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AIR NORTHWEST FIELD GUIDE AUGUST 2017 EDITION

WELCOME TO THE AIR NORTHWEST FIELD GUIDE

Welcome! Air Northwest is brought


to you by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in
With energy efficiency costing just a fraction of building
a new power plant and with BPAs nearly carbon-free
partnership with your local Northwest public power footprint it just makes sense for us to keep investing in
utilities. Local utilities offer the financial incentives for energy efficiency.
energy efficient equipment, and Air Northwest can help

Thats where you come in!


connect you and your customers to those incentives.

We know your time is valuable, and we think this Field


Guide will provide you with a shortcut to key resources.
By working with your customers and local public power
In this Field Guide, our website, and companion utilities to promote energy efficient equipment, you are
workshops, we aim to provide useful information you helping ensure a clean and affordable power supply for
can take to your next job: decades to come.

Youll Learn
about available
incentives that can help you build the
On behalf of your local utility and
Bonneville Power Administration,
business case for equipment upgrades

Thank You!
Youll Learn
more about
working effectively with your local
utilities and we provide you with
Sincerely,
a handy list of utility contacts

Youll Get
a full suite of
tips, industry resources, Michelle Lichtenfels
Program Manager, HVAC

and more! Bonneville Power Administration


melichtenfels@bpa.gov
BEFORE you get STARTED
Lets get you oriented to what you need to know about working with utilities
and how to get incentives for your customers.

Working with utilities can be easy, but it can also feel like a big hurdle.
We understand the feeling. And we are here to help you succeed.
Your local utility has the information and access you need to get incentives.

90% of problems with getting the project started or finished can be solved by
having a good relationship with your local utility.

SEE PAGE 55 OF THE FIELD GUIDE TO FIND OUT WHO YOU NEED TO GET TO KNOW ON A FIRST NAME BASIS.

THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY INCENTIVE OPPORTUNITIES TO BE AWARE OF:

Prescriptive Opportunities Custom Opportunities


Prescriptive incentives, often referred to as Custom projects are more complex.
deemed incentives, mean that the energy If you dont see a prescriptive incentive opportunity, call
savings value is established, and the incentive Air Northwest and explore your options for a custom project.
is predictable. For example, if youre doing a deep retrofit or a built-up system
Paperwork associated with getting prescriptive with boilers or chillers, you might have a custom project
incentives is streamlined, so it makes getting opportunity. Dont let this opportunity slip away!
these rebates and incentives as easy as possible. Air Northwest, Bonneville Power Administration, and your
FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PRESCRIPTIVE local utility want to help you with these projects!
INCENTIVES ON PAGES 13 THROUGH 39. LEARN ABOUT THE CUSTOM PATH ON PAGES 40 AND 41.

WE ARE HERE TO HELP Dont let paperwork, or


ensure you can get your any REAL OR PERCEIVED
customer the utility equipment issues or
funded by incentives they deserve. questions stand in your way.

&
BONNEVILLE POWER EMAIL US AT
info@airnorthwesthvac.com or CALL DIRECTLY AT
503-278-3079

YOUR LOCAL UTILITY WE WILL RESPOND BACK TO YOUR INQUIRY WITHIN 24 HOURS

Like this field guide?

Want to get copies for your shop?

Lets make sure youre an Air Ally member so you get all the member updates
and communications, and well send you the copies you need for your staff.
TERMINOLOGY

ARC Custom Incentive


Advanced Rooftop-Unit Control, consisting of a Incentive for projects for which energy savings
VFD with controls. are estimated by BPA engineers using established
engineering methods, including the use of energy
BPA models or spreadsheets. Incentives for custom
projects are about $0.20 per kWh saved, which
Bonneville Power Administration is a federal
covers about 30-50% of the project cost.
nonprofit agency based in the Northwest. BPA
is a part of U.S. Department of Energy, though
Economizer
it is self-funded and covers its costs by selling
its power products and services. BPA promotes Digital or mechanical controls intended to reduce
energy efficiency and advances innovative energy energy consumption by using outside air for
solutions to enrich life in the Northwest. cooling, whenever the conditions are favorable.
Changeover temperatures above 68 F, and
BTU integrated operation with AC compressors, enable
additional energy savings.
British Thermal Unit

EER, IEER, SEER


CEE
Energy Efficiency Ratio, an efficiency metric, with
The Consortium for Energy Efficiency is a national,
required code minimums and CEE defined Tiers,
non-profit public benefits corporation promoting
which must be met for incentives.
the manufacture and purchase of energy efficiency
products and services. Understanding the CEE tier
HRV
program is important as a few BPA Commercial
HVAC measures cite CEE Tiers as a requirement. Heat Recovery Ventilation is an energy recovery
ventilation system using equipment known as
COP a heat recovery ventilator, heat exchanger, air
exchanger, or an air-to-air heat exchanger. HRV
The Coefficient of Performance is a steady-state
provides fresh air and improved climate control,
ratio of the amount of useful work accomplished to
while also saving energy by reducing heating and
the amount of energy needed to perform the work.
cooling requirements.
Higher COPs equate to lower operating costs.

HSPF
Heating Season Performance Factor, an average
efficiency metric, used to compare heating season
energy use.

6 TERMINOLOGY
TERMINOLOGY

kW RTU
Kilowatt - one thousand watts Rooftop Unit
(units of electric power)
Return Air
kWh The air that the HVAC system returns from the
Kilowatt hour - one thousand watts of electric conditioned space, which is either used for supply
power supplied to or taken from an electric circuit air, or exhausted to the outside. Larger systems
over the period of one hour. can have return air or exhaust fans to ensure
proper airflow.
M&V
Measurement & Verification is a method used to Supply Air
quantify energy savings. Some M&V methods are A mixture of return and outside air, which is
simple, such as an onsite inspection and review heated or cooled by the HVAC system to meet
of documentation. Some M&V methods are more space temperature set points and code required
complex, and could require on-site metering ventilation.
to make sure the equipment is performing as
expected and prove energy savings. Therm
A unit of heat equal to 100,000 BTU/hour
One ton of Air Conditioning Capacity
Equal to 12,000 BTUs per hour of heat removal VFD/VSD
capacity; ducted systems can typically cool
Variable Frequency Drive/ Variable Speed Drive
between 400 and 600 square feet, per ton of
capacity.
Variable Refrigerant Flow
QPL Or Variable Refrigerant Volume, variable capacity
heat pumps, where refrigerant is used to transfer
A Qualified Products List is a list of products that
heat to multiple indoor fan-coil units, or ducted
meet the specifications and requirements for
systems (less common).
incentive qualification. If you are installing certain
technologies in order to claim a prescriptive
incentive, you need to consult the QPL in order to
determine which products qualify for incentives.

ROI
The Return on Invevstment is the benefit to an
investor resulting from an investment of some
resource. A high ROI means the investment gains
compare favorably to investment cost.

TERMINOLOGY 7
HVAC
PROJECT
LIFECYCLE
The table below illustrates the typical project stakeholder roles throughout the HVAC project
lifecycle. Every project is unique and Air Northwest staff is on hand to help you with your project.

PROJECT
STAKEHOLDER

Air Allies Air Northwest Building Owner or Your Local Utility


HVAC/R Contractors, HVAC Specialists Facility Manager
Distributors,
Manufacturers
STEP ONE: Identifies potential Assists Air Allies and Shows interest in Identifies potential
PROJECT project with utilities with identifying potential project. project with
IDENTIFICATION customer. available HVAC customer or Air
Contacts local utility incentives. Ally.
or Air Northwest for Upon request,
available incentives, conducts an initial site
or uses the search visit to identify savings
tool on the Air potential. technology
Northwest website. or products.

Ensures any
STEP TWO: Provides project cost Ensures owner Participates in initial required pre-
PROJECT estimate to business and Air Ally both project scoping project paperwork
SCOPING owner. understand activities. is complete.
the incentive
Reviews Air Allys
requirements.
proposal. Pre-approves
projects.

STEP THREE: Proceeds with Is available to If required, signs Not responsible


project installation answer questions agreements with for project
PROJECT
and commissioning about incentive Air Ally. management or job
INSTALLATION
(if required). requirements. oversight.
Not responsible for
project management
or job oversight.

Provides Local Utility Upon request, helps Conducts post-


STEP FOUR: Confirms
with required final ensure accurate installation
PROJECT completed project.
documentation, completion of inspections (if
CLOSEOUT Receives incentive required).
including Project incentive paperwork
payment within
Information Form prior to submittal to Processes incentive
estimated 6-8
and installation Local Utility. payment (estimated
weeks.
invoices. 6-8 weeks)

Project not eligible for prescriptive HVAC


incentives?

Contact Air Northwest to determine if a


customized project path is right for your project.
620 SW 5th Ave. Ste 400, Portland, OR 97204
Custom projects typically require partnership Phone: 866.610.9555
between the building owner, BPA engineers, and
the local utility. Fax: 503.243.1154
Email: info@airnorthwesthvac.com
www.airnorthwesthvac.com
How TRADE ALLIES Drive Savings

Local Utilities Air Allies


Support their commercial Identify opportunities for
customers with energy energy efficient HVAC projects
efficiency programs and and help customers receive
offset project costs by utility incentives.
offering incentives.

Building Owners &


Bonneville Power Operators
Administration & 
Reduce operating expenses,
Regional Partners
improve air quality and
Invest in low-cost energy efficiency occupant comfort.
to offset the need to build future
power plants throughout the region.

Local Utilities
Invest in efficiency
to keep rates low
for customers.

Trade allies play an integral role in our efforts to reshape the energy
landscape across the Northwest.
Our success is directly tied to their success.

Vice President of Energy EfficiencyBonneville Power


Administration & Regional Partners
TABLE OF CONTENTS

INCENTIVES AND BEST PRACTICES

13 COMMERCIAL INCENTIVES
16 ADVANCED ROOFTOP-UNIT CONTROLS APPROVED QUALIFIED PRODUCTS
17 ADVANCED ROOFTOP-UNIT CONTROLS BEST PRACTICES
22 CONNECTED THERMOSTATS APPROVED QUALIFIED PRODUCTS
23 CONNECTED THERMOSTATS BEST PRACTICES
27 DUCTLESS HEAT PUMPS BEST PRACTICES
33 HEAT PUMP UPGRADES BEST PRACTICES
39 VARIABLE REFRIGERANT FLOW SYSTEMS BEST PRACTICES
40 VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVES ON AIR HANDLING UNIT FANS
44 CUSTOMIZED ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS

RESOURCES

47 SALES TIPS
54 SIZING SMALL HVAC SYSTEMS FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS
56 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
59 UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LIST
72 REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS
75 HVAC MARKET INTELLIGENCE REPORT
76 NOTES
77 AIR NW SUPPORT STAFF
COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES
Your local utilities offer a suite of incentives to help your energy efficiency projects come to life. In the
following pages you will find information on commercial HVAC incentives that may be available to you.

These measures allow customers to choose equipment from a pre-qualified list of energy efficiency
measures and receive a fixed incentive. This path is designed for customers who have projects that are
beyond the design phase. These may include new construction, renovation, remodeling and equipment
replacement projects. If your project is more complex or you are installing equipment not covered by
these measures, the custom project path is the one for you.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 13


ADVANCED OPTIMIZE PERFORMANCE

REDUCE MAINTENANCE
ROOFTOP-UNIT
CONTROLS SAVE MONEY

Full and Lite Retrofits

For Commercial Buildings

SAVINGS THROUGH THE ROOF


Older inefficient rooftop-units can waste
thousands of dollars annually.

By retrofitting those rooftop units with Advanced Rooftop-Unit


Controls (ARC), building owners and operators can save money
and make their building more comfortable.

Your local electric utility may offer incentives anywhere from


$100-225 per ton of cooling capacity for qualifying retrofits.

BENEFITS MAY INCLUDE

Improved comfort Improved indoor Reduced fan usage Remote energy


air quality monitoring 
and control

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL UTILITY ABOUT INCENTIVES.


UTILITY PARTICIPATION AND INCENTIVES VARY.

14 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


HOW DOES IT SAVE ENERGY?

ARC retrofits can reduce fan speeds up to 40% during the first stage of
heating and cooling and 60% when no heating or cooling is needed.

Energy savings generally increase with higher hours of occupancy.

INCENTIVE REQUIREMENTS
PRE-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS: POST-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS:

The existing RTU must have the following Arc Lite and Full retrofits must add one of the
characteristics: following options:
Be packaged unitary equipment (no split systems), A VFD and controller for variable speed fan operation, or
Have greater than five tons of cooling capacity, A multi-speed motor and controller for multi-speed
fan operation,
Constant speed supply fan
(RTUs with variable speed fans are not eligible), and Listed on the Qualified Products List.
Heating must be provided by electricity or gas. Full ARC retrofits must additionally include:
A controller with digital, integrated economizer control, and
Web-enabled control, monitoring and alarms.

For a product to qualify it must be on the Qualified Products List, which can be found at this website:
www.bpa.gov/EE/Policy/IManual/Pages/IM-Document-Library.aspx

If your project meets the

4
ESTIMATED INCENTIVES

above requirements and


the equipment is on the
TO Qualified Products List,

10
YEARS
call your local utility or
Air Northwest today to
confirm eligibility
Your local utility may offer A typical project payback, and incentives.
anywhere from $100-$225 per ton including incentives, is
for qualifying retrofits. about 4-10 years.

Incentives may vary from utility to utility. Additional terms and condition may apply.

Contact Air Northwest for more information.


Call us at 866-610-9555 or email us at info@airnorthwesthvac.com.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 15


ARC APPROVED QUALIFIED PRODUCTS

Full Retrofit
ARC TYPE MANUFACTURER MODEL
Full Retrofit Transformative Wave CATALYST with eIQ

Full Retrofit Pelican Pelican solution that includes:


Pelican TS200 or TS250 Thermostat,
Pelican zone controller Z8 or Z24, or PEARL Economizer,
Pelican Extended Range Wireless Gateway, and
Variable speed drive

Full Retrofit Bes-Tech Digi-RTU

ARC-Lite
ARC TYPE MANUFACTURER MODEL
ARC-Lite Transformative Wave CATALYST Lite

ARC-Lite Lennox ARC -with DCV

ARC-Lite Trane ARC -with DCV

ARC-Lite NexRev DrivePak

ARC-Lite Pelican Pelican solution that includes:


Pelican TS200 or TS250 Thermostat,
Pelican PEARL Economizer,
Pelican Extended Range Wireless Gateway, and
Variable speed drive

The QPL gets updated regularly.

Go to www.airnorthwesthvac.com/technologies/advanced-rooftop-unit-
controls/qualified-products-list.html to see the latest list.

Think you have a product that may qualify? Contact the Air Northwest team!

For a full list of requirements and specifications, please refer to the current BPA Implementation Manual:
https://www.bpa.gov/EE/Policy/IManual/Pages/default.aspx

For more information about qualified products please contact Michelle Lichtenfels, Program Manager, at
melichtenfels@bpa.gov.

16 QUALIFIED PRODUCT LISTS


ARC BEST PRACTICES

CONSIDERATIONS IN
COMMERCIAL CODES
INSTALLATIONS TO KEEP
Existing RTU motor capabilities IN MIND
RTU manufacturers warranty Mechanical codes require that the supply-fan operates
continuously during occupied hours. The minimum
outside-air damper position ensures that adequate
outside-air is delivered during occupied periods, both
before and after the ARC retrofit
WHAT ARE If available and appropriate, include more energy-

GOOD
APPLICATIONS?
saving features, such as optimal start and stop, demand
response strategies and Connected Thermostats

Existing supply fan motor is: constant speed,


three-phase and at least 1 horsepower in size INSTALLATION
RTU units with at least a 5 ton cooling capacity

RTUs that are operating poorly, or that will be


replaced within 18 months of ARC installation
TIPS
Consult the Advanced RTU Campaigns RTU field
checklist prior to installing the ARC
(http://www.advancedrtu.org/)

Check manufacturer installation guidelines and


manufacturer warranty
WHAT ARE
BAD
If available and appropriate, add more capabilities to
the controller, such as start and stop times, demand
response strategies and automatic fault diagnostics
APPLICATIONS?
Rooftop units under 5 tons

Rooftop units that only run occasionally MAINTENANCE

TIPS
(less than 2,000 hours per year)

Make sure that filters and coils are


cleaned and operating properly

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 17


ARC SUCCESS STORY

A Cartful of Energy Savings

SHOPN KART PROJECT-AT-A-GLANCE


EQUIPMENT INSTALLED FINANCIAL ANALYSIS ESTIMATED ANNUAL SAVINGS

Rooftop Unit supply fan controls $7,600 PROJECT COSTS


ANNUAL KILOWATT
19,132 HOUR SAVINGS
(Advanced Rooftop Controls) $3,000 INCENTIVES

The Shopn Kart at Yard Birds Mall provides Lewis County energy-savings retrofit solution for constant volume,
residents a variety of produce and products to meet single-zone packaged rooftop equipment. With the
all their needs. In order to provide the best shopping installed control on the 20-ton rooftop unit, energy
experience, Shopn Kart management undertook a savings are estimated at 19,132 kWh which translates
variety of energy efficient upgrades to make the store to $957 per year. In addition to the energy savings,
more comfortable for the customers and the products. the incentive was also helpful in deciding to install
Conserve Energy, LLC assisted Shopn Kart with the the control. Lewis County PUD offered an incentive
upgrades, which included lighting and HVAC. of $3,000 which brought the project costs down
significantly!
Weve done several projects with public utilities,
including Lewis County PUD and Grays Harbor PUD, Installing retrofit controls on a rooftop unit is a no
where we updated the existing interior and exterior brainer! Rooftop units are responsible for more than
lighting said Gary McDaniel, vice president of 1,000 trillion BTUs per year of energy use nationwide.
operations, D&S Enterprises. Knowing that the HVAC An ARC can reduce energy use by more than 50 percent.
systems were aging at this Shopn Kart location, Adding an ARC to half of existing RTUs would reduce
management decided to go beyond lighting upgrades. energy use by about 285 trillion BTUs!* Make the energy
The existing 20-ton rooftop unit was retrofitted with efficient move and help your business by considering
an Advanced Rooftop Unit Control (ARC). An ARC is an ARCs in your next energy efficient upgrade.

*Per U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field Test Results, July 2013.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 18


CONNECTED INCREASE FUNCTIONALITY
MAXIMIZE COMFORT
THERMOSTATS OPTIMIZE ENERGY USAGE

For Commercial Buildings

TAKE CONTROL OF COMFORT


Making the switch to a connected
thermostat gives you more control
over your buildings HVAC system and
can help you manage and reduce your
energy consumption and costs.
Your local electric utility may offer
up to $200 for qualifying connected
thermostat installations.

BENEFITS MAY INCLUDE

Simple Remote Automatic Web-based Reduced


programming access via updates monitoring energy costs
smart devices and alerts

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL UTILITY ABOUT INCENTIVES.


UTILITY PARTICIPATION AND INCENTIVES VARY.

20 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


HOW DOES IT SAVE ENERGY?
Connected thermostats control the HVAC system in order to maintain zone
temperatures via the internet. Connected thermostats provide internet access to
alerts, and monitoring and control from a remote location.

Programming allows you to more accurately match HVAC operation with actual
occupancy (for example, scheduling setback temperatures during evenings, holidays
and breaks), while ensuring desired temperatures are maintained during occupied
hours, thus minimizing energy usage.

INCENTIVE REQUIREMENTS
PRE-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS: POST-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS:

Individual rooms for hotel and The installed thermostat must include the following features:
motels are not eligible. Limited duration occupied-period override,
Thermostat must replace an existing Multiple set-back schedules with energy- saving temperature
thermostat that is not web enabled. set-points during unoccupied periods including evenings,
Heating can be electric or gas. holidays and breaks,
Existing HVAC system (which will be controlled by Capable of scheduling the supply fan to operate continuously
the new thermostat) has an existing supply-fan. during occupied periods, and to operate in auto mode
during unoccupied periods,
Think you have a product that meets Remote, web-based monitoring and programming,
our requirements, call us! Battery and memory back-up to retain settings during
power or internet losses, and
We can vet products within about 30
days and add them to the QPL. Listed on the Qualified Products List.

To learn which products qualify go to the Qualified Products List at


www.bpa.gov/EE/Policy/IManual/Pages/IM-Document-Library.aspx

If your project meets the


ESTIMATED INCENTIVES

above requirements and


the equipment is on the
Qualified Products List,
call your local utility or
Air Northwest today to
confirm eligibility
Your utility may offer up to A typical project payback, and incentives.
$200 per thermostat for qualifying including incentives, is
thermostat installations. about 2-3 years.

Incentives may vary from utility to utility. Additional terms and conditions may apply.

Contact Air Northwest for more information.


Call us at 866-610-9555 or email us at info@airnorthwesthvac.com.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 21


CONNECTED THERMOSTATS APPROVED QUALIFIED PRODUCTS

MANUFACTURER MODEL
Carrier 33CONNECTSTAT, with the fan set to ON during occupied, and AUTO during unoccupied

DreamWatts Thermostat

Ecobee Commercial EMS

Ecobee EMS SI

Honeywell Vision Pro 8000 with Gateways for web-enabling

Honeywell WIFI Vision Pro 9000

Honeywell Prestige Wireless

Kite & Lightning UNITY System

Pelican Wireless Systems TS200

Profile Systems P1900

Proliphix Internet Managed Thermostats (IMT) 550 hard- wired wi-fi model

Transformative Wave CATALYST BMS

Venstar EMS

The QPL gets updated regularly.

Go to www.airnorthwesthvac.com/technologies/connected-thermostats/
qualified-products-list.html to see the latest list.

Think you have a product that may qualify? Contact the Air Northwest team!

For more information about qualified products or to request that products be added to the list, please contact
Michelle Lichtenfels, Program Manager, at melichtenfels@bpa.gov.

For a full list of requirements and specifications, please refer to the current BPA Implementation Manual:
https://www.bpa.gov/EE/Policy/IManual/Pages/default.aspx

22 QUALIFIED PRODUCT LISTS


CONNECTED THERMOSTATS BEST PRACTICES

CONSIDERATIONS IN
COMMERCIAL CODES
INSTALLATIONS TO KEEP
Existing building control system
IN MIND
Interaction with existing HVAC systems Some state building codes require a
continuous supply of outside air during
Occupancy and occupancy schedules
occupied hours

Consult local building and mechanical

WHAT ARE codes prior to installation

GOOD INSTALLATION
APPLICATIONS?
Commercial buildings with regular, predictable
schedules that can be set in advance
TIPS
Place thermostat away from heating/cooling vents and
Combining connected thermostat with ARC windows to ensure accurate temperature reading
retrofits to achieve even greater energy savings
Consult with building occupant about building
Replacing non-programmable thermostats in and employee schedules in order to
older buildings with connected thermostats pre-program the thermostat

Explain to the occupant how the thermostat works


and how more energy is used if the override function is
being used excessively
WHAT ARE
BAD
Make sure owners are trained to change schedules and
holiday programming, and have operating manuals

APPLICATIONS?
MAINTENANCE

TIPS
Hotel or motel rooms do not qualify
for this incentive

Replace batteries (if applicable) on a


regular basis
Check with your HVAC manufacturer to ensure that
the chosen connected thermostat is compatible Check occupancy schedules on a
with the buildings existing HVAC system. regular basis and make sure that
occupancy matches the schedule

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 23


DUCTLESS REDUCE ENERGY COSTS

INCREASE COMFORT

HEAT PUMPS ZONE CONTROL

For Commercial Buildings

DITCH THE DUCT


Upgrading your existing heating
system to a ductless heat
pump (DHP) can help increase
occupant comfort and the value
of your commercial space.

Your local electric utility may


offer up to $800 per ton for
qualifying energy efficient DHPs
in commercial buildings.

BENEFITS MAY INCLUDE

25% more efficient Improved indoor Quiet operation Easy, low-cost


than central  air quality installation
air systems

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL UTILITY ABOUT INCENTIVES.


UTILITY PARTICIPATION AND INCENTIVES VARY.

24 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


HOW DOES IT SAVE ENERGY?
Ductless Heat Pumps (DHPs) allow the user to control each
heating/cooling zone independently, eliminating the costly
over-heating and cooling common to central air systems and
achieving about 25% greater efficiency than central air systems.

Ductless heat pumps use variable speed compressors to


continuously match the heating and cooling load, and avoid the
on/off cycling of conventional heating systems that are often
associated with uncomfortable temperature variations and
high energy consumption.

Heat pumps are also two to three times more efficient than
electric resistance heaters since moving heat is less energy
intensive than creating heat.

INCENTIVE REQUIREMENTS
PRE-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS: POST-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS:
Conditioned area is heated The installed DHP must have the following features:
by zonal or forced air electric A split system heat pump employing an
resistance heat. inverter- driven outdoor compressor,
Existing space is not conditioned An inverter-driven or variable speed indoor blower,
by an air source, ground source
or ductless heat pump. Must be rated with a minimum of 9.0 HSPF (for single head systems)
and 8.2 HSPF (for multi-head systems), and
Listed on the Qualified Products List

A Qualified Products List can be found at the following website:


www.bpa.gov/EE/Policy/IManual/Pages/IM-Document-Library.aspx

If your project meets the

3
ESTIMATED INCENTIVES

above requirements and


$800 the equipment is on the
TO Qualified Products List,

5
YEARS
call your local utility or
Air Northwest today to
confirm eligibility
Your local utility may offer A typical project payback, and incentives.
up to $800 per ton for qualifying including incentives, is about
ductless heat pump installations. 3-5 years for a 3 ton unit.

Additional terms and conditions may apply. Utility participation and incentives vary.

Contact Air Northwest for more information.


Call us at 866-610-9555 or email us at info@airnorthwesthvac.com.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 25


DUCTLESS HEAT PUMPS APPROVED QUALIFIED PRODUCTS

There are over 1,800 approved products on the ductless heat pump qualified products list!
Below is the current list of manufacturers that you can choose from.

See our website for specific models and up to date information:


www.airnorthwesthvac.com/technologies/ductless-heat-pumps/qualified-products-list.html

MANUFACTURER # OF MODELS MANUFACTURER # OF MODELS


AIR-CON 25 Models HEAT CONTROLLER 20 Models

AMERICAN STANDARD 59 Models HEIL 21 Models

ARCOAIRE 21 Models INTERNATIONAL REFRIG. 15 Models

BRYANT 28 Models KEEPRITE 21 Models

CARRIER 112 Models KLIMAIRE 53 Models

COLEMAN 53 Models LENNOX 84 Models

COMFORTMAKER 21 Models LG 61 Models

COOPER & HUNTER 45 Models LUXAIRE 53 Models

DAIKIN 53 Models MIDEA 78 Models

DAY & NIGHT 21 Models MITSUBISHI 126 Models

ECR INTERNATIONAL 6 Models PANASONIC 24 Models

EVCON 10 Models PARKER DAVIS 64 Models

FRASER-JOHNSTON 10 Models PAYNE 29 Models

FRIEDRICH 16 Models SAMSUNG 61 Models

FUJITSU 62 Models TEMPSTAR 21 Models

GOODMAN 8 Models TOSHIBA CARRIER 26 Models

GREE 210 Models TRANE 79 Models

GUARDIAN 53 Models WOLF STEEL 37 Models

HAIER AMERICA 13 Models YMGI 21 Models

YORK 81 Models

The QPL gets updated regularly.

Go to www.airnorthwesthvac.com/technologies/ductless-heat-pumps/
qualified-products-list.html to see the latest list.

Think you have a product that may qualify? Contact the Air Northwest team!

For a full list of requirements and specifications, please refer to the current BPA Implementation Manual:
https://www.bpa.gov/EE/Policy/IManual/Pages/default.aspx

26 QUALIFIED PRODUCT LISTS


DUCTLESS HEAT PUMPS BEST PRACTICES

CONSIDERATIONS IN
COMMERCIAL CODES
INSTALLATIONS TO KEEP
Ventilation requirements IN MIND
Interaction with existing HVAC systems Commercial buildings must be ventilated during
occupied hours
Power supply requirements
Check airside economizer requirements and exceptions
Building control systems
Simultaneous heating and cooling prohibitions
Pressure testing of refrigerant lines
WHAT ARE
GOOD
APPLICATIONS? INSTALLATION
Adding cooling to an existing zone

Supplemental heating and cooling


for an undersized zone
TIPS
Dont forget to provide secure mounting to the outdoor unit
Heating or cooling a small area to
Make sure all installation clearances are met for the indoor
allow shutting down a large system
unit and that it is located away from the thermostat
when not needed
Determine your line set length and height
Small server room backup or cooling restrictions before you install
Follow manufacturers instructions and building code

WHAT ARE requirements, including all refrigerant protocols

BAD
APPLICATIONS?
MAINTENANCE

TIPS
Central system has existing problems

Hospital treatment areas

Areas with a lot of dust or particles in the air


Clean air filters regularly
Areas that have large ventilation requirements
Check outdoor coils for blockage annually
Check condensate drain and pan to make sure
condensate can drain freely from the unit

27 QUALIFIED PRODUCT LISTS


DUCTLESS HEAT PUMPS SUCCESS STORY

Baking in the Savings

WILD FLOWER CAF AND CUPCAKE SHOP PROJECT-AT-A-GLANCE


EQUIPMENT INSTALLED FINANCIAL ANALYSIS ESTIMATED ANNUAL SAVINGS

Ductless Heat Pump $5,571 PROJECT COSTS


ANNUAL KILOWATT
3,995 HOUR SAVINGS
$500 INCENTIVES

Connie and Bethani Higdon own and operate the Wild Flour Caf and Cupcake Chop in Washougal, WA, and they
were in dire need of an HVAC solution.

The summers were too hot, and the winters were too cold, and they werent getting by with the space heaters and
the two ancient AC units. The building was also old and couldnt accommodate ductworkmaking a Ductless
Heat Pump system a great, energy-saving solution.

Since installing the Ductless Heat Pump system, the Higdons report even, comfortable temperatures and a
noticeable decrease in energy costs.

With the new Ductless Heat Pump, Wild Flour Caf and Cupcake Shop has saved 3,995 kilowatt hours annually
and received $500 in utility incentives.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 29


HEAT PUMP INCREASE COMFORT

UPGRADES REDUCE ENERGY COSTS

For Commercial Buildings

MAXIMUM COMFORT
MINIMUM COST
Your local utility may offer
up to $1,000 per unit for
qualifying energy efficient
heat pump upgrades in
commercial buildings.

Upgrading your existing


heat pump or installing a
heat pump as part of a new
construction project will help
increase comfort for occupants and
increase the value of your commercial space.

BENEFITS MAY INCLUDE

Increased value of Less maintenance Long life span


commercial space than traditional
heating systems

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL UTILITY ABOUT INCENTIVES.


UTILITY PARTICIPATION AND INCENTIVES VARY.

30 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


HOW DOES IT SAVE ENERGY?
Heat pumps dont heat like an electric baseboard heater, instead
they extract heat from outside, which requires less energy.

During the summer, heat pumps extract heat from inside and
move it outside, providing cooling in the process.

Also some heat pumps are more efficient than others; the higher
the COP and EER ratings, the less energy is used to heat and cool
the building.

INCENTIVE REQUIREMENTS
PRE-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS: POST-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS:
Upgrade projects meet the following building characteristics: The installed heat pump must meet the
For retrofits, it replaces an existing heat pump. following requirements:

If the space was previously conditioned by an air source, Have less than 20 tons of cooling capacity,
ground source, or ductless heat pump that is no longer Be an air to air heat pump system, and
working, and the space is conditioned by backup electric heat, Meet BPA Tier 1 or Tier 2 efficiency
the application is eligible for a heat pump upgrade. requirements per the BPA Heat Pump
For new construction, there are no precondition requirements. and VRF Specification located in the IM
Document Library.

If your project meets the


ESTIMATED INCENTIVES

above requirements,
call your local utility or
Air Northwest today to
confirm eligibility
and incentives.

Your local electric utility A typical payback,


may offer up to $1,000 per including incentives, is
installed heat pump. about 17 years.

Incentives may vary from utility to utility. Additional terms and conditions may apply.

Contact Air Northwest for more information.


Call us at 866-610-9555 or email us at info@airnorthwesthvac.com.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 31


HEAT PUMPS SPECIFICATIONS

The BPA Heat Pump Specifications can be found in the Implementation Manual Document Library at:
https://www.bpa.gov/ee/policy/imanual/pages/im-document-library.aspx

Applicable to: Commercial Heat Pump Upgrades and Heat Pump Conversions
Heat Pumps Air Source Note: Selected equipment must meet both cooling and heating Tier requirements (if listed)

Equipment Size Heating Tier 1 Tier 2


(Btu/h) Mode Type Subcategory (High Eiciency) (Highest Eiciency)
All Split System 15 SEER 16 SEER
Cooling Mode
All Single Package 15 SEER 16 SEER
<65,000 Btu/h
Split System 8.5 HSPF 9 HSPF
Heating Mode
Single Package 8 HSPF 8.2 HSPF
Electric Resistance Split System and 12.2 IEER 13.6 IEER
(or None) Single Package
Cooling Mode
All Other Split System and 12 IEER 13.4 IEER
65,000 Single Package
and
<135,000 47F db/43F wb
3.4 COP N/A
Outdoor Air
Heating Mode
17F db/15F wb
2.4 COP N/A
Outdoor Air
Electric Resistance Split System and 11.6 IEER
(or None) Single Package N/A
Cooling Mode
Split System and
135,000 All Other 11.4 IEER N/A
Single Package
and
<240,000 47F db/43F wb
3.2 COP N/A
Outdoor Air
Heating Mode
17F db/15F wb
2.1 COP N/A
Outdoor Air
Electric Resistance Split System and
(or None) 10.6 IEER N/A
Single Package
Cooling Mode
240,000 All Other Split System and 10.4 IEER N/A
and Single Package
<760,000
Heating Mode N/A N/A N/A

Heat Pumps Water Source


Equipment Size Heating Tier 1 Tier 2
(Btu/h) Mode Type Subcategory (High Eiciency) (Highest Eiciency)
Cooling Mode All 86 Entering Water 14 EER N/A
<135,000
Heating Mode 68 Entering Water 4.6 COP N/A

SEERSeasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio wbWet Bulb dbDry Bulb


EEREnergy Efficiency Ratio IEERIntegrated Energy Efficiency Ratio
HSPF Heating Seasonal Performance Factor COPCoefficient of Performance

*The BPA specification is based on the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Commercial Unitary Air-conditioning and Heat Pumps Specification, last
updated January 12, 2016. BPA is a member of the CEE High Efficiency Commercial Unitary Air-conditioning and Heat Pump Initiative. As part of this
Initiative, BPA has adopted CEEs Tier 1 and Tier 2 convention, in addition to a part-load metric in order to focus on energy efficiency savings rather than peak
energy savings. More information about CEE can be found at http://www.cee1.org/

32 HEAT PUMP TIERS


HEAT PUMPS BEST PRACTICES

CONSIDERATIONS IN
COMMERCIAL INSTALLATION
INSTALLATIONS
Sizing requirements
SEER and HSPF ratings and climate zones
TIPS
Select units with demand-defrost control. This will
Supplemental or back up heating compatibility minimize defrost cycles, reducing energy use

WHAT ARE Locate the outdoor unit away from windows and

GOOD
adjacent buildings since fans and compressors can make
noise. You can also reduce this noise by mounting the
unit on a noise-absorbing base
APPLICATIONS? The location of the outdoor unit may affect its
Replacing existing electric resistance heating efficiency. Outdoor units should be protected from high
winds, which can cause defrosting problems. You can
Small to medium-sized buildings that
strategically place a bush or a fence upwind of the coils to
consume less than 600,000 kWh annually
block the unit from high winds

WHAT ARE Talk to the owner about insulating and weather-stripping

BAD
to reduce heating and cooling loads, which may allow a
smaller heat pump to be installed

APPLICATIONS?
Buildings with non-electric heat, such as MAINTENANCE

TIPS
gas or oil - incentive are not provided in fuel
switching applications
Locations where the outdoor air
temperatures are below freezing on a
Inspect and clean all components, including the indoor
regular basis, may require cold-climate heat
and outdoor coils. A dirty refrigerant coil cant properly
pumps to ensure energy savings
complete the heat-exchange process thats essential to
heat pump operation

CODES Lubricate all mechanical parts, including motor bearings

TO KEEP Check the refrigerant level and fill to the recommended

IN MIND level. If the refrigerant is low, inspect the coils and


lines for leaks

Consult local building and mechanical codes Adjust system airflow, and check the air filter and ducts

Conversions and upgrades must meet or exceed Check all electrical wiring and connections; clean and
BPA Tier 1 or Tier 2 efficiency requirements tighten if necessary. Apply non-conductive coating

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 33


VARIABLE ZONE CONTROL
OCCUPANT COMFORT

REFRIGERANT 
FLOW SYSTEMS
For Commercial Buildings

COMFORT AND CONTROL


ANYWHERE YOU WANT IT
Your local utility may offer up to $800
per ton for qualifying energy efficient
variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems
in commercial buildings.

Utilizing VRF technology allows for


better zone control, an increase in
occupant comfort, and increased
efficiency of heating and cooling
in a building.

BENEFITS MAY INCLUDE

50 60
70
40
80
30

90
20

100
10
0

110

0
-1
0
12

Quiet operation Increased value of Precise temperature


commercial space control

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL UTILITY ABOUT INCENTIVES.


UTILITY PARTICIPATION AND INCENTIVES VARY.

34 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


HOW DOES IT SAVE ENERGY?

A VRF system cools or heats a space more efficiently than standard


systems by moving variable amounts of refrigerant through a piping
system to each space independently in order to cool or heat it. The
system swiftly adapts to changing loads and can be designed for the
exact needs of a space resulting in greater control of the buildings
interior temperature.

Compared with other heat pump systems, VRF saves energy with better
part-load performance, zone control, and heat recovery options. By
reducing the amount of ductwork, or eliminating ductwork completely
in some cases, fan energy use is reduced by 10-20%

INCENTIVE REQUIREMENTS
PRE-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS: POST-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS:
The existing building must have the following characteristics: The installed VRF system must meet the
100,000 square feet or less of conditioned floor area, following requirements:

An existing building with at least one year of electrical A split-system heat pump employing an
use data available; incentives are not available for new inverter-driven outdoor compressor, and
construction, and Inverter-driven or variable-speed indoor
The area conditioned by the new VRF system needs to have blowers.
been heated by either zonal or forced-air, electric resistance
heat as the primary heating source.

Your local utility likely requires pre-approval for any VRF project.
Contact Air Northwest or your utility once you start planning your project.

If your project meets the


ESTIMATED INCENTIVES

above requirements,
call your local utility or
Air Northwest today to
confirm eligibility
and incentives.

Your local electric utility may offer up


to $800 per ton for qualifying variable
refrigerant flow installations.

Incentives may vary from utility to utility. Additional terms and conditions may apply.

Contact Air Northwest for more information.


Call us at 866-610-9555 or email us at info@airnorthwesthvac.com.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 35


VRF MULTI-SPLIT HEAT PUMP SPECIFICATION

The BPA VRF Specifications can be found in the Implementation Manual Document Library at:
https://www.bpa.gov/ee/policy/imanual/pages/im-document-library.aspx

Applicable to: Commercial Heat Pump Upgrades and Heat Pump Conversions
VRF Multisplit Heat Pump - Air Source Note: Selected equipment must meet both cooling and heating Tier requirements (if listed)

Equipment Size Heating Tier 1 Tier 2


(Btu/h) Mode Type Subcategory (High Eiciency) (Highest Eiciency)
Cooling Mode All Multisplit System 15 SEER 16 SEER
<65,000
Heating Mode Multisplit System 8.5 HSPF 9.0 HSPF
Multisplit System 14.2 IEER N/A
Cooling Mode Electric Resistance
(or None) Multisplit System
65,000 14 IEER N/A
and with Heat Recovery
<135,000 47F db/43F wb 3.4 COP N/A
Outdoor Air
Heating Mode
17F db/15F wb 2.4 COP
Outdoor Air N/A

135,000 Multisplit System 13.7 IEER N/A


and <240,000 Electric Resistance
Cooling Mode (or None) Multisplit System
135,000 with Heat Recovery 13.5 IEER N/A

Multisplit System 12.5 IEER N/A


For 240,000 Electric Resistance
Cooling Mode (or None) Multisplit System 12.3 IEER N/A
with Heat Recovery
47F db/43F wb 3.2 COP N/A
For all 135,000 Outdoor Air
Heating Mode
17F db/15F wb 2.1 COP N/A
Outdoor Air

VRF Multisplit Heat Pump - Water Source


Equipment Size Heating Tier 1 Tier 2
(Btu/h) Mode Type Subcategory (High Eiciency) (Highest Eiciency)
Multisplit System 14 EER N/A
86 Entering Water
<135,000 Cooling Mode All Multisplit System
with Heat Recovery 13.8 EER N/A
86 Entering Water
Heating Mode 68 Entering Water 4.6 COP N/A

SEERSeasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio wbWet Bulb dbDry Bulb


EEREnergy Efficiency Ratio IEERIntegrated Energy Efficiency Ratio
HSPF Heating Seasonal Performance Factor COPCoefficient of Performance

*The BPA specification is based on the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Commercial Unitary Air-conditioning and Heat Pumps Specification, last
updated January 12, 2016. BPA is a member of the CEE High Efficiency Commercial Unitary Air-conditioning and Heat Pump Initiative. As part of this
Initiative, BPA has adopted CEEs Tier 1 and Tier 2 convention, in addition to a part-load metric in order to focus on energy efficiency savings rather than peak
energy savings. More information about CEE can be found at http://www.cee1.org/

36 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


VRF MULTI-SPLIT AIR-CONDITIONER SPECIFICATION

VRF Multisplit Air Conditioner - Air Cooled

Equipment Size Heating Tier 1 Tier 2


(Btu/h) Mode Type Subcategory (High Eiciency) (Highest Eiciency)
<65,000 Cooling Mode All Multisplit System 15 SEER 16 SEER
65,000 Electric Resistance
and Cooling Mode Multisplit System 14.9 IEER N/A
(or None)
<135,000
135,000
and Electric Resistance
Cooling Mode Multisplit System 14.4 IEER N/A
<240,000 (or None)

Electric Resistance
240,000 Cooling Mode Multisplit System 13 IEER N/A
(or None)

SEERSeasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio wbWet Bulb dbDry Bulb


EEREnergy Efficiency Ratio IEERIntegrated Energy Efficiency Ratio
HSPF Heating Seasonal Performance Factor COPCoefficient of Performance

UES, or Unit of Energy Savings, are measures for which savings are
estimated on a per-unit basis for a typical baseline case to efficient
case scenario. UES measures have relatively small variation in
savings that can be reliably forecasted. This measure was formerly
called a deemed measure.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 37


VRF SYSTEMS BEST PRACTICES

CONSIDERATIONS IN CODES
COMMERCIAL TO KEEP
INSTALLATIONS IN MIND
Ventilation requirements Consult your local building and mechanical codes
Interactions with current HVAC system Commercial buildings must be ventilated during
Building controls system occupied hours

INSTALLATION
WHAT ARE
GOOD TIPS
APPLICATIONS? Require installer training and certification
specific to actual equipment
Where building load diversity indicates a significant
Understand pipeline and selector valve options
simultaneous heating/cooling demand
offered by different manufacturers
Buildings where space restrictions limit the ability to
Clearly define zones and operating intent of the
route ductwork, hydronic piping or place equipment
terminal units
particularly retrofits may benefit from VRF
because of the small size of the refrigerant piping Determine how is the system going to be
and relative low space impact of the equipment controlledtemperature set-back, ventilation,
building pressurization, etc.
In buildings with high tenant or occupant turnover
rates- VRF systems have a great flexibility in being Define interface relationship for the VRF and
redesigned to fit a new space/needs BMS, if BMS is included
Partnering Dedicated Outside Air Systems Determine the correct amount of refrigerant for
with VRF systems the system
VRF may also be employed as a backup source of Identify terminal unit style and capacity
heating/cooling to a central air system Determine how the condensate from the
terminal units will be collected
WHAT ARE
BAD MAINTENANCE

APPLICATIONS?
Buildings with low load diversity
TIPS
Maintenance technicians should be familiar with refrigerant
High air filtration requirements components and systems that were installed
No space for pipeline configurations Clean coils and filters on a regular basis
and selector valve types that are Terminal units are normally maintainable from the occupied space
critical to system operation
Check the refrigerant charge and if the refrigerant is low,
inspect the coils and lines for leaks

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 39


VARIABLE
FREQUENCY DRIVES
INCREASE ENERGY SAVINGS
REDUCE MAINTENANCE
LOWER OPERATING COSTS
ON AIR HANDLING UNIT FANS

For Commercial Buildings

DRIVING DOWN CONSUMPTION


Your local utility may offer up to $300
per horsepower for qualifying variable
frequency drives (VFD) on air handling
unit (AHU) fan installations.

Adding a VFD on a constant speed


AHU fan allows the drive to match the
amount of energy the motor needs for
the amount of work that is being done.
This allows for greater energy savings
and an extended life of the motor.

BENEFITS MAY INCLUDE

50 60
70
40
80
30

90
20

100
10
0

110

0
-1
0
12

Reduced Reduced Long life span Precise temperature


energy costs fan usage control

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL UTILITY ABOUT INCENTIVES.


UTILITY PARTICIPATION AND INCENTIVES VARY.

40 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


HOW DOES IT SAVE ENERGY?
A VFD is a device that matches the energy the motor needs
with the work that is being done. Installing a VFD on an AHU
fan allows the VFD to vary the speed of the fan. As the fan
slows down, it draws less power than at constant speed,
resulting in energy savings.

Many AHU system are engineered for 100% design flow, but
many could operate with less flow. For example, fans that are
turned down just 10% can save up to 25% in energy costs. In
most systems, reducing the speed by 50% can cause a 75%
drop in energy consumption.

INCENTIVE REQUIREMENTS
PRE-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS: POST-INSTALLATION CONDITIONS:
Qualifying VFD applications have the following VFD applications must have the following
building characteristics: characteristics:
Heating type is electric or gas, Retrofit adds a VFD and controller for
Building operates for equal to or greater than 2,000 variable-speed fan operation,
hours per year, The VFD is set to trend historical kWh usage,
AHU has a variable flow-based HVAC system fan runtime and average fan speed, and
(constant volume systems are not eligible), and AHU throttling or bypass devices (e.g., inlet
AHU has a constant-speed fan guide vanes, dampers, etc.) are removed or
(AHUs with variable-speed fans are not eligible). permanently disabled.

For a full list of requirements and specifications, please refer to the current BPA Implementation Manual:
https://www.bpa.gov/EE/Policy/IManual/Pages/default.aspx.

If your project meets the


ESTIMATED INCENTIVES

above requirements,
call your local utility or
Air Northwest today to
confirm eligibility
and incentives.

Your local utility may A typical payback,


offer up to $300 per including incentives, is
horsepower. about 2 years.

Incentives may vary from utility to utility. Additional terms and conditions may apply.

Contact Air Northwest for more information.


Call us at 866-610-9555 or email us at info@airnorthwesthvac.com.
VFD SYSTEMS BEST PRACTICES

CONSIDERATIONS IN CODES
COMMERCIAL TO KEEP
INSTALLATIONS
Proper run/stop control of the VFD is important
IN MIND
EN IEC 61800-5-2
Some VFD cables have insulation thats thicker than
that required by code National Electrical Code (NFPA 70)
Current is never zero at neutral because VFDs have
unbalanced three-phase vector sums
INSTALLATION

TIPS
Unshielded cables in metal trays can create ground
loops, conduct EMI, or common-mode noise
Grounding Shields with improper contact can create EMI

WHAT ARE Mount the drives vertically

GOOD
APPLICATIONS?
If multiple VFDs are installed in a single location,
connect each ground to a single ground point,
connected in parallel. The line reactor can help
to protect from transient voltages and reduce
harmonics to or from the drive
AHUs that often run at less than peak load Install drive in close proximity to the motor
conditions, or have oversized fan motors
Install an output filter for long motor lead lengths
If you have HVAC loads that vary due to weather, over 100 feet
occupancy, etc., a VFD can increase/decrease
airflow to meet the loads and save fan energy. Tie the Shield directly to the PE terminal at the drive
(to avoid skin effect from drain wires)
If you need to vary the speed of the motor, change
its acceleration, or soften how the motor starts, a For Power and Controls Wiring, wire sizing, cable
VFD is a smart choice type, routing, and shielding should be considered
Larger motors and longer runtimes will result in Ground the equipment to a panel is a very important
higher potential savings aspect to mitigate EMI issues and preventing high
frequency currents from effecting other equipment

WHAT ARE Use PVC insulation for dry and damp locations, XLPE

BAD
for wet locations

MAINTENANCE
APPLICATIONS?
Undersized fan motors that will run at full speed
all the time
TIPS
Take amperage, resistance and insulation resistance
Running a VFD in hand or bypass mode
readings periodically
continuously at 60Hz will increase energy
consumption Keep the VFD clean, dry, and connections tight
Running the VFD at perpetually low speed may During regular mechanical inspections, check
cause it to overheat circulating fans for bearing failure
Smaller horsepower motors and lower runtimes Take voltage measurements while VFD is in operation
will result in lower potential savings Monitor heat-sink temperatures

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 43


CUSTOMIZED MAXIMIZE BUILDING PERFORMANCE

ENGINEERING INCREASE OCCUPANT COMFORT

SOLUTIONS SAVE MONEY

ENGINEERING EXPERTISE STRAIGHT TO YOUR DOOR

Thinking about a building or equipment upgrade? These experts will analyze your building and
Need help understanding your options? help you understand your buildings unique
energy savings opportunities from indoor
Efficiency has benefits beyond energy savings it can and outdoor lighting to HVAC equipment,
improve customer comfort, help workers get their windows, insulation and more.
jobs done and increase your bottom line. Your local
electric utility has engineers, tools, and incentives to
help you get energy efficiency projects off the ground.

BENEFITS MAY INCLUDE

Technical expertise Free, customized Reduced energy


and support on-site assesment costs

When you know you can


INCENTIVES save energy in the building,
but it doesnt have
Not only can you get free assistance, you may be eligible to prescriptive incentives,
receive incentives that cover 30-50% of project costs. you might have a custom
Involve your local utility early on in the process so we can project on your hands.
ensure you get the support and incentives for your project.
Call us early in the design phase!

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL UTILITY ABOUT INCENTIVES.


UTILITY PARTICIPATION AND INCENTIVES VARY.

44 COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES


HOW DOES THE CUSTOM PROCESS WORK?

1 Proposal Development
Your utility may require a custom
project proposal as a first step.

Custom project proposals include


estimated energy savings, a cost 2 Proposal Approval
estimate and an energy savings
measurement & verification (M&V) plan. Projects sometimes require preapproval before
proceeding. Check with your local utility about their
You tell us about the project and we can requirement. If approval is required, wait until your
help with the energy savings and M&V. project proposal is approved before proceeding.

3 Project Implementation
Proceed with project installation and
continue to work with your utility and
Air Northwest team if applicable.
4 Project Close-Out
After your project is complete the energy savings
and final incentive level need to be confirmed.

Your utility will help with this step and develop a


project completion report.

5 Incentive Payment
Incentives are based on verified savings. Payment is made after the completion
report is reviewed and accepted.

Actual custom project incentives are based on the accepted completion report.

Incentives may vary from utility to utility. Additional terms and conditions may apply.

Contact Air Northwest for more information.


Call us at 866-610-9555 or email us at info@airnorthwesthvac.com.

COMMERCIAL HVAC INCENTIVES 45


Deliver Comfort and Efficiency
Join Bonneville Power Administrations Residential Program in delivering quality HVAC
installations that provide your customers greater savings, comfort and efficiency.

By the Numbers 103 participating Pacific Northwest utilities

4,122 participating HVAC technicians

88,500 approved HVAC installations

33,311 heat pump installations

6 million housing units in BPA territory

$300-$1400 heat pump incentive *subject to change

$800 - $1000 ductless heat pump incentive


*subject to change

Participate in our HVAC programs, visit: www.bpa.gov/ResHVAC


A Pacific Northwest regional program for quality installation of:
Air Source Heat Pumps Ground Source Heat Pumps
Variable Speed Heat Pumps Duct Sealing
Ductless Heat Pumps

BPAs Residential HVAC program has been active in the Northwest


region since 2006.
For more information, visit www.bpa.gov/ResHVAC
or call 1-800-941-3867.
SALES TIPS
Learn how to better communicate with your customers and understand their needs in order to provide the
best service and technology for their buildings.

SALES TIPS 47
SALES TIPS

What Are You Selling? You!


Your personality

Your willingness to listen

Your knowledge

Your ability to learn

Skills You Must Have To Sell Efficiently? Once you meet with your potential
Active Listening customer, how do you move from selling
to signing that potential contract?
Note Taking

Asking the right questions 1


Develop a relationship with your
Why would you be interested in making potential customer. Do the research
this change/adding this service? so that when you meet with him or
Why now? her, you are prepared and you know
who you are talking to and why.
Why us?
2
Ask the right questions. Ask him or
her about their business, what they
do and what they see as their needs
You want your customer to trust you thats at that time.
how you win the sale. Therefore, you want 3
your customer to think that you: Take notes. When you take notes you
show that you are interested in this
Are honest potential customer beyond this one
time sale. It drives more questions and
Are fair it confirms that you hear their concerns
and plan on building a proposal or an
Follow through answer to their problems.
Have integrity
4
Confirm what you heard. As the
meeting closes, repeat back to
your potential customer what you
discussed and what the actions items
from that meeting are.

Do you confirm appointments, send follow-up material quickly, and


stay in contact after the sale? When you exceed the expectations of
the customer, you show you are someone they can trust.

48 SALES TECHNIQUES AND TIPS


SALES TIPS

Remember:
Perception is reality. If the customer interpreted some of your information
incorrectly, that is good insight into your process.
Dont use this as an opportunity to tell them they didnt understand, rather
acknowledge you didnt make it clear.

1 Ensure success
Dont walk away until youre
sure the project is a success.
2 Communicate
Define your work with the client
Make sure everyone on your team
Be precise on how you will deliver understands the clients wants and needs.
Stay true to your word
Keep track of the project and
Your client will remember what you promised update your customer

Dont leave things to chance Be in tune with the clients communication


style and adapt to it

Remind them of key project dates and


issues; dont assume they remember
3 Long Term Sales Opportunities everything youve told them

After the initial sale take a step back and


ask yourself if they should be a part of your
strategic plan for sales growth. Will they: 4 Account Plans
Have long-term profitability Share what they can expect from you
Provide additional opportunities Keep up to date on trends in their business
Fit your company goals Find out how you can make their
Provide referrals day-to-day life easier

Value a strategic partner Agree upon a check-in time to


develop the relationship

Stay up to date on the latest technologies and energy efficiency


incentives to differentiate yourself from the competition.
Youll look more knowledgeable and be able to provide more options.

SALES TIPS 49
FROM SERVICE PROVIDER TO TRUSTED PARTNER

There are abundant opportunities and new sales opportunities that offer energy
savings for your customers. Retrofit projects can enhance your maintenance program
and offer more value to your customer.

Follow these tips to get the conversation started with your customers and show them
that you are more than just their service provider.

1
Establish
Create a solid base.
It is important to establish your
credibility with the customer early on
2 Expand
in the relationship.
Grow the relationship.
Customers learn to trust the technician
Utilizing that trust, the sales manager should
that regularly services their equipment.
work with the technician to solidify and
Trust is the foundation of the sales
expand the relationship making the retrofit
manager and technician relationship.
dialogue a natural evolution.
With trust as a foundation and good
communication, getting the job done Explore the relationship history and figure
becomes second nature to the team. out what the customers needs are in order to
make this dialogue a success.

3 Respond
React to circumstances.
When a technician describes a simple motor replacement or a more involved VFD
installation, the account manager should respond with a sense of urgency to the customer.
Something like a motor replacement should be an opportunity for the manager to explain
the proactive approach to energy efficiency and gain the customers recognition that you
are more than just their service provider. You are their partner. A partner that recognizes
energy efficiency saves the client money and builds your credibility in the marketplace!

Customers dont care about your products or solutions; they care about
their company and how you make it even better.
Keep it simple and align your proposal to meet their business objectives.

SALES TIPS 51
GUIDELINES, STANDARDS AND FAQS
Find answers to program and incentive questions as well as guidelines and
standards that will make every job a success!

GUIDELINES, STANDARDS AND FAQS 53


SIZING HVAC SYSTEMS IN SMALL TO MEDIUM-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Many HVAC systems are significantly oversized, causing frequent cycling and poor temperature control. Oversized
equipment can cause inefficient operation and reduced reliability. Oversizing increases maintenance costs and
results in higher energy costs

Oversized systems result in wasted capital investment in both the HVAC unit and distribution system, and may
contribute to higher energy costs over time.

Peak Load: The maximum electrical power used by a system


Part Load: The ability of a system to run below its full or maximum load.

Calculating Loads Selecting a Unit


Be accurate in your load calculations Avoid oversizing
Whether using computerized load calculations or manual Since most sizing methods are based on
methods, many conservative assumptions are made conservative assumptions, it is recommended
regarding building shell, lighting design and occupancy. that designers use accurate calculations and
However, lower first cost and monthly bills are achieved then size up if necessary.
when peak loads are reduced by accurately reflecting the
existing building loads Select the right unit for EER and SEER
Designers should consider both the rated
Use reasonable assumptions for plug loads
full load energy efficiency ratio (EER) and the
seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) when
Engineers often base HVAC sizing decisions on the entire selecting a unit.
connected load of computers, copiers, printers, etc. and
assume simultaneous operation of such equipment. When, Select units with both efficient part load and
in fact, most of this equipment operates at a fraction of peak performance.
the nameplate value and rarely operates simultaneously.
Consider this when calculating plug loads.

Check your occupancy load assumptions


Peak occupant load (the maximum number of occupants
for which a space or portion of the building is designed for)
and the corresponding ventilation load can contribute to
equipment capacity in certain spaces such as lobbies.

Often, actual occupant loads are substantially less than peak


egress loads (the maximum number of occupants coming in
or out of the space). Many building codes reference ASHRAE
Standard 62 which allows the designer to base the design on
the actual anticipated occupant density.

54 RESOURCES
Codes and Standards

Are you up to date on your local codes and standards?


Check out the links below for your state and find the latest building and mechanical codes.

OREGON
Oregon Mechanical Code:
http://ecodes.biz/ecodes_support/free_resources/Oregon/14_Mechanical/14_ORMech_main.html

Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code:


http://ecodes.biz/ecodes_support/free_resources/Oregon/14_Energy/14_OREnergy_main.html

Oregon Commercial Structures Program:


http://www.oregon.gov/bcd/codes-stand/Pages/commercial-structures.aspx

WASHINGTON
Washington State Building Code:
https://fortress.wa.gov/ga/apps/sbcc/Page.aspx?nid=14

IDAHO
Idaho Building Codes:
http://dbs.idaho.gov/rules/current.html

INTERNATIONAL
2015 International Building Code:
http://codes.iccsafe.org/app/book/toc/2015/I-Codes/2015%20IBC%20HTML/index.html

2015 International Mechanical Code:


http://codes.iccsafe.org/app/book/toc/2015/2015%20San%20Antonio/2015%20IMC%20HTML/

STANDARDS
ASHRAE Standard and Guidelines:
https://www.ashrae.org/standards-research--technology/standards--guidelines

ASHRAE 18-2012:
http://www.techstreet.com/ashrae/standards/ashrae-180-2012?product_id=1832333

ACCA Quality Standards:


http://www.acca.org/standards/quality

ACCA Technical Manuals:


http://www.acca.org/standards/technical-manuals

Engineer in a pocket:
http://www.engineerinapocket.org/

GUIDELINES, STANDARDS AND FAQS 55


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

1
What are Qualified Product Lists and how do they apply to my project?
A A Qualified Product List (QPL) is a list of products that meet the specifications and requirements
for incentive qualification. If you are installing a Connected Thermostat or Advanced Rooftop-Unit
Controls, you need to consult the QPL in order to determine which products qualify for incentives.

Qualified Products Lists can be found on online at: www.airnorthwesthvac.com

2
What if I want to install a Connected Thermostat or Advanced Rooftop-Unit Control that is
not on the Qualified Product List? Can I still use it?

A If you feel that you have a product that meets the requirements and specifications but is not listed,
reach out to Air Northwest to see if the product can be added to the list. Product review and placement
on the list (if the product complies) is completed within 30 days of original request.

3 Who gets the incentive payment? Do I, the contractor, get it or does my customer get it?

A Some utilities will allow the incentive to go directly to you, the contractor. This helps with the sale by
requiring the end-use customer to pay less money out of pocket. Make sure to always work with the
local utility to understand their policy on this matter.

4 I want to install equipment that isnt included in the Prescriptive Measures, who can help
me find incentives?

A If your equipment isnt included under the Prescriptive Measures, or if you want to pursue a more
complex project, the custom project path may be for you. Air Northwest staff and your local utility are
here to help you find applicable incentives.

5
What is the difference between a Smart Thermostat and a Connected Thermostat?

A Thermostat technology has evolved significantly in just the past few years. Understanding what kind
of thermostats are on the market and the difference between them is more important now than ever.
Two thermostats that get easily confused are smart and connected thermostats. Thermostats that
qualify as smart respond to input such as occupancy and customer preferences. Unlike connected
thermostats (which feature a Wi-Fi connection and remote operation), smart thermostats can make
adjustments in system operation, going beyond a simple response to set points without user input.

56 FAQ
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

6
Are there are additional costs that I need to be aware of after installing equipment?
A Some equipment controls may come with platform fees or subscriptions. Be sure to ask about
additional costs and stay informed.

7
The Advanced Rooftop Unit Control (ARC) incentive requires an existing RTU greater than 5
tons, does that include 5 ton units as well?

A Yes, units 5 tons or greater are eligible for the ARC incentive. The existing RTU must also be packaged
unitary equipment and have a constant speed supply fan.

8 Can you recommend efficient HVAC equipment for my project?


A Air Northwest and local public utilities are here to support Air Allies and distributors. As such we keep
a neutral stance and dont recommend specific equipment or manufacturers. We will work with you
to figure out what the project requirements and the most efficient options are. It is then up to you to
make the decision on what equipment you want to install.

9
How do variable speed fan controls save energy?
A Variable speed fans and blower controls ensure that HVAC systems respond more precisely to indoor
temperature needs reducing overheating or overcooling can waste energy and money.

10
Whats the deal with thermostat temperature set-backs?
A Its important to install controls that will set back indoor temperature settings at night or when a facility
is closed. When a building is unoccupied, less heating and cooling will be needed. These temperature
setback systems are usually automated to adjust thermostats appropriately at night, then return
indoor temperatures to regular levels in the morning before the building is opened for business.

11
What does conditioned space really mean?

A A conditioned space is an enclosed space within a building that is cooled or heated by a cooling or
heating system. When it comes to commercial buildings and conditioned space, some equipment, like
ductless heat pumps, are fairly flexible. Depending on the situation, you can have one ductless heat
pump serve multiple offices or spaces or you can have one big space that requires multiple ductless
heat pumps. Install what is requires to serve the space, so long as existing conditions are met.

FAQ 57
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

12
Why is maintenance important?
A HVAC systems require regular preventative maintenance to keep them working properly, reliably
and at the lowest cost. Systems should receive a professional inspection and tune-up from an HVAC
professional at least once a year- in the spring for cooling systems and in the fall for heating systems.

13
How does regularly changing HVAC filters reduce energy costs?
A Dirty filters overwork HVAC systems by restricting air flow, cost far more to use, lead to poor indoor air
quality and result in far more commercial HVAC maintenance issues and costs. Check HVAC filters on
a quarterly basis. HVAC filters should be changed every month. At the longest, HVAC filters should be
switched out every three months. Switching out dirty filters is one of the simplest sustainability steps
a business can take, and it can reduce wasted energy costs by 5-10%. Understanding the reasons
why a customer should change their filters on a regular basis (energy savings!) and conveying that to
them clearly can lead you to a maintenance contract!

14
What is a heat recovery VRF system?

A A heat recovery VRF system has the ability to cool one room (pull heat from one room) and distribute
heat to another room. By doing this, the efficiency of the system is improved. While this is effective
for some applications, there are also additional material and installation expenses associated with
Heat Recovery. Local climate, building layout, and occupancy dictate if heat recovery should be used.

15
I heard VRF systems are really expensive, is that true?

A A VRF system uses a combination of advanced electronics and precision mechanical components to
deliver the highest efficiency possible. As such, the initial cost for a VRF system tends to be more than
most conventional systems. However, when you take into consideration the quality of the system,
ease of installation and the reduced energy consumption, a VRF system becomes one of the most
economical options.

Air Northwests team of experienced HVAC specialists are always


available to assist you with incentive calculators, technology
questions and general trade ally support.
See the Air Northwest Staff section of this guide for contact
information or visit airnorthwesthvac.com and click on contact us.
Phone: 866.610.9555 Email: info@airnorthwesthvac.com

58 FAQ
UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS
Weve all heard that its often not what you know but who you know. When it comes to incentives that might be truer
than you think. Your local utility has the information and access you need to get incentives to your customer. Check
out the following pages to find out who you need to know on a first name basis at your local utility.

UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS 59


Contact us for your own laminated copy!

UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS 61


OREGON UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS

UTILITY NAME CITY REP PHONE EMAIL


Blachly-Lane Electric Cooperative Eugene Debbie Swanson & (888) 883-9879 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette
Canby Utility Board Canby Debbie Swanson & (888) 883-9879 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette
Central Electric Cooperative, Inc. Metolius Contact Air Northwest (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
for more inormation
Central Lincoln Peoples Utility District Newport Wade Carey (541) 574-2068 wcarey@cencoast.com
City of Ashland Ashland Larry Giardina (541) 552-2065 giardin@ashland.or.us
City of Bandon Bandon Debbie Swanson & (888) 883-9879 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette
City of Cascade Locks Cascade Locks Debbie Swanson & (888) 883-9879 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette
City of Drain Drain Contact Air Northwest (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
for more inormation
City of Forest Grove Forest Grove Renae Ooley (503) 992-3253 ROoley@forestgrove-or.gov
City of Hermiston Hermiston Contact Air Northwest (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
for more inormation
City of Milton-Freewater Milton-Freewater Pat Didion (541) 938-8237 pat.didion@milton-freewater-or.gov
City of Monmouth Monmouth Micah Palmer (503) 751-0158 mpalmer@ci.monmouth.or.us
Clatskanie Peoples Utility District Clatskanie Brian Fawcett (503) 308-4575 BFawcett@clatskaniepud.com
Columbia Basin Electric Coop., Inc Heppner Debbie Swanson & 503-718-3734 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette
Columbia River Peoples Utility District Deer Island Tim Lammers (503) 397-8155 tlammers@crpud.org
Consumers Power Philomath Thomas Elzinga (541) 929-8532 thomase@cpi.coop
Coos Curry Electric Cooperative Port Orford Duffell Gray (541) 332-8182 gray@cooscurryelectric.com
Douglas Electric Cooperative Roseburg Debbie Swanson & (888) 883-9879 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette
Emerald PUD Eugene Rob Currier (541) 744-7402 ROB@epud.org
Eugene Water & Electric Board Eugene Dan Morehouse (541) 685-7194 Dan.morehouse@eweb.org
Hood River Electric Cooperative Hood River Contact Air Northwest (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
for more inormation
Lane Electric Cooperative, Inc. Eugene John Murray (541) 484-1151 john.murray@laneelectric.com
McMinnville Water & Light McMinville David Christie (503) 435-3115 djc@mc-power.com
Midstate Electric Cooperative, Inc. LaPine Teresa Lackey & (541) 536-7253 tlackey@midstateelectric.coop
John Thomas jthomas@midstateelectric.coop
Northern Wasco County PUD The Dalles Lance Kublick (541) 298-3319 lance_kublick@nwasco.com
Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative, Inc. Baker City Sandra Ghormley (541) 524-2822 SGhormley@otecc.com
Salem Electric Salem Willie Ball (503) 362-3601 ball@salemelectric.com
Springfield Utility Board Springfield David Harris (541) 744-3775 DavidH@subutil.com
Tillamook County PUD No. 1 Tillamook Dave Wimpy (503) 815-8635 davew@tpud.org
Umatilla Electric Cooperative Hermiston Kathy Moore (541) 564-4357 kathy.moore@umatillaelectric.com
Wasco Electric Cooperative The Dalles Traci Brock (541) 296-2740 TraciB@wascoelectric.com
West Oregon Electric Cooperative, Inc. Vernonia Debbie Swanson & (888) 883-9879 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette

62 UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS


OREGON PUBLIC UTILITIES, COOPERATIVES, AND MUNICIPALITIES

Clatskanie PUD Columbia River PUD


West Oregon City of Forest Grove
Electric Coop.
City of Cascasde Locks
Hood River Electric Coop. Hermiston City of Milton-Freewater
Tillamook PUD Northern Wasco County PUD

Canby Utility Board Umatilla Electric


Salem Electric Coop.
Columbia Basin
City of Monmouth City of McMinnville
McMinnville Electric Coop. Oregon Trail
Central Lincoln PUD Water & Light Electric Coop.
Wasco
Blachly-Lane Electric Consumers Electric
County Coop. Consumers Power Coop.
Power Columbia
Power Coop.
Emerald PUD Eugene Water Central Oregon Trail
and Electric Electric Electric Coop.
Board Coop
Springfield Utility Board
Central Electric Coop
Lane
Douglas Electric
Electric Coop.
Coop.
City of Bandon City of Drain
Midstate Electric Coop.

Umpqua Indian
Utility Coop. Harney Electric Coop.

Coos-Curry Surprise Valley


Electric Electric Corp.
Coop.
City of Ashland

UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS 63


WASHINGTON UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LIST

UTILITY NAME CITY REP PHONE EMAIL


Alder Mutual Light Company Eatonville Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more information
Asotin County, PUD No. 1 Clarkston Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more information
Benton PUD Kennewick Terry Mapes and (509) 582-1268 and mapest@bentonpud.org
Kevin Fischer (509) 585-5395 fischerk@bentonpud.org
Benton Rural Electric Association Prosser Eric Miller (509) 786-8265 emiller@bentonrea.org
Big Bend Electric Cooperative, Inc. Ritzville Dale Anderson (509) 659-1700 x116 danderson@bbec.org
City of Blaine Blaine Ravyn Whitewolf (360) 332-8820 x3428 RWhitewolf@ci.blaine.wa.us
City of Centralia Centralia Ashley Stahl (360) 330-7512 AStahl@cityofcentralia.com
City of Cheney Cheney Stephen Boorman (509) 498-9230 sboorman@cityofcheney.org
City of Chewelah Chewelah Richard Hixon (509) 455-3845 RHixson@cityofchewelah.org
City of Ellensburg Ellensburg Shan Rowbotham (509) 962-7251 rowbothams@ci.ellensburg.wa.us
City of McCleary McCleary Mike Porter (503) 730-3122 mike.porter@evergreen-efficiency.com
City of Milton Milton Richard Hutchinson (206) 382-9800 rjh@dksassociates.com
City of Port Angeles Port Angeles Bob Kajfasz (360) 417-4718 rkajfasz@cityofpa.us
City of Richland Richland Dawn Senger (509) 942-7436 dsenger@ci.richland.wa.us
City of Sumas Sumas Ruben Hernandez (360) 988-5711 ruben.hernandez@cityofsumas.com
Clallam County, PUD No.1 Sekiu Mattias Jarvegren (360) 565-3263 mattiasj@clallampud.net
Clark Public Utilities Vancouver Bill Hibbs (360)-992-3340 bhibbs@clarkpud.com
Columbia Rural Electric Association Dayton Doug Case (509) 526-4041 DCase@columbiarea.coop
Cowlitz County, PUD No. 1 Longview Rob Salberg (360) 501-9555 RSalberg@cowlitzpud.org
Elmhurst Mutual Power & Light Co Tacoma Mike Porter (503) 730-3122 mike.porter@evergreen-efficiency.com
Ferry County, PUD No. 1 Republic Ed Forsman (509) 775-3325 EForsman@fcpud.com
Franklin County, PUD No. 1 Pasco Vic Hubbard (509) 542-5904 vhubbard@franklinpud.com
Grant County, PUD No. 2 Moses Lake Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more information
Grays Harbor County, PUD No. 1 Aberdeen Jacob Henry (360) 538-6416 jhenry@ghpud.org
Inland Power & Light Company Spokane John Francisco (509) 789-4231 johnf@inlandpower.com
Jefferson County, PUD No. 1 Port Hadlock Bill Graham (360) 385-8375 bgraham@jeffpud.org
Kittitas County, PUD No. 1 Ellensburg Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more information
Klickitat County, PUD No. 1 Goldendale Anita Clever (509) 773-7622 AClever@klickpud.com
Lakeview Light & Power Company Lakeview Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more information
Lewis County, PUD No. 1 Chehalis Norm Goodbla (360) 740-2430 norm@lcpud.org
Mason County, PUD No. 1 Shelton Teresa Hummer (360) 877-5249 x200 teresah@mason-pud1.org
Mason County, PUD No. 3 Shelton Michelle Patterson (360) 432-5323 michelep@masonpud3.org
Modern Electric Water Company Spokane Valley Terri Ritchey (509) 755-9003 TRichey@mewco.com
Nespelem Valley Electric Cooperative Nespelem Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more inormation
Ohop Mutual Light Company Eatonville Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more inormation
Okanogan County Electric Cooperative Winthrop Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more inormation
Okanogan County, PUD No. 1 Winthrop Kenny Stanley (509) 422-8428 kennys@okpud.org
Orcas Power & Light Cooperative Friday Harbor Jon Blomgren (360) 376-3571 JBlomgren@opalco.com
Pacific County, PUD No. 2 Raymond Jim Dolan (360) 942-2411 jim@pacificpud.org
Parkland Light & Water Company Tacoma Susan Cutrell (253) 531-5666 cutrell@plw.coop
Pend Oreille County, PUD No. 1 Newport Mark Bubba Scott (509) 447-6375 mscott@popud.org
Peninsula Light Company Gig Harbor Jim Bellamy (253) 853-1386 JimB@penlight.org

64 UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS


WASHINGTON UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LIST

UTILITY NAME CITY REP PHONE EMAIL


Seattle City Light Seattle Lori Moen (206) 684- 3000 SCLEnergyAdvisor@seattle.gov
Skamania County, PUD No. 1 Carson Debbie Swanson & (888) 883-9879 rebates@esgroupllc.com
Michelle Ouellette
Snohomish County, PUD No. 1 Everett Sinh Tran (425) 783-8248 svtran@snopud.com
Tacoma Power Tacoma Natasha Houldson (253) 502-8571 nhouldson@cityoftacoma.org
Tanner Electric Cooperative North Bend Lisa Peabody (425) 888-0623 lisa@tannerelectric.coop
Town of Coulee Dam Coulee Dam Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more inormation
Town of Eatonville Eatonville Kerri Murphy (360) 832-3361, x. 114 kmurphy@eatonville-wa.gov
Town of Steilacoom Steilacoom Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more inormation
Vera Water & Power Spokane Valley Michael DeVleming (888) 883-9879 mdevleming@verawaterandpower.com
Wahkiakum County, PUD No. 1 Cathlamet Lia Sealund (360) 795-3266 lsealund@wahkiakumpud.org
Yakama Power Toppenish Contact Air Northwest for (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
more inormation

WASHINGTON PUBLIC UTILITIES, COOPERATIVES, AND MUNICIPALITIES

Orcas Power & Blain Sumas


Light Cooperative Okanogan PUD
County Okanogan No. 1
County, Pend
Electric Oreille
Cooperative PUD No. 1 of
Ferry County
PUD No. 1 of PUD
Jefferson County County
No. 1
Snohomish County, Nespelem Valley
PUD No. 1 Electric Cooperative Chewelah
of Clallam County PUD No. 1

Chelan Co. Vera


Mason Port Angeles Water &
County PUD #1 Coulee
PUD
Seattle City Light
Dam Modern Electric Power
Douglas Co. Water Company
No. 1 PUD #1
Peninsula Mason Cheney
Light Company Grays Tanner Electric Cooperative
County Harbor Inland Power
PUD County Kittitas Co. Grant Co. & Light,
No. 3 PUD McCleary PUD #1 PUD #2 Company
No. 1 See Insert
Ellensburg
Tanner Pacific
Electric County, Centralia
Cooperative PUD PUD No. 1 of Lewis County Benton REA
Tacoma No. 2
Power Richland
Steilacoom Benton PUD Columbia
Milton Cowlitz PUD No. 1 REA
County of
PUD No. 1 Skamania Yakama Power
Lakeview Wahkiakum
County, County
Light & Power
Company PUD No. 1 Klickitat County, PUD No. 1
Asotin County,
Parkland Light & PUD No. 1
Water Company Tacoma Franklin County, PUD No. 1
Power
Elmhurst Clark
Mutual Public
Power & Utilities
Light Co Ohop
Mutual
Light
Company
Eatonville
Alder Mutual
Light Company

UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS 65


IDAHO UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LIST

UTILITY NAME CITY REP PHONE EMAIL


City of Bonners Ferry Bonners Ferry Lisa Ailport (208) 267-3105 lailport@bonnersferry.id.gov

City of Idaho Falls (Idaho Falls Power) Idaho Falls Wid Ritchie (208) 612-8143 WRitchie@ifpower.org

Clearwater Power Company Lewiston Greg Hansen (208) 743-1501 ghansen@clearwaterpower.com

Fall River Electric Ashton Contact Air Northwest (866) 610-9555 info@airnorthwesthvac.com
for more inormation

Idaho County Light & Power Cooperative Grangeville Rita Holman (208) 983-1610 rholman@iclp.coop
Association, Inc.

Kootenai Electric Cooperative, Inc Hayden Don Crawford (208) 292-3213 dcrawford@kec.com

Northern Lights Electric Sagle Elissa Glassman (208) 263-5141 elissa.glassman@nli.coop

Raft River Electric Cooperative Malta George Darrington (208) 645-2914 georged@rrelectric.com

United Electric Co-op, Inc. Heyburn Chris Seibold (208) 679-2222 cseibold@unitedelectric.coop

66 UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS


IDAHO PUBLIC UTILITIES, COOPERATIVES, AND MUNICIPALITIES

City of Bonners Ferry

Northern
Lights,
Inc.
Kootenai East End Mutual Electric Riverside Electric Company,
Electric Cooperative, Inc. Ltd, Cooperative, Inc.
Cooperative,
Inc.

City of Plummer City of Rupert United Electric


Cooperative, Inc.
City of Heyburn South Side Electric, Inc.
City of Burley City of Declo

Clearwater
Power
Company
City of Albion

United Electric Farmers Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Cooperative, Inc.

Idaho County
Light & Power
Coop. Assn., Inc.

Salmon River
Electric
Cooperative,
Inc. Fall River
Rural Electric
Cooperative,
Lost River Inc.
Electric
Cooperative,
Inc.
Idaho Falls Power

City of Minidoka

See City of Soda Springs


Insert

Raft River Rural Electric


Cooperative, Inc.

UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS 67


NEVADA UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT

UTILITY NAME CITY REP PHONE EMAIL


Wells Rural Electric Company Wells Spencer Egbert (775) 752-3328 segbert@wrec.coop

WYOMING UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT

UTILITY NAME CITY REP PHONE EMAIL


Lower Valley Energy, Inc. Jackson Tony Allen (307) 739-6022 tony.allen@lvenergy.com

MONTANA UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACTS

UTILITY NAME CITY REP PHONE EMAIL


Flathead Electric Cooperative, Inc. Kalispel Don Newton (406) 751-4485 d.newton@flathead.coop

Glacier Electric Cooperative, Inc. Cut Bank Jonnalea Tatsey (406) 873-5566 jtatsey@glacierelectric.com

Lincoln Electric Cooperative, Inc. Eureka Tim Engleson (406) 889-3301 TimEngleson@lincolnelectric.coop

Mission Valley Power Polson Lyle Neiss (406) 883-7910 neiss@missionvalleypower.org

Missoula Electric Cooperative, Inc. Missoula Dan Rodgers (406) 541-6333 DanR@meccoop.com

Northern Lights Electric Sagle Elissa Glassman (208) 263- 5141 Elissa.glassman@nli.coop

Ravalli County Electric Cooperative Corvallis Jim Maunder (406) 961-3001 jmaunder@ravallielectric.com

Vigilante Electric Cooperative, Inc. Dillon Rod Siring (406) 683-2327 rod.siring@vec.coop

68 UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS


MONTANA PUBLIC UTILITIES, COOPERATIVES, AND MUNICIPALITIES

Northern Lights, Inc.


Lincoln Electric Cooperative, Inc.

City of Troy
Glacier Electric
Cooperative, Inc.

Flathead Electric
Cooperative Inc.

Mission
Valley
Power
(USBIA)

Missoula Electric
Cooperative, Inc.

Vigilante Electric
Ravalli County Cooperative, Inc.
Elecric Cooperative, Inc.

UTILITY PROGRAM MANAGER CONTACT LISTS 69


REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS
For the last 30 years, the Northwest has been a leader in treating energy efficiency and conservation as a power
resource. The Northwest Power Act of 1980 called on the Northwest to give energy conservation top priority in
meeting its power needs. The region quickly learned that a megawatt saved is the equivalent of a megawatt
produced. Market transformation with energy efficiency and purchasing energy efficiency through incentives
(known as resource acquisition) is less expensive than creating new power plants or purchasing electricity on
the open market.

As of 2009, energy efficiency accounted for only one percent of all electricity production in the United States. But
in the Norhtwest it accounted for 12 percent thanks to collaboration among a number of entities.

REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS 71


REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS

Bonneville Power Administration BPA is a federal nonprofit agency based in the


(BPA) Northwest. Although part of the U.S. Department
of Energy, it is self-funding and covers its costs
www.bpa.gov
by selling its products and services. BPA markets
wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro
projects in the Columbia River Basin, one nonfederal
nuclear plant and several other small nonfederal
power plants. About one third of the electric power
used in the Northwest comes from BPA. BPA has 142
power customers that include utility cooperatives,
municipalities, public utility districts, and tribal
utilities.

BPA also operates and maintains about three-


fourths of the high-voltage transmission in its service
territory, which includes Idaho, Oregon, Washington,
western Montana and small parts of eastern Montana,
California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming.

As part of its shared commitment to meeting the


regions power needs, BPA promotes energy efficiency,
renewable resources and new technologies. BPA
guides the delivery of energy efficiency opportunities
and programs and provides tools, technical support
and financial resources to their utility customers.

Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance NEEA is a nonprofit organization working to increase


(NEEA) energy efficiency to meet our future energy needs.
NEEA is supported by, and works in collaboration
www.neea.org
with, BPA, Energy Trust of Oregon, and more than
140 Northwest public and investor-owned utilities to
accelerate the innovation and adoption of energy-
efficient products, services and practices.

NEEA leverages the regions market power within


the commercial, industrial, and residential sectors
to remove barriers to adoption of energy efficiency
measures, aggregate and synthesize knowledge,
convene, and collaborate with the region and provide
an independent perspective.

72 REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS


REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS

Northwest Power and Conservation Council The Council was created by the Northwest Power Act
www.nwcouncil.org of 1980 to develop and maintain a regional power
plan and a fish and wildlife program to balance the
Northwests environmental and energy needs.

The Councils three tasks are:

1. Develop a 20-year electric power plan to provide


adequate and reliable energy at the lowest
economic and environmental cost to the Northwest.

2. Develop a program to protect and rebuild fish


and wildlife populations affected by hydropower
development in the Columbia River Basin.

3. Educate and involve the public in the Councils


decision-making processes.

The Council sets the regional energy efficiency target


through power plans.

The Seventh Power Plan set public powers share of


the regional target at 1,400 aMw.

Regional Technical Forum Formed by the Northwest Power and Conservation


Council in 1999 the RTF selects, develops, and
(RTF)
maintains methods for estimating savings, costs,
www.rtf.nwcouncil.org and lifetimes from the delivery of energy efficiency
measures.

A volunteer organization comprised of 20-30 voting


members and 60+ corresponding members, the RTF
helps review the technical elements of energy efficiency
in the Councils power plan including analysis of the
regions progress toward its energy efficiency goals.

REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS 73


REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS

Air Northwest Air Northwest supports both trade allies and utilities
www.airnorthwesthvac.com with valuable resources and information relevant to
HVAC opportunities across the Northwest.

Air Northwest is the premier resource for HVAC energy


efficiency information in the Northwest.

Members, known as Air Allies, receive exclusive


educational opportunities and personalized resources
that build the foundation to help them provide utility
incentives to their commercial customers.

Air Allies that have the latest information about HVAC


best practices and technologies are able to provide a
higher level of customer service and energy efficiency
expertise through the Northwest.

Performance Tested Comfort Systems Performance Tested Comfort Systems (PTCS) and
(PTCS) Prescriptive Duct Sealing are Pacific Northwest regional
programs promoting contractor training for quality
www.ptcs.bpa.gov
installation of high efficiency residential heat pumps
and duct sealing. The requirements and specifications
focus on proper sizing, commissioning, and controls of
heat pumps and energy saving duct sealing resulting
in increased comfort and energy savings. These
programs are supported by the Bonneville Power
Administration (BPA) and Northwest Public Utilities.
PTCS and Prescriptive Certified Technicians complete
a BPA-approved training and sign a participation
agreement in order to be certified to perform work in
this program. Since 2006, BPA has certified more than
4,000 technicians and more than 88,000 homes have
received PTCS and/or Prescriptive services.

For more information, please contact the Program


team by email at ResHVAC@bpa.gov or call the
program hotline toll free at 1-800-941-3867.

74 REGIONAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY ORGANIZATIONS


HVAC MARKET INTELLIGENCE REPORT

For this report, researchers went straight to the best data sources available for the Northwest residential and
commercial HVAC markets. This report reflects findings and analysis from:

HVAC distributor sales data

Interviews with key players in the HVAC industry supply chain

Discussions with BPA program staff

If you are in the HVAC industry in the Northwest and want to keep a pulse on energy efficiency trends and utility
programs in the region, this is a must-read report.

HVAC MARKET INTELLIGENCE REPORT 75


NOTES

76 NOTES
AIR NORTHWEST TRADE ALLY NETWORK SUPPORT STAFF

Bianca Sloma
Program Manager
971-678-5489
bianca.r.sloma@lmco.com

Joel Arken
Program Coordinator
503-522-0252
joel.s.arken@lmco.com

David Jackson
HVAC Specialist
503-278-9149
david.a.jackson@lmco.com

Gary Gao
HVAC Specialist
206-218-3541
zhongxiang.gao@lmco.com

AIR NW SUPPORT STAFF 77


Field Guide Version 1.3

Air Northwest
Accelerating HVAC efficiency in the Northwest

620 SW 5th Ave., Ste 400, Portland, OR 97204


Phone: 866.610.9555
Fax: 503.243.1154
Email: info@airnorthwesthvac.com
www.airnorthwesthvac.com