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LANCAIR KIT ASSEMBLY MANUAL

FOR LANCAIR IV FAST BUILD KIT

LANCAIR KIT ASSEMBLY MANUAL FOR LANCAIR IV FAST BUILD KIT -==-=-- Lancair Internntiunal Inc., Represented byNeicu
LANCAIR KIT ASSEMBLY MANUAL FOR LANCAIR IV FAST BUILD KIT -==-=-- Lancair Internntiunal Inc., Represented byNeicu

-==-=--

KIT ASSEMBLY MANUAL FOR LANCAIR IV FAST BUILD KIT -==-=-- Lancair Internntiunal Inc., Represented byNeicu Aviation

Lancair Internntiunal Inc., Represented byNeicu Aviation inc., Copyright(i) 1998, Ifodmond, OH 97756

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Dear Future Lancair Flyer,

All of us with Lancair wish to welcome you to this unique area of aviation. The name Lancair has become synonymous with industry leadership, in fact we've played a major role in actually defining the kit aircraft industry that we've come to know today. But above all, we thank you for choosing Lancair.

Building a kit aircraft is both educational and recreational and is without question, one of today's most active areas of general aviation. If you arc new to this segment of aviation, then you will be pleasantly surprised by the warm fraternity of friends you'll soon be making since you are a part of perhaps the most unique flying community. Everyone who flies enjoys a certain fellowship with other pilots but the pilots who build the planes they fly realize a camaraderie that is impossible to adequately describe.

We introduced the concept of the "fast-build" kit over a decade ago and we've been perfecting it ever since. Our goal is to continually find ways to make the building and assembly process easier for you. By following this manual along with information from recommended sources and our Builder's Technical Support Program, which is just a phone call away, even the novice should finish their Lancairs without difficulty and enjoy years and years of rewarding flight.

We also encourage you to join a local EAA (Experimental Aircraft Association) chapter. Generally these EAA chapters offer exceptional assistance and are simply great social organizations as well. EAA also works very hard to protect, on a world wide basis, the freedoms of the flying environment that we've come to know.

So once again, thank you and welcome to our family.

to know. So once again, thank you and welcome to our family. _J/i[:-~ ], 1

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CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

A. RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND INFORMATION

B. MANUAL LAYOUT AND USE

 

C. SETTING UP YOUR SHOP

D. TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

E. STRUCTURAL ADHESIVE

F. AN- BOLT AND HARDWARE GUIDE

 

G. BASIC SHOP TOOLS

 

H. THE PREMOLDED PARTS

I.

PROCEDURE

J.

JOINT DESCRIPTION

 

K

TRIMMING PROCEDURE

L.

DRILLING ALIGNMENT HOLES

 

M.

REMOVING THE PROTECTIVE COATING (PEELPLYJ

N.

DRILLING

0.

FASTENING PARTS TOGETHER

 

P.

FIBERGLASS STRIP INSTALLATION

Q.

CUTTING ON A BIAS

 

R.

THE PLASTIC SANDWICH

S. TONGUE DEPRESSORS AND MICRO RADII

T. THOSE ANNOYING 2" WIDE BID TAPES

 

U. CARDBOARD TEMPLATES

 

V. BUILDING LIGHT

W. BUILDING STRAIGHT

X. CONTROL SYSTEMS

Y.

HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS

Z.

PAINTING

Lnncnir Inlenmtional Inc., Rllpresented by Nuicu Avinlion Inc., Copyright tD l 9!)8, Redmond, OR 9775G

INTRODUCTION

The purpose ofthis chapter is to familiarize the builderwith the use ofthis manual, the general philosophy behind its layout, the terms we use and their definitions, and the construction materials and methods we will use throughout the manual. You should also read the texts recommended in the preface to familiarize yourself with the fine points ofglassworking ifyou are a newcomer to fiberglass construc- tion te~hniques. You may want to refer back to this section often as you build your plane. There is a lot ofinfohere, and it would be difficult to absorb itin one reading, so refer to it whenever you aren't familiar with a term, or ifyou are about to start a step that you're not sure of. It may be explained here in more detail than it would be at each and every spot in the manual that it is used, such as the terms "BID" and "release", which will be found on nearly every page, but only explained in detail in this chapter.

A. RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND INFORMATION

This manual provides detailed step-by-step instructions for assembling the Lancair IV Kit. There are two different versions of the IV manual, one for the fast build kit and one for the standard. Note that some chapters may be identical, such as this one.

Note that some chapters may be identical, such as this one. Hands on experience with fiberglass
Note that some chapters may be identical, such as this one. Hands on experience with fiberglass
Note that some chapters may be identical, such as this one. Hands on experience with fiberglass

Hands on experience with fiberglass construction techniques and various hand tools is assumed. Ifyou do not have that background knowledge, the study ofother, more basic texts will be necessary. Suggested references are given on the following pages.

Although one person might build this kit alone, there will be times when an extra pairofhands or eyes will be veryhelpful and will speed assembly. Besides, working with a friend can be a great deal more fun. If you do not already belong to the local chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA), you may want to join. The EAA chapter nearest you will probably have members already building aircraft who will be happy to help you. Contact the EAA at the following address for the location of the nearest chapter:

EAA

Whittman Airfield

Oshkosh, WI 54903-3065 (414) 426-4876

WARNING

IF DURING CONSTRUCTION YOU HAVE ANY QUESTION OR DOUBT ABOUT A CONSTRUCTION PROCEDURE, DO NOT CONTINUE UNTIL YOU HAVE OBTAINED THE NECESSARY INFORMATION OR SKILL. IF YOU ARE NOT KNOWLEDGEABLE IN FIBERGLASS OR OTHER REQUIRED CONSTRUCTIONTECHNIQUES ORTOOLS, OBTAINTHAT KNOWLEDGE BEFORE STARTING CONSTRUCTION.

NO CHANGE TO THE AIRCRAFT DESIGN OR SPECIFIED CONSTRUC- TION PROCEDURES IS PERMITTED. SUCH CHANGES MAY AD- VERSELY EFFECT THE AIRCRAFT'S STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY OR AIRWORTHINESS.

FAILURE TO FOLLOW THIS WARNING AND OTHERS FOUND THROUGHOUT THIS MANUAL COULD RESULT IN COMPONENT FAILURE AND LOSS OF AIRCRAFT CONTROL CAUSING SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.

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COMPOSITE MATERIALS PRACTICE KIT: This kit contains various materials with which to practice and develop your fiberglass construction technique. It also contains a copy of Burt Rutan's Moldless Composite Sandwich Homebuilt Aircraft Construction book described below. This kit is recommended for all newcomers to fiberglass construction and is a good refresher for others.

MOLDLESS COMPOSITE SANDWICH HOMEBUILTAIRCRAFT CONSTRUC- TION: by Burt Rutan. Though the hot wire shaping technique covered by this book is not used on the Lancair, this book has a great deal ofother excellent, basic fiberglass construction information. Highly recommended.

BUILDING RUTAN COMPOSITES: This is a video tape by Burt Rutan. Although it covers some techniques not used on the Lancair, it shows you how the experts handle fiberglass construction. Highly recommended.

COMPOSITE CONSTRUCTIONFORHOMEBUILTAIRCRAFT: by Jack Lambie. This book is an additional source ofuseful construction information and goes into the theory of aircraft design as well. Jack's Chapter 9, Safety in Working With Composite Construction, is particularly worth reading. This book would be a useful addition to the above.

KITPLANE CONSTRUCTION: by Ron WenttaJa. information on metal, wood, and composites

This is a resourceful book with

The above publications, practice kit and video tape are available from:

Aircraft Spruce and Specialty Company Box 424 Fullerton, CA 92632 Phone: 1-800-824-1930 or 1-714-870-7511 FAX: 1-714-7289 The following recommended books largely describe aspects ofaircraft construction other than working with fiberglass:

FIREWALL FORWARD:

by Tony Bingelis is packed with vital info about engine

installation. You'll need this when you're getting ready to install the engine.

THE SPORTPLANE BUILDER: by Tony Bingelis has a lot ofuseful information on aircraft construction in general such as electrical systems, instrumentation and fuel systems. The chapter entitled :You and the FAA" gives important informa- tion on the procedures that you will need to follow during construction in order to get your homebuilt's airworthiness certificate.

These two books can be obtained from: EAA Aviation Foundation Whittman Airfield Oshkosh, WI 59403-3065 Phone: 1-414-426-4800

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B. MANUAL LAYOUT AND USE

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PLEASE- READ THIS MANUAL. In this age of computers that are "user friendly", cars that talk and tell you what their status is, and all ofthe other bubble- packaged, predigested things on the market, many people have gotten out ofthe habit of reading the manual. That philosophy will not work here. While there really aren't any "complex" steps to building this aircraft, there are many that must not be overlooked. So, please do read this manual.

For ease of understanding and use, this assembly manual is laid out in a logical progression of aesembly steps. The first section explains the technique used to prepare and join mating parts. This technique is used throughout the kit assembly process, and is shown in detail.

Followingthat, actual assemblyinstructions beginwith the horizontal stabilizer. Directions are provided for preparing the necessary fixtures for alignment, installing the spars, ribs, etc.

Assembly instructions for the remaining parts are given in a sequence that either makes for convenient construction or is necessary due to the kit design.

A. Chapter Arrangement

Each chapter is arranged in a similar sequence:

Introduction: This describes, in a brief overview, the work that will be performed throughout that chapter.

a.

b. Special items

c. Three lists comprise this section, and they consist of:

1.

Parts: providing a complete list of all parts or components within the

chapter as well as diagrammatic exploded views ofthe components.

2.

Tools and Supplies: this list will consist ofthe tools and supplies required

for assembly of components in that particular chapter.

3.

Construction: this section is typically divided into specific areas of

assembly, and each division is defined by an alphabetical prefix: a, b, etc.

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REVISIONS

From time to time, revisions to this assembly manual may be deemed necessary. When such revisions are made, you should immediately replace all outdated pages with the revised pages. Discard the outdated pages. Note that on the lower right corner of each page is a "revision date". Initial printings will have the number "O" printed and the printing date. All subsequent revisions will have the revision number followed by the date of that revision. When such revisions are made, a "table ofrevisions" page will also be issued on a "per chapter" basis. This page (or pages) should be inserted in front ofthe openingpage ofeach chapter that is affected. A new "table ofrevisions" page will accompany any revision made to a chapter.

page will accompany any revision made to a chapter. Each chapter should be read through entirely
page will accompany any revision made to a chapter. Each chapter should be read through entirely

Each chapter should be read through entirely and understood before beginning the work it describes. The equipment and supplies called for in each chapter should be on hand and ready for use.

In order to make it a little easier, since most ofthese aircraft are built in spare time (and no one has as much as they would like), we have put a column on the right of each page for "checking for" of procedures completed so that you can more easily see where you left off. Since you may want to work in more than one thing at a time, such as working on the horizontal stabilizer while the resin sets up on the wing, using these boxes will help to prevent you from overlooking any steps while moving about "out-of-sequence" in the manual (which, by the way, is not a problem, as long as you read it through once first to make sure you don't seal up an area before it is really finished, or glass over where something else still needs to be mounted, etc.).

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C.

SETTING UP YOUR SHOP

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1

INTR_

Your work area should be well lit, clean and uncluttered, and have at least one large table to cut on and workwith the fiberglass. Since parts will be placed on the floor occasionally, oil, grease and dirt must be removed from the floor to prevent contamination ofthe parts.

Ifworkis to be done when the outside temperature is less than 70°F, a heat source may be necessary. Working with adhesive or fiberglass resin at temperatures lower than 70°Fis difficult and cure times are longer. After turning offthe heater, allow time for the materials to come up to room temperature before using.

The following drawings will help you determine the size of the working area required for various stages of construction.

The wings can be assembled one at a time or both at once. Ifyou have enough space to assemble both wings at one time, you may want to do so since it is a bit more convenient, however it is not necessary.

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Area Drawing

Fig. l:C:l.

1-<111-------------- 30'-3"--------------i~

1-<111-------------- 30'-3"--------------i~ ( ~ 25" T 7"-8" 1 Luncair Intemnlional Inc.,
1-<111-------------- 30'-3"--------------i~ ( ~ 25" T 7"-8" 1 Luncair Intemnlional Inc.,
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Luncair Intemnlional Inc., Represented by Neko Aviutinn Inc., CllpyrightlD 1998, Redmond, OR 9775(-;

NOTE: Once the wing is in position on the fuselage, you will need at least 45" clearance beyond the wing tip to remove it. Unless your doorway is large enough to allow removal ofthe plane with the wing(s) on, make sure you have that clearance. You do not want to have to cut a hole in the wall to get your plane out.

Wing Removal Area Required

Fig. l:C:2.

get your plane out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points

Cutting Tables

out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop
out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop
out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop
out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop
out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop
out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop
out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop
out. Wing Removal Area Required Fig. l:C:2. Cutting Tables One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop

One ofthe focal points ofany composite shop is the fiberglass cutting table. Those ofus who previously built composite planes without a cutting table can't believe we were so naive. If you have the room, build a cutting table in your shop!

The cutting table should have the fiberglass roll mounted at one end so you can unwind the cloth onto the table. You should be able to unroll at least four feet of cloth onto the cutting surface. A PVC pipe, or any pipe, can be used as a roller for the cloth roll. Mount the pipe through two plywood supports nailed to the sides of your table.

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The cutting surface should be a hard plastic, such as 1/8" thick, high density polyethylene
The cutting surface should be a hard plastic, such as 1/8" thick, high density
polyethylene (HDPE). Some home supply stores have similar sheets of this
material called "Tileboards" for use as shower liners. Check plastic supply stores
also. When the plastic surface gets well used and you don't get clean cuts anymore,
simply flip the plastic sheet over and use the other side, provided it still fits the
table.
When the cutting table is not in use, it's a good idea to at least cover the fiberglass
roll with plastic to keep the dirt from settling on it.
* Fiberglass cutting table
No selfrespecting builder would be without one ofthese.
Fiberglass Cutting Table
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Fiberglass
Roll
PVC pipe
to support
fiberglass
1/8" thick high
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cutting surface
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This setup for a layup table comes in quite handy when it comes time to start your wet layups. Construct the table about 3' X 8' and mount the exhaust hood low over the table surface. Use the same hard plastic as you installed on the cutting table.

Layup Table

Fig. l:C:4.

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Flapper Valve--"
Vent
Flexible Hose
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Lnncair lnlenmtional lne., Represented by Neicu Aviation Ine., Cupyright<D l\1!18, Redmond, OR !J775G

D. TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

Aft

BID tape

Back side or measured back.

A strip of BID cloth cut on the bias, usually 2-4 inches wide.

Bidirectional glass cloth Bidirectional glass cloth (BID) means that 50% of its fibers are running in one direction, and 50% ofthe fibers are running perpendicu- lar (90°) to the other fibers.

Cutting on the bias Cutting BID cloth on the bias is to cut in such a way as to leave the fibers on a45° angle to the edge. See drawing. You can wrap a smaller radius corner when the fibers are running on a 45° angle to the corner.

when the fibers are running on a 45° angle to the corner. Chord The length of

Chord

The length of the airfoil; from the leading edge to the trailing edge of the

wmg.

from the leading edge to the trailing edge of the wmg. Cotton Flox Finely chopped cotton

Cotton Flox Finely chopped cotton fibers which are in appearance nearly as fine as micro balloons. The big difference is that flox is structurally stronger than micro when combined with epoxy. USE: Mixed similarly to micro and used for strengthening glass to glass areas where BID tapes can't be used. Can fill small gaps where pure epoxy might run out and leave a void, also large amounts ofpure epoxy is heavier and too brittle. Flox is heavier than micro. Should be used sparingly- can add a lot of weight if used without discretion.

can add a lot of weight if used without discretion. Lancair Intcnmtionul Jne., lfoprcmmtcd by Neico

Lancair Intcnmtionul Jne., lfoprcmmtcd by Neico Avinthm Inc., Copyright (i) l!HlB, Ifodmnnd, OR \J775G

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BL

WL

Center.

Baseline. This line is used to measure distances outward from the centerline ofthe fuselage. Thus, the baseline is the actual center line.

Water line. This is an imaginary line used to measure vertical distances on the airplane. On the Lancair IV, water line 100 (WL 100) is established at the top of the longeron with the longeron level. Thus WL 90 would be 10" below the top of the longeron, WL 102 would be 2" above the top of the longeron.

FS Fuselage Station. This imaginary line is used to measure distance forward or aft on the fuselage. FS-0 is established at the forward face ofthe prop flange. Thus FS-28 is 28" aft of the forward face of the prop flange.

BLO

is 28" aft of the forward face of the prop flange. BLO BL Measurements FSO BL

BL Measurements

FSO

BL & WL Measurement Drawing

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Dihedral Looking at the front of the aircraft, most non-swept wings form a positive angle to the horizontal. That angle is called dihedral. The Lancair N has 3° of dihedral, meaning that the wings are slanted upward at a angle from the horizontal. Dihedral improves roll stability on non-swept wing aircraft.

- n --c:: - - ;::IP Fuselage. Fitting. Forward. Inboard. A lengthwise structuralmember ofthe fuselage.
-
n
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-
-
;::IP
Fuselage.
Fitting.
Forward.
Inboard.
A lengthwise structuralmember ofthe fuselage. Some planes have top and
Outboard.
Typically the part ofthe wing spar that runs vertically.
The top and bottom members ofa spar, held in proper relation by the shear
------SPAR CAP
~~~
14111E------ SPAR WEB
(We use C-Sectlon spars
for the main sparl
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FSLG

Ftg

Fwd

Inbd

Longeron

bottom longerons. The Lancair N has only 2/3-length top longerons.

Micro Microballoons. These are very small thin-walled air-filled glass bubbles. Being extremely light for their volume, they can be added to resin to produce a very lightweight filler material that is easy to shape and sand. They do not add strength to the mixture however, and should be used where "cosmetics" is the consideration, not strength.

Outbd

Shearweb

Spar cap

web.

Typ

Simply means "typical" when seen on a drawing.

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E. STRUCTURAL ADHESIVE

DURING AIRCRAFT ASSEMBLY TWO TYPES OF EPOXY ARE USED:

A

STRUCTURAL PASTE ADHESIVE AND A LAMINATING RESIN.

THE LAMINATING RESIN IS USED TO MAKE FIBERGLASS LAYUPS AND IS ALSO MIXED WITH FLOX OR MICRO.

THESTRUCTURALPASTEADHESIVEISUSEDTOSTRUCTURALLYBOND MOLDED PARTS TOGETHER.

THESE EPOXIES ARE NOT INTERCHANGEABLE. FOLLOW THE INSTRUC- TIONS CONCERNING WHICH SYSTEM TO USE.

NOTE: Although Hysol 9339 Structural Adhesive and a laminating resin from J effco are illustrated, other structural adhesives may be used instead ofthis type if deemed appropriate. Mixing ratios will also differ.

BE SURE TO CHECK FOR PROPER MIXING RATIOS OF STRUCTURAL ADHESIVES AND LAMINATING RESINS SUPPLIED. FAILURE TOPROPERLYMIXSTRUCTURALADHESIVES OR LAMINATING RESINS COULD RESULT IN BOND FAILURE.

HYSOL 9339 ADHESIVE

Mix: 44.5 parts 9339A(bluc)

to

100 parts 9339B(White)

Mix: 44.5 parts 9339A(bluc) to 100 parts 9339B(White) .IEFFCO :'l10:?/l:l07LV Mix: !!Ii 1111rts a102 to
Mix: 44.5 parts 9339A(bluc) to 100 parts 9339B(White) .IEFFCO :'l10:?/l:l07LV Mix: !!Ii 1111rts a102 to

.IEFFCO :'l10:?/l:l07LV Mix: !!Ii 1111rts a102 to 100 tmrts 1307LV

Mix: !!Ii 1111rts a102 to 100 tmrts 1307LV SAMPLE ILLUSTRATIONS, OTHER SYSTEMS MAY BE SUPPLIED AS
Mix: !!Ii 1111rts a102 to 100 tmrts 1307LV SAMPLE ILLUSTRATIONS, OTHER SYSTEMS MAY BE SUPPLIED AS

SAMPLE ILLUSTRATIONS, OTHER SYSTEMS MAY BE SUPPLIED AS STAN-

DARD WITH YOUR AIRFRAME KIT.

SEE ABOVE WARNING.

NOTE: Most epoxies have a manufacturer's recommended shelflife of typically one year. In some cases this is quite conservative. However, the manufactw·ers recommendations should obviously be followed.

recommendations should obviously be followed. VCA/A® IV i[~·~;" 11·~-Ch_a_p-te_r_l_IN~TR-R~-, :-·

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F.

AN- BOLT AND HARDWARE GUIDE This guide to AN hardware can be helpfu1 if you are not familiar with the code number system.

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Chapter I
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INTRODUCTION
tr'\

AN 3 thru AN 20 BOLT· HEX HD, AIRCRAFT

AN21 thruAN36BOLT· CLEVIS

AN 42 thru AN 49 BOLT· EYE

AN 73 thru AN 81 BOLT • DR HD (engine)

AN 100 ·THIMBLE ·CABLE

AN 115 SHACKLE· CABLE

AN 116 • SHACKLE ·SCREW PIN AN 155 BARREL· TURNBUCKLE

AN161FORK-TURNBUCKLE ~

AN 162 FORK· TURNBUCKLE (for Bearing)

AN 165 EYE ·TURNBUCKLE (for pin)

AN 170 EYE ·TURNBUCKLE (for cable)

AN 173 thru AN

AN 210 thru AN 221 PULLEY. CONTROL

186 BOLT, CLOSE TOL.

AN 253 PIN· HINGE

AN 254 SCREW· THUMB, NECKED

AN 255 SCREW· NECKED

AN 256 NUT • SELF LOCK (Rt. Angle Plate)

AN257HINGE-CONTINUOUS

AN 276 JOINT· BALL & SOCKET

AN 280 KEY· WOODRUFF

AN 295 CUP • OIL

AN 310 NUT • CASTLE <Air Frame)

AN 315 NUT ·PLAIN (Air Frame)

AN 316 NUT - CHECK

AN

320 NUT· CASTLE, SHEAR

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Lrmcair International !nc., Rllprcmmtcd by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyrigl1t© Jflfl8, Redmnnd, QR 9775h

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AN hardware guide (continued)

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INTRODUCTION
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AN 335 NUT • PL. HEX (NC) Semi·Fin)

AN 340 NUT· HEX, MACH. SCREW (NC)

AN

341

NUT

HEX,

BRASS <Elec.)

AN

345

NUT - HEX,

MACH. SCREW (NF)

AN 350 NUT· WING

AN 355

NUT • SLO'ITED (Engine)

USAF 356 NUT ·PAL

·PLAIN (Engine)

AN 360 NUT

AN 362 NUT ·PLATE, SELF-LOCK. (Hi-Temp.) ~-

AN 363 NUT • HEX, SELF-LOCK. (Hi-Temp.)

AN 364 NUT· HEX. SELF-LOCK.

(Thin)

AN 365 NUT ·HEX, SELF-LOCK

AN 366 NUT

AN 373 NUT ·PLATE, SELF-LOCK. (100° CTSK) 6

AN 380 PIN· COTTER

AN 381 PIN·

AN 385 PIN • TAPERED, PLAIN

AN 386 PIN· THREADED TAPER

·PLATE, SELF-LOCK

COTTER, STAINLESS

AN 392 thru AN 406 PIN· CLEVIS

AN 415 PIN· LOCK

AN 416 PIN· RETAINING, SAFETY

AN 426 RIVET • 100° FL. HD., ALUM.

AN 427 RIVET - 100° FL. HD., Steel, Monel, Copper I=>

AN 430 RIVET • RD. HD., ALUM.

AN 435 RIVET • RD. HD., Steel, Monel, Copper

AN 442 RIVET • FL. HD., ALUM.

AN 450 RIVET·

AN 470 RIVET· UNIVERSAL HD., ALUM.

TUBULAR

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Lancair Internalionnl Inc., Reprmmnt.ed byNeico Aviation Inc., Copyright@ 1998, Redmond, OR 917v6- -.

AN hardware guide (continued)

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AN 481.CLEVIS - ROD END

AN 486 CLEVIS - ROD END ADJ.

AN 490 ROD END ·THREADED

AN 500 SCREW • FILL. HD. (NC)

AN 501 SCREW - FILL. HD. (NF)

AN 502 SCREW - DR. FILL. HD. (Alloy StL) (NF)

AN 503 SCREW - DR. FILL. HD. (Alloy Stl.) (NC)

AN 504 SCREW - RD. HD. SELF TAP.

AN 505 SCREW - FLAT HD., 82° (NC)

AN 506 SCREW - FLAT HD., 82° SELF TAP.

AN 507 SCREW - FLAT HD., 100° (NF & NC)

AN 508 SCREW - RD. HD. BRASS (Elec.)

AN 509 SCREW - FL HD. 100° (Structural)CALLOY STEELJ

AN 510 SCREW - FLAT HD. 82° (NF)

AN 515 SCREW • RD. HD. (NC)

AN 520 SCREW - RD. HD. (NF)

AN 525 SCREW - WASHER HD. (Alloy StL)

AN 526 SCREW - TRUSS HD. (NF & NC)

AN 530 SCREW • RD. HD., SHEET METAL AN 531 SCREW • FL. HD. 82° SHEET METAL (Type B)

AN 535 SCREW • RD. HD. DRIVE (Type "U")

AN 545 SCREW· WOOD, RD. HD.

AN 550 SCREW ·WOOD, FLAT HD. AN 565 SCREW • HDLESS., SET AN 663 TERMINAL - CABLE, DBLE. SHK. BALL <FOR SWAGING> QP

AN 664 TERMINAL- CABLE, SGLE. SHK. BALL CFORSWAGINGl Q)

AN 665 TERMINAL - CABLE, THDED. CLEVIS

CFORSWAGINGl Q) AN 665 TERMINAL - CABLE, THDED. CLEVIS

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Lnncnir Internntionnl lnc., Rnpresented by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright([) IH!l8, Redmond, OR 97756

AN hardware guide (continued)

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AN 666 TERMINAL • CABLE, THDED (for swaging) AN 667 TERMINAL • CABLE, FORK END (for swaging)

AN 668 TERMINAL • CABLE, EYE END (for swaging)

AN 669 • TERMINAL • CABLE, TURNBUCKLE (for swaging)

AN 737 CLAMP· HOSE

AN 741 CLAMP· TUBE

AN 742 CLAMP - PLAIN, SUPPORT

AN 900 GASKET· COP.· ASBESTOS, ANGULAR

AN901GASKET-METALTUBE

AN 931 GROMMET· ELASTIC AN 935 WASHER- LOCK, SPRING

AN 936 WASHER - LOCK TOOTH (Ext. & Int)

AN 960 WASHER· FLAT, AIRCRAFI'

AN 961 WASHER· FLAT, BRASS (Elec.)

AN 970 WASHER· FLAT, LARGE AREA

AN 975 WASHER· TAPER PIN

AN 986 RING· LOCK

_JJr~:;:~-:]1 Chapter I IN~~:UCTI~:2-0l-98

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Lune.air lnlomnlionnl Inc., Rcpreacmled by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright© 1998, Redmond, OR g775i;

AN hardware guide (continued)

AN804 AN824 HOSE ELBOW, TEE, Pipe Thread Flared Tube 900 AN807 AN82~5F~ube HOSE ELBOW, with
AN804
AN824
HOSE
ELBOW,
TEE,
Pipe Thread
Flared Tube
900
AN807
AN82~5F~ube
HOSE
ELBOW,
with Pipe
~ADAPTER
.
'
.
ad.onside
Pipe Thread
45•
(MS20825)
~Hoseto Universal
PLUG
AN814 "''I .,.
ANS2~6 Tu~~th
AND
NIPPLE,
BLEEDER,
Pipe Thread
Pipe Thread
(~
Screw Thread
on Run
(MS20826)
ANS27
AN912
UNION,
CROSS,
VJ
BUSHING,
Flared tube
Jared Tube
Pipe
Thread Reducer
AN832
UNION,
AN913
Flared Tube,
PLUG,
NIPPLE,
Bulkhead
FlaredTube
Square Head,
and
end pipe thread
Pipe Thread
Universal
<MS20913)
,AN81S
AN833
AN914 IC,
ELBOW,
fjl:'I_ ELBOW
Flared
NUT,
Tube,
Coupling
Internal
Bulkhead and
and E:rternal
Univeraal, 90°
Pipe Thread, 90°
AN834
TEE,
AN915
AN819 s
(MS20819)
Flared, Tube,
ELBOW,
SLEEVE,
Bulkhead and
tern.al and
Coupling
Universal
External
ipe Thread, 45°
AN837
AN919
~REDUCER,
External Thread
Universal,, 45°
AN924 ·f1
AN83Sr
NUT,
ELBOW,
Flared Tube and
Pipe Thread, 90°
ELBOW
Flared Tube,
Hose to
Bulkhead and
Universal, 90°
Universal Fitting
<MS20822)
AN929 G
ANS40
ELBOW,
CAP,
Flared Tube
Flared Tube and
~SENIPPLE,
Fitting
Pipe Thread. 45°
Pipe Threaded
(MS20823)
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Lancn.ir Jnternntionnl Inc., Represented hy Neico Aviation Jnr., Copyright(!) 1998, Redmond, OR !l775fi

Torque Chart

Fig. l:F:l.

DOLTS lJOI,TS DOLTS Steel Tension Steel Tenstan Alumlnunt AN 3 thru AN 20 AN 42
DOLTS
lJOI,TS
DOLTS
Steel Tension
Steel Tenstan
Alumlnunt
AN 3 thru AN 20
AN 42 thru AN 49
AN 73 thru AN 81
MB 20004 thrn MS 20024
N AS
14-4
thrn
N AS
158
.
AN aDD thrn AN 20DD
AN 173DD thru AN 186DD
N
AS 333 thru N AS 340
AN 173 t.hrn AN 186
MS 20033 thm MS 20046
MS 20073
MS 20074
AN 509 NK9
MS 24694
AN 525 NK525
NAS 583 thru NAB 590
NAS 624 thru NAS 644
AN 509DD
AN 525D
~IS 27039D
N
AS
1303 thru N AS 1320
MS 24604DD
NAS 172
NAS 174
NAS 517
Ste.al shear bolt
MS 27030
I
NAH 46'
NUTS
NUTS
NUTS
51.nol Tcm.slon
Slet!l Shcnr
Btf'tl Tension
Steel Shear
Aluminum Ten.slon
Aluminum Shear
AN 310
AN 320
AN 310
AN 320
AN 365D
AN 320D
AN 315
AN 364
AN 31G
AN 364
AN 310D
AN 364D
AN 363
NAB 1022
AN 363
NAS 1022
NAS 1021D
NAS 1022D
AN 365
MS 17826
AN 365
MS 17826
NAS 1021
MS 20364
MS 17825
MS 20364
MS 17825
MS 20365
MS 21045
MS 21045
MS 20365
NAS 1021
MS 20500
NAS 679
NAB 679
NAS 1291
FINE THREAD SERIES
Torqu11 Llmlta
Tor?:.~ 1 ~ 8 ~lta
To"f~~l~~ta
Tor?:.~ 1 ,~lt.a
Tor?:~,~~~lts
Tor?:.~ita~lt.a
Nut-bolt
ln.·lbn.
""
Min.
Min.
Mu.
Min.
Min.
"'"'·
"""'·
Min.
"'"'·
Min.
Mu.
8
-36
12
15
7
D
--------
--------
--------
--------
5
10
3
6
· 15
10
-32
20
25
12
15
25
30
20
10
15
5
10
Y.-28
50
70
30
40
80
100
50
60
30
45
15
30
DO
%1-24
100
60
85
120
145
70
40
65
25
40
l~O
I
H-24
160
190
95
110
200
250
120
75
110
45
70
150
J{r20
450
590
270
300
520
630
300
400
180
280
llO
170
H-20
480
690
290
419
770
950
450
550
280
410
160
260
J{r18
800
1, 000
480
600
1, 100
1, 300
650
800
380
580
230
360
,, _18
1, 100
1, 300
660
780
1, 250
1, 550
750
950
550
670
270
420
2,300
2,500
1,300
1, 500
2,650
3, 200
1, 600
1, 900
950
1, 250
560
880
~· -16
J\-14
2, 500
3,000
1,500
1, 890.
3, 550
4, 350
2, 100
2, 600
I, 250
1, 900
750
1, 200
1
-14
3,700
4,500
21 200
3, 300
4, 500
5,500
2, 700
3,300
1, 600
2,400
950
1, 500
l)l -12
5. 000
7,000
3,.000
4, 200
6,000
7, 300
3,600
4,400
2, 100
3, 200
1, 250
2, 000
lY. -12
o, 000
11,000
5,400
6,600
11, 000
13,400
6, 600
8,000
3, 900
5,600
2,300
3, 650
Note:
All bolts should be torqued according to the above chart
unless otherwise specified.
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Lancair Internutional lnc., Represl!nted by Neico Avintion Inc., Copyright (f) 1998, Hedmond, OR !l7756

G. BASIC SHOP TOOLS

The tools listed are not mandatory for your shop, but we have found them extremely useful in ours. The tools we feel are most important are marked with an asterisk(*).

You probably won't be familiar with some ofthe tools listed, but the purpose and description ofthese items will be explained.

Saber saw (jig saw)* Very handy for cutting out large or complex shapes from pre-preg material. You can use a manual saw, but it won't be fun. Or a very pretty sight. Either way, be sure you get sharp blades, and change them often. Dull blades will chew up the edges and make for more sanding/smoothing work later. We use carbide tipped blades exclusively for composite cutting. They work great.

Hand drill or drill motor*

Most ofthe material you would have to drill on a glass kit is fairly soft and thin, and should require no more than a small drill motor with at least a 3/8" chuck. If you don't already have one, go buy one with a variable speed (variable, not two speed),

and get one with a 1/2" chuck. The extra couple ofbucks they cost will be worth it in the long run, and some ofthe stuffyou need to drill, like plastic parts, must be drilled at a very slow speed that is below the range ofall single and most two speed drills.

Drill Motor

Fig. l:G:l.

single and most two speed drills. Drill Motor Fig. l:G:l. Drill press Here's a tool that

Drill press Here's a tool that most people don't have, but no one that's ever had one will be without again. For precision drilling it is a must. For instance it can be used in drilling out broken bolts, and with a fly-cutting tip it can cut holes large enough to amaze your neighbors. I wouldn't run right out and buy one just for building the plane, but I would make friends with that guy down the street that has one gathering dust in his garage.

down the street that has one gathering dust in his garage. L1111cair lnternnlionul Inc., Reprnsented by

L1111cair lnternnlionul Inc., Reprnsented by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright 0 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

Drill bits (Numbered AND Fractional)

It takes a lot of cheap drill bits to make a lousy hole that one good bit could have made quickly and perfectly. Ifyou have a vault to keep them safe in, bite the bullet and buy a good set ofnumbered drill bits. Ifcared for, they will last longer and give you better service than your foreign made car. Unfortunately, a good set will seem

to cost about as much as that car.

Rotary sander (rotary or orbital type)*

This I would go out and buy for building a kit-plane, unless you want arms like Arnold Schwarzenegger. It will definitely make sanding and smoothing the rough edges a lot easier, and a good orbital can be had with a trapper bag to keep a lot of the "stuff' out ofthe air. And your clothes. And your nose. And everywhere. We don't use one with a bag here, which is why sometimes even in July it looks like it just snowed in the shop.

Die grinder (angle grinder)

If you have one, bravo. This is a powerful tool that can custom fit your ribs and bulkheads quickly. Be very careful though, ifthe high speed grinder surface gets away from you, it can quickly customize everything in the general vicinity. While not a necessity, if you have a used tools store in the area, it would give you an

excuse to browse around.

2 & 4 ft. Carpenter's levels If you want a plane to fly straight, you should build it straight. These are indispensable in a good shop. Get the good aluminum ones (you'll be holding them up, down and at various angles in between for hours at a time), make sure they start out life in your shop with straight edges, and round the sharp ends a bit so you won't gouge any holes into precious prepared surfaces. All you might find is just a few, little, easily filled dents.

Carpenter's Level

Fig. l:G:2.

easily filled dents. Carpenter's Level Fig. l:G:2. Lancair Intematiannl lnc., Repre11enl.lld byNeico Aviation
easily filled dents. Carpenter's Level Fig. l:G:2. Lancair Intematiannl lnc., Repre11enl.lld byNeico Aviation

Lancair Intematiannl lnc., Repre11enl.lld byNeico Aviation Inc., Copyright ID 1998, Redmond, OR 9775!i

Carpenter's square Buy this when you get the carpenter's levels, and for the same reason. Don't round these ends, just be careful.

===O= I ~
===O=
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Carpenter's Square (Framing Square)

Fig. l:G:3.

Carpenter's square

Square (Framing Square) Fig. l:G:3. Carpenter's square Clamps (Vise grip clamps, spring clamps, and "C"

Clamps (Vise grip clamps, spring clamps, and "C" clamps) Here's a briefdescription ofthe clamps you will need.

A

again, never use these on any fiberglass, prepreg or carbon composite parts. They

couple of the vise grip clamps for really forcing things together (never-stress

grip with enough force to do great damage to the parts, which may not be visible

to the naked eye.)

Spring clamps- get a bunch ofthese when you wander through the used tool store. Three or four large ones like Arnold uses for strengthening his grip, and about a dozen that you can work with one hand while you try to hold the six other parts in exact proper position.

"C" clamps. These should be in the bin next to the spring clamps in the used tool store. Ifthere is an assortment, get three or four ofeach. Again, use caution when applying these to any glass parts. Tighten slowly, and only until just snug. Ifyou hear any cracking and popping when putting these on, remember who has to fly

in what you have just damaged.

Clamps, Assorted

Fig. l:G:4.

in what you have just damaged. Clamps, Assorted Fig. l:G:4.
in what you have just damaged. Clamps, Assorted Fig. l:G:4.

~b~-:::=:?=:Jl:§'"::A:"·=:~§~§=:A~~=ID~®_W:::: :

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Lanc.1.ir lnternntional Inc., Representlld by Neico Avintion Inc., Cnpyright ID 1998, R~dmond, OR 97756

Now that you have clamped the parts together and drilled the holes, the instruc- tion book tells you that you need to insert pop rivets. The best thing to do this with is a pop rivet tool. The second best thing to do this with doesn't work. Get the pop rivet tool. It should come with three extra tips for use with all four common sizes of pop rivets, 3/32", 1/8", 5/32", and 3/16". Three cheap ones will get you through most any project, but a good one will last a lifetime. Get the good one. Besides, it's cheap if you buy it at that used tool store you've been spending so much time in lately.

SPECIALIZED TOOLS

We call them specialized shop tools because it makes it a little easier to swallow the higher price tags on these items. Again, the tools listed are not mandatory for your shop, but we have found them extremely useful in ours. The tools we feel are most important are marked with an asterisk(*).

Air die grinder tool*

The one we have shown here has a saw blade installed, but they come with a fantastic array ofspecial bits (there's that special word again). We can't imagine building a composite aircraft without a die grinder tool. You'll use this tool more than any other in your growing collection.

Die Grinder

Fig. l:G:5.

cutting line
cutting line

Saw blade~

collection. Die Grinder Fig. l:G:5. cutting line Saw blade~ Note: If you don't have an aircompressor

Note:

If you don't have an aircompressor consider getting

a Dremmel tool. The Dremmel \vorks similarly to the

air die grinder but it is not as po\verful.

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Lam:air J11tern11lional Inc., Repremmled by Neicu Aviation Inc., Copyright© HJ!JB, Redmond, OR 97756

Tungsten carbide bits for Dremel tool*

During construction ofthe prototype Lancair we were in need ofa Dremel bit that could easily cut prepreg. The prepreg is very easy to work with, but it eats power tool blades/bits for breakfast. Dremel's tungsten carbide cutters come in various shapes and sizes and are the best bet. Some Dremel part numbers to look for are 9931through9936. We now use these bits almost exclusively because they really cut. As long as you don't use them on aluminum or Kevlarn 1 , which tend to gum them up, the carbide bits last a long time. They're expensive, though. We paid abov'- $12.00 for a single bit, but they're worth it in the long run. For availability

checkhobbystores, hardware stores, Sears, as well as the Lancair Kit Components Catalog. They also offer a wide range ofcutting, grinding, buffing, polishing, etc. bits for use with the Dremel. If they have them at that used tool store, get one of each. You may never use them all, but they'll sure impress your neighbors. Especially if you make one ofthese snappy little holders to display them in. You can make it out of a piece of 2x4, drilling holes as you add bits to your collection.

Tungsten Carbide Bits and Snappy Little Holder

Fig. l:G:6.

Tungsten Carbide Bits and Snappy Little Holder Fig. l:G:6. Luu:nir Intemutionnl Inc., Rupresented by Neico Aviation

Epoxy pump (Sticky Stuff dispenser)* The Sticky Stuff dispenser will pay for itselfin saved epoxy. With every pump of the handle, you receive the proper amount ofresin and hardener, no weighing, no measuring. With practice you'll know the proper number ofpumps needed for the size oflamination you are doing. We offer this item in our catalog, and highly recommend its use.

Many builders are using a light bulb heated box over their epoxy pumps to keep the epoxy warm and thin. This is fine, we do the same, but if you're not going to use the pump for a week or so, turn the light bulb off in the box. Otherwise the volatiles in the epoxy can evaporate out and cause faulty curing or no curing at all. If you are a dedicated builder, using the pump every night (I've heard there are such people) you needn't worry about evaporation and can leave the heat on. Use no higher than a 25 watt bulb in your pump box.

Epoxy Pump

Fig. l:G:7.

than a 25 watt bulb in your pump box. Epoxy Pump Fig. l:G:7. Lancair !nternnlionnl Inc.,
than a 25 watt bulb in your pump box. Epoxy Pump Fig. l:G:7. Lancair !nternnlionnl Inc.,

Lancair !nternnlionnl Inc., lfopru~ented by Neicu Avintion Inc., Copyright 0 l!l!J8, Redmond, OR 97756

Roller blade for cutting fiberglass*

Don't even think ofusing scissors to cut the fiberglass you've just unrolled on your new cutting table. That's like using a 1/2" brush to paint the Golden Gate Bridge. Use a roller blade (looks like a pizza cutter, but it ain't) and you'll cut the time you spend cutting cloth in half (at least!). These roller blades are available through Aircraft Spruce, Lancair, or your local fabric store. They sell under the names of roller blades, rotary cutters, and fabric cutters, but all models closely resemble each other. Pick up a couple of extra blades when you buy it and save yourself a trip later. We suggest getting the aluminum rotary cutter for fiberglass work as it tends to last much longer.

Roller Blade

Fig. l:G:S.

rotary cutter
rotary cutter
Plastic rotary cutter
Plastic rotary
cutter

Here at Lancair, our pet name for the roller blade was "Pizza cutter". As word spread to our builders of this handy tool, sure enough, we started getting com- plaints that these vaunted "Pizza cutters" didn't cut fiberglass worth a s@*t. Yes, they were using true pizza cutters, not actual blades. Sorry for the mix-up, guys, and abondanza!

2" side paint roller (without furry part) or wallpaper roller*

Another simple but handy tool in our shop is the roller. We use a small, 1-1/2" wide paint roller (without the furry paint sleeve), and a larger, 3" wide roller for pushing the air bubbles our from under laminates. Try sliding a length ofPVC tubing onto the paint roller to get a smooth, hard rolling surface. Common paint rollers work okay, but we made a solid aluminum roller that works even better. Wallpaper rollers are also good for this application.

Wallpaper rollers are also good for this application. Lancair lnternationnl Ine., Represented by N!lica Avinli1m

Lancair lnternationnl Ine., Represented by N!lica Avinli1m lne., Cnpyrighl© 1998, Redmond, OH !!7756

Smooth, Hard Faced Roller

Fig. l:G:9.

Smooth, Hard Faced Roller Fig. l:G:9. 1 to 1-1/2" wide all-thread Rollers*. These rollers are the

1 to 1-1/2" wide all-thread Rollers*. These rollers are the best tool for working the bubbles out of the wet lay-ups. Make yourself a couple of these or buy them finished.

Make yourself a couple of these or buy them finished. 'Bend the rod into a "handle"

'Bend the rod into a "handle"

1 to 1-112" wide all- thread (drill each end to accept rod)

1-112" wide all- thread (drill each end to accept rod) Lnncair Internnlional Jue., lfopresenled by Neicu

Lnncair Internnlional Jue., lfopresenled by Neicu Aviation Inc., Copyright ID 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

Rivet squeezer

Rivet Squeezer Fig. l:G:lO. Clecoes and Cleco pliers Fig. l:G:ll. Cleco Cleco Pliers
Rivet Squeezer
Fig. l:G:lO.
Clecoes and Cleco pliers
Fig. l:G:ll.
Cleco
Cleco Pliers
p_::.te.:.;r:_l=---IN-TR_L_R_~v_D_U_C_TI_~-~-12_-_0_1-_9s

This tool will save hours whenever you are installing rivets. Next trip to the used tool store, get one ofthese, too.

ClecoTM Pliers and Clecoes*

These are very handy. You should have the tool and about 15 ofthe Cleco bits. We sell them, use them and recommend them to all ofour friends.

sell them, use them and recommend them to all ofour friends. ~§ -l+*i-I
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Lnncair !nlernationnl Inc., Reprnsunted \Jy Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright ID 19!J8, Redmond, OR 97756

Digital SMART level*

You aren't very likely to find one of these at that used tool mart. Try calling the hardware store. The Smart Levelis made by Wedge Innovations and has an LCD readout instead of a bubble. The center of the Smart Level pops out to become a small, sixinch level that's extremelyhandy for measuring control surface throws, seat back angles, firewall angles, engine thrust lines, etc., all with an accuracy of 1/lOth of a degree.

The SMART Level

Fig. l:G:l2.

accuracy of 1/lOth of a degree. The SMART Level Fig. l:G:l2. We've received a few inquiries

We've received a few inquiries where to buy SMART Levels. Superflite is one of a few mail order outfits that carry the SMART level. It's not cheap, $100 just for the center module, progressively more expensive with the longer rails. This is a great tool, but always remember to re-calibrate the level module when you turn it on, otherwise you could be offby a couple of degrees.

SUPERFLITE 2149 E. Pratt Blvd. Elk Grove, IL. 60007

1-800-323-0611

2149 E. Pratt Blvd. Elk Grove, IL. 60007 1-800-323-0611 Lnni:air lnlemalionnl !nc., Represented by Neicn Aviation

Lnni:air lnlemalionnl !nc., Represented by Neicn Aviation Inc., Copyright(i) 1!1!18, lfodmomJ, OR 97756

Tubing bender

This will be there at the used tool store, where you should be on a first name basis with the owner by now. Tell him youjust need one for 1/4" tubing. It should be in the bin right next to the 37° Flaring tool.

37° flaring tool

Keep this with your tube bender. You won't need it often, but when you do nothing else willwork. Don't use automotive type flaring tools-theyhave a differentflaring angle.

Surveyor transit

Ifyou love gadgets, this one will be fun, but a water level would work just as well for a whole lot less money (just keep a mop around). It may save you an hour or two in setup time, and can usually be rented from surveyor/construction suppliers. Like the water level, it still takes two people to use it effectively, but you can quickly level fuselages, wings, horizontal stabs and jigs, staying dry in the process.

horizontal stabs and jigs, staying dry in the process. Transit Water level Transit and Water Level

Transit

Water level

Transit and Water Level

Fig. l:G:l3.

Water Level

Water level Transit and Water Level Fig. l:G:l3. Water Level A cheap and simple means ofcheckingwingwashout,
Water level Transit and Water Level Fig. l:G:l3. Water Level A cheap and simple means ofcheckingwingwashout,

A cheap and simple means ofcheckingwingwashout, horizontal stab position, and other big jobs on the airframe. We use 1/4" inch I.D. clear tubing, available at the hardware store. I've heard that dying the water in your water level tube with food coloring can make it easier to read, but when I tried it, the coloring didn't help much, it just messed up the tube.

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Lancair Inti;irnntionnl inc., Reprnanuted by Neko Avintion Inc., Copyright© 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

Plumb bob

These should be laying around the tool store somewhere. Since you will be (hopefully) working indoor out of the wind, you will only need a small one for measuring things for vertical.

l" Makita belt sander Areal handy item, you might score one ofthese at the local tool shop (isn't your wife starting to wonder about all the time you've been spending there lately?). Get an assortment ofdifferent grit belts for it, they'll all come ;n handy before this is over.

Heat gun

Ifyou have one ofthese, it can help to warm a couple ofparts you want to bond, to straighten a warped part, or a lot ofother jobs. It can also destroy parts ifcare is not taken. Take care when using. The heat gun is a well used tool in our shop, not only for heating parts but for gently heating to cure epoxy, shrinking heat shrink tubing on electrical connections, etc.

SUPPLIES

l mil thick plastic drop cloths

You will use a lot of these. Fortunately you can probably get them at most hardware stores for about a buck a roll. They're not only great for covering things,

but you'll be using them in the preparation of BID tapes and other fiberglass layups. Get several, but be sure they are all the 1mil thick ones. Thinner, and they won't be easy to handle, thicker and they will be too hard to work with when we do the BID tapes. More about that later.

Paper towels

If you have a lot of storage room, buy these by the case. If not, keep at least 3 or 4 rolls on hand. You'll be using them for cleaning up a lot of drips and dribbles of this and that, as well as using them for some other trick things we'll talk about later

in Chapter 5.

Tongue depressors

We supplythese in the kit, and there should be enough to complete the project with

a few left over. You'll be using them mostly formixing sticks to mix up the epoxy you pump from your nifty Sticky Stuff epoxy dispenser (you do have that on order now, don't you?). You will also be shown how to make a neat little tool out of one later, the kind that you will want to cherish and hang from a special hook on your shop wall.

to cherish and hang from a special hook on your shop wall. Lum:air lnlernntional lnc., Repre~ented

Lum:air lnlernntional lnc., Repre~ented \Jy Neico Avi11tiun Inc., Copyright(!) l!l98, lfor.Jmund, OR 97756

Tongue Depressor

Fig. l:G:l4.

Tongue depressor 0
Tongue depressor
0

Jl[~:~~:]l---'C'---h_a p;_:ct_:cer=-l'---IN-TR_L_R_~v_~_U_C_T_I_~-~-i2_-_o_1-_9s

Brushes (l" wide) These too are supplied in the kit.
Brushes (l" wide) These too are supplied in the kit.

Brushes (l" wide)

These too are supplied in the kit. There's a whole bunch ofthem in there, but don't give them away, you'll need most ofthem for the project. Simply clean in acetone and re-use.

Brush, 1" Wide

Fig. l:G:l5.

II II
II
II

Rubber squeegees

Hit up the auto parts store for a set of the plastic Bondo™ smoothing paddles. There should be 3 or 4 different sizes in the package. They will all come in handy for getting excess epoxy and air out oflayups, applying and smoothing out micro, and any number of other things. Clean up is pretty easy and they should last through the project.

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Lancair Juternalional lnc., Repretienled by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright@ 1998, Ifodmond, OR 9775G

Sand paper (40-320 grits)

You will need a lot ofthe 40 grit sandpaper for working with the wing ribs, all the spar webs, etc. Nearly every time you have to apply epoxy or BID tapes to something, you will have to rough it up with 40 grit first. Get some for your belt sander, your sanding blocks, put it everywhere. You'll use all ofit. The other grits you canjust get a couple ofsheets ofeach and set them aside for a while. Ifyou can find it, 3M Production Paper Sheets are the best we've seen for preparing fiberglass/carbon fiber. The sheets start out life as 2-3/4" x 17-1/2" and are meant for longboard sanders. By cutting them in half, they fit perfectly into most rubber hand sanding blocks. 3M calls them "The Green Corps" and, ofcourse, the paper is green. Auto body supply and auto paint stores should carry it.

1 ~_N_o1_2-_0_1-_s_s l-0'11

Instant glue

You'll find some ofthis in the kit, and it will come in handy for many ofthe steps called out in the manual. You can use it to temporarily tack most any parts together, it is void-filling, and it can become permanent ifyou use too much. Just

a drop or two will suffice for any ofthe steps in the manual. You can use it to glue

a piano hinge in place and measuring where clecoes would get in the way. You can

test the placement of brackets, you can find your wife using it to repair broken fingernails, you can lose it to the rest ofyour household ofyou don't keep it hidden

somewhere. If they do get it, just call us. We keep it in stock, along with the accelerator spray.

Instant glue accelerator

The ultimate stufffor impatient people, this makes instant glue even faster (more instant?). A quick spray of this stuff and the glue is set, right now.

The eyeball

Our last tool used to check how straight an edge is, it is the most complicated in design and yet the cheapest and most accurate ofall. It's called the human eyeball. These eyeballs are widely available and should be used whenever possible.

Eyeball

Fig. l:G:l6.

and should be used whenever possible. Eyeball Fig. l:G:l6. If an edge or surface looks straight

If an edge or surface looks straight to the eye, they are straight enough. Even minor discrepancies in wing tip washout can easily be detected by kneeling down ten feet in front ofyour Lancair, closing one eye, and swiveling your head. Sight one trailing edge tip above the high point ofthe wing, swivel your head, and sight the other tip, comparing the two. The eyeball, use it!

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Lnncair lntemntional Inc., Repreiwnted byNeko Aviation Inc., Copyright([) W9B, Hedmuml, OH 97750

H. PREMOLDED PARTS.

The Premolded Parts

Fig. l:H:l.

Ci) 0
Ci)
0

z

H. PREMOLDED PARTS. The Premolded Parts Fig. l:H:l. Ci) 0 z Lancnir luternational Inc., Ifopresent.cd by

Lancnir luternational Inc., Ifopresent.cd by Neico Aviation Ine., Copyright tD 19!!8, Rndmoml, OR 9775G

Parts:

1) R. Bottom Wing Skin 2) R. Top Wing Skin 3) R. Bottom Flap 4) R. Top Flap

R. Bottom Aileron

5)

6) R. Top Aileron 7) R. Wingtip 8) R. Lens Mount 9) R. Lens lO)L. Bottom 'Ning Skin ll)L. Top Wing Skin 12)L. Bottom Flap 13)L. Top Flap 14)L. Bottom Aileron 15)L. Top Aileron 16)L. Wingtip 17)L. Lens Mount lS)L. Lens 19)Bottom Horizontal Stabilizer 20)Top Horizontal Stabilizer 2l)L. Bottom Elevator 22)L. Top Elevator 23)R. Bottom Elevator 24)R. Top Elevator 25)Bottom Trim Tab Skin 26)Top Trim Tab Skin

27)Spinner

28)TopCowl

29)Bottom Cowl 30)Bottom Fuselage 31)L. Top Wing Fairing 32)L. Bottom Wing Fairing 33)R. Top Wing Fairing 34)R. Bottom Wing Fairing 35)Rear Access Panel 36)L. Vertical Stabilizer 37)R. Vertical Stabilizer 38)L. Rudder 39)R. Rudder 40)Top Fuselage Skin 41)Cabin Door 42)Baggage Door

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Lancnir International Inc., Represented by Neico Aviation Jnc., Copyright© l!HJ8, Redmoml, OR !J77fiG

I.

PROCEDURE

Cleaning, care, and handling of parts

1. Cleaning Parts

You will find instructions calling for the use ofcleaning agents throughout this manual. We have found that Methylene Chloride (MC) cleaner is very good in its ability to remove impurities from surfaces. As with all cleaners. be sure to read

and follow the safety directions. Acetone is a good cleaner but Methylene Chloride

(MC) is superior. MEK should not be used. As of December 1997 Lancair is still

testing alternative methods of cleaning parts.

2. Storage of Premolded Parts

The manner in whichyour pre-moldedparts are stored isveryimportant. Care and thought should be exercised when laying pre-molded parts away for some future use which could be months away. Try to store these parts in a position that won't produce any distorting forces (i.e., store them supported in a position as close to the actual use orientation as possible).

Unlike fiberglass composite parts, the carbon fiber parts are much stiffer and less prone to distortion, however it is still highly recommended that great care be exercised when storing these valuable components. Also, all composite parts should be kept away from direct sunlight for any extended periods of time. An afternoon or a day is perhaps okay. However a week, for example, in direct sunlight would not be acceptable.

3. Honeycomb Prepreg Panels

The prepreg honeycomb panels are available in two types: 3/8" core+ 2 BID per side and 1/4" core+ 1 BID per side. All BID ply schedules must remain the same when using prepreg panels (i.e., if a part calls for 6 BID on one side and 2 BID on the other side, the 2 BID honeycomb panel will require 4 additional BID on the first side). Also, all attachment BID schedules must remain the same (i.e., ifplans call for a 6 BID attachment, then 6 plies (wet layup) must be used.) Typically l" contact on each surface unless otherwise noted is sufficient.

on each surface unless otherwise noted is sufficient. Lancnir Intentnticmnl lnc., Reprenented by Ncico Avinlion

Lancnir Intentnticmnl lnc., Reprenented by Ncico Avinlion Inc., CtJpyright<D 19!JB, Redmond, OR 97756

J. JOINT DESCRIPTION

Adjoining parts are attached with bonded, overlappingjoints (joggles) reinforced with fiberglass strips, see Figure l:J:l. Figure l:J:2 shows the overlaps prior to assembly (the dimensions shown in the figures are approximate). As supplied, the part edges may have excess material. To obtain the dimensions shown the excess material must be trimmed by the builder.

Reinforced Overlapping Joints

Fig. l:J:l.

2 ply builder layup Interior surface 1 ply builder ---"" layup
2 ply builder layup
Interior
surface
1 ply builder ---""
layup

Structural Adhesive

Trimmed Parts

Fig. l:J:2.

layup Structural Adhesive Trimmed Parts Fig. l:J:2. Single Joggle Note: Before trimming, single and double
layup Structural Adhesive Trimmed Parts Fig. l:J:2. Single Joggle Note: Before trimming, single and double
layup Structural Adhesive Trimmed Parts Fig. l:J:2. Single Joggle Note: Before trimming, single and double
layup Structural Adhesive Trimmed Parts Fig. l:J:2. Single Joggle Note: Before trimming, single and double
layup Structural Adhesive Trimmed Parts Fig. l:J:2. Single Joggle Note: Before trimming, single and double
layup Structural Adhesive Trimmed Parts Fig. l:J:2. Single Joggle Note: Before trimming, single and double

Single Joggle

Note: Before trimming, single and double joggle swfaces may look similar. To learn what each looks like, examine the front ofthe fuselage. The joggle that is forward ofthe

The area

firewall, where the bottom cowl will meet, is an example ofa singlejoggle.

above and behind the firewall, where the forward deck will mount, is a double joggle.

CAUTION:

EDGES OF PARTS MAY BE SHARP. HANDLE WITH CARE, USE GLOVES OR FILE/SAND OFF SHARP EDGES.

HANDLE WITH CARE, USE GLOVES OR FILE/SAND OFF SHARP EDGES. Lrmcnir Jntemutfonnl Inc., Represented by Neico

Lrmcnir Jntemutfonnl Inc., Represented by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright© 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

K. TRIMMINGPROCEDURE

1. Place the fuselage on a convenient working surface. Mark a line on all joggle

surfaces as shown in figure l:K:l. Amarking tool can be made from a piece ofwood,

a nail and a pencil. Make sure the nail tip is well rounded and has no sharp edges which could damage the glass fibers during use. On doublejoggled surfaces, mark

a line as shown in figure l:K:l.

Trimming Procedure

Fig. l:K:l.

Marking Trim Line, SINGLE JOGGLE This device is not necessary, just a possible method l"
Marking Trim Line, SINGLE JOGGLE
This device is not
necessary, just a
possible method
l"
TRIM
is not necessary, just a possible method l" TRIM Lancnir lntemnlionnl Inc., Representetl by Neico Avinlion
is not necessary, just a possible method l" TRIM Lancnir lntemnlionnl Inc., Representetl by Neico Avinlion

Lancnir lntemnlionnl Inc., Representetl by Neico Avinlion Inc., CopyrighttD HJ98, Redmond, OR !!7756

2. Using the shears, cut along the lines. Refer to Figure l:K:2 for proper appearance ofthe edge after trimming. Ifnecessary, trim additional material to obtain correct edge shape. Some sanding may be useful to complete the trim and smooth the edge.

3. Repeat this trimming procedure for all joggles.

Shearing Joggle

Fig. l:K:2.

/ \ , ~ i''
/
\
,
~
i''

This is the inner joggle edge, measure out I" for your

cut line. The double joggled parts work similarly.

for your cut line. The double joggled parts work similarly. Incorrectly trimmed Correctly trimmed edge :C:
Incorrectly trimmed
Incorrectly trimmed
The double joggled parts work similarly. Incorrectly trimmed Correctly trimmed edge :C: :h=:a::.pc :t:::e::
The double joggled parts work similarly. Incorrectly trimmed Correctly trimmed edge :C: :h=:a::.pc :t:::e::

Correctly trimmed edge

:C:

:h=:a::.pc

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Lancair International Inc., Represented by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright© 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

L.

DRILLING ALIGNMENT HOLES

1. Equipment required:

Electric drill 1/8" Drill bit

2. Procedure

To obtain proper overlap alignment during assembly, holes are drilled for screws or clecoes, which are placed in these holes to hold the parts in proper alignment during cure time.

Using a 1/8" drill bit, drill alignment holes in the two parts to be joined (See Fig.

1-27).

Place screws or clecoes in the alignment holes, and drill the rivet holes every 2" in-between alignment holes.

Drilling Alignment Holes

Fig. l:L:l.

Drill alignment holes, as far apart as is practical, with 1/f!' bit. After parts are
Drill alignment holes, as far apart as is practical, with
1/f!' bit. After parts are temporarily clecoed together,
you'll drill rivet holes (1/8") every 2" along seams
NOTE: The pop rivets are only used
as a clamping device, and will
be drilled out after bonding.

M.

REMOVING THE PROTECTIVE COATING (PEELPLY)

1. Description of Parts

Molded parts are shipped with a protective coating of"peelply" material on their inner surfaces. This material will interfere with bonding and must be removed. The peelply usually sticks out from the edge ofa part in at least one area and looks like white cloth. Where the peelply meets and lays on the part surface it becomes

transparent.

WARNING:

ALL PEELPLY MUST BE REMOVED FROM BOND AREAS TO OBTAIN GOOD BONDS. BONDING OR LAYING FIBERGLASS OVER PEELPLY COULD RESULT IN STRUCTURAL FAILURE.

Most of the peelply has already been removed from your pre-molded parts, but some may remain.

Peelply is removed by hand. It can require considerable force to pull the peelply

offin some places. As it is pulled off, it usually tears offin odd shaped pieces. Use

a utility knife to pick up a new edge when necessary. Use care not to cut into the glass ofthe parts.

The white cotton strips running in irregular directions on the surface of the peelply are required by the manufacturing process. These will come offwith the peelply but more pulling force will be required.

NOTE: Although removingpeelply looks simple, it can cause serious injury ifyour

hand slips and scrapes a sharp edge. This has happened to us here at Lancair and

it is not at all fun. Please be careful. The peelply can be removed from parts at

this time. However, it does provide some protection and may be left on until those parts are needed for assembly. At that time it MUST be removed.

needed for assembly. At that time it MUST be removed. Lrmcair lnlcmationnl Inc., R<lpresentcd by N!licu

Lrmcair lnlcmationnl Inc., R<lpresentcd by N!licu Aviation Inc., CopyrightO 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

N.

DRILLING

It takes practice to drill a close tolerance hole in aluminum and fiberglass. We're not all precision machinists here at the shop, but through trial and error we've come up with some drill combinations that work well for various size screws and rivets.

First a note about tolerances. When a bolt is holding a bracket tight against a bulkhead, rib, firewall etc., you needn't drill a .001" tolerance hole, because the bolt's clampingaction willkeep the bracketfrom wearing the bolthole larger. This applies to rod end bearings and bellcrank bearings that are mounted tight with elastic locknuts. In this case, the slop in the bearings are not dependent on the tolerance ofthe holes.

Here is a list of drills we commonly use for various bolts and rivets:

-AN 426 rivets are .097" diameter, use #40 drill.

-1/8" rivets are .125" diameter, use 1/8" or #30 (.1285") drills.

-#6 screws are .137", drill a sloppy#29 (.136) hole or a tight #28 (.1405").

-#8 screws are .161", #20 (.161") and #21 (.159") both work well.

-3/16" (AN3) bolts can use, in addition to the obvious 3/16" drill, a #13 hole with reaming to get a tight fit, (See above section when and where this is necessary). A #12 hole is sometimes too sloppy but can be used for unimportant, quick and dirty holes.

-1/4" (AN4) bolts use 1/4" drill, of course. Also handy are lettered drills, like "E" (.250") or D (.246") with a reamer.

When drilling, creep up on your final drill size. If you want a tight AN4 hole and simply use a 1/4" drill first, the hole will be loose and usually triangular shaped. Try drilling a 3/16" hole first, then 7/32", then 1/4". Tbe extra one minute spent changingdrills is wellworth it, especially ifyou're drilling a hole that needs a tight tolerance (See above).

drilling a hole that needs a tight tolerance (See above). Lnncair International Inc., Represented by Neko

Lnncair International Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation In~-, Copyright ID 1998, Hedmond, OR 9775fi

Bolt Holes Not Requiring Tight Tolerance

Fig. l:N:l.

Free spinning pulley, sleeve, etc.

Free spinning pulley, sleeve, etc.
Tolerance Fig. l:N:l. Free spinning pulley, sleeve, etc. These bolts simply hold two fixed objects together.

These bolts simply hold two fixed objects together.

They are usually secured with elastic locknuts which are

torqued down tight

The possibility of

excessive wear

because of a loose tolerance hole is remote,

One the other hand, bolt holes that require close tolerance are those in which the bolt can rotate freely. When a castle nut and cotter pin are called for, it means the nut and bolt will not be tightened against a fixed object but will allow the object to float between the brackets. A loose tolerance bolt hole will allow the bolt to vibrate and slowly enlarge the hole.

Bolt Holes Requiring Tight Tolerance

Fig. l:N:2.

I

the hole. Bolt Holes Requiring Tight Tolerance Fig. l:N:2. I This bolt requires a close tolerance

This bolt requires a close tolerance hole to prevent 'slop' and vibration from enlarging the holes

Castle nuts should not be torqued down tight, just snuggE1d down and secured with a cotter pin. You don't want to bind the free spinning pulley or sleeve.

--1-i*.).j

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Lancnir Intemnlionnl Inc., Represenl!ld by Neko Avintion Inc., Copyrigl1t!D l9!J8, Rmlmoml, OR 97756

0. FASTENJNGPARTSTOGETHER

1. When parts are to be fastened together using epoxy or structural adhesive, they must be held tightly in position until the bonding material has set. Several methods are available, but pop rivets remain the best way to be sure of a proper bond. Typically, the bonding sequence is:

The parts are prepared for bonding-

a. peelply is removed

b. Joggled surfaces are trimmed

c. Alignment holes are drilled

d. Sheet metal screws or clecoes* (Fig. 1:0:1.) are installed into these holes to

hold the parts in alignment while holes are drilled about every 2" from pop rivets.

*ClecoesTM are a sheet metal fastening device used extensively in the aircraft industry(refer to Fig. 1:0:1). A special pair ofpliers (deco tool) is used. The tip of the cleco is inserted into the alignment hole. When the pliers are released, the cleco locks itself into the holes, tightly holding the parts together. Clecoes and cleco pliers are available from aircraft supply stores or catalogs (ours included). Surplus clecoes are inexpensive, and only about 15 are needed for the construction ofyour airplane.

NOTE:

Eithersheet metal screws or clecoes are used asfasteners. Ifthe fastener you will use has grease, oil or other such contaminates, it must be thoroughly cleaned before use to prevent contamination of surfaces which will be bonded later. Methylene Chloride may be used as a cleaning fluid.

Cleco and Cleco Pliers

Fig. 1:0:1.

Cleco

a cleaning fluid. Cleco and Cleco Pliers Fig. 1:0:1. Cle co Cleco Pliers Luncair International Inc.,

Cleco Pliers

Cleco and Cleco Pliers Fig. 1:0:1. Cle co Cleco Pliers Luncair International Inc., llepresenlnd liy Neieo

Luncair International Inc., llepresenlnd liy Neieo Avintion Inc., Cn]lyrii;hl 0 1998, lfodmond, OR 97756

Squeeze the pliers and the grippers extend and come together. Insert into the [lB hole, press parts together, and release the cleco. The grippers will spread, holding the parts together.

1 ::c ::h: 0 _TI_~-~-1_2-_0_1-_9s +X00-1
1
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0 _TI_~-~-1_2-_0_1-_9s +X00-1

e.

The surfaces to be bonded must now be cleaned since they may have become

contaminated during handling and storage. The screws or clecoes are removed

and the surfaces to be bonded are cleaned thoroughly with wax and silicone remover, acetone or MEC.

WARNING:

FAfLURETOFOLLOWCLEANINGSTEPSCANRESULTINEVEN-

TUALBONDFAILURE. EVENSURFACESWHICHAPPEARCLEAN MUST BE CLEANED SINCE NOT ALL CONTAMINANTS ARE OBVIOUS. FOLLOW CAUTIONARY LABEL ON THE WAX AND SILICONE REMOVER CONTAINER. WAX AND SILICONE REMOVER IS FLAMMABLE AND MUST BE KEPT AWAY FROM SPARKS, HEAT AND OPEN FLAMES. HARMFUL OR FATAL IF SWALLOWED. DURING USE AND UNTIL ALL VAPORS ARE GONE: KEEP AREA WILL VENTILATED AND DO NOT SMOKE. EXTINGUISH ALL FLAMES, PILOT LIGHTS AND HEATERS. TURN OFF STOVES, ELECTRICAL TOOLS AND APPLIANCES THAT COULD ACT AS AN IGNITION SOURCE. VAPOR IS HARMFUL. AVOID BREATH- ING VAPORS AND USE ONLY WITH ADEQUATE VENTILATION. AVOID SKIN AND EYE CONTACT. WEAR RUBBER GLOVES OR SUITABLE PROTECTIVE SKINBARRIER. WASHHANDS IF THEY COME IN CONTACT WITH THIS LIQUID. IF SPILLED ON CLOTH- ING, REMOVE AND LAUNDER BEFORE RE-USING.

f.

Dampen one cloth or piece oftoweling well with the wax and silicone remover

and wipe it along the bond surface of either part. Do not rub or scrub the surface as that may work the contaminants into the surface. Follow within seconds with a dry cloth or toweling piece to absorb the solvent and the contaminants it removes from the bonding surface.

g.

Continue that process until that seam has been cleaned. Then replace both

the wetting and drying cloths with new pieces and repeat the cleaning process for the other half. It at any time the wetting or drying cloth shows any soiling or the drying cloth becomes wet, replace it immediately with a new one.

:IV=--=-----

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~lo~==*==~=="\-="'=~==fi==~=!:O~®

Lancairlnlernational Inc., Represent.cd byNeico Aviulion Inc., Copyright(i) Hl!JB, Redmond, OR 97756

h. Ifany obvious contaminants still remain, the above process may be repeated

with methylene chloride.

WARNING:

FOLLOW CAUTIONARY LABELS ON THE METHYLENE CHLO- RIDE CONTAINER. METHYLENE CHLORIDE IS A VOLATILE SOLVENT. CAUSES IRRITATION OF THE EYES, SKIN AND RESPIRATORY TRACT. PROLONGED BREATHING OF VAPOR CAN CAUSE LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS. DO NOT GET IN EYES, ON SKIN, OR CLOTHING. DO NOT TAKE INTERNALLY. AVOID BREATHING OF VAPORS. WHEN HANDLING WEAR CHEMICAL SPLASH GOGGLES, PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND SOLVENT RESISTANT GLOVES. WASH THOROUGHLYAFTER HANDLING. USE ADEQUATE VENTILATION IN WORK AREA.

i. After the seam is cleaned, repeat the cleaning process for the other part.

j. Using clean #80 grit abrasive paper roughen all cleaned surfaces lightly

Remove the powder with a clean cloth

until the surface shows a fine white powder. or clean brush.

k. The bonding material (epoxy, epoxy/flox, epoxy/micro or structural adhe-

sive) is prepared and applied to one or both surfaces to be bonded.

WARNING THE CONTAINERS USED TO MIXTHE ADHESIVE MUST NOT BE WAX COATED. THE WAX COATING COULD CONTAMINATE THE ADHESIVE AND REDUCE THE BOND STRENGTH. LIKEWISE, THEMIXINGCONTAINERMUSTBEFREEOFDIRT,GREASE,OIL OR OTHER SIMILAR CONTAMINANTS.

WARNING READ THE CAUTIONARY LABEL ON THE EPOXY CANS.

EPOXY IS EXTREMELY IRRITATING TO THE EYES AND CAN CAUSE PERMANENT EYE DAMAGE. MAY ALSO CAUSE SKIN IRRITATION OR SENSITIZATION REACTION IN CERTAIN INDI- VIDUALS. PREVENT EYE AND SKIN CONTACT WITH EPOXY MATERIALS. AVOID BREATHING VAPOR. USE ONLY IN WELL VENTILATED AREA. AVOID INHALATION OR EYE CONTACT WITH DUST FROM GRINDING OR SANDING OF CURED EPOXY.

REMOVE CONTAMINATED CLOTHING AND LAUNDER BEFORE RE-USE.

THIS

REMOVE CONTAMINATED CLOTHING AND LAUNDER BEFORE RE-USE. THIS Lancair Intemntional Inc., Reprmmntcd by Neico Aviation

Lancair Intemntional Inc., Reprmmntcd by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright<!) 1998, R!!dnmnd, OR 97756

If structural adhesive is to be used, prepare it as follows:

HYSOL 9339 Epoxy can be mixed in the proper weight ratio only by using a good scale. A small calculator will help, too. IMPROPER MIXING CAN SPEED OR SLOW CURE TIME AND DECREASE ADHESIVE STRENGTH. ATTEN- TION TO THE MEASURING PROCESS IS IMPORTANT.

Hysol Structural Adhesive

Fig. 1:0:2.

HYSOL 9339 ADHESIVE Mix: 44.5 parts 9339A(bluc)

to

100 parts 9339B(Whitc)

Mix: 44.5 parts 9339A(bluc) to 100 parts 9339B(Whitc) The mixing ratio for Hysol 9339 is 100:44.5,
Mix: 44.5 parts 9339A(bluc) to 100 parts 9339B(Whitc) The mixing ratio for Hysol 9339 is 100:44.5,

The mixing ratio for Hysol 9339 is 100:44.5, part A to part B. The easiest way to

do this is put the mixing cup on the scale and record its empty weight. Guessing at how much epoxy you will need for the job, take about 2/3's of that amount from the Part "A" can and put it in the cup, weigh, and subtract the weight ofthe empty cup from the new weight, giving you the weight of just the epoxy in the cup. Multiply the weight of the epoxy in the cup by 1.455. Add the weight ofjust the epoxy in the cup to this figure, and now add Part "B" until the cup weight is the

Maintaining nearest 1/10 oz. is plenty close

same as your calculated figure. enough. a. Example:

1. Weight of empty cup: .5 oz.

2. Weightwith2/3's (estimated)ofthematerialyou'llneed, Part "A": 3.7 oz.

3. Weight of Part "A": 3.2 oz

4. Multiply by mix ratio 100:44.5:

5. Total weight of Part "A" and Part "B" needed is:

6. Add the weight of the cup back in .5 oz.

oz.

7. The total weight, once you've added the

8. Add Part "B" to the cup until it weighs 5.1 oz., mix, and you're ready.

x 1.4

4.6 oz.

proper amount of Part "B" 5.1

b. Mix the Hysol 9339 epoxy adhesive components as follows:

b. Mix the Hysol 9339 epoxy adhesive components as follows: 1. Read all the instructions and

1. Read all the instructions and information on the epoxy cans. Tempera-

ture ofthe adhesive ingredients and the surrounding room temperature must be

60°F or more.

2. The 9339 adhesive has a working life of 2 hours at 77°F. However, at higher temperatures orwith a larger batch this working life will be less. Therefore, before mixing adhesive, all necessary equipment should be ready.

3. For the same reason, it is better to mix too much adhesive than too little.

If you run out and must mix a second batch, the first batch may have already begun to thicken making it difficult to compress the seam properly and possibly reducing bond strength when cured. Another reason for mixing more than you need- Ifyou have a Iittle left over, leave itin the corner ofthe cup with the mixing stickin it. Because cure time varies with

temperature, by leaving a little in the cup and leaving the cup near the part you have epoxied, the cup can now be used as your test for curing. Wait at least 24 hours afterjoiningparts. Then, before touching parts, try to move the stick around in the epoxy in the cup. Ifyou can move it at all, your parts have not cured. Wait another 24 hours and repeat. Handling parts before cure is complete can reduce the bond strength, and should be avoided.

The epoxy cure time depends on the temperature during cure time. Because ofthe fire hazards involved with most heaters, it is not recommended to have a heater operating in the room that could cause a fire. However, getting the room nice and warm before applying adhesive, so the parts and air temperature is above 77°F, willhelp shorten cure times, but remember it will also shorten the potlife/working time ofthe adhesive.

(a) Estimate the amount of adhesive that you will need for the

first seam and measure a sufficient amount of Part "A" and "B" to make that

amount.

(b) Using a mixing stick, thoroughly mix the two parts for at least

two minutes. Mix longer for larger batches. Occasionally scrape unmixed material from the sides ofthe cup. Uniform blue-gray color will result.

(c) Apply the structural adhesive as follows (the following as-

sumes the seams have been cleaned and sanded as previously described. Ifnot, do so at this time).

as previously described. If not, do so at this time). Lnncair lnternationnl Inc., Represented \Jy Neicu

Lnncair lnternationnl Inc., Represented \Jy Neicu Aviation Inc., Copyright@ 1998, Ifodmund, OR 97756

Beginning with the seam of the first part you have

chosen to start on, with a wood spatula, spread an even layer of adhesive on the overlap surface ofthe part. Repeat the adhesive application process onthe overlap

surface ofthe other part.

(1)

(2) Overlap the two adhesive coated surfaces and align the holes in the surfaces. Insert a screw or cleco into a hole at each end of the part, or every foot along the partifitis longer than 18". Starting at either end, insert rivets into the predrilled holes and form the heads (backup washers are normally not necessary).

(d)

Remove the fasteners and place rivets into those holes.

(e)

While the adhesive is still soft, scrape off the excess that

squeezes out (Fig. 1-32). Adhesive is much harder to remove when hardened. Use methylene chloride on a clean cloth to remove adhesive that smears on the

fiberglass surface. Clean adhesive from the clecoes if any were used.

Removing Excess Epoxy/Adhesive

Fig.1:0:3.

epoxy ~
epoxy
~

scrape off excess 9339 ~~illil~

remove the excess fro~)/ both sides

Make sure you're wearing work clothes, since the adhesive may drip on you. Also check for adhesive on hair, arms, etc., and wipe it offbefore it cures. A long sleeve shirt and long pants are highly recommended.

(f) Wait at least 24 hours, then test your mixing cup residue for

cure. If solidly cured, then the part should be ready to start work on once more. Drill out the rivets using a 1/8" drill, and remove any loose pieces.

(g) Fill the rivet holes with a 50/50 mix ofmicro/flax, clean offany

excess, let it harden, and you're done with the seam. To make things a little neater,

you can put a piece oftape over the back side ofthe seam, covering the bottom of the rivet holes, to help contain the filler mix and make a smoother neater finish, that requires less epoxy (and adding less weight, something to think about all through the construction process).

to think about all through the construction process). Lnncair l11ternatianal Inc., Represented by Neico Aviation

Lnncair l11ternatianal Inc., Represented by Neico Aviation Inc., Cupyright<D Hl!l8, Red01and, OR 97756

3. Epoxy

As with the structural adhesive, you can use a scale for

measuring the proper amount oflaminating resin and hardener. There are also some good measuring pumps on the market that will probably pay for themselves (about $265) since you'll waste less epoxy with them, and have less chance ofspills or improper mixes. We offer one inourcatalogthathas performed well here in our

own shop for years now.

Typically, you will be using from 1 to 6 ounces at a time. If you prefer to use a scale instead of a dispenser, you can measure the two parts as you did for the Hysol, except use 1.44 instead of 1.445. Another way is (Jeffco resin system used here for example purposes only. Use the appropriate ratios for your supplied system of resins.) (1) Place your empty cup on the scale.

(2) Record the weight of the empty cup. (3) Estimate to amount of epoxy you will need. (4) Add .25 oz ofhardener (yellowish) to cup for each 1-1/4 oz you'll

need.

(5) Pour 1 oz of resin (clear) into cup for each .25 oz ofhardener and

mix thoroughly.

(b) Working time can be as short as ten minutes ifitis hot, so

be sure everything is in place and ready to go before you begin mixing.

(a) Mixing epoxy:

(c) As with the Hysol, the surfaces must be totally free ofoil,

grease or other contaminants, and slightly roughened. Fasten with pop rivets, let harden, remove fasteners & fill holes.

NOTE: USE CARE TO MIX YOUR RESINS AND ADHESIVES ACCORD- ING TO THE MANUFACTURER'S INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAR- TICULAR SYSTEM YOU ARE USING- THEY ARE ALL DIFFERENT, AND AN IMPROPER MIX RATIO COULD RESULT IN IMPROPER BONDING- OR NO BONDING AT ALL.

BE CAREFUL- PAY ATTENTION TO THE MANUFACTURER'S INSTRUCTIONS!!!

P.

FIBERGLASS STRIP INSTALLATION

1. Description To stiffen joints and provide a double bond, fiberglass strips are laid over the bonded seams as shown in the sequence of drawings in fig. l:P:l.

Joining Parts

Fig. l:P:l.

of drawings in fig. l:P:l. Joining Parts Fig. l:P:l. Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation
of drawings in fig. l:P:l. Joining Parts Fig. l:P:l. Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation
of drawings in fig. l:P:l. Joining Parts Fig. l:P:l. Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation
of drawings in fig. l:P:l. Joining Parts Fig. l:P:l. Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation
of drawings in fig. l:P:l. Joining Parts Fig. l:P:l. Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation
of drawings in fig. l:P:l. Joining Parts Fig. l:P:l. Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation
of drawings in fig. l:P:l. Joining Parts Fig. l:P:l. Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation

Lancnir lntmnational Inc., Represented by Neko Aviation inc., Copyright(]) 1998, Hetlmontl, OH 97756

a. Fig. l:P:lA shows the two pieces to be joined. After the adhesive has been

place along the inside ofboth pieces to be joined, the two clecoes were installed to

hold the parts in alignment.

b. Fig. l:P:lB shows pop rivets set into the other holes drilled l" apart for the

length ofthe seam

c. Figure l:P:lC shows the pop rivets after being compressed.

d. In figure l:P:lD, the two clecoes have been removed and replaced with pop

rivets awaiting compression.

e.

Figure l:P:lE displays the two parts, waiting patiently for the adhesive to

cure.

Preparing Seam For BID Tape

Fig. l:P:2.

to cure. Preparing Seam For BID Tape Fig. l:P:2. apply tape (temporarily) to prevent filler from

apply tape (temporarily) to prevent filler from dropping through · rivet holes. Remember to remove before applying the bonding tape

fill the small channel with 50/50 flox/micro mixture to bring up to level with adjacent surfaces

fill the pop rivet holes with flax/micro mixture before applying tapes for bonding

f. After the adhesive has cured, the pop rivets are drilled out, the holes filled

with a 50/50 mix offlox and micro (see Fig. l:Q:2) and, without a need to wait for

that to cure, a bid strip is being laid into place over the top of the joggles.

strip is being laid into place over the top of the joggles. Lancair lnternalionnl Inc., Repnrnentetl

Lancair lnternalionnl Inc., Repnrnentetl by Neicn Aviation Inc., Copyright([) 1ml8, Rctl111ontl, OR 97750

Q. CUTTING ON A BIAS

When cutting your clothwith that wonderful roller blade, please pay attention to the weave bias specifiedfor the part you are glassing. There are very few fiberglass parts in the Lancairs that are cut on a 0° bias. Nearly every piece of fiberglass you apply will be cut on a 45° bias. The weave orientation arrows in the construction

manuals are there for a reason, please use them.

Weave Orientation

Fig. l:Q:l.

Most fiberglass pieces are cut on a 45° bias to the weave of the cloth
Most fiberglass pieces are
cut on a 45° bias to the
weave of the cloth
please use them. Weave Orientation Fig. l:Q:l. Most fiberglass pieces are cut on a 45° bias

R. THE PLASTIC SANDWICH

This method ofwetting out cloth is simple and invaluable. knocked offyour project by using this technique.

Many hours can be

At the hardware store, buy a few rolls of 1 mil thick plastic drop cloths. Regular household garbage bags work well when cut along the edges with a roller blade. Cut two sections of plastic bigger than the piece of fiberglass you are about to apply. Tape one piece of the plastic to your fiberglass cutting table and lay the fiberglass piece (up to 4 BID thick) on the plastic. The cutting table provides an excellent surface for this technique. Wet out the fiberglass cloth with plenty of epoxy. Gravity is your friend, it will allow the epoxy to soak down through the layers ofcloth. No need to stipple the BID with a brush, just lay the other piece of plastic over the wetted out cloth and roll the air bubbles and excess epoxy out of the laminate. See the next section for more information on rollers and rolling techniques.

Plastic Sandwich Method of Wetting Cloth

Fig. l:R:l.

Plastic Sandwich Method of Wetting Cloth Fig. l:R:l. 1 Mil thick plastic sheet 1 Mil thick
Plastic Sandwich Method of Wetting Cloth Fig. l:R:l. 1 Mil thick plastic sheet 1 Mil thick

1 Mil thick plastic sheet

1 Mil thick plastic sheet

l:R:l. 1 Mil thick plastic sheet 1 Mil thick plastic sheet Using a roller blade, cut

Using a roller blade, cut out the shape of the laminate you need. Remove the shape. See how easy the piece is to handle with the plastic on both sides? Peel the plastic off one side of the sandwich and lay the laminate in position (of course you've already prepared the surface by sanding, cleaning, and painting on a light coat ofepoxy). DON'TAPPLY THE LAMINATE WITH THE PLASTIC SIDE DOWN, STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY WILL BE COMPLETELY LOST.

SIDE DOWN, STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY WILL BE COMPLETELY LOST. Lnncair Intemntimml Inc., Rcprenented liy Neico Avinlion

Lnncair Intemntimml Inc., Rcprenented liy Neico Avinlion Inc., Copyright© 1998, Hedmond, OR 9775il

Applying Plastic Sandwich Laminate

Fig. l:R:2.

Use a dry brush to stipple air bubbles from under BIU tapes JJr~:~~]l 1 _-=c:
Use a dry brush to stipple air
bubbles from under BIU tapes
JJr~:~~]l
1
_-=c:
::h:c:a"'p"'t-"'er=-1=---INT--1
;-~-:-u-c_T_
;-~-:-u-c_T_ / / Stipple or roll against the side of the laminate still

/

/

Stipple or roll against the side of the laminate still covered by plastic to squeeze the air bubbles out from underneath. Remove the remaining piece ofplastic. You should now have a bubble-free laminate with a good epoxy content. A little extra stippling might be necessary if air bubbles were formed when you removed the plastic. Easy, right?

~Ja~:::={=f;,==A=~=~"'===B:::§~=~~®-IV=-

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Lane.air IntCJmatianal Inc., Repre.senled by Neico Avinlion Inc., CopyrightO 1998, Redmond, OR !17756

Using Rollers to Remove Air Bubbles (and Excess Epoxy)

Fig. l:R:3.

Rollers to Remove Air Bubbles (and Excess Epoxy) Fig. l:R:3. When usingthe plastic sandwichmethod ofwetting out

When usingthe plastic sandwichmethod ofwetting out your fiberglass, simplyroll out the bubbles from between the plastic and you have an air free laminate. Peel off one side ofthe plastic and apply the laminate to whatever you're working on. Before you peel offthe second layer ofplastic, use the roller to help push the air out from under the laminate.

S. TONGUE DEPRESSORS and MICRO RADII

Someone asked me recently what was the most important toolin the Lancair shop. Let me think, the milling machine, the high capacity air compressor, the super- trick mini grinder? Naw, the tongue depressor. That's the most important tool. But notjust any tongue depressor, the Lancair special modified tongue depressor.

Modified Tongue Depressor

Fig. l:S:L

Round

to 1/4"

Modified Tongue Depressor Fig. l:S:L Round to 1/4" Tongue depressor Developed in the late 1980's because
Modified Tongue Depressor Fig. l:S:L Round to 1/4" Tongue depressor Developed in the late 1980's because

Tongue depressor

Developed in the late 1980's because of a demand for smaller microballoon radii, the Lancair tongue depressor is a necessary tool for any Lancair builder. You see, the problem with normal tongue depressors is the large radius on each end. Ifyou were to use this radius for all your microballoon filling ofjoints, your Lancair will be heavier than one with properjoint radii, not by much but every pound counts, right? By sanding down the tongue depressor to a smaller radius, the micro joints on your ribs, bulkheads, etc., will look much more professional. Don't think that moremicrowillmakethejointstronger,infactit'sjusttheopposite. Microballoons are not structural, so the more fiberglass tape you have bonding the actual part, the stronger the bond will be.

A word ofcaution. Ifyou get carried away with smaller and smaller micro radii, the fiberglass will want to "bridge" over the microballoons, not bonding as it should. Bridging is fairly easy to detect, the air is visible under the laminate. A little practice will have your micro joints looking great.

A little practice will have your micro joints looking great. Lancair lnternntional Inc., Reprnsented hyNeico Avinlinn

Lancair lnternntional Inc., Reprnsented hyNeico Avinlinn Inc., Copyright@ 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

Bridging Fiberglass Over a Radius

Fig. 1:8:2.

INCORRECT

Bridging Fiberglass Over a Radius Fig. 1:8:2. INCORRECT Bridging over fillet CORRECT Following contour of

Bridging

over fillet

Over a Radius Fig. 1:8:2. INCORRECT Bridging over fillet CORRECT Following contour of fillet ABOUT THOSE
Over a Radius Fig. 1:8:2. INCORRECT Bridging over fillet CORRECT Following contour of fillet ABOUT THOSE
Over a Radius Fig. 1:8:2. INCORRECT Bridging over fillet CORRECT Following contour of fillet ABOUT THOSE

CORRECT

Following

contour

of fillet

over fillet CORRECT Following contour of fillet ABOUT THOSE MICRO RADII The subject ofhow to best
over fillet CORRECT Following contour of fillet ABOUT THOSE MICRO RADII The subject ofhow to best

ABOUT THOSE MICRO RADII

The subject ofhow to best apply microballoon radii is a hotly debated topic around

the shop (hey, we're bored sometimes, alright?). methods:

Eventually we settled on two

Method #1- Some believe that the rib/bulkhead should be bonded in and all extra micro scraped away leaving no radius. After the rib/bulkhead is cured in position, another batch ofmicro can be used to make the radius and the BID tapes applied while this micro is still wet. This method makes application ofthe micro radius easier because the part is already held firmly in position, but when pure resin is painted onto the area where the BID tapes will be applied, the micro can sag and become runny. When this condition occurs, it is easy to get air bubbles trapped underneath the BID tapes.

Method #1 of Forming Micro Radii

Fig. 1:8:3.

the BID tapes. Method #1 of Forming Micro Radii Fig. 1:8:3. Part bonded in, with all

Part bonded in, with all excess micro scraped away.

Fresh ~icro

fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet.

~icro fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet. Lnncair International Inc., Heprellenllld by Neico
~icro fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet. Lnncair International Inc., Heprellenllld by Neico
~icro fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet. Lnncair International Inc., Heprellenllld by Neico
~icro fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet. Lnncair International Inc., Heprellenllld by Neico
~icro fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet. Lnncair International Inc., Heprellenllld by Neico
~icro fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet. Lnncair International Inc., Heprellenllld by Neico
~icro fillet shaped, then BID applied while micro is wet. Lnncair International Inc., Heprellenllld by Neico

Method #2 - Others, like myself, believe that the micro radius should be formed when the rib/bulkhead is first installed. Care must be taken to hold the rib/ bulkhead in its proper positionwhile formingthe radius with your modified tongue depressor. After curing, the BID tapes can be applied over a solid micro radius. I feel this method helps eliminate air bubbles forming under the BID tapes because the resin that is used to saturate the tapes will not dissolve the micro. Plus, you can stipple the air bubbles out from under the BID tapes without destroying your beautiful radius. Be sure to sand the areas, including the micro radius, where the BID tapes will be applied.

Method #2 of Forming Micro Radii

Fig. 1:8:4.

be applied. Method #2 of Forming Micro Radii Fig. 1:8:4. Laminate is applied after micro radius

Laminate is

applied after

micro radius

has cured.

sure to sand radius before application of laminate.

Excess micro is formed into radius when part is installed

Be

Excess micro is formed into radius when part is installed Be All this talk about something
Excess micro is formed into radius when part is installed Be All this talk about something
Excess micro is formed into radius when part is installed Be All this talk about something
Excess micro is formed into radius when part is installed Be All this talk about something
Excess micro is formed into radius when part is installed Be All this talk about something
Excess micro is formed into radius when part is installed Be All this talk about something

All this talk about something as simple as micro radii, you say? Well, you'll be making a lot ofthese buggers in the process ofbuildingyour Lancair, and paying attention to details such as this will ensure confidence and pride in your aircraft. As forwhichmethod to use for applying micro radii and BID tapes, either will work, but the second method is safer to avoid air bubbles and get a good radius.

method is safer to avoid air bubbles and get a good radius. Lnncair Jntcmational Inc., Represented

Lnncair Jntcmational Inc., Represented by N!.!ica Aviulion Inc., Copyright ID 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

T. THOSE ANNOYING 2" WIDE BID TAPES

On the subject of glassing in ribs and bulkheads, we've received a few inquiries about
On the subject of glassing in ribs and bulkheads, we've received a few inquiries
about using 2" wide, pre-cut fiberglass tape, such as available through Aircraft
Spruce, instead ofcutting your own out ofthe 50" wide roll provided in the kit. This
is fine, as long as the cloth is cut on a 45° bias. THIS IS IMPORTANT! If you use
cloth that is cut go 0 , it will only be half as strong. Most commercially available
tapes are cut goo and unsuitable for structural areas such as ribs and bulkheads.
The safe way to glass is to cut your own. At Lancairwe cut 20 or 30 tapes at a
time, all on a 45° bias. Then we roll the tapes up, carefully so as not to shrink or
expand the 2" width, and set them aside in a clean place to use as needed. If you
do buy pre-cut tapes, be very sure they have a 45° cloth weave.
Difference in BID Tape Weave
Fig. l:T:5.
Typical
store bought
2" wide fiberglass
rolls do not have the
proper weave orientation
glass strips
from a large roll
on the proper 45' bias.
~la~:::=*=~== =~=i--u.=~=.8=="~=1D=-®-=IV:_::
J[::.~~:-J,'--C_h_a~p_t_er_l_IN_TR~R-~-~-U-C_T_I_~-~-1_2-_0_1-_9s

-+f-.J<-H

Laneuir Inlemational Inc., Represented by Neico Avinthm Inc., Copyright@ 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

U. CARDBOARD TEMPLATES

U. CARDBOARD TEMPLATES In an early newsletter, it was suggested that the builder use cardboard to
U. CARDBOARD TEMPLATES In an early newsletter, it was suggested that the builder use cardboard to
U. CARDBOARD TEMPLATES In an early newsletter, it was suggested that the builder use cardboard to

In an early newsletter, it was suggested that the builder use cardboard to find the shape ofribs or bulkheads before cutting them out ofClarkfoam or prepreg. Since many ofyou are new builders, we thought this is worth repeating.

Simplicity and cost is why we use cardboard templates here at Lancair. The more complexthe rib or bulkhead shape, the more a cardboard template willhelp. Plus, screwing up a piece ofcardboard is much cheaper than a similar piece ofprepreg.

®_IV=-_:_----_J/:[~-i;~"]!l--C-h_a p_t_er_l_IN_TR_,_R_~-:-u-c_T_I_~-~-'-2-_0_1-_9_8_---,H-)(+1

a=:w=:~="'!:.f'B==:A==:~=::O=:

~l~~~=~=:~==:

Lnncair International Ine., Repreiientud byNeico Aviation lne., Copyright.(1) 1998, Redmond, OR !17756

V.

Building Light

How much resin should I put on my laminates? The worst enemy to a light, high performance airframe is too much resin. Here at the Lancair factory, we wet out almost all our glass on 1 mil thick plastic, place another plastic sheet over the wetted cloth, and use a roller to squeeze out the excess resin (the plastic sandwich method). Use a fair amount of pressure when rolling to get a good squeezeout of resin. Not only will these BID tapes be much lighter than ones wetted out on the airframe, they will save lots of time and look very professional. And remember, when the call for BID is higher than two or three, you will save even more time (and weight) wetting the cloth out on plastic.

:.h:ca:,;p: :.te.:.:r:

:.h:ca:,;p:

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1.

BID schedules About those BID schedules, which are the number of fiberglass layers bonding a structure together. Ahomebuilder's naturalinstinctis to make his plane stronger. Ifthe manual calls for 2 BID, three or four must be better, right? WRONG! Ifyou

increase the number ofBID layers in your aircraft you are decreasing its strength.

A

than the one built to spec. The Lancair was stress analyzed by Martin Hollmann,

a

such a high empty weight that it is over gross as soon as the pilot steps into the

heavier aircraft is quicker to build up G loads, has less payload, and is slower

leader in composite engineering, and fully tested. We've seen a Lancair with

cockpit, with no fuel! Think about it, and stick to the manual.

2.

Paper towels Enough preaching, want to save even more weight? Throw out that peel ply and use paper towels. That's right, paper towels. After pulling the plastic offa newly applied BID tape, place a paper towel directly on the wet glass and tamp it with a dry brush. The towel will soak up excess resin and the tamping will help push out those evil air bubbles.

and the tamping will help push out those evil air bubbles. :IV:: '="'§1.::'r§-§:A§l.§R_:§:® :

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Lnncnir Internnliomil lnc., Repre!llmted \Jy Neico Avi11tiun Inc., Copyright(i) 1998, Hedmom.I, OR \l7756

Soaking Out Excess Resin With Paper Towel

Fig. l:V:l.

Soaking Out Excess Resin With Paper Towel Fig. l:V:l. When the towel is soaked through, pull

When the towel is soaked through, pull it offand look at the results. If the towel has pulled up or distorted the glass, tamp it with the dry brush further. Does the

glass still look glossy, with an uneven resin content? Well, put another paper towel

on it and tamp it again.

meaning it's too dry, there will be plenty ofresin in the glass. Try it, paper towels

are cheap.

So long as you don't make the laminate look white,

So long as you don't make the laminate look white, Lnncnir Intemationnl lnc., Reprcmmtcd by Neico

Lnncnir Intemationnl lnc., Reprcmmtcd by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright© Hl!l8, Redmond, OR 97756

W. Building Straight

Keeping the airframe straight is also important in a good flying aircraft. Your pristine Lancair might weigh in nice, but ifit corkscrews through the air in giant barrel rolls when you let go of the stick, you haven't built a straight airplane. Building your plane according to plans and following the advice given in the construction manual, your Lancair should fly straight and true (in Oz.). Back in Kansas and the rest ofthe world, it seems that one wing is always a tad heavy, or a trailing edge is wavy. Our prototypes never come out exactly straight and true, so we can't expect any ofyou builders to perform this miracle. Here's some tips that might help.

Straight Trailing Edges

some tips that might help. Straight Trailing Edges Now let's pretend thatyou'vejiggedyourwings
some tips that might help. Straight Trailing Edges Now let's pretend thatyou'vejiggedyourwings

Now let's pretend thatyou'vejiggedyourwings perfectly, leveled and attached the horizontal stab, and plumb bobbed the vertical stab and bonded it on. The trailing edges ofyour Lancair should be straight so the control surfaces can travel freely with a consistent gap. As is usually the case with the plans ofallgoodmiceormen, sometimes things aren't quite perfect.

Ifyour wing or tail trailing edge has a slight warp in it, heat the area with a heat gun until it's just too hot to touch. Be very careful not to burn or scorch the fiberglass or carbon fiber. Tryheating an extra piece ofprepregmaterial first, just to see how much heat is required to burn it. A piece ofstraight wood or aluminum angle (the wood is better, because it will cool slower than the aluminum and tend to prevent re-warpingthe edge) canbe clamped to the edge to keep it straightwhile cooling. Be sure to heat the angle, also. Otherwise the cold aluminum will cool the edge too quicklyand the warp will remain. Heat atleast an inchforward ofthe edge and don't discolor or burn the fiberglass (or wood). If the warp still remains, try finding a lx2 or 2x4 board with the right curvature to warp the edge the opposite way when clamped tight. Heat the edge and let it cool with the bo;ird clamped in position. With any luck, the part will spring back nice and straight when the board is removed. See the figures on the next two pages.

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Straightening Trailing Edges

Fig. l:W:l.

Straightening Trailing Edges Fig. l:W:l. Lnncair Intun1nticmnl Im:., Represented by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright(!)

Straightening Trailing Edges

H-*-H

Fig. l:W:2. After heating the distorted area use clamps to hold the trailing edge straight.
Fig. l:W:2.
After heating the distorted
area
use clamps to hold
the trailing edge straight.
Don'tremcwe the clamps
until the skin has
completelycooled.
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Lancair International Inc., Represented by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright(!) 1998, Hcdmond, OR 97756

X.

CONTROL SYSTEMS

Pushrod Tips

a. After cutting the pushrod tube to length, don't immediately rivet the rod end in position. It is better to test the pushrod in the system (flap, aileron, elevator) by temporarily securing the rod ends to the pushrod with instant glue. Use only a few drops ofglue to secure the rod end or the bond may become more than temporary. Don't cover the rod end with glue then slide it into the pushrod, the bond would be impossible to breakfree. Once you determine the tube is the proper length, you can break the rod ends free, clean them up, and rivet them in place.

b. Fill the rod ends with a 50/50 micro/flox mixture. This will allow the drill to track straight through the rod end when drillingfor the rivets. The solid rod end will also prevent rivets from buckling when they are set in place.

Filling Rod Ends With Micro/Flox Mixture

Fig. l:X:l.

place. Filling Rod Ends With Micro/Flox Mixture Fig. l:X:l. c. When sliding the rod ends into

c. When sliding the rod ends into the pushrod tube for the last time (before riveting), coat them with Loctite™ to prevent slippage or vibration wear.

d. A rivet gun is the best method of setting the rivets that secure the rod end. In a

pinch, we've used a hammer to lightly tap and expand the rivets.

lightly and accurately to avoid mashing the rivet end to one side. A rivet squeezer is not recommended for pushrod rivets because the rivets may buckle in the center

ofthe pushrod.

Hit the rivet

rivets may buckle in the center ofthe pushrod. Hit the rivet Lancair Intemalional Inc., Repn.!Eentod by

Lancair Intemalional Inc., Repn.!Eentod by Nnico Aviation Inc., Copyright© 1998, Rodmund, OR 97756

Setting the Rivets in the Rod End

Fig. l:X:2. Rod end Bench vise Rivet Rule RIVET RULE: I !Dia. ®_l rotrudin p_te_r_1_IN
Fig. l:X:2.
Rod end
Bench vise
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Rivet

Tube

Rivet set

The correct length of protrusion is equal to 1.5 times the diameter of the rivet, i.e., a 1/8" rivet should extend 3/16" from the material to be riveted.

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2. Painting pushrods

At Lancair we usually spray paint our pushrods with one coat of Zinc Chromate and one coat ofcolor. Hardware store spray cans are fine for the color coat and you can choose from all kinds ofnifty colors.

3. Castle nuts and cotter pins

One common error in the Lancairs we have inspected is mis-bent cotter pins and castle nuts without cotter pins. Castle nuts are commonly called for items in the Lancair control systems. A castle nut is only used on drilled bolts and MUST be secured with a cotter pin. Castle nuts are usually snugged down, not tightened like an elastic locknut and

the cotter pin will prevent the nut from loosening!

and the cotter pin will prevent the nut from loosening! Properly Pinned Castle Nut Fig. l:X:3.

Properly Pinned Castle Nut

Fig. l:X:3.

The longer cotter pin prong is bent over the top of the bolt and cut as shown.

pin prong is bent over the top of the bolt and cut as shown. The shorter

The shorter prong is bent

ht down

strai

The standard method ofbending and securing cotter pins is shown above. Many builders simply bend the two cotter prongs around the bolt and call it done. Without cutting the prongs to proper length, the prongs could grab a stray piece of upholstery or wire, possibly jamming the system.

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4.

Control surface gaps

Ifyou'd like to get a closer gap on your control surfaces, try this method. No
Ifyou'd like to get a closer gap on your control surfaces, try this method. No matter
how good the mold, the leading edges of the elevators, ailerons, flaps, and the
rudders never seem to fit the trailing edge ofthe wings and stabs just right. Ifyou
have this problem on your elevator, for example, mount the elevator to the
horizontal stab and make sure you have at least 1/16" gap between the elevator
leading edge and the stab trailing edge. Mark on the elevator where the gap is too
great or fairly close and remove the elevator. Now add a micro layer, mixed thick,
to the areas marked "too great" and shape a rough radius (a little sculpting skill
is helpful).
Gapping Control Surfaces
Fig. l:X:4.
Sandpaper
new micro
fill leading
edge
Travel up
Travel down
Old leading edge
After the micro cures, sand it so the elevatorwilljustfit back into the stab, and sand
the stab trailing edge straight, parallel to the hingeline. Got all that? Now take
one strip ofsandpaper, 3M or Norton 40 grit longboard sheets work best, and run
it back and forth between the elevator and the stab, sanding the micro on the
elevator. Another pair ofhands is very helpful in this process to hold the elevator
stablewhile youwork the sandpaper. Have yourhelperraise orlower the elevator
slightly when you feel the resistance on the sandpaper decrease. Slowly work the
elevator through its full range of travel. Now you should see a consistent gap
between stab and elevator when the elevator is moved through its travel range.
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Lancair International Inc., Rnprc~cnled by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright© 1998, Redmond, OR 97756

Y. Hydraulic systems

Eastman hydraulic fittings

Let's talk hydraulics.

8" hole through a l"x 2" piece of3/4" plywood, then cut it in two. Use this to clamp the hydraulic hose in a vise and avoid any damage the bare vise jaws may cause.

When installing the Eastman hose-end fittings, drill a 3/

Installing Eastman Fittings

Fig. l:Y:l.

fittings, drill a 3/ Installing Eastman Fittings Fig. l:Y:l. Nipple Socket Hydraulic hose Lancair International Inc.,

Nipple

Socket

Hydraulic hose
Hydraulic hose
Eastman Fittings Fig. l:Y:l. Nipple Socket Hydraulic hose Lancair International Inc., Rcpresent!!d by Ncico Aviation

Lancair International Inc., Rcpresent!!d by Ncico Aviation Inc., Copyright ID l!l98, llmlmomJ, Oil 97756

A good idea is to cut off and polish a gutter nail, and insert it into the hose to help screw the left-hand threads of the socket onto the hose. Or you can also use a mandril or lubricate a drill bit ofproper size and insert it in the hose, unfluted end first. Install the socket and pull the drill bit out, wobbling it as much as possible to open up the hose. Insert another proper size drill bit through the nipple and extend it past the end. Lubricate the nipple and carefully start it in the hose. Be sure to back offthe socket from the full bottomed position to avoid gouging the hose when the nipple is inserted. If the nipple does partially gouge the inside of the hose, it can cause a flapper door effect, blocking flow in one direction. We blow through our hoses both ways after installing an Eastman fitting. If the hose sounds different when you blow through it one direction than the other, you might have a flapper. Be careful. See chapter 26, pages 11and12 for more information.

H="=

Hose Blockage

Fig. l:Y:2.

-_=-:_=-~_=-~=====-=-_-_=::-~-~"-~~Rimi

When threading fitting into flex tubing, tubing may be cut by sharp edges, resulting in blockage.

2. Cutting hydraulic lines

I

Most Lancair hydraulic lines are made from 1/4", 5052 aluminum tubing. A tubing cutter is the standard, and best, tool for cutting the aluminum tubing to

length.

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Tubing Cutter

Fig. l:Y:3.

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L:mcnir Internnlionnl Inc., Rcprenented by Neico Avinlion Inc., Copyright© lflfl8, Redmond, OR !17756

We use a small cutter because it's much easier to handle. Simply roll the cutter around the tube, tighten the handle slightly, then roll it around the tube again, etc., etc

After every cut you must debur the inside of the aluminum tube. A small deburring tool makes quick work ofthis.

WARNING: Only debur what is necessary to achieve a smooth edge. Excess use of a deburring tool will remove too much mate- rial and potentially weaken the subsequently flared end.

Deburring Tool

Fig. l:Y:4.

the subsequently flared end. Deburring Tool Fig. l:Y:4. Tony Bingelis has much more information on tubing

Tony Bingelis has much more information on tubing cutting and deburring in his Sportplane Builder books and SportAviation columns. These books are extremely helpful to the home builder. Get them and read them!

Tube flaring

Here's another area ofconstruction where you need a specialized tool, the flaring tool. The tube must be deburred, as described in the previous section, in order to get a clean flare. Otherwise you could score the inside ofthe tube when flaring. The

tube may not seal properly in this condition.

flaring. The tube may not seal properly in this condition. Lancnir International Inc., Represented \Jy Neico

Lancnir International Inc., Represented \Jy Neico Aviutiun Inc., Copyright(i) 19!18, Redmond, OR !J7756

Flaring Tool

Fig. l:Y:5.

Flaring Tool Fig. l:Y:5. We usually grease the cone shaped part of the flaring tool so

We usually grease the cone shaped part of the flaring tool so it will not gouge the tube. Don't flare the tube too much, the expanding aluminum may crack. The cracks are visible if you look closely. Experiment and learn how to use your flaring tool. Again, the books by Tony Bingelis contain a lot ofvaluable info on these sorts of specialized jobs.

Z.

PAINTING

In the last year, the Lancair shop has prepared and painted Lancair prototypes. In the process, we've learned a few basic painting tips and rules you may find interesting, or even helpful.

Painting is a disgusting, dirty, tedious, boring, stressful, sometimes toxic process that you will do once and swear never to attempt again. Lock up all your weapons because with one slip of the spray gun, one little mistake, you might feel like ending it all. Bet you can't wait to get started on your paint job no 01, huh?

Seriously though, ifyou take your time and don't try to produce a flying Mona Lisa, a good looking paint job is fairly easy to produce. Here's the basic flow chart that we follow for preparation and painting of our Lancairs.

1. Clean all surfaces

2. Sand all surfaces with 80 grit

3. Prime with featherfill

4. Sand with 100 grit

5. Paint with normal primer

6. Sand down to 220 grit

7. Fill pinholes

8. Prime with normal primer

9. Sand down to 360 grit

10. Clean for color coat

11. Paint your favorite color!

Now let's get more detailed, step by step:

Step 1. Before the initial sanding of your surfaces, and before each primer and color coat, you MUST clean the area to remove any contaminants that would affect the paint. We use DuPont Prep-Sol cleaner for this purpose.

Step 2.

After you've Prep-Soled your bare fiberglass or carbon fiber surface, scuff up the surface with 80 grit so the primer can bond properly. We use a dual action (DA) sander to make short work ofthis step.

Step 3. Clean your surfaces with Prep-Sol again in preparation for the first primer coat. We use the polyester based Featherfill primer as a first coat. It may sound strange, but we actually apply the Featherfill with a paint brush. We find brushing on the first coat of primer fills the pinholes much better than spraying does. Don't worry about making this first coat pretty, most all ofit will be sanded offanyway.

Step 4. The goal ofthe Featherfill was to fill the weave ofthe material and the scattered pinholes. Now you can sand most of the Featherfill away with 100 grit. Use a longboard sanding block or one of the sanding blocks that use 1/2 sheet of sandpaper. If there are low spots in the surface, here is where you'll start to see them.

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Step 5. Blow offthe surface with an air nozzle and clean with Prep-Sol. This next coat ofprimer should be the same brand as your color paint. Be sure ofcompatibil- ity! We'vefoundafewreallygoodprimers. The WLS system is a great primer, we used it on the Lancair IV prototype, but the white WLS paint we applied over it isn't sticking worth a darn, especially on the leading edges (We just tell people that the paint tends to burn off during reentry into the earth's atmosphere). We just tried the Superflite primer on the 320 and we're very happy with it's application and sanding properties. Whatever brand you use, spray on a good, thick coat.

Step 6.

Sand the primer smooth with 180 grit. We usually wet sand at this point, the sandpaper is much more efficient when wet. This is where many builders start to run into trouble. They begin to paint on coat after coat ofprimer, only to sand offeach coat they apply. They complain about the huge amount oftime required to get a good finish on their planes. Well ofcourse it takes a longtime ifyou sand offevery bit ofprimer you put on. They might as well use watercolors, it'd come off real quick when wet sanding. Anyway, you don't have to sand all the way through the primer coat you just applied. Sand until it's smooth and that's all. On the bottom ofyour plane, you may not want to apply any more primer ifthis coat has sanded smooth without sanding through. In this case, simply switch to 320 grit and finish it off, ready for the color coat.

Step 7. This is the best time to look for pinholes in your surfaces. Use the air nozzle to blow the dust offthe smoothly sanded surface and out ofthe pinholes. We use Evercoat polyester glazing putty to fill pinholes, chips, and other boo boos. The lacquer glazing putties tend to shrink too much with age, as does Bonda. Use a putty knife, or squeegee, to force the putty into the pinholes. Lightly re-sand the pinhole-covered areas after filling.

Step 8.

Now clean all your surfaces and spray on what should be your last coat of primer. Use the same brand ofprimer as the previous coat. Use your judgement to decide if you need a thinner or thicker primer coat (usually this last coat is applied thinner). This primer coat should look pretty good, very evenly applied and few, if any, sandpaper scratches visible.

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Step 9.

Wet sand this last coat ofprimer with 360 grit. Some builders would cringe at this, saying that the last primer coats should be sanded down to at least 400 grit. We've found that 400 grit sands the surface just a bit too smooth, the paint doesn't have anything to grab onto. The last grit we used on the Lancair 320 repaint job was 320 grit (easy to remember, 320 on a 320) and the gray color coat did not show any scratch marks.

Step 10. This is it! Blow off and clean all your surfaces thoroughly with Prep-Sol. Fill any remaining, pesky pinholes now or forever hold your peace. Use a tack rag, available at all automotive paint stores, to remove the dust and dirt from the surfaces. Congratulations, you're ready to paint.

Step 11. The best advice we can give you about painting the color coat on your aircraft is DON'T, at least not ifyou don't have the proper facility, tools and training. We convinced ourselves here at Lancair that spraying the color coat on during the early dawn or dusk hours, with the pavement wetted down and no wind, would produce a lovely finish suitable for frammg. It just doesn't work that way. Shootingthe primer coats onin your backyard with a lousy spray gun is one thing, but getting a dust free, no runs, color coat is another. Seriously consider taking your plane to a paint shop. The Lancairs are perfectly suited for this because you can take the wings offand roll them anywhere. Having a professional shoot the color coat is not as expensive as you think IF you do all the preparation yourself. All the painter will have to do is shoot the color.

Ifyou absolutely must spray the color on yourself, seek advice and assistance from a painter who could probably tell you ten times more than we could about painting.

Again, we're not saying this is the best, or even a standard process for finishing your Lancair, but it works for us. Sure, some ofthe parts may need an extra coat ofprimer, some edges may have to be puttied up and reprimed, but these are part of the joys ofbuilding your own plane, aren't they?

CHAPTER 2 REVISION LIST

Description Chapter 2 REV. 1-_:::::.:::=--=---'- -==.: :_ AN4/4-26-99 o~ :o_::::: =_--+f¥-l.j 8 upp
Description
Chapter
2
REV.
1-_:::::.:::=--=---'-
-==.:
:_
AN4/4-26-99
o~
:o_:::::
=_--+f¥-l.j
8
upp ements
1

The following list ofrevisions will allow you to update the Lancair IV construction manual chapter listed above. Under the "Action" column, "R&R" directs you to remove and replace the pages affected by the revision. "Add" directs you to insert the pages shown and "R" to remove the pages.

 

Current

Page(s) affected

Rev.#

Action

2-1

& 2-2

0 or 1

None

2-2 thru 2-15

4

R&R

2-15a

4

Add

2-16 thru end

0

None

Either Rev.# is correct Revised Speed Brakes Section Revised Speed Brakes Section

~.IPA.l.O® IVFB 10

2-i

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Lancair International Inc., Hepresented by Neico Avi111.ion Inc. Copyright V l!l!l!J, Het!nwnt!. OR !J7i5G

CHAPTER 2 SUPPLEMENTS

REVISIONS

From time to tin1e 1 revisions to this assembly manual may be deemed necessary. \\Then such revisions are made, you shouldimmediately replace all outdatedpages \Vith the revisedpages. Discardthe out dated pages. Note that on the lo\verright corner of each page is a "revision daten. Initial printings will have the number "O" printed and the printing date. All subsequent revisions \vill have the revision number follo\ved by the date ofthat revision. \Vhen such revisions are made, a 11 tableofrevisions"page \Villalso be issued. This page (or pages) should be inserted in front of the opening page (this page) ofeach affected chapter. A ne\v "table of revisions" page \Vill accompany any revision n1ade to a chapter.

ARROWS

Most drawings\vill have arro\VS to sho\V\Vhich direction the parts are facing, unless the dra\vingitselfn1akes that very obvious. "A/CUP"refers to the direction that\voulclbe up ifthe part \Vere installed in a plane sitting in the uprightposition. In tnostcasesthepartsho\vn \villbe orientedin the same position as the part itseli\vill be placed during that assen1bly step. Ho\vever, time goes on and changes are made, so careful attention should be paid to the orientation arro\VS.

CONTENTS

1. SPEED BRAKE

2. DOOR SEAL

3. WING LETS

4. DOOR LATCH- STD IV

5. FUEL DRAIN

6. SA-008 ANTENNA

7. INTERIOR CABIN HEAT- NON PRESSURIZED

8. INTERIOR CABIN HEAT- PRESSURIZED

9. SUN VISOR

10. GASCOLATOR

11. LANDING LIGHT

12. FAST BUILD FUSELAGE

13. ALIGNING THE CRADLES

14. ONE PIECE "B" KIT FB

15. BELLCRANK BEARINGS

14. ONE PIECE "B" KIT FB 15. BELLCRANK BEARINGS Lmicair lntC!rnation11l Inc. RC!prmmntetl by NC!ico

Lmicair lntC!rnation11l Inc. RC!prmmntetl by NC!ico Aviation Inc., Copyright.© 1908, Redmond. OR 9775G

Manual supplement for Precise Flight Speed Brakes PF2000 g,, , ,.,a1,a® IV I~ Chapter2 REV.
Manual supplement
for
Precise Flight
Speed Brakes
PF2000
g,, ,
,.,a1,a®
IV
I~
Chapter2
REV.
4/ 04-26-99
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Supplements

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Copydght if) 1999, Heclmond. OR 97756

1.

SPEED BRAKE INSTALLATION

wing. Precise Flight speed brakes have proven reliable in hundreds of aircraft instruct you to.
wing. Precise Flight speed brakes have proven reliable in hundreds of aircraft
instruct you to. Mounting the units further inboard would give you more room
Note: In the following assembly steps and figures, the term "Speed Brake"
has been abbreviated to "S/B".
Precise Flight speed brakes
SB-1
Speedbrake
REV.
4/ 04-26-99
Supplements

The Precise Flight Model 125 speed brakes are specially designed for the Lancair

IV

and will add a new safety dimension to your fast, high altitude flying. High rate of

descents, whether voluntary or involuntary, can be made without risking engine damage by shock cooling. The throttle can still be left open, although a partial power reduction is highly recommended for maximum sink rate.

Installation is very straight forward, but please locate the speed brake units where

we

to work, but the turbulence ofthe deployed brakes would cause turbulence over the

horizontal stabilizer.

would cause turbulence over the horizontal stabilizer. Lancair lnternatiannJ Inc., lfopres1?nted by Neicn
would cause turbulence over the horizontal stabilizer. Lancair lnternatiannJ Inc., lfopres1?nted by Neicn

Lancair lnternatiannJ Inc., lfopres1?nted by Neicn Aviation Inc

CllJl}Tight 'D i!J!l!l, H.eclmoud, OR !l775G

CONTENTS

A MOUNTING SIB TO TOP WING SIUN

B. CABLE INSTALLATION

C. BOTTOM WING SIUN SUPPORT

Overview of SIB location

FigureSB:2

BL 114

I

SUPPORT Overview of SIB location FigureSB:2 BL 114 I 1111111111 = Speed brake NOTE: Be sure

1111111111 = Speed brake

NOTE: Be sure to orient yourself with the arrows in the drawings. Some drawings are oriented right- side up and some upside-down as the wing sits in the jig. So whether your wings are still in the jig or not, pay attention to the arrows.

are still in the jig or not, pay attention to the arrows. Lancair lnt()rnatio1ml lnc., Represented

Lancair lnt()rnatio1ml lnc., Represented hy Neico Aviat.ion Inc., C[)prright 'D l!J!l!l, ltetlmnntl, OH !J775G

A. MOUNTING SIB TO TOP WING SKIN

The S/B is mounted to the top wing skin with countersunk screws and nutplates. A flange must be formed in the top wing skin so that the S/B will be flush when screwed in position.

Al. Figure SB:A: 1 and SB:2 show the location ofthe cutout in the top wing skin. Notice that the rear wing spar is notched slightly. This notch is to provide more clearance between the S/B and the long aileron pushrod. Draw the 11.5" x 1.8" rectangular shape on the inside ofthe top wing skin. Drill four #50 holes through the top wing skin, one through each corner ofthe rectangle. These holes will help you locate the rectangle from the outer side of the top wing skin. Do not cut into the top rear spar cap more than .25".

Speed brake location

Figure SB:A: 1

BL 76

ri\

than .25". Speed brake location Figure SB:A: 1 BL 76 ri\ ~ 1" Fwd ~bd Right

~

1"

Fwd

~bd

Right rear wing spar (top spar cap)

Right rear wing spar (top spar cap)
Right rear wing spar (top spar cap)
Right rear wing spar (top spar cap)

Note: Do not cut into the top rear spar cap more than .25"

0

Top wing

skin

------

,

-.I

1.8" 1~

1

:,1"17"1

1 ,.,. 1 ,.,. 11

11

 

11

11

11

111 /

II 111

111

 

Rear wing

   

spar

--------

 
   
 

II

11111111

111\ 11\111"

 

/ 111111

I

I

I

I 111

rr1n11ii11i11,

  / 111111 I I I I 111 rr1n11ii11i11, Bottom win~n llEV. 4/ 04-26-99 Supplements Ln1u:nir

Bottom win~n

  / 111111 I I I I 111 rr1n11ii11i11, Bottom win~n llEV. 4/ 04-26-99 Supplements Ln1u:nir

llEV.

4/ 04-26-99

Supplements

rr1n11ii11i11, Bottom win~n llEV. 4/ 04-26-99 Supplements Ln1u:nir lnternntinnal Inc Represented hy Neico A.,.i11tin11

Ln1u:nir lnternntinnal Inc

Represented hy Neico A.,.i11tin11 Inc_, Coprr:ig:ht f) I !l!l!l, ltcdmond, OH !l775G

A2. Carefully cut the rectangular section out of the top wing skin as shown. Use the four small holes you drilled in Step Al to locate the rectangle from outside the top wing skin. Cutting from outside is much easier than from the inside. Don't cut more than 114" into the rear spar.

~

A3. From outside the wing, insert the S/B cartridge into the rectangular hole and center it. It will be necessary to grind a small notch in one side to allow the cable to fit. Notice that the S/B connector and cable are on the right side facing forward for both wings and the opening in the Speed Brake Cartridge for Blade Passage is biased toward the forward side (thin forward, thick aft). Wben the blades are deployed the cupped-machined blade surfaces will be forward. This allows for a slightly greater air spill for the blades and incrementally increases their effective- ness.

A4.

When the S/B is properly centered, mark the outline of the large S/B mounting flange onto the outer surface ofthe top wing skin. An aw1type scribe works well for this step.

A5.

Remove the S/B. Carefully trim back the OUTER laminate and core ofthe top wing skin to the outline you drew in Step A4. Don't trim back the inner laminate of the wing skin. Also recess the core material around the cutout 1/4" between the inner and outer laminates.

~

Core removal for S/B

Figure SB:A:2

Fi'i"i':":'~~l287" ~

{Jlll/111111

Fi' i"i':":'~~l 287" ~ {Jlll/111111 S/B housing AIC up Top wing /skin Rear wing spar ~

S/B housing

AIC up

Top wing

/skin

Rear wing spar ~
Rear
wing
spar
~

E:::'.:'.':'.11I1111111111///1/W

.

'

c:::>'7

~;;:;='~~~~.A==l'

=~==A==l.='D=:_® :!'JV_'!

L

Vlll'flll-'7/lll"fi.

Lanc;iir lnternot.ion!ll Inc., Hep resented hr Neico Aviation Inc

_JI~

. L:_j

1---=-C=ha""p-'-te: ::.rc:.Z

_i_l_RE_·'-'·

4_/_04_-_2_6-_9_9_--1+'A11E-+i

y:o.

Su pp le ments

Cop~Tit:-ht 1 D I!J!l9, Hedmond, OR 97756

AG. Mark (with a felt pen) the orientation of the large aluminum S/B flange. (i.e.
AG.
Mark (with a felt pen) the orientation of the large aluminum S/B flange. (i.e. -
forward, outer surface, etc.) Remove this flange from the S/B and cover it with thin
release tape. Apply a light coat of wax to the S/B housing and let it dry prior to
putting on the release tape. This is to keep the adhesive backing ofthe tape from
permanently sticking to the aluminum.
A7.
Use instant glue to temporarily bond straight wood pieces to the outer surface of
the aluminum S/B flange. These wood pieces will hold the flange flush with the
wing skin. See Figure SB:A:3.
AS.
Use 40 grit to sand the inner surface of the top wing skin in the area around the
S/B cutout. Clean this area with MC.
A9.
Place the aluminum S/B flange into position in the top wing skin. The wood pieces
should hold the flange flush with the top surface. Use instant glue to hold the wood
pieces and flange in position.
SIB mounting flange
Figure SB:A:3
Wood pieces hold S/B flange
flush wi
the top wing skin.
SIB flange
(covered with
Top wing
release
pe)
/skin
f I 111111111111111 '
Flox
Rear
wing
sp~
Bottom wing
skin~
I I I III II \II I I
I
I
11 I
\ I
I
I
I \ I
I
l
I 11111
REV.
4/ 04-26-99
Supplements

Lancair ln1t?l'1Hltion11J lnc., HeprE~sented by Neico Aviation Inc., Copyright D i!J!l9, Herlmm1d. OH !li75(i

AlO.

Fill the area between the aluminum S/B flange and the inner wings skin laminate with a thick epoxy/flax mixture. Be sure to push the flox back into the wing skin where the core has been removed.

When the flox has cured, carefully use the countersunk mounting holes in the aluminum flange as guides to drill #28 holes through the flox and wing skin.

Remove the aluminum mounting plate from the wing skin and remove the release tape from the flange.

Attach MS21069 nutplates to the inside ofthe top wing skin at each S/B mounting hole. Use either of the methods shown in Figure SB:A:4 to mount the nutplates.

Securing S/B 1110unting nutplates

Figure SB:A:4 Top wing /skin 11111111111111111 Nutplate secured Rear to flange wing using Method #2
Figure SB:A:4
Top wing
/skin
11111111111111111
Nutplate
secured
Rear
to flange
wing
using
Method #2
/spar
11Jii1 1111 I
111 \I I II\ II I,
1 J 1111
II
J
(Method #2)
11
-
AN426A3-8
Li-
rivet
'jj'~AN426A3-5
MS21069
/~rivet
'
nutplate
1" x 1/2" piece
of 6 BID
MS21069
V'~
nutplate
Nutplate is riveted to piece
of 6 BID, then the 6 BID is
bonded to the wing skin.

REV.

4/ 04-26-99

Supplements

is bonded to the wing skin. REV. 4/ 04-26-99 Supplements Al 1. Al2. A13. S/B housing

Al 1.

Al2.

A13.

S/B housing

Bottom wing

I I

skin
skin

(Method #1 )

1. Al2. A13. S/B housing Bottom wing I I skin (Method #1 ) Nutplate is riveted

Nutplate is riveted directly to flange.

I skin (Method #1 ) Nutplate is riveted directly to flange. L11m:iiir Jnternntional Inc., Represented hr

Al4.

Al5.

Reattach the aluminum S/B flange to the S/B.

You should now be able to mount the en MS24693-S30 countersunk screws.

~

tire SIB to the top wing skin using

countersunk screws. ~ tire SIB to the top wing skin using C h a p t

Chapter2

41 04-26-99