-paragraph 5;1.2.2 states which designs must have competent authority approval.

Each of these packages are described below.

Industrial Packages (IP) (4;9.2 and 6;7.4)

Industrial packages can be used for:


Low Specific Activity (LSA) material
Surface Contaminated Object (SCO)
9-34 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Use of industrial packaging:

Industrial package type

Not under
Contents Exclusive use (*) exclusive use

LSA I
Solid Type 1 Type 1
Liquid Type 1 Type 2

LSA II
Solid Type 2 Type 2
Liquid and Gas Type 2 Type 3

LSA III Type 2 Type 3

SCO I Type 1 Type 1

SCO II Type 2 Type 2

Industrial packagings Type 1 (Type IP-1) are normal strong packaging that must meet the general packing requirements
for radioactive materials. (6;7.1, 7.2 and 6;7.6.2)

Industrial packagings Type 2 (Type IP-2) must meet the requirements of a Type IP-1 and are in addition subject to drop
and stacking tests. (6;7.14.4 and 6;7.14.5)

Industrial packagings Type 3 (Type IP-3) must comply with the requirements for Type A packages and must be tested as
for Type A packages containing solids. (6;7.1,7.2, 6;7.6.2 to 6;7.6.15)

Note.

A package which conforms to the packaging performance standards of Packing Group I or II (UN packages) can be
used as an alternative packaging for an IP-2 under certain conditions. (6;7.4.4.1)

Freight containers of a permanent enclosed character may also be used as industrial packages of Type IP-2 or IP-3
under certain conditions. (6;7.4.4.2)

Quantity activity limits per industrial package are detailed in 4;9.2.1.

Type A packages (6;7.6)

Type A packaging is used when the activity and/or the radiation limits for excepted materials have been exceeded.

A Type A package must not contain activities greater than the following:
for special form radioactive material: A1
for all other radioactive material: A2 (2;7.2.4.4.1.1)

A Type A package must comply with the general packing requirements (6;7.1 and 6;7.2) and the requirements for
Type A packages as described in 6;7.6.
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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-35

Important Notes:
the smallest overall external dimension of the package must not be less than 10 cm.
the outside of every package must incorporate a feature, such as a seal, which is not readily breakable and
which, while intact, will be evidence that the package has not been opened.

Type A packages must be tested to demonstrate the ability to withstand normal conditions of transport. Specimens of
the package must be subjected to the free drop test, the stacking test and the penetration test, preceded in each case by
the water spray test.

Type A packages are intended to provide a safe, economical means for transporting relatively small quantities of
radioactive material. These are expected to retain their integrity under conditions that may occur during transport: falling
from surface vehicles, being exposed to rain, being struck by a sharp object, which may penetrate the package or having
other cargo stacked on top.

It is assumed, however, that Type A packages may be damaged in a severe accident and that a fraction of the contents
may be released.

Limits are therefore prescribed in the Regulations for the maximum activities of radionuclides that can be transported in
Type A packages. These limits ensure that in the event of a release, the risks of external radiation or contamination are
low.

For larger amounts of radioactive material, a Type B package is required.

An overview of all required tests can be found in the summary to the package requirements below.

Governmental approval: Type A packages do not require government approvals unless they are used for fissile
materials. If the radionuclide is in special form, a special form approval certificate is required.

Type B packages (6;7.7 and 6;7.8)

A Type B package is a packaging containing an activity that may be in excess of A1 or in excess of A2.

Type B packages must meet the general packing requirements (6;7.1 and 6;7.2) and most of the requirements for
Type A packages and in addition the requirements for Type B(U) packages (6;7.7) or Type B(M) packages (6;7.8).
9-36 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Type B packages are not only tested to demonstrate ability to withstand normal conditions of transport, but also to
demonstrate ability to withstand accident conditions in transport.

An overview of all required tests can be found in the summary to the package requirements below.

Type B(U) and Type B(M) packages, if transported by air, must not contain activities greater than the following: (see also
A160)

for low dispersible radioactive material as authorized for the package design as specified in the certificate of
approval;
for special form radioactive material 3000 A1 or 100.000 A2 whichever is the lower; or
for all other radioactive material 3000 A2.

Governmental approval: Type B(U) needs unilateral approval, i.e. approval by the competent authority of the State of
origin except that:

a Type B(U) package design for fissile material must require multilateral approval;
a Type B(U) package design for low dispersible material must require multilateral approval;
Type B(M) needs multilateral approval and may be transported on cargo aircraft only.

Type C packages (6;7.9)

A Type C package is a packaging containing an activity that may be in excess of A1 or in excess of A2.

For air transport a Type C package must be used in case the activity is higher than the maximum allowed activity for a
Type B package.

Type C packages must comply with the requirements and tests as specified in 6;7.9.
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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-37

Governmental approval: Each Type C package design shall require unilateral approval except that a package design for
fissile material shall require multilateral approval.

Requirements for packages containing fissile material (4;9.3 and 6;7.10)

Any packaging containing fissile material must comply with the applicable activity limits depending on the type of
packaging used. (Excepted Industrial Packaging Type A Type B Type C).

Any packaging containing fissile material must not contain:


a mass of fissile material greater than that authorized for the package design;
any radionuclide or fissile material different from those authorized for the package design;
contents in a form or physical or chemical state, or in a special arrangement, different from those authorized for
the package design as specified in the certificate of approval.

Packages of fissile materials must comply with the requirements for packages containing fissile material as specified in
6;7.10.

Packages of excepted fissile materials must not comply with the requirements of these regulations that apply specifically
to fissile material, however such packages must be regulated as non-fissile radioactive material and are still subject to
those requirements which pertain to their radioactive nature and properties.

Transitional requirements for Class 7 (6; 7.23)

Packagings manufactured to a package design approved by the competent authority under the provisions of the 1973
or the 1973 (As amended) or the 1985 or the 1985 (As amended), edition of the IAEA Safety Series n6 may still be
used under certain conditions but are subject to a multilateral approval of package design.

Overpacks

Definition: An enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or more packages and to form one handling unit for
convenience of handling and stowage.

Packages of radioactive material may be combined together in an overpack for transport provided that each package
therein meets the applicable requirements of these regulations.

The transport index (TI) for an overpack*:


sum of TIs of all packages; or
direct measurement of radiation level (done by original shipper).

* for non-rigid overpacks, the TI must be determined only as the sum of the TIs of all the packages.

Freight containers

Definition: An article of transport equipment designed to facilitate the carriage of goods by one or more modes of
transport without intermediate reloading:

small freight container: overall outer dimension <1.5 m or internal volume 3 m3


large freight container: all other containers.
9-38 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Each freight container must meet following requirements:


of a permanent enclosed character and rigid and strong enough for repeated use;
fitted with devices facilitating its handling.

Note. Shippers are allowed to present for air transport radioactive materials in freight containers.

The transport index for a freight container


sum of TIs of all packages; or
direct measurement of radiation level in which case this value must be multiplied by the appropriate factor from
following table:

Largest cross-sectional area


of the freight container Multiplication factor

1 m 1

>1 m to 5 m 2

>5 m to 20 m 3

>20 m 10

Summary of package requirements

Transport conditions to be considered in package design

Excepted Type A Type B Type C


package IP-1 IP-2 IP-3 package package package

Routine
X X X X X X X
(incident free)

Normal
X X X X X
(minor mishaps)

Accident
X X
(severe accidents)

Package test requirements for normal conditions of transport

Excepted Type A Type B Type C


package IP-1 IP-2 IP-3 package package package

Drop test
X X X X X
0.3-1.2 m

Stacking X X X X X

Water spray X X X X

Penetration

1.0 m X X X X

1.7 m Liquid
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-39

Package test requirements for accident conditions of transport

Excepted Type A Type B Type C


package IP-1 IP-2 IP-3 package package package

Drop test 9 m Liquid HDD X

Penetration 1 m X

Crush test 9 m LDD X

Thermal test X

Water immersion 15 m X

Contents
Water immersion 200 m X
>105 A2

Puncture/tearing X

Enhanced thermal test X

Impact test x

HHD Heavy weight/High density packages


LLD Light weight/Low density packages

Package marking

The standard package markings required on packages of dangerous goods are used to:

1) Clearly identify the content of the package by showing the:


proper shipping name; and
UN number. (Subparagraph 5;2.4.1)

Example: Radioactive material, low specific activity (LSA-II) fissile, UN 3324.

Note. Additional descriptive text in the entries in column 1 of the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 is not part of
the proper shipping name but may be used in addition to the proper shipping name.

2) Identify the name and address of the shipper and the consignee (receiver) of the dangerous goods.
(Sub-paragraph 5; 2.4.2)

3) Indicate by displaying package specification markings the packaging meets approved standards.
(Sub-paragraph 5;2.4.5 c))

The package marking requirements of Part 5;2 also call for marks that apply specifically to radioactive material. The
following table summarizes the applicable marking provisions in the Instructions, i.e. what the mark is and when it is to
be applied.
9-40 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Maximum permissible gross mass must be marked on packages with a gross mass >50 kg.

e.g. 75 kg G

(5;2.4.5.1 a))

Type IP-1, Type IP-2 or Type IP-3 packages must be marked as:

TYPE IP-1,
TYPE IP-2, or
TYPE IP-3.

(5;2.4.5.1 b) i))

Type A packages must be marked:

TYPE A.

(5;2.4.5.1 b) ii))

Type IP-2, Type IP-3 and Type A packages must be marked with the international vehicle registration
code (VRI Code).

Note. This website http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_international_license_plate_codes#U


contains a complete list of VRI Codes.)

(5;2.4.5.1 b) iii)

Type IP-2, Type IP-3 and Type A packages must be marked with the name of the manufacturer or, if the
design has been approved by a competent authority, they must be marked with the identification mark
allocated to the design.

(5;2.4.5.1 b) iii))

Packages whose design has been approved by a competent authority must be marked with the
identification mark allocated to that design and a unique serial number.

(5;2.4.5.1 c) i) and ii))

Type B(U) or Type B(M) packages must be marked either:

TYPE B(U), or
TYPE B(M)

(5;2.4.5.1 c) iii))

Type C packages must be marked:

TYPE C

(5;2.4.5.1 c) iv))
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-41

Type B(U), Type B(M) or Type C packages must display the following mark on the outside of the
outermost receptacle which is resistant to effects of fire and water:

60

60

X/2
X
5X

(5;2.4.5.1 d))

Where international transport occurs, the marking is to be in accordance with the certificate of country of
origin of the design.

(5;2.4.5.2)

Note. See:
5;2.2.1 and 5;2.2.2 for the requirements concerning the application of markings; and
5;2.4 for the requirements concerning language.

Package labelling and placarding

As we learned in Unit 5 there are two types of labels found in the Instructions:

The class hazard label, which is used to provide an immediate indication of the risk posed by the dangerous
goods.
The handling label, which is used to provide information on proper handling and stowage.

Notes.
Part 5;3 establishes most of the labelling requirements, but additional requirements may be found in the special
provisions and packing instructions. Always check.
See paragraph 5;3.2 for the requirements concerning the application of labels.

Ask the following seven questions when trying to figure out what labels to display on a package of radioactive material,
other than excepted packages, and where they should go:

1. What class hazard label(s) is specified adjacent to the proper shipping name in Columns 5 and 6 of Table 3-1?
2. What do the radioactive material hazard labels look like?
3. How do you determine which of the hazard labels to put on a package or overpack containing radioactive material?
4. What information is required on the radioactive material labels?
5. How are the radioactive material labels to be displayed?
6. What are the required handling labels?
7. What safety marks are required on a freight container?
9-42 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Question 1.
What class hazard label(s) is specified adjacent to the proper shipping name in Columns 5 and 6 of Table 3-1?

According to Column 5 of Table 3-1, all radioactive material, other than excepted packages, must display a radioactive
material label for the primary hazard. Only the entries for UN 2978 and UN 2977 show a subsidiary labeling requirement
in Column 6.

Question 2.
What do the radioactive material hazard labels look like?

There are four radioactive material hazard labels:

Category I Category II Category III Criticality safety


White Yellow Yellow index label
(for fissile material)

5
m
m
RADIOACTIVE II RADIOACTIVE
CONTENTS.......................
RADIOACTIVE CONTENTS......................
ACTIVITY....................... ACTIVITY........................
CONTENTS......................
ACTIVITY....................... TRANSPORT INDEX TRANSPORT INDEX
FISSILE
7 7
7 CRITICALITY
N

M
SAFETY INDEX
SIO

IN
Figure 5-19 Figure 5-20 EN

IM
U 100
IM

M
D m

D
M m

IM m
Figure 5-18
U 100

m
EN
7 IM

SIO
IN
M

N
Figure 5-21

Question 3.
How do you determine which of these hazard labels to put on a package or overpack containing radioactive material?

Primary hazard label

Radioactive materials are assigned to Category I, II or III based on the information in the following table:

Table 5-2. Categories of packages and overpacks

Conditions

Maximum radiation level at any


Transport index point on external surface Category

0* Not more than 0.005 mSv/h I-WHITE

More than 0 but not more More than 0.005 mSv/h but not II-YELLOW
than 1* more than 0.5 mSv/h

More than 1 but not more More than 0.5 mSv/h but not III-YELLOW
than 10 more than 2 mSv/h

More than 10 More than 2 mSv/h but not more III-YELLOW**


than 10 mSv/h

* If the measured transport index is not greater than 0.05, the value quoted may be zero in accordance
with 1.2.3.1.1 c).
** Must be transported under exclusive use and special arrangement.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-43

To use this table you must have two pieces of information, the:
Transport Index (TI) of the radioactive material (See below for an explanation on how to determine the TI); and
Maximum radiation level at any point on the external surface.

If the radiation level at surface requires another Category than the TI, the highest category will apply.

For example:

If the Transport Index is 0, but the maximum radiation level is 0.006 mSv/h then the II Yellow label must be shown
because the radiation level at surface exceeds the value for Category I-White. (5;1.2.3.1.4 a))

Important note:
Where the surface radiation level is greater than 2 mSv/h, the package or overpack must be transported under
exclusive use and may only be transported by air under special arrangements. (5;1.2.3.1.4 c) and 7;2.9.5.3)
Special arrangement packages and overpacks must display the category III Yellow label unless otherwise
specified in the approval certificate. (5;1.2.3.1.4 d) and e))

Note. The definition for exclusive use for the transport of Class 7 material means the sole use, by a single shipper, of
an aircraft or of a large freight container, in respect of which all initial, intermediate and final loading and unloading is
carried out in accordance with the directions of the shipper or consignee. (1;3)

Example:

Transport Index = 9 and Maximum radiation level at any point on external surface = More than 2 mSv/h but not
more than 10 mSv/h
Label = III-Yellow, but must be transported under exclusive use and special arrangement.

Transport Index = .5 and Maximum radiation level at any point on external surface = 0.5 mSv/h
Label = II Yellow

Criticality safety index label

Packages of Fissile material, other than excepted fissile material 6;7.10.2, must display the Criticality Safety Index (CSI)
Label (Figure 5-21) adjacent to a Category I, II or III label.
5
m
m

FISSILE

CRITICALITY
N
M

SAFETY INDEX O
SI
IN

EN
IM
U 100

IM
M m

D m
D m

M m
IM

U 100
EN

7 IN
IM
SI
O

M
N

Note. The Category I, II and III labels and the Criticality Safety Index label have space on their surface for the
inclusion of information relevant to the radioactive material. See below for an explanation on how this information is
determined.
9-44 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Subsidiary hazard label

If the radioactive material has one or more subsidiary risks, the package must also be labeled for the subsidiary risk(s).

5;3.2.5 Packages containing radioactive material having additional hazardous characteristics must also be labelled
to indicate those characteristics.

Example:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft

Max. net Max. net


Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Radioactive 2978 7 8 Radioactive CA 1 A139 See Part 2;7 and Part 4;9
material, &
uranium Corrosive
hexafluoride,
non-fissile or
fissile excepted

Uranium hexafluoride, UN 2977 and UN 2978 have a primary risk of Class 7 and a subsidiary risk of Class 8 corrosive.

One of these labels must be displayed on opposite sides of the package depending on the Transport Index and the
maximum radiation level at any point on external surface:

RADIOACTIVE RADIOACTIVE II RADIOACTIVE


CONTENTS.......................
CONTENTS...................... CONTENTS......................
ACTIVITY....................... ACTIVITY....................... ACTIVITY........................

TRANSPORT INDEX TRANSPORT INDEX

7 7 7

This label must also be displayed to reflect the corrosive hazard:

*
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-45

Question 4.
What information is required on the radioactive material labels?

The following is a list of the information that must appear on the:


Category I, II or III label; and
Criticality safety index label.

Package Contents (5;3.5.1.1 h) 1)):

LSA I material:
Mark just LSA I.
LSA II and III and SCO I and II:
Non-mixtures mark the name(s) of the radionuclide(s). See Table 2-12.
Mixtures mark the names of the most restrictive nuclides, space permitting.
and
Mark LSA-II, LSA-III, SCO-I and SCO-II, as applicable.

Package activity (5;3.5.1.1 h) 2)):

Other than fissile radioactive material:


Mark the maximum activity during transport in becquerels with appropriate SI prefix
(i.e. T = tera = X 1012).

Fissile material:
The activity in becquerels or the mass of fissile material in units of grams or multiples
thereof.

Overpacks and freight containers (5;3.5.1.1 h) 3)):


Loaded with packages containing identical radionuclides Mark total contents and activity
for entire load.
Loaded with packages of different radionuclides Mark the words See Transport
Document.

Transport Index (TI) (5;3.5.1.1 h) 4) and 5;1.2.3.1.1 and 5;1.2.3.1.2):

Category I White labels No TI is required.

Category II or III Yellow labels A TI is required on the label displayed on packages,


overpacks and freight containers. For packages the TI is calculated by direct
measurement. For overpacks and freight containers the TIs are assigned one of two ways:
9-46 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

1. by calculation; or
2. by assignment. (5;1.2.3.1.1 a) and b) and 5;1.2.3.1.2)

Note. The TI value must be rounded up to the first decimal place, except 0.05 or less = 0.

Criticality safety index label

CSI
As stated on the certificate of approval for special arrangement, or package design.

Note. Calculating the CSI for fissile material (other than excepted fissile material) in overpacks, freight containers
or aboard an aircraft is done by adding together the CSI assigned to each package.
(5;3.5.1.1 i) and j) and 5;1.2.3.1.3)

Question 5.
How are the radioactive material labels to be displayed?

Two labels must be displayed on opposite sides of a package, small freight container or overpack containing radioactive
material. (5;3.2.6)

Four placards (see Figure 5-27) with a minimum overall dimension of 250 mm X 250 mm must be displayed in a vertical
orientation to each side wall and each end wall of the large freight container or tank. (5;3.6.1)

Cylindrical packages:
If dimensions allow two labels must be centered on opposite points of the circumference and must not overlap.
If dimensions do not allow one label, but it must not overlap itself. (5;3.2.8)

Criticality safety index label must be displayed adjacent to the category label on a package of fissile material (other
than excepted fissile material). (5;3.2.6)

EXERCISE 9-7

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. A Type A package contains 100 GBq of P-32 in


other form and 200 GBq of P-33 in other form.
The transport index of the package is 0.2 and the
surface radiation level is 0.3 mSv/h.

Indicate the category of the label and show how


the label must be marked.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-47

2. 30 TBq of Mo-99 is packed in a Type B(U)


package approved as ZA/NNR1005/ B(U)-96. It is
determined that:

The maximum radiation level at 1 m from the


surface of the package is 0.02 mSv/h.
The maximum surface radiation level is
0.6 mSv/h.

a) What is the transport index (TI) for the


package?

b) What is the category of the package?

3. A non-rigid overpack contains two Type A


packages. Each Type A package contains
Am-241 (non special form). The activity limit and
transport index for each package are as follows:

Package 1: Activity = 1 GBq; TI = 1


Package 2: Activity = 0.4 GBq; TI = 0.3

Indicate the markings and labels required on the


overpack.

4. The following shipment of radioactive material is


offered for transport by air:

From: Brussels, Belgium


To: Montreal, Canada
Content: radioactive material
Radionuclide: Mo-99, liquid, Na2MoO4
Physical form: liquid
Activity: 600 GBq
Transport index: 2
Packages: 1 Type A package
Dimensions: 30 x 30 x 40 cm
Gross weight: 55 kg

Indicate the markings and labels required on the


package.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Documentation

The proper completion of transport documentation is an essential component of the safe transport process, and this
responsibility must not be taken lightly. In signing the dangerous goods transport document, the shipper certifies that the
dangerous goods are:
9-48 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

1) correctly classified;
2) not forbidden for transport by air;
3) correctly identified as shown in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1;
4) packed in accordance with all requirements;
5) in compliance with all applicable special provisions and State variations;
6) in correctly marked and labelled packages, overpacks or freight containers; and
7) correctly documented.

Appendix 9-3 contains the dangerous goods transport document checklist. Use it to assist in the preparation of the
dangerous goods transport document for radioactive material.

Note. See Part 5;4 of the Instructions for the requirements concerning the transfer of the dangerous goods
document from the shipper to the operator and the dangerous goods transport document design.

The following summarizes the information required in the dangerous goods transport document that is unique to
radioactive material, other than excepted packages:

The name and symbol of the radionuclide(s):


For a consignment containing only one radionuclide: the name and symbol of the radionuclide (See Table
2-12).
For a consignment containing mixtures of radionuclides: a general description or list of the most restrictive.
(5;4.1.5.7.1 a))

A description of the physical and chemical form or whether it is special form or low dispersible radioactive material,
where applicable. (5;4.1.5.7.1 b))

The maximum activity or mass, as applicable


Other than fissile radioactive material:
maximum activity during transport in becquerels with appropriate SI prefix (i.e. T = tera = X 1012).
Fissile material:
the mass of fissile material in units of grams or multiples thereof may be used instead of activity.
(5;4.1.5.7.1 c))

Category of package (i.e. I-White, II-Yellow) (5;4.1.5.7.1 d))

Transport index for categories II-Yellow and III-Yellow only. (5;4.1.5.7.1 e))

Criticality safety index for consignment of fissile material, other than excepted fissile material. (5;4.1.5.7.1 f))

Identification mark of each competent authority approval certificate. (5;4.1.5.7.1 g))

If the consignment is made up of:


more than one package; or
packages in an overpack or freight container,
the dangerous goods transport document must show for each package the following information:
UN number
proper shipping name and technical name in brackets
primary hazard class. (5;4.1.5.7.1 h))

Note. If packages from the consignment are to be distributed at different points in the transport chain, the
dangerous goods transport document for the remaining radioactive material packages must accurately reflect the
revised load. (5:4.1.5.7 h))
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-49

The words exclusive use shipment, as applicable. (5;4.1.5.7.1 i))

Total activity of the consignment as a multiple of A2 for LSA-II, LSA-III, SCO-I and SCO-II. (5;4.1.5.7.1 j))

The shipper must also include in the dangerous goods transport document the following instructions (at a minimum) to
the operator and any concerned authority:

a) supplementary requirements for loading, stowage, carriage, handling and unloading of the package, overpack or
freight container including any special stowage provisions for the safe dissipation of heat (see 7;2.9.3.2), or a
statement that no such requirements are necessary;

b) restrictions on the type of aircraft and any necessary routing instructions;

c) emergency arrangements appropriate to the consignment. (5;4.1.5.7.2)

Note. The language of the dangerous goods transport document must be that of the operator and authorities
concerned. (5;4.1.5.7.2)

Note. Where packages travelling between two or more countries require competent authority design or shipment
approval and those approvals differ, the UN number and proper shipping name to be used are determined by the
certificate of the country of origin of design. (5;4.1.5.7.3)

Additional documentation

Note. See 5;4.2 for the requirements concerning the air waybill.

Package design approval certificates, confirming that all applicable requirements have been met and the package has
been prepared in accordance with the provisions of 6;7.22, must be issued by the competent authority for:

specified package designs (5;1.2.2.1 a));


special arrangements (5;1.2.2.1 b)); and
specified shipments (5;1.2.2.1 c) and 5;1.2.1.2).

Note. The package design and shipment approval certificates may be combined into a single certificate. (5;1.2.2.1)

The shipper must have a copy of the certificate of the radioactive package offered for transport. (5;1.2.2.2)

Note. Where a certificate of approval is not required the shipper must be able to produce for inspection
documentary evidence of the compliance of the package design with all the applicable requirements. (5;1.2.2.3)

In addition to the package design approval certificates, there are other types of approvals that may be needed for the
transport of radioactive material. They are:

shipment approvals; (5;1.2.1.2) and


shipment approval by special arrangement. (5;1.2.1.3)
9-50 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 9-8

Referring to the Instructions, indicate which documents are required for the following radioactive material
consignments:

1. A Type A package containing Ir-192 in special


form

2. A Type B(U) package containing Co-60 in special


form

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Notification

Regular Transport

Before the first shipment is sent, the shipper must provide a copy of all applicable package design approval certificates
to the competent authority of each country through or into which the shipment is to be transported. No acknowledgement
is required. (5;1.2.1.4 a))

At least seven days in advance of the shipment, the shipper who intends to offer for transport certain Type C and
Type B(U) and Type B(M) packages or special arrangement packages must notify this intent to the competent authority
of each country through or into which the shipment is to be transported. (5;1.2.1.4 b))

This notice must include specific information about the shipment. (5;1.2.1.4 d))

Where the required information has already been provided in the shipment approval, a notification is not required.
(5;1.2.1.4 c))

Non-compliance

For everyones safety, those in the transportation system must be notified when the radiation level of a package,
overpack or freight container exceeds allowable limits or radiation contamination occurs.

Paragraph 1;6.6 states who must be informed, who must do the informing and when must it occur.

Note. Immediate action must be taken to mitigate consequences and to investigate causes, circumstances and
consequences.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-51

Operators responsibilities

The following text is divided into six sections:

a) Training
b) Employee protection
c) Acceptance procedures Part 7;1
d) Storage and loading Part 7;2
e) Inspection and decontamination Part 7;3
f) Provision of information Part 7;4

Each section highlights only those provisions that apply specifically to the operators responsibility with respect to
radioactive material. Be sure to read the entire text of Part 7 in order to clearly identify all of the operators
responsibilities. (See Unit 7 for instructions on the application of the requirements of Part 7.)

Training 7;2.9.1.2

In addition to the training requirements of Part 1;4 operators are required to provide training to their transport and
storage personnel which includes: training in the hazards associated with the transport of radioactive material and the
precautions to be taken.

Employee protection 7;2.9.1.1

Operators are required to ensure their transport and storage personnel receive no more than the same radiation
exposure as the public, unless arrangements are made with the competent authority to have them classified as radiation
workers.

Acceptance procedures Part 7;1

Appendix 9-4 contains the acceptance procedures checklist. Use it to assist you in conducting an acceptance check on
a shipment of radioactive material.

Should a consignment of radioactive material become undeliverable, place it in a safe location and notify the appropriate
authorities as soon as possible, seeking their direction. (7;1.6)

Note. Only radioactive material, the activity of which does not exceed one-tenth of that listed in Table 2-15
(Activity Limits for Excepted Packages), is acceptable for transport in the mail and then only if the competent post
authority deems it acceptable. (1;2.3)
9-52 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 9-9

Referring to the Instructions, indicate whether an operator should accept the following dangerous goods transport
document:

Shipper: XYZ Co., 123 Smart St.,


Anywhere, Canada, XYZ 123

Consignee: ABC Co., 456 Smarter St.,


Someplace, India, XXX YYY 123

UN 2916, Radioactive material, special form,


Type B(U) package, 7

I-131, liquid, 1 Type B(U) package x 5505 GBq


TI: 1.9

Type B(U) package design approval certificate


F/2008/B(U)S

Passenger and Cargo Aircraft only

I hereby declare that the contents of this


consignment are fully and accurately described
above by the proper shipping name, and are
classified, packaged, marked and labelled/
placarded and are in all respects in proper
condition for transport according to applicable
international and national governmental
regulations. I declare that all of the applicable air
transport requirements have been met.

Shippers signature and date:

Mr. Smith, 1 January 3000

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Storage and loading Part 7;2

Unit 7 provides detailed guidance on the storage and loading provisions of Part 7;2 of the Instructions. Be aware that
among these are ones that relate only to radioactive material and include:

training for loading staff; (7; 4.2 b))


prohibition of radioactive material from transport in a passenger cabin or on the flight deck; (7;2.1.1)
separation distances between persons onboard an aircraft and the radioactive material; (7;2.9.1)
allowable activity limits; (7;2.9.2)
stowage during transport and storage in transit; (7;2.9.3)
separation requirements for packages or overpacks of radioactive material; (7;2.9.3)
segregation of packages containing fissile material; (7;2.9.4)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-53

transport by air; (7;2.9.5)


separation. (7;2.9.6)

EXERCISE 9-10

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions related to the loading of radioactive materials:

1. Can the following package of radioactive material


be loaded?

The height of the package is 65 cm and the TI is


3.8. The height of the cargo compartment from its
floor to the floor of the passenger cabin is 1.25 m.

Explain your answer.

2. Calculate the minimum distance required between


the following groups of radioactive packages:

2.1 0.2 2

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Inspection and decontamination Part 7;3

When a package is damaged or leaking:

restrict access to damaged or leaking package;


have a qualified person assess the extent of contamination and the resultant radiation level of the package. All
other locations and cargo that came in contact with the package must be assessed as well.
when necessary, protect people, property and the environment. (7;3.2.1)

Damaged or leaking packages that no longer meet the conditions of transport may be moved to an acceptable location,
but not be forwarded until repaired or reconditioned and decontaminated. (7;3.2.2)

Aircraft and equipment used for the transport of radioactive material must have their level of contamination checked
regularly. (7;3.2.3)

When non-exclusive use aircraft and equipment become contaminated, they must be decontaminated as soon as
possible by a qualified person and not re-used until then. (7;3.2.4)

Contamination of the internal surfaces of exclusive use overpack, freight container, or aircraft is to be dealt with in
accordance with Paragraph 7;3.2.5.

Provision of information Part 7;4

For emergency response purposes the operator is required to provide specific information about the dangerous goods
on board the aircraft to the pilot-in-command. This is to be done on a designated form and as early as possible before
the departure of an aircraft. (See Unit 7 for instructions on the application the requirements of Part 7;4.)
9-54 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

When radioactive material is to go on board the aircraft the operator must also include in the notice to the pilot-in-
command the following information:

number of packages, overpacks or freight containers, and their:


categories;
TIs, if any; and
exact loading location. (7;4.1.1)

G. RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMME PARAGRAPH 1;6.2

The creation of a radiation protection programme by those involved in the transport of radioactive material is mandatory
for the safety of all. Such a programme is to take into consideration how the radioactive material is to be handled, stored
and transported. It must establish how individual doses and exposure are to be made as low as is achievable and in
every case below the relevant dose limits.

The programme is to establish an effective dose monitoring system for occupational exposure using the following
framework:

between 1 and 6 mSv per year workplace monitoring is required, or


in excess of 6 mSv in a year individual monitoring is required.

1;6.2.4 Note. For occupational exposure arising from transport activities, where it is assessed that the effective
dose is most unlikely to exceed 1 mSv in a year, no special work patterns, detailed monitoring, dose assessment
programmes or individual record-keeping need be required.

The programme must be designed to ensure that records are kept of the results of all individual monitoring. (1;6.2.4)

The programme must also include emergency response provisions such as those found in Planning and Preparing for
Emergency Response to Transport Accidents Involving Radioactive Material, Safety Standard Series No. TS-G-1.2
(ST3), IAEA, Vienna (2002). (1;6.2.5)

Such emergency response provisions must take into account any possible reaction resulting from the exposure of a
radioactive material to the contents of any other consignment or to the environment. (1;6.2.6)

Workers must be trained in radiation hazards and precautions to limit their exposure and that of others. (1;6.2.7)

Note. Programme documents are subject to inspection by the relevant competent authority. (1;6.2.1, 1;6.2.2 and
1.6.2.3)

H. QUALITY ASSURANCE PARAGRAPH 1;6.3

Quality assurance programmes prepared in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 1;6.3 must be established for
the design, manufacture, testing, documentation, use, maintenance and inspection of all special form radioactive
material, low dispersible radioactive material and packages, and for transport and in-transit storage operations. Such
programmes are subject to competent authority inspection. (1;6.3)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-55

I. SECURITY PARAGRAPH 1;6.5

Security training and planning are essential to prevent the misuse of radioactive material. The Convention on Physical
Protection of Nuclear Material and of IAEA INFCIRC/225 (Rev.4) establishes provisions for the secure handling and
transport of high consequence radioactive material (i.e. Class 7 radioactive materials in quantities greater than 3000 A1
(special form) or 3000 A2, as applicable in Type B and Type C packages).
(1;5.4 and Table 1-6)
9-56 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Appendix 9-1.

INDEX OF PART 4;9 OF THE INSTRUCTIONS

Packing Instruction
Class 7 Radioactive Material

4;9.1 General

4;9.2 Requirements and controls for transport of LSA material and SCO

4;9.3 Packages containing fissile material


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-57

Appendix 9-2.

INDEX OF PART 6;7 OF THE INSTRUCTIONS

Requirements for the construction,


testing and approval of
packages and material of Class 7

6;7.1 General requirements

6;7.2 Additional requirements for packages transported by air

6;7.3 Requirements for excepted packages

6;7.4 Requirements for industrial packages

6;7.5 Requirements for packages containing uranium hexafluoride


6;7.6 Requirements for Type A packages

6;7.7 Requirements for Type B(U) packages

6;7.8 Requirements for Type B(M) packages

6;7.9 Requirements for Type C packages

6;7.10 Requirements for packages containing fissile material

6;7.11 Test procedures and demonstration of compliance

6;7.12 Testing the integrity of the containment system and shielding and evaluating criticality safety

6;7.13 Target for drop test

6;7.14 Tests for demonstrating ability to withstand normal conditions of transport

6;7.15 Additional tests for Type A packages designed for liquids and gases

6;7.16 Tests for demonstrating the ability to withstand accident conditions in transport

6;7.17 Enhanced water immersion test for Type B(U) and Type B(M) packages containing more than
105A2, and Type C packages

6;7.18 Water leakage test for packages containing fissile material

6;7.19 Tests for Type C packages

6;7.20 Tests for packagings designed to contain uranium hexafluoride

6;7.21 Approvals of package designs and materials

6;7.22 Registration of serial numbers and validation

6;7.23 Transitional measures for Class 7


9-58 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Appendix 9-3.

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORT DOCUMENT CHECKLIST

Section 1 Name and address of shipper and consignee X Reference in the Instructions

1. Shippers name and address 5;4.1.3

2. Consignees name and address 5;4.1.3

Section 2 Dangerous goods description (Information in


this section must appear in the order specified below.)

3. UN number preceded by the letters UN or ID 8000. Column 2 Table 3-1


5;4.1.4.1 a)

4. Proper shipping name and, where required or applicable: 3;1.2.4


3;1.2.5
the technical name(s) or, where applicable chemical group 3;1.2.7
name, in brackets following the proper shipping name, Column 1 Table 3-1
(Important: Read all of 3;1.2.7 for clarification of this 5;4.1.4.1 b)
requirement.) 5;4.1.4.3 a), b), c) and d)
in the case of explosives, the commercial or military name Note 2 and Note 3 of 5;4.1.4.2
may be added following the proper shipping name.
the words Empty uncleaned or Residue last contained
before or after the proper shipping name,
the word Waste preceding the proper shipping name, unless
already included in the proper shipping name
the word molten added to the proper shipping name,
(Additional reference is found in 3;1.2.4.)
the word stabilized added to the proper shipping name,
(Additional reference is found in 3;1.2.5.)

Note. Additional descriptive text in the entries in Column 1


of the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1 may be used with the
proper shipping name.

5. Primary Class or Division and, for explosives, the Compatibility Column 3 Table 3-1
Group. (The words Class or Division may appear before the 5;4.1.4.1 c)
primary class or division.)

6. Subsidiary hazard Class(es) or Division(s) in brackets. (The Column 4 Table 3-1


words Class or Division may appear before the subsidiary 5;4.1.4.1 d)
class or division.)

7. Packing Group, where applicable. (The letters PG may appear Column 8 Table 3-1
before the packing group.) 5;4.1.4.1 e)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-59

Section 3 Additional information about the dangerous


goods

8. For a consignment of one item of dangerous goods indicate: 5;4.1.5.1

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note.
The packaging specification code may only appear on a
dangerous goods transport document as a supplement to the
description of the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume
or mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L

For a consignment of dangerous goods with different proper


shipping names, UN numbers or packing groups indicate for
each the:

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note.
The packaging specification code may only appear on a
dangerous goods transport document as a supplement to the
description of the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume
or mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L
UN 1299, Turpentine, 3, PG III, 1 fibreboard box, 1 L

9. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous 5;4.1.5.1


goods and the same quantity per package you may replace the
net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L

10. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous 5;4.1.5.1


goods, but different quantities per package you may replace
the net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:
9-60 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package of


each separate quantity.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 10
fibreboard boxes X 10 L

11. For a consignment of empty, uncleaned packages you may 5;1.6


replace the net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the: 5;4.1.5.1 a)
5;4.1.4.3 b)
number and type of packagings.

Example:
UN 1263, Residue last contained Paint, 3, PG II 1 fibreboard box

12. For a consignment of Chemical kits or First aid kits you may 5;4.1.5.1 b)
replace the net quantity per package with the:

the total net mass of dangerous goods.

(Note. Where the kits contain solids and/or liquids, the net mass
of liquids within the kits is to be calculated on a 1 to 1 basis of
their volume, i.e. 1 litre equal to 1 kilogram.)

Example:
UN 3316, Chemical kit, 9, 1 Fibreboard box, 1 L

13. For a consignment of dangerous goods in machinery or 5;4.1.5.1 c)


apparatus replace the net quantity per package with the:

individual total quantities of dangerous goods in solid, liquid


or gaseous state, contained in the article

Example:
UN 3363, Dangerous Goods in Apparatus, 9, 1 wooden box X
Liquid 0.5 L, Solid 1 kg

14. For a consignment of dangerous goods contained in a salvage 5;1.5


packaging replace the net quantity of dangerous goods per 5;4.1.5.1 d)
package with an: 5;4.1.5.3

estimate of the quantity of dangerous goods.

Note. The words Salvage package must be shown at the end


of the description.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 Fibreboard box, 1 L, Salvage
Package

15. For a consignment of a substance of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-61

net mass or volume for the substance.

Example:
UN3291, Medical waste, n.o.s., 6.2, PG II, 1 fibreboard box X
45 kg

16. For a consignment of an article of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:

gross mass, followed by the letter G

Example:
UN 3166, Vehicle, flammable liquid powered, 9, 55 kg G

(Note. In this example the article is not in a package, therefore


no information regarding the kind of package is shown on the
dangerous goods transport document.)

17. For a consignment of limited quantities (See Part 3;4 for 5;4.1.5.2
provisions concerning limited quantities and Unit 10 associated
training material.)

18. Chemical oxygen generators shipped in accordance with 5;4.1.5.4


Special Provision A 144:

add the statement Aircrew protective breathing equipment


(smoke hood) in accordance with Special Provision A 144

Example:
UN 3356, Oxygen generator, chemical, 5.1, PG II, 1 fibreboard
box X 2 kg G, Aircrew protective breathing equipment (smoke
hood) in accordance with Special Provision A 144.

19. For a consignment of self-reactive substances or organic 2;4.2.3.2.5


peroxides where approval is required: 2;5.3.2.5
5;4.1.5.5
add a statement indicating that such an approval has been
issued.

Note. A copy of the classification approval and conditions of


transport for non-listed organic peroxides and self-reactive
substances must be attached to the dangerous goods transport
document.

Example:
UN 3110, Organic Peroxide type F, solid
(Phthalimidoperoxyhexanoic acid 88%), 5.2, 1 fibreboard box x 5
kg, approval C-OPS/KV/2008-06-01 attached
9-62 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

20. For a consignment of Samples of new formulations of an 2; 5.3.2.6


Organic Peroxide not listed in 2;5.3.2.4 (Table 2-7) or a self- 2;4.2.3.2.6
reactive substance not listed in Table 2-6: 5;4.1.5.5.2

add a statement indicating that a sample of a new formulation


of an organic peroxide or a self-reactive substance is being
transported.

Example:
UN 3224, Self-reactive solid, Type C (sample of a new
formulation), 4.1, 1 plywood box X 0.5 kg

21 For a consignment of Infectious substances or controlled 5;4.1.5.6


substances (See Unit 8 of this manual for a consolidation of the
infectious substance requirements.)

22 For a consignment of Radioactive Material (See Unit 9 of this 5;4.1.5.7


manual for a consolidation of the radioactive material
requirements.)

Section 4 Additional requirements

23. The designation for the applicable packing instruction. 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 351 (See new
packing instruction assigned this substance for carriage on
passenger aircraft.)

24. When applicable, reference to Special Provision A1, A2 or A109 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)


(except for radioactive material).

25. A statement the shipment is within the limitations for either 5;4.1.5.8.1 b)
passenger and cargo aircraft or cargo-only aircraft, as
appropriate.
(Read the Note in the Instructions located at the end of this
reference.)

26. When applicable, special handling information. 5;4.1.5.8.1 c)

27. When applicable, an indication that an overpack has been used. 5;4.1.5.8.1 d)

28. When applicable, the Q value rounded up to the first decimal 5;4.1.5.8.1 e)
place. 3;4.3.3 or 4;1.1.8 e)

29. When an explosive is being shipped in accordance with Packing 5;4.1.5.8.2


Instruction 101, the State of authorizations distinguishing sign for
motor vehicles in international traffic following the words:

Packaging authorized by the competent authority of

Note. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_international_license_plate_co
des#U)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-63

for a listing of the international vehicle registration codes, but be


aware that this is not a complete list and some countries do not
use what they register.

30. When a self-reactive substance of Division 4.1 or an organic 5;4.1.5.8.3


peroxide of Division 5.2 or substance with similar properties are
being shipped, a statement indicating

the packages must be protected from direct sunlight and all


sources of heat and be placed in adequately ventilated areas.

Section 5 Certification

31. The following statement: 5;4.1.6.1 and


Note. The word placarded is
I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment are fully not essential for shipments by air.
and accurately described above by the proper shipping name, and
are classified, packaged, marked and labelled/placarded, and are
in all respects in proper condition for transport according to
applicable international and national governmental regulations. I
declare that all of the applicable air transport requirements have
been met.

32. The signature of the shipper and the date. 5;4.1.6.1


5;4.1.6.2
Note 1. Signatures on faxed documents are acceptable in some
States. Always verify with the competent State authority.

Note 2. When transmitting the dangerous goods transport


electronically the name of the shipper, typed in upper case,
replaces the hand written signature required on a paper document
(5;4.1.6.2).
9-64 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Appendix 9-4.

ACCEPTANCE PROCEDURES CHECKLIST

Acceptance Procedures Checklist Yes No Reference in the


(to be used only by trained acceptance staff.) Instructions

1. Document . Are there two copies of the document? 7;1.2.1 a)


5;4

OR

2. Document. Has the information on the consignment been provided 7;1.2.1 b)


electronically? 5;4

OR

3. Document. Has the information been provided by permitted 7; 1.2.1. c)


alternative documentation?

4. Information on document. Does the documentation/electronic data 7;1.3.1 a)


include all of the required information? 5;4

5. Match quantity shown on document with type of aircraft. Is the 7;1.3.1 b)


quantity of dangerous goods shown on the document within the limits Table 3-1
of the type of aircraft to be used (i.e. passenger or cargo)?

6. Visibility of marking. Is the marking on the package, overpack or 7;1.3.1 c)


freight container visible? 5;2

7. Match markings to document information. Do the markings on the 7;1.3.1 c)


package, overpack or freight container agree with the information
provided in the document?

8. Packaging specification marking: Is the letter (X,Y,Z ) in the 7;1.3.1 d)


packaging specification marking, and does it designate the packing Table 3-1
group for which the design type was tested appropriate for the 6;2
dangerous goods contained in the package? (Note. Overpacks do
not show specification marking.)

9. Overpack. When the dangerous goods are in an overpack, are the 7;1.3.1 e)
proper shipping name(s), UN number(s), label(s) and special handling 5;2
instructions clearly visible or, if not, are they reproduced on the 5;3
overpack?

10. Labelling. Do the label(s) conform to the labelling requirements of 7;1.3.1 f)


Part 5;3? 5;3

11. Outer packaging. Does the description of the outer packaging in the 7;1.3.1 g)
document match the outer packaging offered for transport and is it Part 4
allowed in the packing instruction? Packing Instructions

12. Segregation. Does the package or overpack contain dangerous 7;1.3.1 h) and Table
goods that should be segregated? 7-1
(See below for more information on segregation.)

13. Damage. Is the package, overpack, freight container or unit load 7;1.3.1 i)
device leaking?
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Unit 9. Radioactive material 9-65

14. Damage. Is there any indication that the package, overpack, freight 7;1.3.1 i)
container or unit load device has been damaged to the extent that its
integrity is affected?

15. Overpack. If the overpack contains packages with the label Cargo 7;1.3.1 j)
Aircraft Only:
Are the packages arranged so that they are clearly visible and
easily accessible?
OR
Does 7;2.4.1 allow them to be inaccessible?
OR
Is there only one package contained in the overpack?

16. Freight container. Does the freight container contain only radioactive 7;1.4.1 a), b), c) and
material? (see 6;7.1) d)

17. Unit load device or pallet. Does the unit load device or pallet contain 7;1.4.1 b, c) and d)
only:
Consumer Commodities (Packing Instruction 910);
OR
Dry Ice as a refrigerant (Packing Instruction 904);
OR
Magnetized Material?

Note 1. Unlike the shipper, the operator is permitted to place


other dangerous goods in a unit load device.

Note 2. Be sure to check Attachment 4 of the Instructions to


identify the new packing instructions assigned to consumer
commodities and dry ice.

Should a checkmark appear under the No column adjacent to any of the entries in the checklist, the
dangerous goods consignment is to be rejected.

______________________
UNIT 10

Dangerous Goods in Limited Quantities and


Dangerous Goods in Excepted Quantities
Note. This unit is not a substitute for the Instructions, but may be used together with the Instructions to
facilitate understanding of that text.

Table of Contents
A. Training Subject Matter and Category of Personnel Unit 10 ....................................................................... 10-2
B. Goal Unit 10 ................................................................................................................................................ 10-2
C. Introduction...................................................................................................................................................... 10-2
D. Dangerous Goods in Limited Quantities Part 3;4 ........................................................................................ 10-3
E. Dangerous Goods in Excepted Quantities Part 3;5 .................................................................................... 10-21
Appendix 10-1. Assigning the Y Packing Instruction ........................................................................................... 10-33
Appendix 10-2 (Appendix 4-1). Checklist for the identification of the new Packing
Instructions in the 20092010 edition of the Instructions ................................................................................. 10-35
Appendix 10-3. Colour-coded Packing Instruction Y370 ....................................................................................... 10-37
Appendix 10-4. Segregation TableTable 7-1 ..................................................................................................... 10-39
Appendix 10-5. Dangerous Goods Transport Document Checklist ....................................................................... 10-40

10-1
10-2 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

A. TRAINING SUBJECT MATTER AND CATEGORY OF PERSONNEL UNIT 10

Subject Matter: General requirements for shippers


Category of personnel:
shippers and persons undertaking the responsibilities of shippers
staff of freight forwarders involved in processing dangerous goods
operators and ground handling agents staff accepting dangerous goods.

B. GOAL UNIT 10

After study of this unit, the student should be able to evaluate whether the limited quantities and excepted quantities
provisions of Part 3 of the Instructions have been correctly applied.

With reference to the Instructions, the student will be able to:

a) state where to find meanings for words and terms used in Part 3;4 and 3;5;

b) state where to find in the Instructions information pertinent to the application of the requirements of Part 3;4 and
3;5;

c) demonstrate how to extract the dangerous goods description from Table 3-1;

d) demonstrate how to extract the relevant transport information for limited quantities and excepted quantities from
Table 3-1;

e) demonstrate how to choose an appropriate packaging for a limited quantity or excepted quantity dangerous
good;

f) demonstrate how to mark and, where applicable, label a package or overpack of limited quantities or excepted
quantities; and

g) demonstrate how to complete a document that accompanies a consignment of limited quantities and, where
applicable, a document accompanying a consignment of excepted quantities.

C. INTRODUCTION

Note. References to packing instructions in this unit mean the new packing instructions found in Attachment 4 of
the Instructions.

The Instructions establish three levels of regulation for dangerous goods to be transported on board an aircraft:

1. Those subject to the full provisions of the Instructions for which no exception applies (e.g. Picric acid, wetted,
UN 1344; Corrosive Solid, Toxic, n.o.s., UN 2923, Packing Group I);

2. Those subject to partial provisions within the Instructions (e.g. limited quantities, excepted quantities, and
dangerous goods carried by passengers and crew in carry-on or checked baggage);
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-3

3. Those not subject to the provisions of the Instructions (e.g. dangerous goods transported in accordance with
the airworthiness requirements or operating regulations (e.g. fire extinguishers, smoke hoods, etc., necessary
for the safe operation of the aircraft); aerosols, alcoholic beverages, perfumes, colognes, safety matches,
liquefied gas lighters for use or sale during flight; and dry ice intended for use in food and beverage service.)

This unit looks at how to safely prepare and transport, subject to the partial provisions in the Instructions:

dangerous goods in limited quantities; and


dangerous goods in excepted quantities.

Note. See Part 8 of the Instructions for provisions concerning passengers and crew and Unit 12 of this manual for
training material on that part.

D. DANGEROUS GOODS IN LIMITED QUANTITIES PART 3;4

Introduction

3;4 Note. The UN Recommendations contain provisions for limited quantities of dangerous goods. These
recognize that many dangerous goods when in reasonably limited quantities present a reduced hazard during
transport and can safely be carried in good quality packagings of the types specified in the Recommendations but
which have not been tested and marked accordingly.

The Limited Quantity provisions in Part 3;4 are based on those in the UN Recommendations and allow limited
quantities of dangerous goods to be transported in packagings which, although not tested and marked in accordance
with Part 6 of these Instructions, do meet the construction requirements of that part.

The following nine-step process will aid in the identification and preparation of those dangerous goods that can be
transported as limited quantities in accordance with Part 3;4 of the Instructions.

Action

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the limited quantity provisions.

Step 2 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions.

Step 3 Using the information in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 answer the following two questions:
i) Is the item of dangerous goods you wish to offer for transport listed by proper shipping name in
Table 3-1?
ii) Based on the information provided in the list adjacent to your entry, can it be transported as a
Limited Quantity?

Step 4 If the item can be transported as a limited quantity, determine the requirements of the appropriate
packing instruction.

Step 5 Evaluate which of the general packing requirements relate to your packaging and determine if they have
been met. (Parts 4;3-11).
10-4 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Step 6 Evaluate which of the following provisions from Part 3;4 apply to your packaging:
packing and packagings;
quantity limitations and inner packagings of different dangerous goods packed together; and
package testing.

Step 7 Choose the most appropriate packagings for your item of dangerous goods

Step 8 Choose and apply the appropriate package marking and labelling.

Step 9 Prepare the dangerous goods transport document.

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the limited quantity provisions.

Exercise 10-1 will help you learn much of the vocabulary necessary to understand the Instructions associated with the
Limited Quantity provisions. Remember, if in doubt, always check the Instructions for definitions, particularly Part 1 and
Attachment 2.

Note. If the Instructions do not provide a definition for a word or term, the dictionary definition applies.

EXERCISE 10-1

Referring to Part 1 and 2 of the Instructions, identify the word or words that best match the definition or description
provided below:

1. An aircraft that carries any person other than a crew


member, an operators employee in an official capacity, an
authorized representative of an appropriate national
authority or a person accompanying a consignment or
other cargo.

2. Non-refillable receptacles meeting the requirements of


6;3.2.7, made of metal, glass or plastic and containing a
gas, compressed, liquefied or dissolved under pressure,
with or without a liquid, paste or powder, and fitted with a
release device allowing the contents to be ejected as solid
or liquid particles in suspension in a gas, as a foam, paste
or powder or in a liquid state or in a gaseous state.

3. For packing purposes, substances other than those of


Classes 1, 2 and 7, Divisions 5.2 and 6.2 and other than
self-reactive substances of Division 4.1 are assigned to
three packing groups in accordance with the degree of
danger they present.
Packing Group I: Substances presenting high danger.
Packing Group II: Substances presenting medium
danger.
Packing Group III: Substances presenting low
danger.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-5

4. Substances which, by chemical action, will cause severe


damage when in contact with living tissue or, in the case
of leakage, will materially damage, or even destroy, other
goods or the means of transport.

5. Any aircraft, other than a passenger aircraft, which is


carrying goods or property.

6. A combination of packagings for transport purposes,


consisting of one or more inner packagings secured in an
outer packaging in accordance with the relevant
provisions of Part 4.

7. Packagings which do not require any inner packaging to


perform their containment function during transport.

8. Packagings consisting of an outer packaging and an inner


receptacle so constructed that the inner receptacle and
the outer packaging form an integral packaging. Once
assembled, it remains thereafter an integrated single unit;
it is filled, stored, transported and emptied as such.

9. Packagings for which an outer packaging is required for


transport.

10. The outer protection of a composite or combination


packaging together with any absorbent materials,
cushioning and any other components necessary to
contain and protect inner receptacles or inner packagings.

11. The total mass of the package.

12. Articles or substances which are capable of posing a risk


to health, safety, property or the environment and which
are shown in the list of dangerous goods in these
Instructions, or which are classified according to these
Instructions.

13. One or more packages of dangerous goods accepted by


an operator from one shipper at one time and at one
address, receipted for in one lot and moving to one
consignee at one destination address.

14. One or more receptacles and any other components or


materials necessary for the receptacles to perform their
containment and other safety functions.

15. The complete product of the packing operation, consisting


of the packaging and its contents prepared for transport.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


10-6 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Step 2 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions.

It is important to note that, unless otherwise specified in Part 3;4 of the Instructions, limited quantities are to be
prepared for transport as any other article or substance of dangerous goods. (3;4.1.1)

Exercise 10-2 assists you in determining where to find the relevant linkages with other parts of the Instructions.

EXERCISE 10-2

Referring to the Table of Contents in the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. In which chapter of the Instructions are the training requirements


found?

2. In which part of the Instructions are the characteristics of the nine


classes of dangerous goods found?

3. In which part of the Instructions is the list of dangerous goods found?

4. In which part of the Instructions are the packing instructions found?

5. In which chapter of the Instructions are the package marking, other


than package specification marking, requirements found?

6. In which chapter of the Instructions are the labelling requirements


found?

7. In which chapter of the Instructions are the documentation


requirements found?

8. In which paragraph of the Instructions are the requirements for


packagings other than inner packagings found?

9. In which paragraph of the Instructions are the requirements for inner


packagings found?

10. In which chapter of the Instructions are the provisions for dangerous
goods carried by passengers or crew found?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 3 Using the information in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 answer the following two questions:
i) Is the item of dangerous goods you wish to offer for transport listed by proper shipping name
in Table 3-1?
ii) Based on the information provided in the list adjacent to your entry, can it be transported as a
Limited Quantity?

There are two easy steps to using the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, as it applies to the transport of limited
quantities:
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-7

a) Locate the description of the dangerous goods in Columns 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 of the list, Table 3-1 (i.e. proper
shipping name, UN number, primary class or division and subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and packing group);
and

b) Extract from Columns 5, 6, 7, 10 and 11 the relevant information required to prepare an item of dangerous
goods for transport as a limited quantity.

a) Locate the description of the dangerous goods in Columns 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 of the list, Table 3-1 (i.e. proper
shipping name, UN number, primary class or division and subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and packing
group).

Following the application of the Part 2 Classification provisions of the Instructions, you are now equipped with the
primary and, where applicable, subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and packing group for your item of dangerous goods.
The next phase of the process is to match the hazardous characteristics of your item of dangerous goods with the most
appropriate entry in Table 3-1 of the Instructions.

Note 1. See Part 2 of the Instructions for the classification requirements, and Unit 2 of this manual for training
material on that part. Also see Part 3 of the Instructions for the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1, and Unit 3 of this
manual for training material on that part.

Note 2. To locate the appropriate proper shipping name for any UN number, see Attachment 1, Chapter 1 of the
Instructions.

Exercise 10-3 will help to learn how to navigate through the information found in Table 3-1.

EXERCISE 10-3

Referring to Table 3-1 of the Instructions, place the letter adjacent to the
following headings in the appropriate column of the table shown below:

A. Special provisions

B. Excepted quantity

C. Name

D. Subsidiary risk

E. State variations

F. UN No.

G. Labels

H. Cargo aircraft

I. Class or division

J. Passenger aircraft

K. Max. net quantity per package

L. Packing instruction

M. UN packing group

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


10-8 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Note. Should the word FORBIDDEN appear in Columns 2 and 3 adjacent to the proper shipping name you have
chosen, that dangerous goods article or substance is forbidden for transport by air. Should the word FORBIDDEN
appear in Columns 10 and 11, or both 10 and 11 and 12 and 13, the item of dangerous goods is forbidden from
transport on a passenger aircraft or both passenger aircraft and cargo aircraft.

b) Extract from Columns 5, 6, 7, 10 and 11 the relevant information required to prepare an item of dangerous
goods for transport as a limited quantity.

Once an entry in Table 3-1 has been chosen, use a ruler to line-up the proper shipping name, UN number and packing
group with the corresponding information in Column 10, which establishes whether it can be transported as a limited
quantity.

Only those dangerous goods with a Y packing instruction number in Column 10 of Table 3-1 are permitted for
transport as a limited quantity and then only if they comply with that packing instruction and the provisions of
Part 3;4 of the Instructions.

See Appendix 10-1 for the rationale used to assign the limited quantity packing instructions to specific classes/divisions
and, where appropriate, packing groups.

Note. The new packing instructions in Attachment 4 of the Instructions will be used in all of the examples,
exercises and tests found in this unit. See Appendix 10-2 for an explanation of how to identify the appropriate packing
instruction for each entry and, where applicable, their packing group in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1.

Example:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN Quantity Quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
N-Methylaniline 2294 6.1 Toxic III E1 655 60 L 663 220 L
Y642 2L

As indicated in the above example from Table 3-1, the limited quantity packing instruction for N-Methylaniline, Packing
Group III, is Y642, with maximum net quantity per package of 2 litres.

Note 1. A packaging prescribed in a limited quantity packing instruction may be used for either passenger or
cargo aircraft. (3;4.1.3 and 3;2.1.1 Note 2)

Note 2. Remember some entries in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 may have:

i) more than one packing group. Be sure to determine which packing group applies so that you can correctly
identify the appropriate Y packing instruction and maximum net quantity per package; or
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-9

ii) a State variation or special provision that affects the limited quantity provisions.

EXERCISE 10-4

Referring to Table 3-1 of the Instructions, state which of the following dangerous goods may be transported as a
limited quantity and then, when applicable, state the letter and numbers of the relevant new packing instruction, the
maximum net quantity per package and the type of label to be displayed on the package.

1. Iron chloride solution

Yes ___ No ___

Packing Instruction:
Maximum net quantity per package:
Label:

2. Natural gas,
compressed with
high methane content

Yes ___ No ___


Packing Instruction:
Maximum net quantity per package:
Label:

3. Hexaldehyde

Yes ___ No ___

Packing Instruction:
Maximum net quantity per package:
Label:

4. Trimethylamine,
aqueous solution,
not more than 50%
trimethylamine, by
mass, Packing
Group I Packing Instruction:
Maximum net quantity per package:
Yes ___ No ___ Label:

5. Vinyl isobutyl ether,


stabilized

Yes ___ No ___


Packing Instruction:
Maximum net quantity per package:
Label:

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.


10-10 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

STEP 4 If the item can be transported as a limited quantity, determine the requirements of the appropriate
packing instruction.

Each limited quantity packing instruction has a common look to the information presented.

Refer to Appendix 10-3 Colour-coded Packing Instruction Y370, of this unit to see how the following description of
limited quantity packing instructions applies:

1. The packing instruction is headed by the packing instruction number or numbers, for example,

a) Packing Instruction Y370; or


b) Packing Instructions Y440-Y443.

2. Next is the heading Limited quantities immediately followed by an indication of the type of aircraft suitable for
the transport of the limited quantity, for example,

a) Passenger aircraft and cargo aircraft;


b) Passenger and cargo aircraft for specific dangerous goods (e.g. UN 1888 only). The applicable packing
group(s) may also be shown here with the UN number.

3. The next section General requirements establishes the connection between the packing instruction and the
general requirements of Part 4; 1. (Note. The exceptions to Part 4;1 are also listed here, see below for an
explanation.)

The link to the limited quantity requirements in Part 3;4 is also included here.

4. The table following the General requirements is divided into two headings Combination Packagings and
Single Packagings. Entry to this table is through the left column either by:

a) Packing instruction number and packing group (e.g. Packing Instruction Y474, Packing Group II);
b) Packing condition (e.g. Activator (Organic peroxide) for UN 3269 Packing Group II or III only); or
c) UN number and proper shipping name (e.g. UN 1228, Mercaptans, liquid, flammable, toxic, n.o.s.).

Under the heading Combination Packagings are found the details on the:

a) acceptable inner packaging;


b) inner packaging quantity (per receptacle);
c) total quantity per package; and
d) total gross mass per package.

Adjacent to the columns associated with combination packagings is a separate column for single packagings,
which shows the word No.

THE USE OF SINGLE PACKAGINGS IS NOT PERMITTED FOR LIMITED QUANTITIES. (3;4.2.3)

5. Additional packing requirements for combination packaging are directly after the table. Here you will find
information such as:

ADDITIONAL PACKING REQUIREMENTS FOR COMBINATION PACKAGINGS


The components may be placed in the same outer packaging provided that they will not interact dangerously in the
event of leakage (see 4;1.1.7).
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-11

6. The next table is headed by the words Outer packagings of combination packagings (see 6;3.1). Located
here is information on the types of outer packagings that can be used in a combination packaging, for example,

Boxes Drums

Aluminium Aluminium
Fibreboard Fibre
Natural Wood Other metal

Note 1. The Y packing instructions for limited quantity dangerous goods do not display the packaging code for
outer packagings as is found in the other packing instructions. This is because the provisions in Part 6 of the
Instructions associated with the assignment of that code do not apply. (3;4.2.1)

Note 2. It is the exclusive responsibility of the shipper to ensure that the inner packagings used are permitted in
the relevant packing instruction and that the general packing requirements (quantity limitations, cushioning, absorbent
material, etc.) have been met.

EXERCISE 10-5

Referring to the packing instructions in Part 4, and, assuming all of the appropriate requirements of Part 4 and Part
3;4 have been met, indicate whether the packaging described for the following items of dangerous goods is suitable
to meet the limited quantity requirements.

1. 4-Methoxy-4-methylpentan-2-one, UN 2293 Combination Packaging


Inner packaging Two 5-litre plastic inner packagings
Outer packaging one fibreboard box

2. Waste Aerosols, flammable, UN 1950


Combination Packaging
Inner Packaging 500 mL IP.7 Non-refillable metal aerosol, internal
pressure 1000 kPa
Outer Packaging Plastic box

3. Tellurium compound, n.o.s., UN 3284, Packing Group I


Combination Packaging
Inner Packaging Eight .5 kg metal inner packagings
Outer Packaging 4 kg Plywood Drum

4. Chloroform, UN 1888, Packing Group III


Combination Packaging
Inner Packaging: Five 0.1 L glass inner packaging
Outer Packaging: 2 kg gross mass Fibreboard box
10-12 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

5. Kerosene, UN 1223, Packing Group III


Single Packaging Aluminium jerrican

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 5 Evaluate which of the general packing requirements relate to your packaging and determine if they
have been met. (Parts 4;3-11)

Each of the relevant limited quantity packing instructions found in Part 4 of the Instructions begins with the following text:

General requirements

Part 4, Chapter 1 requirements must be met (except that 4;1.1.2, 1.1.8 c), 1.1.8 e) and 1.1.16 do not apply).

Note. Also see 3;4.2, which duplicates the above text.

This means that all of the general packing requirements of Part 4;1.1 apply, except for the following four references:

Reference number Summary of those requirements that do not apply to limited quantities.

4;1.1.2 New, remanufactured, reused or reconditioned packagings listed in Table 6-2 and 6-3 of
the Instructions must comply with the requirements of Part 6 Packaging Nomenclature,
Marking, Requirements and Tests.

4;1.1.8 c) Outer packaging may contain more than one item of dangerous goods provided that:
the package as prepared for shipment meets the specification performance tests for the
most restrictive packing group of a substance or article contained in the package.

4;1.1.8 e) Q value calculation for quantities of different dangerous goods contained in one outer
packaging. (See 3;4.3 for the calculation of Q values relevant to limited quantities.)

4;1.1.16 Hydraulic pressure test and mark.

The following can be used as a guide to help in locating those provisions of Part 4;1.1 General Packing Requirements
that apply to any given packaging to contain limited quantities.

References
Part 4;1 Summary of those requirements that do apply to limited quantities.

4;1.1.1 Dangerous goods must be packed in good quality packagings, constructed and closed in
accordance with the instructions from the manufacturer to prevent loss of contents. No dangerous
goods residue is permitted on the outside of the package.

4; 1.1.3 Compatibility requirements between the item of dangerous goods and all components of the
packagings.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-13

Note. It is important to note that it is the shippers responsibility to ensure


compatibility between the packaging and the dangerous goods it is to contain. Only the
shipper knows the specific product formulation.

4;1.1.4 Closure requirements.

4; 1.1.5 Filling requirements for packagings of liquids.

4; 1.1.6 and 4; Pressure differential requirements for inner packagings of liquids.


1.1.6.1

4; 1.1.7 to 4; Requirements regarding the packing of dangerous goods in one package of dangerous goods or
1.1.8, except dangerous goods with other goods.
4;1.1.8 c)
and e)

4; 1.1.9 Requirements regarding the packing, securing, cushioning and orientation of inner packaging in
an outer packaging.

4; 1.1.9.1 Types and sizes of inner packagings permitted in an outer packaging without additional testing.

4; 1.1.10 to 4; Absorbent material requirements.


1.10.2

4;1.1.11 Prohibition of the use of packagings that generate heat through friction or alter the stability of their
contents.

4;1.1.12 Venting prohibition.

4;1.1.13 Package orientation for combination packagings containing liquid dangerous goods.

4;1.1.14 Minimum packaging size.

4;1.1.15 Treatment of an empty packaging that has contained dangerous goods.

4;1.1.17 Requirements regarding solids that may become liquid at temperatures encountered during
transport. (See 4;2.5)

4;1.1.19 Closure requirements for packagings intended to contain wetted or diluted substances.

EXERCISE 10-6

Referring to the general packing requirements of Part 4;1, state whether the following statements are True or False.

1. Venting of packagings to reduce internal pressure, which may develop by the evolution of gas from the contents,
is permitted for air transport.

True ____ False ____

2. Where an outer packaging of a combination packaging has been successfully tested with different types of inner
packagings, a variety of such different inner packagings may also be assembled in this outer packaging or large
packaging.

True ____ False ____


10-14 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

3. Absorbent material used with Classes 3, 4 or 8 or Division 5.1, 5.2 or 6.1 must not react dangerously with the
liquid.

True ____ False ____

4. Dangerous goods may be packed together in the same outer packaging with dangerous goods or other goods if
when mixed they cause the formation of unstable substances.

True ____ False ____

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 6 Evaluate which of the following provisions from Part 3;4 apply to your packaging:
packing and packagings 3;4.2,
quantity limitations and inner packagings of different dangerous goods packed together 3;4.3, and
package testing 3;4.4.

Packing and packagings 3;4.2

In addition to the combination packaging requirements specified in the Y packing instructions, the following provisions
apply:

All packaging, including closures, cushioning and absorbent materials used more than once must be thoroughly
inspected to ensure they are capable of performing as efficiently as if new. (3;4.2.2)

Inner packagings must conform to the construction and, where specified, the test requirements of 6;3.2.
(3;4.2.5)

Outer packagings must conform to the construction requirements of 6;3.1 which apply to the type of outer
packaging to be used for the article or substance. (3;4.2.5)

Quantity limitations 3;4.3

Gross mass per package of limited quantities:

No more than 30 kilograms

Inner packagings of different dangerous goods packed together 3;4.3

Inner packagings of different dangerous goods may be packed together in the same outer packaging provided they meet
the requirements of 3;4.3.3.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-15

3;4.3.3 When different dangerous goods are contained in one outer packaging, the quantities of such dangerous
goods must be so limited that:

a) for classes other than Classes 2 and 9, the total net quantity in the package does not exceed the value of 1,
where Q is calculated using the formula:

n1 n2 n
Q= + + 3 +
M1 M2 M3

where n1, n2, etc., are the net quantities of the different dangerous goods and M1, M2, etc., are the maximum
net quantities for these different dangerous goods shown in Table 3-1 against the relevant Y packing
instructions; and

b) for Classes 2 and 9:

1) when packed together without goods of other classes, the gross mass of the package does not
exceed 30 kg; or

2) when packed together with goods of other classes, the gross mass of the package does not exceed
30 kg and the total net quantity in the package of goods other than in Classes 2 or 9 does not exceed
the value of 1 when calculated according to a) above.

c) carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), UN 1845 may be packed together with goods of other classes, provided that
the gross mass of the package does not exceed 30 kg. The quantity of dry ice does not need to be taken
into account in the calculation of the Q value. However, the packaging containing the carbon dioxide, solid
(dry ice) and the outer packaging must permit the release of carbon dioxide gas.

Inner packagings of different dangerous goods with the same UN number, packing group and physical state may be
packed together in the same outer packaging provided they meet the requirements of 3;4.3.4.

3;4.3.4 Where the different dangerous goods in the outer packaging consist only of those with the same UN
number, packing group and physical state (i.e. solid or liquid), the calculation in 3;4.3.3 a) does not need to be made.
However, the total net quantity in the package must not exceed the maximum net quantity according to Table 3-1.

Note. The segregation Table 7-1 will assist in identifying those dangerous goods that require segregation from
each other. (7;1.3.1 h)) (See Appendix 10-4 Segregation Table Table 7-1.)
10-16 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

EXERCISE 10-7

Referring to the requirements of 3;4.3.3, state whether the following limited quantity dangerous goods may be
transported together in the same package. Explain how you reached your conclusion.

1. 0.5 litre inner packaging of Hydrocarbons, liquid, n.o.s.,


UN 3295, Class 3, Packing Group III.
with
0.5 litre inner packaging of Phenolates, liquid, UN 2904,
Class 8, Packing Group III.
with
2 kilograms of Carbon dioxide, solid, UN 1945, Class 9

Total gross mass of package is 4 kilograms.

Yes _____ No _____

2. 6 inner packagings of Environmentally hazardous


substance, liquid, n.o.s.* UN 3082, Class 9 weighing
2 kilograms each.
with
7 inner packagings of Environmentally hazardous
substance, solid, n.o.s.* UN 3077, Class 9 weighing
5 kilograms each.

Yes _____ No _____

3. 10 Aerosols, non-flammable, UN 1950, Division 2.2,


weighing 0.5 kilograms each.
with
20 Aerosols, non-flammable, containing substances in
Division 6.1, Packing Group III and
substances in Class 8, Packing Group III, UN 1950,
Division 2.2, weighing 0.5 kilograms each.

Yes _____ No _____

4. 12 plastic inner packagings of 2-Bromobutane, UN 2339,


Class 3, Packing Group II, weighing .5 litres each.
with
12 plastic inner packagings of 1-Bromo-3-chloropropane
2688, PG III Class 6.1 weighing 1 Litre each.

Total gross mass of package is 20 kilograms.

Yes ____ No ____


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-17

5. 10 plastic bags of Solids containing flammable liquid,


n.o.s.* UN 3175, Division 4.1, Packing Group II, weighing
2 kilograms each
with
5 plastic bags of Water-reactive solid, n.o.s.*, UN 2813,
Division 4.3, Packing Group I, weighing 1 kilogram each.

Yes ____ No ____

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Package testing 3;4.4

Each package containing limited quantities must be capable of passing the following two tests:

drop test (3;4.4.1)


stacking test (3;4.4.2)

EXERCISE 10-8

Referring to the requirements of 3;2, 3;3 and 3;4, state whether the following statements are True or False.

1. Inner packagings must meet the requirements of 6;3.2. Outer packagings must be so designed that they meet
the construction requirements in 6;3.1 which apply to the type of outer packaging to be used for the article or
substance.

True ____ False ____

2. The gross mass per package must not exceed 40 kg.

True ____ False ____

3. All the general packing requirements of 4;1.1 applicable to passenger aircraft must be met.

True ____ False ____

4. Each package offered for transport must be capable of withstanding a 1.2 m drop test on to a rigid, non-resilient,
flat and horizontal surface, in the position most likely to cause damage. To pass this test the outer packaging
must not exhibit any damage liable to affect safety during transport and there must be no leakage from the inner
packaging(s).

True ____ False ____


10-18 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

5. The use of single packagings is permitted.

True ____ False ____

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 7 Choose the most appropriate packagings for your item of dangerous goods.

At this point the shipper consolidates all of the information collected so far and chooses and fills a combination
packaging (both inner and outer packaging) that complies with the Instructions and best suits the situation. (Table 3-1,
Part 3;4 and Part 4)

STEP 8 Choose and apply the appropriate package marking and labelling.

All the applicable marking provisions of Part 5;2 apply, except 5;2.4.4.1 (which requires the display of a packaging
specification mark). Note Part 5;2 includes special requirements that apply solely to limited quantities. (3;4.5)

All of the applicable labelling provisions of Part 5;3 apply.

Note. See Part 5 of the Instructions for package marking and labelling requirements, and Unit 5 of this manual for
training material on that part.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-19

EXERCISE 10-9

Referring to the Instructions, state what marks and labels must appear on a limited quantity packaging of the
following dangerous goods:

1. Phenetidines, UN 2311, Packing Group III

2. Maleic anhydride UN 2215, Packing Group III

3. Triisopropyl borate, UN 2616, Packing Group III

4. Aerosols, flammable, corrosive, containing substances in


Class 8, Packing Group III

5. Sulphurous acid, UN 1833, Packing Group II

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 9 Prepare the dangerous goods transport document.

All of the applicable documentation provisions of Part 5;4 apply.

Note. See Part 5 of the Instructions for the provisions concerning documentation, and Unit 6 of this manual for
training material on that part. Also see Appendix 10-5 for a copy of the dangerous goods transport document checklist.

Example: A dangerous goods transport document for a limited quantity consignment of Sulphurous acid, UN 1833,
Packing Group II.
10-20 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Consignee:

ABC Co.,
456 Smarter St.,
Someplace,
India,
XXX YYY 123

Shipper:

XYZ Co.,
123 Smart St.,
Anywhere,
Canada,
XYZ 123

UN 1833, Sulphurous acid, Class 8, PG II, 5 Fibreboard boxes X 0.5 L, Packing Instruction Y840
Limited Quantity or LTD QTY

The shipment is within the limitations for either passenger and cargo aircraft.

I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment are fully and accurately described above by the proper
shipping name, and are classified, packaged, marked and labelled/placarded, and are in all respects in proper
condition for transport according to applicable international and national governmental regulations. I declare that all of
the applicable air transport requirements have been met.

Shippers signature and date:

Mr. Smith, 1 January 3000

Note. Text shown in italics is not mandatory, but it is permissible.

The package of limited quantity dangerous goods in now ready to be offered for transport by air.

Summary

Decision points with respect to the application of the limited quantity provisions:

Yes = Go on No = STOP,
to next not permitted
question. for transport as
limited quantity
dangerous
goods.

Is the proper shipping name of the dangerous goods listed in Table 3-1?

Has a Y packing instruction been assigned to the proper shipping name, UN


number and packing group?
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-21

Yes = Go on No = STOP,
to next not permitted
question. for transport as
limited quantity
dangerous
goods.

Has a combination packaging been chosen from the pertinent Y packing


instruction and have all of the applicable general requirements of Part 4 been met?

Does the combination packaging comply with all of the requirements of 3;4.2, 3;4.3
and 3;4.4?

Have all of the pertinent State variations and special provisions of Table 3-1 been
complied with?

Does the combination packaging display the appropriate marks and labels?

Has documentation been prepared for the limited quantity consignment in


accordance with Part 5;4 of the Instructions?

If the answer is Yes to all of these questions, the limited quantity consignment is ready to be offered for transport by air.

If the answer is No to any of these questions, the dangerous goods may not be offered for transport as a limited quantity.

E. DANGEROUS GOODS IN EXCEPTED QUANTITIES PART 3;5

Introduction

5.1.1 Excepted quantities of dangerous goods of certain classes, other than articles, meeting the provisions of this
chapter are not subject to any other provisions of these Instructions except for:

a) the training requirements in 1;4;

b) the classification procedures and packing group criteria in Part 2; and

c) the packaging requirements of 4;1.1.1, 4;1.1.3.1, 4;1.1.5, 4;1.1.6 and 4;1.1.7.

Note. In the case of radioactive material, the requirements for radioactive material in excepted packages in
1;6.1.5 apply.

The following six-step process will aid in the identification and preparation of those dangerous goods that can be
transported as excepted quantities in accordance with Part 3;5 of the Instructions.

Action

Step 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the excepted quantity provisions.

Step 2 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions.
10-22 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Step 3 Using the information in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, answer the following two questions:
i) Is the item of dangerous goods you wish to offer for transport listed by proper shipping name in
Table 3-1?
ii) Based on the information provided in the list adjacent to your entry, can it be transported as an
Excepted Quantity?

Step 4 If the item can be transported as an excepted quantity, determine the appropriate packaging.

Step 5 Choose and apply the appropriate package marking.

Step 6 Prepare the document.

STEP 1 Familiarize yourself with the words and terms used in the excepted quantity provisions.

Exercise 10-10 will help you learn much of the vocabulary necessary to understand the excepted quantity provisions.
Remember, if in doubt, always check the Instructions for definitions, particularly Part 1 and Attachment 2.

Note. If the Instructions do not provide a definition for a word or term, then the dictionary definition applies.

EXERCISE 10-10

Referring to Part 1 of the Instructions, identify the word or words that best match the definition or description provided
below:

1. Packagings with complete rectangular or polygonal faces, made of metal,


wood, plywood, reconstituted wood, fibreboard, plastic or other suitable
material. Small holes for purposes such as ease of handling or opening,
or to meet classification requirements, are permitted as long as they do
not compromise the integrity of the packaging during transport.

2. An enclosure used by a single shipper to contain one or more packages


and to form one handling unit for convenience of handling and stowage.

3. The outer protection of a composite or combination packaging together


with any absorbent materials, cushioning and any other components
necessary to contain and protect inner receptacles or inner packagings.

4. Articles or substances which are capable of posing a risk to health,


safety, property or the environment and which are shown in the list of
dangerous goods in these Instructions, or which are classified according
to these Instructions.

5. Packagings for which an outer packaging is required for transport.

6. Receptacles which require an outer packaging in order to perform their


containment function.

7. Packagings placed between inner packagings or articles and an outer


packaging.

8. Flat-ended or convex-ended cylindrical packagings made of metal,


fibreboard, plastic, plywood or other suitable materials. This definition
also includes packagings of other shapes, e.g. round taper-necked
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-23

packagings, or pail-shaped packagings. Jerricans are not covered by this


definition.

9. The complete product of the packing operation, consisting of the


packaging and its contents prepared for transport.

10. Any person, organization or government which is entitled to take delivery


of a consignment.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 2 Familiarize yourself with the linkages to other parts of the Instructions.

Exercise 10-11 assists you in determining where to find the relevant linkages with the other parts of the Instructions.

EXERCISE 10-11

Referring to the Instructions, answer the following questions:

1. In which chapter of the Instructions are the training requirements found?

2. In which part of the Instructions are the characteristics of the nine classes
of dangerous goods found?

3. In which part of the Instructions is the list of dangerous goods found?

4. What is the heading for 4;1.1.3?

5. In which chapter of the Instructions are the provisions for dangerous


goods carried by passengers or crew found?

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 3 Using the information in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, answer the following two questions:
i) Is the item of dangerous goods you wish to offer for transport listed by proper shipping name
in Table 3-1?
ii) Based on the information provided in the list adjacent to your entry, can it be transported as an
Excepted Quantity?

There are two easy steps to using the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, as it applies to the transport of excepted
quantities:

a) Locate the description of the dangerous goods in Columns 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 of the List, Table 3-1 (i.e. proper
shipping name, UN number, primary class or division and subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and packing
group); and

b) Extract from Columns 6, 7 and 9 the relevant information required to prepare an item of dangerous goods for
transport as an excepted quantity.
10-24 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

a) Locate the description of the dangerous goods in Columns 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 of the List, Table 3-1 (i.e.
proper shipping name, UN number, primary class or division and subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and
packing group).

Following the application of the Part 2 Classification provisions of the Instructions you are now equipped with the primary
and, where applicable, subsidiary class(es) or division(s) and packing group for your item of dangerous goods. The next
phase of the process is to match the hazardous characteristics of your item of dangerous goods with the most
appropriate entry in Table 3-1 of the Instructions.

Note 1. See Part 2 of the Instructions for the classification requirements, and Unit 2 of this manual for training
material on that part. Also see Part 3 of the Instructions for the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1, and Unit 3 of this
manual for training material on that part.

Note 2. To locate the appropriate proper shipping name for any UN number see Attachment 1, Chapter 1 of the
Instructions.

Exercise 10-12 will help you to learn how to navigate through the information found in Table 3-1.

EXERCISE 10-12

Referring to Table 3-1 of the Instructions, place the letter adjacent to the
following headings in the appropriate column of the table shown below:

A. Special provisions

B. Excepted quantity

C. Name

D. Subsidiary risk

E. State variations

F. UN No.

G. Labels

H. Cargo aircraft

I. Class or division

J. Passenger aircraft

K. Max. net Quantity per package

L. Packing Instruction

M. UN Packing Group

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-25

Note. Should the word FORBIDDEN appear in Columns 2 and 3 adjacent to the proper shipping name you have
chosen, that dangerous goods article or substance is forbidden for transport by air. Should the word FORBIDDEN
appear in Columns 10 and 11, or both 10 and 11 and 12 and 13, the item of dangerous goods is forbidden from
transport on a passenger aircraft or both passenger aircraft and cargo aircraft.

b) Extract from Columns 6, 7 and 9 the relevant information required to prepare an item of dangerous
goods for transport as an excepted quantity.

Once an entry in Table 3-1 has been chosen, use a ruler to line-up the proper shipping name, UN number and packing
group with the information in Column 9, which establishes whether it can be transported as an excepted quantity.

Only those dangerous goods with an E1 to E5 entry in Column 9 of Table 3-1 are permitted for transport as an
excepted quantity and then only if they comply with the provisions of Part 3;5 of the Instructions. (3;5.1.2)

Example:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft


Max. net Max. net
Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN Class or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity instruction package instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Magnesium alloys 1418 4.3 4.2 Danger A3 I E0 Forbidden 488 15 kg
powder if wet
&
Sponta- II E2 483 15 kg 490 50 kg
neous
Combus- III E1 486 25 kg 491 100 kg
tion

The excepted quantity code for Magnesium alloys powder is dependent on the packing group of the substance. In this
case the E Code for Packing Group:

I is E0.
II is E2.
III is E1.

Note. Remember some entries in the Dangerous Goods ListTable 3-1 may have:

i) more than one packing group. Be sure to determine which packing group applies so that you can correctly
identify the appropriate E Code; or

ii) a State variation or special provision that affects the excepted quantity provisions.

The E Codes numbers 1 to 5, found in Table 3-1, have two purposes. Their presence adjacent to a proper shipping
name and packing group:

1) indicates the substance or article can be transported as an excepted quantity; (3;5.1.2) and

2) establishes a maximum net quantity per inner and outer packaging for the specific proper shipping name and
packing group. (Table 3-3)
10-26 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

3;5.1.2.1 For gases, the volume indicated for inner packagings refers to the water capacity of the inner receptacle
and the volume indicated for outer packagings refers to the combined water capacity of all inner packagings within a
single outer package.

Note. Where E0 is found adjacent to a proper shipping name and packing group in Table 3-1 it means this item of
dangerous goods is Not permitted as Excepted Quantity. (Table 3-3)

Read Table 3-3.

EXERCISE 10-13

Referring to Table 3-1 of the Instructions, state which of the following dangerous goods may be transported as an
excepted quantity and state the E Code, maximum quantity per inner packaging and maximum quantity per outer
packaging.

1. Carbamate pesticide,
liquid, toxic,
flammable*, flash point
not less than 23C, E Code:
Packing Group III Maximum quantity per inner packaging:
Maximum quantity per outer packaging:
Yes ____ No ____

2. Toluidines, solid

Yes ____ No ____


E Code:
Maximum quantity per inner packaging:
Maximum quantity per outer packaging:

3. Aerosols, flammable

Yes ____ No ____


E Code:
Maximum quantity per inner packaging:
Maximum quantity per outer packaging:

4. Lithium nitride

Yes ____ No ____ E Code:


Maximum quantity per inner packaging:
Maximum quantity per outer packaging:
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-27

5. Printing ink related


material, (including
printing ink thinning or
reducing compound), E Code:
flammable, Packing Maximum quantity per inner packaging:
Group II Maximum quantity per outer packaging:

Yes ____ No ____

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

Excepted quantities with different E Codes packaged together

When the same outer packaging is to include excepted quantities with different E Codes, the total quantity per outer
packaging must be limited to that of the most restrictive code. (3;5.1.3)

EXERCISE 1014

Referring to the Instructions, state the maximum quantity per outer packaging for the following combination of
dangerous goods.

1. Thiocarbamate pesticide, liquid, toxic* UN 3006, Packing


Group II
packed in the same outer packaging with:
Pesticide, liquid, toxic, flammable n.o.s.*, flash point not
less than 23C, UN 2903, Packing Group II

2. Disinfectant, liquid, corrosive, n.o.s.*, UN 1903, Packing


Group I
packed in the same outer packaging with:
Disinfectant, liquid, toxic, n.o.s.*, UN 3142, Packing Group I

3. Fuel, aviation, turbine engine UN 1863 Packing Group I


packed in the same outer packaging with:
Fuel, aviation, turbine engine UN 1863 Packing Group II
packed in the same outer packaging with:
Fuel, aviation, turbine engine UN 1863 Packing Group IIII

4. Gas cartridges (toxic, flammable & corrosive) without a


release device, non-refillable, UN 2037
packed in the same outer packaging with:
Hexadecyltrichlorosilane, UN 1781, Packing Group II
10-28 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

5. Matches, safety (book, card or strike on box) UN 1944,


Packing Group III
packed in the same outer packaging with:
Silicofluoric acid

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 4 If the item can be transported as an excepted quantity, determine the appropriate packaging.

Packagings

The excepted quantity provisions of Part 3 begin with a statement regarding which of the provisions of the Instructions
apply. In addition to training and classification it is noted that the packaging requirements of 4;1.1.1, 4;1.1.3.1, 4;1.1.5,
4;1.1.6 and 4;1.1.7 must be met. (3;5.1.1 c)).

The following can be used as a guide to help in locating those provisions of Part 4;1 General packing requirements,
that apply to any given excepted quantity packaging.

References
Part 4;1 Those requirements in Part 4 that apply to excepted quantities.

4;1.1.1 Dangerous goods must be packed in good quality packagings, which must be strong enough to
withstand the shocks and loadings normally encountered during transport, including removal from
a pallet, unit load device or overpack for subsequent manual or mechanical handling. Packagings
must be constructed and closed so as to prevent any loss of contents when prepared for transport,
which may be caused under normal conditions of transport, by vibration, or by changes in
temperature, humidity or pressure (resulting from altitude, for example). Packagings (including
inner packagings and receptacles) must be closed in accordance with the information provided by
the manufacturer. No dangerous residue must adhere to the outside of packages during transport.
These provisions apply, as appropriate, to new, reused, reconditioned or re-manufactured
packagings.

4;1.1.3.1 Parts of packagings which are in direct contact with dangerous goods:
a) must not be affected or significantly weakened by those dangerous goods; and
b) must not cause a dangerous effect, e.g. catalyzing a reaction or reacting with the
dangerous goods.
Where necessary, they must be provided with a suitable inner coating or treatment.

4;1.1.5 When filling packagings for liquids sufficient ullage (outage) must be left to ensure that neither
leakage nor permanent distortion of the packaging will occur as a result of an expansion of the
liquid caused by temperatures likely to prevail during transport. Liquids must not completely fill a
packaging at a temperature of 55C.

4;1.1.6 Summary Pressure differential requirements for packagings of liquids.


Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-29

4;1.1.7 Dangerous goods must not be packed together in the same outer packaging with dangerous or
other goods if they react dangerously with each other and cause:
a) combustion and/or evolution of considerable heat;
b) evolution of flammable, toxic or asphyxiant gases;
c) the formation of corrosive substances; or
d) the formation of unstable substances.

Note. Always check the Instructions for the wording of the requirement.

In addition to the above, packagings used for excepted quantities are to be constructed to prevent breakage and, should
breakage occur, to prevent any escape of content. Such packaging must be made up of three components:

i) inner packaging and closure;


ii) intermediate packaging with cushioning material and absorbent material; and
iii) strong rigid outer packaging.

The specific rules governing the construction and assembly of these packagings are found in 3;5.2.1.

3;5.2.1 f) Overpacks may be used and may also contain packages of dangerous goods or goods not subject to
these Instructions.

Package testing requirements are found in 3;5.3 and include a drop test and a stacking test.

EXERCISE 1015

Referring to Parts 3 and 4 of the Instructions, state whether the following statements are True or False and explain
your answer by stating the pertinent reference number from the Instructions.

1. To prevent movement during flight, packaging may be 100% filled with liquids.

2. A little leakage from a limited quantity package is to be expected.

3. Parts of packagings which are in direct contact with dangerous goods must not be
affected or significantly weakened by those dangerous goods.

4. Dangerous goods must not be packed together in the same outer packaging with
dangerous or other goods if they react dangerously with each other and cause the
formation of corrosive substances.

5. The intermediate packaging must completely contain the contents in case of


breakage or leakage, regardless of package orientation.

6. The intermediate packaging must be securely packed in a flexible outer packaging

7. Inner packagings are not required for dangerous goods in excepted quantities.
10-30 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

8. The drop test requires the package to be dropped from a height of 1.8 metres.

9. A package must be capable of withstanding the tests without breakage or leakage


of any inner packaging and without significant reduction in effectiveness.

10. Each package must be of such a size that there is adequate space to apply all
necessary markings.

Check your answers with those in Unit 13.

STEP 5 Choose and apply the appropriate package marking.

This mark (Figure 3-1 of the Instructions) must appear on every excepted quantity package. The class or division
number of the primary hazard of each of the different types of excepted quantities in the package must be shown where
the * appears on the mark. If the shippers or consignees name is not shown elsewhere on the package, it must be
placed where the ** appears on the mark.

The following is an example of the mark for a package containing:

Thiocarbamate pesticide, liquid, toxic* UN 3006, Packing Group II packed in the same outer packaging with:
Pesticide, liquid, toxic, flammable n.o.s.*, flash point not less than 23C, UN 2903, Packing Group II.

Note. If an overpack is used it must bear the excepted quantity mark for its contents, unless the mark(s) are
clearly visible from the outside of the overpack. (3;5.4.3)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-31

STEP 6 Prepare the document.

Documentation

No specific document is required, however if a document, such as an air waybill accompanies the excepted quantities, it
must include the following statement:

Dangerous Goods in Excepted Quantities

and include the number of packages. (3;5.5)

The package of excepted quantity dangerous goods in now ready to be offered for transport by air.

Summary

The E Code, numbers 1 to 5 have two functions. Their presence adjacent to a proper shipping name and packing group:

1) indicates that the substance or article can be transported as an excepted quantity; and
2) establishes a maximum net quantity per inner and outer packaging.

Remember the Code E0 means that the entry is Not permitted as Excepted Quantity.
10-32 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Decision points with respect to the application of the excepted quantity provisions:

Yes = Go on No = STOP,
to next not permitted
question. for transport
as excepted
quantity
dangerous
goods.

Is the proper shipping name of the dangerous goods listed in Table 3-1?

Has E Code 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 been assigned to the proper shipping name, UN number


and packing group?

Does the packaging meet the requirements of 3;5.2 and 3;5.3?

Does the package display the Excepted Quantity mark and does it include the
required information? (3;5.4)

Have all of the pertinent State variations and special provisions of Table 3-1 been
complied with?

If an overpack is used, is it appropriately marked? (3;5.4)

If a document accompanies the excepted quantity consignment, does it include the


required information? (3;5.5)

If the answer is Yes to all of these questions, the excepted quantity consignment is ready to be offered for transport by
air.

If the answer is No to any of these questions, the dangerous goods may not be offered for transport as an excepted
quantity.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-33

Appendix 10-1.

ASSIGNING THE Y PACKING INSTRUCTION

Even before going to Table 3-1 the following chart may be helpful in determining if the dangerous goods you intend to
transport may be eligible for transport as a limited quantity.

For example, if you are thinking of offering a Class 1 for transport as a limited quantity, the right-hand NO GO column in
the following table indicates that it is not permitted as a limited quantity.

If you want to transport a Division 6.1, Packing Group III as a limited quantity, the left-hand GO column in the following
table indicates that you should GO to Column 10 of Table 3-1 of the Instructions to see if it has been assigned a limited
quantity packing instruction.

GO to Column 10 of Table 3-1 NO GO


May be acceptable for transport as a limited quantity Not acceptable for transport as a limited quantity

Any cargo aircraft only dangerous goods packages

and

Division 2.1 Only Any dangerous goods of Packing Group I


UN 1950, Aerosols, or
UN 2037, Receptacles small
containing gas

Division 2.2 Only Any Class 1 Explosives


UN 1950, Aerosols, or
UN 2037, Receptacles small
containing gas

Class 3 Only Any Division 2.1 Flammable gas, other than aerosols
Packing Groups II and III

Division 4.1 Only Any Division 2.3 Toxic gas


Packing Groups II and III
Excluding all self-reactive substances.

Division 4.3 Only Any Division 4.2 Substances liable to spontaneous


Packing Groups II and III, solids combustion, either as a primary or subsidiary risk

Division 5.1 Only Any Division 6.2 Infectious substances


Packing Groups II and III

Division 5.2 Only Any Class 7 Radioactive material


when contained in a chemical kit or a
first-aid kit (UN 3316)

Division 6.1 Only


Packing Groups II and III

Class 8 Only
Packing Groups II and III,
Excluding:
UN 2794, Batteries, wet, filled with
acid, electric storage
UN 2795, Batteries, wet, filled with
alkali, electric storage
UN 2803, Gallium
UN2809 Mercury, and
UN 3028, Batteries, dry, containing
10-34 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

potassium hydroxide solid, electric


storage

Class 9 Only
UN 1941, Dibromodifluoromethane
UN 1990, Benzaldehyde
UN 2071, Ammonium nitrate fertilizers
UN 3077, Environmentally hazardous
substance, solid, n.o.s.*
UN 3082 Environmentally hazardous
substance, liquid, n.o.s.*, and
UN 3316, First aid kit
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-35

Appendix 10-2 (also Appendix 4-1).

CHECKLIST FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE NEW PACKING INSTRUCTIONS


IN THE 20092010 EDITION OF THE INSTRUCTIONS

To determine the appropriate packing instruction for each of the affected dangerous goods listed in Table 3-1 follow
these steps:

Step 1: Referring to Table 3-1, identify the proper shipping name, UN number and packing group for the article or
substance of dangerous goods.

For example: The proper shipping name, UN number and packing group entry for Gasoline in Table 3-1 is as follows:

Passenger aircraft Cargo aircraft

Max. net Max. net


Class Sub- State Special UN quantity quantity
UN or sidiary varia- provi- packing Excepted Packing per Packing per
Name No. division risk Labels tions sions group quantity Instruction package Instruction package
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Gasoline 1203 3 Liquid A100 II E2 353 5L 364 60 L
Flammable Y341 1L

Step 2: Referring to Table A-3 Packing instruction numbers in Attachment 4 of the Instructions, locate the UN number
(UN No.) and packing group (PG) you have chosen from Table 3-1. Table A-3 shows two columns per page, each
column is divided into eight (8) sections:

Sections 1 and 2 show the UN Nos. in numerical order and their respective packing groups;
Sections 3 and 4 show the current packing instruction and new packing instruction for limited quantities;
Sections 5 and 6 show the current packing instruction and new packing instruction for passenger aircraft;
Sections 7 and 8 show the current packing instruction and new packing instruction for cargo aircraft.

For example: The entry point for Gasoline is UN No. 1203, Packing Group II.

UN PG Limited Quantity Passenger Cargo


No.
Current New Current New Current New
1203 II Y305 Y341 305 353 307 364

The new packing instructions for Gasoline are:

limited quantity Y341


passenger aircraft 353
cargo aircraft 364.

Note. When the letter F appears in any of the sections of Table A-3 it indicates that the item of dangerous goods
is FORBIDDEN for transport under that section.
10-36 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Step 3: Referring to the second part of Attachment 4 of the Instructions, locate the appropriate packing instruction by
matching the new packing instruction number identified in Table A-3 with the number shown at the top of the packing
instructions.

For example: If gasoline is to be transported by passenger aircraft, the introduction to the new packing instruction would
look like this:

Packing Instructions 350 355

Passenger aircraft

General requirements

Part 4, Chapter 1 requirements must be met, including:

1) Compatibility requirements

Substances must be compatible with their packagings as required by 4;1.1.3.


Metal packagings must be corrosion resistant or be protected against corrosion for substances
with a Class 8 subsidiary risk.

2) Closure requirements

Closures must meet the requirements of 4;1.1.4.

Note. Certain of the new packing instructions will be headed with a range of numbers, for example Packing
Instructions 360-366. The new cargo aircraft packing instruction for Gasoline is 364; therefore Packing Instruction
360-366 would apply.
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-37

Appendix 10-3.

COLOUR-CODED PACKING INSTRUCTION Y370

1.

Packing Instruction Y370

2.

Limited quantities
Passenger and cargo aircraft for UN 3269 (Packing Group II or III) only

3.

General requirements
Part 4, Chapter 1 requirements must be met (except that 4;1.1.2, 1.1.8 c), 1.1.8 e) and 1.1.16 do not apply), including:

1) Compatibility requirements
Substances must be compatible with their packagings as required by 4;1.1.3.
Metal packagings must be corrosion resistant or be protected against corrosion for substances with a Class 8
subsidiary risk.

2) Closure requirements
Closures must meet the requirements of 4;1.1.4

3) Limited quantity requirements


Part 3, Chapter 4 requirements must be met, including:
the capability of the package to pass a 1.2 m drop test;
a 24-hour stacking test; and
inner packagings for liquids must be capable of passing a pressure differential test (4;1.1.6)

4.

COMBINATION PACKAGINGS

Inner
packaging SINGLE
quantity (per Total Total PACKAGINGS
Inner receptacle) quantity gross
Packing packaging for liquid Total quantity per mass per
conditions (see 6;3.2) activator per package package package

Activator Plastic* 30 mL 100 g


(Organic No
Metal* 30 mL 100 g
peroxide)

Base material Glass 1.0 L 1.0 L 1 kg 30 kg


Class 3
Plastic 1.0 L 1.0 L No
Packing Group
II or III Metal 1.0 L 1.0 L

*Including tubes
10-38 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

5.

ADDITIONAL PACKING REQUIREMENTS FOR COMBINATION PACKAGINGS

The components may be placed in the same outer packaging provided that they will not ineract dangerously in the event
of leakage (see 4;1.1.7).

6.

OUTER PACKAGINGS OF COMBINATION PACKAGINGS (see 6;3.1)

Boxes Drums Jerricans

Aluminium Aluminium Aluminium


Fibreboard Fibre Plastics
Natural wood Other metal Steel
Plastics Plastics
Plywood Steel
Reconstituted wood
Steel
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-39

Appendix 10-4.

SEGREGATION TABLE TABLE 7-1

Table 7-1. Segregation between packages

Class or division

Hazard label 1 2 3 4.2 4.3 5.1 5.2 8

1 Note 1 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2 Note 2

2 Note 2

3 Note 2 x

4.2 Note 2 x

4.3 Note 2 x

5.1 Note 2 x x

5.2 Note 2

8 Note 2 x

An x at the intersection of a row and column indicates that packages containing these classes of
dangerous goods may not be stowed next to or in contact with each other, or in a position which
would allow interaction in the event of leakage of the contents. Thus, a package containing Class 3
dangerous goods may not be stowed next to or in contact with a package containing Division 5.1
dangerous goods.

Note 1. See 2.2.2.2 through 2.2.2.5.

Note 2. This class or division must not be stowed together with explosives other than those in
Division 1.4, Compatibility Group S.

Note 3. Packages containing dangerous goods with multiple hazards in the class or divisions
which require segregation in accordance with Table 7-1 need not be segregated from other packages
bearing the same UN number.
10-40 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

Appendix 10-5 (also Appendix 6-1).

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORT DOCUMENT CHECKLIST

Section 1 Name and address of shipper and consignee X Reference in the Instructions

1. Shippers name and address 5;4.1.3

2. Consignees name and address 5;4.1.3

Section 2 Dangerous goods description (Information in


this section must appear in the order specified below.)

3. UN number preceded by the letters UN. Column 2 Table 3-1


5;4.1.4.1 a)

4. Proper shipping name and, where required: 3;1.2.4


3;1.2.5
the technical name(s) or, where applicable chemical group 3;1.2.7
name, in brackets following the proper shipping name, Column 1 Table 3-1
(Important: Read all of 3;1.2.7 for clarification of this 5;4.1.4.1 b)
requirement.) 5;4.1.4.3 a), b), c) and d)
in the case of explosives, the commercial or military name Note 2 and Note 3 of 5;4.1.4.2
may be added following the proper shipping name.
the words Empty uncleaned or Residue last contained
before or after the proper shipping name,
the word Waste preceding the proper shipping name, unless
already included in the proper shipping name
the word molten added to the proper shipping name,
(Additional reference is found in 3;1.2.4.)
the word stabilized added to the proper shipping name,
(Additional reference is found in 3;1.2.5.)

Note. Additional descriptive text in the entries in Column 1


of the Dangerous Goods List Table 3-1 may be used with the
proper shipping name.

5. Primary Class or Division and, for explosives, the Compatibility Column 3 Table 3-1
Group. (The words Class or Division may appear before the 5;4.1.4.1 c)
primary class or division.)

6. Subsidiary hazard Class(es) or Division(s) in brackets. (The Column 4 Table 3-1


words Class or Division may appear before the subsidiary 5;4.1.4.1 d)
class or division.)

7. Packing Group, where applicable. (The letters PG may appear Column 8 Table 3-1
before the packing group.) 5;4.1.4.1 e)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-41

Section 3 Additional information about the dangerous


goods

8. For a consignment of one item of dangerous goods indicate: 5;4.1.5.1

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note.
The packaging specification code may only appear on a
dangerous goods transport document as a supplement to the
description of the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume
or mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L

For a consignment of dangerous goods with different proper


shipping names, UN numbers or packing groups indicate for
each the:

number of packages.
type of packaging (e.g. steel drum, fibreboard box). (Note.
The packaging specification code may only appear on a
dangerous goods transport document as a supplement to the
description of the kind of package.)
net quantity of dangerous goods in each package, by volume
or mass, as appropriate. (Note. Abbreviations for the unit of
measurement may be used. Gross mass instead of net mass
must be shown in the dangerous goods transport document
when the letter G follows the quantity in Table 3-1.)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 fibreboard box, 5 L
UN 1299, Turpentine, 3, PG III, 1 fibreboard box, 1 L

9. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous 5;4.1.5.1


goods and the same quantity per package you may replace the
net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L
10-42 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

10. For a consignment of packages with the same dangerous 5;4.1.5.1


goods, but different quantities per package you may replace
the net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the:

number of packages multiplied by the quantity per package of


each separate quantity.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 10
fibreboard boxes X 10 L

11. For a consignment of empty, uncleaned packages you may 5;1.6


replace the net quantity of dangerous goods per package with the: 5;4.1.5.1 a)
5;4.1.4.3 b)
number and type of packagings.

Example:
UN 1263, Residue last contained Paint, 3, PG II 1 fibreboard box

12. For a consignment of Chemical kits or First aid kits you may 5;4.1.5.1 b)
replace the net quantity per package with the:

the total net mass of dangerous goods.

(Note. Where the kits contain solids and/or liquids, the net mass
of liquids within the kits is to be calculated on a 1 to 1 basis of
their volume, i.e. 1 litre equal to 1 kilogram.)

Example:
UN 3316, Chemical kit, 9, 1 Fibreboard box, 1 L

13. For a consignment of dangerous goods in machinery or 5;4.1.5.1 c)


apparatus replace the net quantity per package with the:

individual total quantities of dangerous goods in solid, liquid


or gaseous state, contained in the article

Example:
UN 3363, Dangerous Goods in Apparatus, 9, 1 wooden box X
Liquid 0.5 L, Solid 1 kg
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-43

14. For a consignment of dangerous goods contained in a salvage 5;1.5


packaging replace the net quantity of dangerous goods per 5;4.1.5.1 d)
package with an: 5;4.1.5.3

estimate of the quantity of dangerous goods.

Note. The words Salvage package must be shown at the end


of the description.

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 1 Fibreboard box, 1 L, Salvage
Package

15. For a consignment of a substance of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:

net mass or volume for the substance.

Example:
UN3291, Medical waste, n.o.s., 6.2, PG II, 1 fibreboard box X
45 kg

16. For a consignment of an article of dangerous goods where the 5;4.1.5.1 e)


words no limit are shown in Columns 11 or 13 replace the net
quantity per package with the:

gross mass, followed by the letter G

Example:
UN 3166, Vehicle, flammable liquid powered, 9, 55 kg G

(Note. In this example the article is not in a package, therefore


no information regarding the kind of package is shown on the
dangerous goods transport document.)

17. For a consignment of limited quantities (See Part 3;4 for 5;4.1.5.2
provisions concerning limited quantities and Unit 10 associated
training material.)

18. Chemical oxygen generators shipped in accordance with 5;4.1.5.4


Special Provision A 144:

add the statement Aircrew protective breathing equipment


(smoke hood) in accordance with Special Provision A 144

Example:
UN 3356, Oxygen generator, chemical, 5.1, PG II, 1 fibreboard
box X 2 kg G, Aircrew protective breathing equipment (smoke
hood) in accordance with Special Provision A 144.
10-44 Dangerous Goods Training Manual

19. For a consignment of self-reactive substances or organic 2;4.2.3.2.5


peroxides where approval is required: 2;5.3.2.5
5;4.1.5.5
add a statement indicating that such an approval has been
issued.

Note. A copy of the classification approval and conditions of


transport for non-listed organic peroxides and self-reactive
substances must be attached to the dangerous goods transport
document.

Example:
UN 3110, Organic Peroxide type F, solid
(Phthalimidoperoxyhexanoic acid 88%), 5.2, 1 fibreboard box x 5
kg, approval C-OPS/KV/2008-06-01 attached

20. For a consignment of Samples of new formulations of an 2; 5.3.2.6


Organic Peroxide not listed in 2;5.3.2.4 (Table 2-7) or a self- 2;4.2.3.2.6
reactive substance not listed in Table 2-6: 5;4.1.5.5.2

add a statement indicating that a sample of a new formulation


of an organic peroxide or a self-reactive substance is being
transported.

Example:
UN 3224, Self-reactive solid, Type C (sample of a new
formulation), 4.1, 1 plywood box X 0.5 kg

21 For a consignment of Infectious substances or controlled 5;4.1.5.6


substances (See Unit 8 of this manual for a consolidation of the
infectious substance requirements.)

22 For a consignment of Radioactive Material (See Unit 9 of this 5;4.1.5.7


manual for a consolidation of the radioactive material
requirements.)

Section 4 Additional requirements

23. The designation for the applicable packing instruction. 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)

Example:
UN 1263, Paint, 3, PG II, 5 fibreboard boxes X 5 L, 351 (See new
packing instruction assigned this substance for carriage on
passenger aircraft.)

24. When applicable, reference to Special Provision A1, A2 or A109 5;4.1.5.8.1 a)


(except for radioactive material).

25. A statement the shipment is within the limitations for either 5;4.1.5.8.1 b)
passenger and cargo aircraft or cargo-only aircraft, as
appropriate.
(Read the Note in the Instructions located at the end of this
reference.)
Volume 1. Using the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods
Unit 10. Dangerous goods in limited quantities and dangerous goods in excepted quantities 10-45

26. When applicable, special handling information. 5;4.1.5.8.1 c)

27. When applicable, an indication that an overpack has been used. 5;4.1.5.8.1 d)

28. When applicable, the Q value rounded up to the first decimal 5;4.1.5.8.1 e)
place. 3;4.3.3 or 4;1.1.8 e)

29. When an explosive is being shipped in accordance with Packing 5;4.1.5.8.2


Instruction 101, the State of authorizations distinguishing sign for
motor vehicles in international traffic following the words:

Packaging authorized by the competent authority of

Note. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_international_license_plate_co
des#U)
for a listing of the international vehicle registration codes, but be