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Ex: She writes the music he plays the guitar

Separate clauses Link ideas using


Two independent clauses, Compound Insert
with periods and a subord.
but both the comma and Sentences semi-colon
capitallztion clauses.
coordinating conjunction
are missing.
Coordinating While she writes the music for Coldplay, he
conjunction (for, She writes the music. He plays the guitar. plays the guitar for that band.
and, nor, but, or,
FUSED SENTENCES yet, so) plus a
comma
Sparingly and connect independent clauses whose meanings are closely related.
She writes the music, and he plays the guitar
RUN-ON Connected
improperly
SENTENCES
She writes the music for Coldplay; he plays the guitar for that band.

More details
Much more closely
COMMA SPLICES related

Coordinating conjunction Ex: She writes the music. For Coldplay, and he plays the guitar for that band
Two or more independent clauses that She writes the music. For Coldplay, but he plays the guitar for that band
follow one another and are incorrectly Compound sentences
linked together only with a comma (or
commas). The coordinating conjunction is
Important! Considerer the meaning before joining sentences.
missing.

Meanings closely connected.


Ex: She writes the music, he plays the guitar.
A coord conj. Its also necesary Insert semicolon Ex: She writes the music for Coldplay; he plays the guitar for that band

Source: Avoiding Run-On Sentences, Comma Splices, and Fragments - BCCC Tutoring Center
Ex: She writes the music he plays the guitar
Separate clauses Link ideas using a
Compound Insert
with periods and subord. Conjunct.
Has two main clauses joined with no Sentences semi-colon
capitallztion
punctuation at all.

Coordinating conjunction While she writes the music for Coldplay, he


She writes the music. He plays the guitar. plays the guitar for that band.
(for, and, nor, but, or, yet,
so) plus a comma
FUSED SENTENCES

Ex: She writes the music, and he plays the guitar


RULE
RUN-ON Connected Sparingly and connect independent clauses
improperly whose meanings are closely related.
SENTENCES
More details
Much more closely
related
She writes the music for Coldplay; he plays the guitar for that band.
COMMA SPLICES

A comma splice incorrectly joins two main


clauses with a comma. Ex: She writes the music. For Coldplay, and he plays the guitar for that band
Coordinating conjunction Compound
She writes the music. For Coldplay, but he plays the guitar for that band
sentences

Ex: She writes the music, he plays the guitar. Important!! Considerer the meaning before joining sentences.
A coord conj. Its also necesary

Insert semicolon Ex: She writes the music for Coldplay; he plays the guitar for that band

Meanings closely connected. Source: Avoiding Run-On Sentences, Comma Splices, and Fragments - BCCC Tutoring Center
a. Connect the fragment to the sentence that comes before or after it.
Ex: While I was waiting for my car to be repaired, I read a magazine.
1. Subordinating Conjunction and Relative Pronoun Fragments
b. Remove the subordinating conjunction/relative pronoun.
Ex: While I was waiting for my car to be repaired.
Ex: I was waiting for my car to be repaired.

2. -ing Fragments a. Connect the fragment to the sentence that comes before or after it.

Ex: Her expertise being in chemistry and biology. Ex: Her expertise being in chemistry and biology, she was not hired as an English instructor.
Ex: She designed the new science exhibit, her expertise being in chemistry and biology.
If the only verb in the sentence ends
in ing and does not have a helping b. Correct the verb form.
verb, you have a fragment.
Ex: Her expertise is in chemistry and biology.
SENTENCE Her expertise was in chemistry and biology.
FRAGMENTS
3. Missing Subject Fragments
a. Connect the fragment to the sentence that comes before or after it.
Ex: Security set off the alarm and evacuated
the building. Next, closed all the entrances. Ex: Security set off the alarm, evacuated the building, and closed all the entrances.
Incomplete sentence.
b. Add the missing subject.
Missing the subject,
the verb, or both Ex: Security set off the alarm and evacuated the building. Next, they closed all the entrances.

Ex: After the party starts.

4. Extra Information Fragments


a. Connect the fragment to the sentence that comes before or after it.
Ex: For instance, clean water and electricity. Ex: Many Americans take basic amenities for granted, for example, clean water and electricity.

The verb is missing b. Add the missing subject.


Ex: For example, basic amenities include clean water and electricity.

Source: Avoiding Run-On Sentences, Comma Splices, and Fragments - BCCC Tutoring Center
1. Extraneous Apostrophes Simply add an s to anything you want to pluralize. Only add an apostrophe if you want to use the possessive
form, such as: my wifes
Ex: Its all yours.

2. Unnecessary Quotation Marks If youre not quoting something, dont use single or double quotation marks. If you want to
emphasize a specific part of your message, use a bold or italicized font, but keep it short.
Ex: We offer the best price in town!.

3. Missing Commas Speak the sentence aloud and take note of any breaks in your speech. Insert commas when you pause or when you
change gears within a sentence.

Ex: I went to the store but they were closed so I went home.

4. Too Many Commas


PUNCTUATION
Ex: I went to the store, but they were closed, so I got in my car, then I turned my radio on, then I backed out, and then I went home.

5. Excess Exclamation Save them only for the big points and for the ends of paragraphs, leaving the reader on a high note.

Ex: Our products are the best! They really work! Get yours today!

6. Semi-colons Use a colon if you want to set off a list of items.

Ex: I brought three things; a toothbrush, a blanket, and a pillow. I was glad to be going on vacation; I need the rest from work.

7. Quotation Mark Placement The punctuation is part of the passage youre quoting.

Ex: I had a great day at work today!

8. Hyphen (-) vs. Dash () Use a hyphen, or a short line, to bridge two like concepts in a sentence. Use a dash (a long line) to indicate that youre
moving onto a separate idea or train of thought.

Ex: I prefer chocolate milk its tastier than plain milk.

Source: http://www.walsworth.com/blog/10-common-punctuation-mistakes-avoid