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1

THE

GOLDEN LYRE:
_A
v \

NEW COLLECTION OF CHUECH MUSIC, "J

TO THE VARIOUS METRES NOW I\

TOOF.THER WITH A NEW AND EXTENSIVE VARIETY OF

WTllKMS. SENTENCES, AM) Cli


FOR

- 1 f' AL ASSOCIAT ii SOCIAL BACB

By IVtrail (Ponton <Tanlor,


iirriii
L fNSTRl

1
If A\\ I ST) <

. >
FROM THE LIBRARY OF

REV. LOUIS FITZGERALD BENSON, D. D.


>*
BEQUEATHED BY HIM TO

THE LIBRARY OF

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


I

Dtoka

^7
THE
0* of MCf

GOLDEN LYRE: . JUL 7 1932


'

NEW 0OLLECTI0I OF CHURCH MUSIC,


ADAPTED

TO TnE VARIOUS METRES NOW IN USE;


rountEa mra a .v Elv AKD ,, VAB|ETV or

ANTHEMS, SENTENCES, AND CHANTS,


FOR
CHOIRS, .,, CUSSES. MUSIC,,. ,,^,,ATI0N, AN, SOC.U, SACKM 1U8IC
C.BCLB8.

Bg bhrgil tferg&on Caiilor,


A '
T,V "" !S ' 1 '
- J::::
zsas-

twSSSS^SSSSk H. \\. DERBY AM> OO, l'INYI'W.vh.


,
ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONGRESS, IN THE YEAR 1850, BY
VIRGIL CORYDON TAYLOR,
IN THE CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF CONNECTICUT.

N. B. All Tunes, Anthems, Sentences, Chants, or otber pieces of music contained in this work, having the initials of the Editor,

or the asterisk (*) affixed to them, are claimed as the property of the copyright owner.

216 WILLIAM ST., NEW YORK.


PREFACE.

A raw explanations to the friends of music, who may become ac- character, beauty, and originality to Commend it to the taste and ap-
quainted with this work, may he of service in answering any queries proval of the critical and discerning, into whose hand- In- work may
which may arise relative to its characteristic features. When my 6rs1 fall. Again, such tunes as are deserved I popular, he cannot always
j
work (The Sacred Minstrel) appeared, it was thought that the nume- command ; he is, therefore, thrown upon his <>\\ n resources fiJr nearly all
rous contributions it contained, from my own pen, might, in the esteem to fill the pages of his work. There is one point deserving of attention
me, ultimate to the prejudice of the work. The auspicious inter- respecting tunes in conn i ps dmodj to which are appended the names
,

vention of some counteracting but unknown cause, (doubtless,) saved


of namerous celebrated European compose] - It should be rememl i

the work from what seemed (to such individual-) n- inevitable fate. that these persons seldom wrote other music than Oratoi
Respecting this point, however, as constituting either in a general or S\ mphonies, &c, which do not admit always of the most complete and
particular Bense, a necessary and valid objection to a work.
would 1 literal transformation into plain metrical tunes, without many interpo-
say, however numerous the contributors to any book of church music lations and abridgments; which materially interfere with their pei
may be, no author can feel safe 111 setting aside his own judgment to identity and originality, as emanating from their attributed
admit, without proper discrimination, whatever might be offered for n, it i- sometimes thought that an author who has written much.
Ins work, even from the most renowned musicians. A piece might he should not republish in successive works,even his best and most iu
presented him which, for elaborateness and beauty of harmonic struc- tunes. Give something demand.
" u> neio/* is the In answer to this
ture, would, to the ear of the professor, be considered superlatively fine would
objection, I first inquire of its propounder, did you ever find in a
and exquisite, but tor any purpose of utility, it would he absolutely book church music
ot all th* j f one voritt bq h kit?
worthies-. Therefore, whatever goes into his look, must of necessity \_ r
iin. are you not aware that a tune which the author 1 1 1 i^ht not think
pass the test of his own scrutiny and inspection he must judge of its to republish, because you have long been familiar with
j fit it in a former
availability for practical use, must see whether it embodies sufficient work of his, another writer would consider a
-
"

ould he offer it
PREFACE.

to you in a work of his own ? There is no individual, poet, painter, church use. The Anthems are not difficult, yet they are of a charac-
sculptor, statesman, or what else he may be, but that has some one ter better adapted for occasions like Thanksgiving, Ordinations, Dedi-
production, or at most a comparative few, which both himself and Sacred Music, than for the more strict use
cations, and for Concerts of

others will claim transcends all his other efforts. A


composer of mu- of the church. Those persons acquainted with my "Choral An-
sic forms no exception to this general principle he can by no possi- thems," will recognize in the Anthems of the Golden Lyre, a vein of
;

bility write to the same words several tunes of equal excellence. Again, relationship which they will regard according to their estimate of the
all words do not admit of equally perfect affinity with music. Or, to former work. After all that can be inculcated with respect to the
all words you cannot so interblend sentiment with song, that the com- mere mechanical use of music, if we go no further, we can real-
bined effect will be enhanced by their union. Consequently, the book ize nothing of that which is elevating and sublime in its true nature
that is made up of judicious selections from former works, together and effect. To the composer who writes, or the performer who
with the best specimens of subsequent production, is incomparably strives for perfection of execution, merely to gratify the desire of re-
more valuable than can be produced by any other means. A particu- nown, to him the soul of music has no delightful and abiding charms.
lar point upon which I am ever solicitous, is, that music of my own It must and will be as evanescent and transitory as the desire which
writing (however inconsiderable its merit) should always be thoroughly seeks it is superficial and grovelling. If the " kingdom of heaven is

studied and judged of by its own standard. Tunes like Vesper, In- peace and righteousness," and if that can dwell " within us," deeply is

galls, Twilight, Vienna, Peace, Evening, etc., can never be understood it to be lamented that music, so redolent of benign and sanctifying in-
if divested of the least shade of their intended character. While I am fluence, should be diverted from its high and appropriate end of refin-
aware that the tastes of different individuals are as diverse nearly as ing and elevating the soul to that which heavenly and divine. And
is

their personal appearance, and that it is in vain and unreasonable to when it leads its where its own nature would
followers into the realms
expect all to attach the any one given style of music, seek to go, then will the ideal
same value to entrancement of celestial harmonies to
is most intrinsically
a desideratum that that which them become a living reality.
yet I feel it is still

characteristic of a work, should be rightly understood and appreciated.

The goodly number of short Sentences the work contains, will be Hartford, Ct., Aug. 1850.

found, it is believed, quite sufficient for all ordinary purposes for


ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC.
Note to Scholars. If you have a good voice, and can sing readily by
imitation, ifyou prefer, you may omit the pains of learning to sing theoret-
(II A PTEB I.

ically,upon condition that you arc willing to forego the advantage of singing
NOTES.
at right from a knowledge of the rules, and always depend upon others to
teach you what you attempt to sing. Should you wisely prefer the opposite, I. Notes represent musical sounds. Seven kinds are used generally.
;

however, all Q6& BSary lor you to commit to memory, to enable you
the rales however, hut six.
to siii^ mechanically any piece of ordinary difficulty, are few and SIMPLE. $ II. Their names and value are as follows :

Do you inquire, - Why, then, so difficult to ring at


once after the rul A II ' A c- is equal
understood?" Because (and no process of instruction can obviate it) after to two P P Hal.
you have learned arithmetically that a particular note or manlier of notes are
ung at a beat, you have still to learn a concomitant part, which is to do it, to four f f f f Quarters,
after you have first learned the theory.
* * * * m m m m
to eight gj^jjj-
Note to Teaches In
adopting the elements as here laid down, your ____ *> *> * +
preconceived views as respects other methods of classification for instruction
may induce you at tirst to hesitate m following implicitly the arrangement
to sixteen Pf9JP __ mnmm
^^JJJJJ*
******** Sixteenths,

adopted ;
perceiving, as you will, that the whole Bubject of elementary in-
to thirty-two
struction is abridged and reduced in many particulars very much from what
'

^^^C***^C***^> I ' rtj

you may have been accustomed to. Instead of giving m once, the definitions
of the several departments upon which the subject is based, the principles Do
themselves are first defined, then follow the names of them. The frequent III A /' '
placed after a note adds to it one half its length
$
Notes interspersed, will afford comments on all departures from established
A-s- equals & & or PPP\ *P' equals 5
p
P or **P ;
a** equals
usages; showing, it is believed, reasons which will commend themselves to
the candor and judgment
PP or &c.
of all unbiased and discerning minds.
* ***
, .

6 ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC.


IV. Notes twice dotted are three quarters as long again. $ VIII. A Shir, , connects two or more notes sung to the same
Key . equals &
j^ft a s" * equals equals & ft "ft ft
syllable, thus, P 1

Eighths, Sixteenths, Thirty seconds, and


I I
;
I
ft

r
ft ft ft ft
p .

A meiv _ 9
QUESTIONS. Sixty-fourths are slurred by uniting their hooks thus, or
[ |
,

1.What characters represent musical sounds ? How many kinds are there used ?
2. What are the names and values of notes? 3. By what means can you make a note
one half longer ? A
whole note dotted receives the additional value of what note ?
4. How can a note be made three quarters longer ? A
whole note dotted twice receives QUESTIONS.
the additional value of what two notes ?
6.What effect has the figure under three notes of the same kind ?
3 placed over or
6. What effect has the figure 6placed over or under six notes ? 1. Is it material
whether the stems of notes point up or down ? Is their value the same whether the hooks
are connected or separate ? 8. What character shows that two or more notes are sung to
one syllable ? How are notes having hooks, slurred ?

CHAPTER II.

VARIOUS CHARACTERS EXPLAINED.


CHAPTER III
V. Any three notes of a kind, having the figure 3 placed over or under
$
them, are equal to the time of two. RESTS.
3
* * * IX. Rests are marks of silence. All notes have rests of the same name
Thus, ft ft are equal to
and duration as the notes themselves.
3 A Whole Note rest hangs upon a line, ------
ft ft ft are equal to * ft &c, &c.
I* * U * K
,
A Half Note rest stands upon a line, - - - jm.
VI. The figure 6 reduces sB of the same kind to the time offour. A Quarter rest, the iving turns to the right,
r
(( Eighth, wing turns to the left,
Thus are equal to ft ft * ft i
Sixteenth, two wings to the left, - - - -

6
areequalt0 Thirty-second, three wings to the left, - - - !3

CCC Cu* CC**-


VII. The manner of writing notes, whether with their stems up or
Sixty-fourth, four wings to the left,
down, T C or thus, * immaterial; their value
thus,
0000 , \

\
\

\
\

> *
. is
_____
is

Note 1. It is indispensable that each scholar should practise writing down the notes and
the same: also whether their hooks axe connected, i, or detached
d rests (out of school), until they can transcribe them all without hesitancy from memory.
isms* A slight experience will convince one how liable the Quarter and Eighth rests are to be con-
founded when only glanced at in reading quick music, especially by the inexperienced singer.
ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC.

Note. In tlii* work the Half and Quarter re-t-< have been slightly modified in form, M $ XIV. On the Base staff the alphabet commences on the lower space.
as to render them more distinguishable from the W bole end Eighth rests which, in the old ;

form*, are almost univmally eonfounded r A

^ X Eli Btfl may be dotted the same as notes; tlius, 1!

as-. ---.. -*- * f r-


| ,

$ XV. In counting the lines and spaces of the stall", always commence at
the bottom and count upwards.
- 1 ioNa
9. What are Bests 1 Whsi besides the note itself represents its sfleirt duration 1 Eton $ XVI When notes are written <'.
Led lines and
do tou distingmeh Whole Note reetl How Bal/t Quarter I Eighth! Bizteenthl
a apexes are used ^~ -&-
'I hut] 'Second ( irth i i 10. In what way can you lengthen the duration of rests
Dan rest Ik; clotted more than vncet

^ XVII. When more than the first seven letters are wanted above or
CHAPTER IV. below the stall", no additional ones are used, but these same ar led.

THKBLK. .-c-
1 1 \ - 1 .

-E-
THE STAFF, CLEFS, AND OTHER CHARACTERS.
tr
(Ton Teacher Bay should note upon a piece of paper "r on the
to hi~ < la** :

I writ.' :i

wall, wuhout anything being added determine its pitch, could we tell how high or how
to

;

sound it " (Glass will answer, Wi could nor.) "Then it -n r- thai tometh : j [ -c- r-
>

\r>i to enable u^ to tell how high or A.i/- notes ihould be written in order to receive a
'

certain pitch of sound. For thi> pnrpOSS WS luu' a StalF.


$ X\'III To find what letter a note is on when above or below the staff,
XI. A S/aJ'is used to write music upon. call the letter which the note is on one, and count each line an until
you arrive at eight, within the staff} this lu^t will be the same as that one

3 from which you commenced to count.

^ XTT. The Lines and Spaces of the staff are named by the first seven /.'
t com< b on B " '>otc above
letters of the alphabet. TUKIM.K.
the staff is consequently B
Norr. The term Dtarm for designating the tinea and spaces of the staff is found Buper-
Boons, consequently it i^ dispensed with.

$ XIII On the Treble, Alto, and Tenor staves, the letters applying to the
tiikhi.i:. .Ml E ght comes on B, the note below
- B
lines' are b , to the spaces (they */*//) - -^p ^>
Apply the same process to the Base staff
:

8 ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC


XIX. The Clef distinguishes the different parts in music which are XXIV. A Score consists of two or more parts connected by a Brace.

suno- too-ether. For the Treble and Alto the Treble Clef is used, /. (The
Note. In this work the double bar will not extend across the entire five lines of the
staff, except the measure preceding it be full as, ;

Tenor

it

Base
may

clef, Tenor
also have the same.)
Note. Teacher should avoid calling the Treble clef the " G"
has no signification, and only tends to bewilder the scholar.
clef.
clef, as, in its
Simply
present form,
say, Teeble clef,
Where
measure,
it is
it
%?
i
used only to show the end of a
will always be found thus
^E
strain, and does not divide the time into a full

(In this work the following clef is used for Tenor, fe). For the Base, the Base clef, Jg-
2: 1
XX. The relation of the several parts as respects pitch is thus :

TREBLE, Tins arrangement has been adopted to prevent the almost certain liability of a scholar sup-
posing a measure preceding a double bar necessarily full ; which, in fact, is seldom the case.
TENOR. _
same E as ]fF" QUESTIONS.
BASE. A -.jrG-
11. are the five lines and four spaces called upon which music is written?
What
\y'. ^e f . . . . same E as jgf 12. By what are the lines and spaces of the staff named ? 13. What letters apply to
the lines of the Treble and Tenor staves ? What letters to the spaces of the Treble and

Tenor ? Note. Teacher see the letters of the staff are thoroughly committed to memory by
divide the music into
his class. 14. In the Base staff, on what space' does the alphabet commence ? 15. In
XXI. Bars, t, are drawn across the staff to
counting the lines and spaces of the staff, where do you commence ? 16. Upon what are
Measures. t notes written when placed above or below the staff? 19. What character distinguishes
Mea sure. Meaanre. Measure. the different parts of music ? What clef is used for Treble and Alto ? 20. What letter
in the Base staff corresponds with the first line of the Tenor ? What one in the Tenor, with
the first one in the Treble staff? 21. Of what use are Bars in music? Of what use is
El the Double Bar ? 22. In church music, what does the Double Bar denote ? 23. What
is a Brace ? 24. What is- a Score ?

$ XXII. In church music the Double Bar, t, shows the end of a line of
poetry, or Strain. t

The heavens de - clare


m thy glo - ry, Lord.
CHAPTER V.

a tune.
TIME.
Double Bars thus, - - - - form a Close to
J,
XXV. Musical sounds may be long or short, which distinction forms

XXIII. A Brace, < connects the parts sung together in a piece of music. the department of Time.
$ ,

Note.Teacher illustrate 25 (the first above), by giving two sounds with his voice or
MI, KM KNTS OK VOCAL MUSH' 9
upon an instrument, one long and the other short, stating that, in a general sense, tliat D
2wu; but in enaa, it is Out
nse, i! mnuenoe which
inai influence wnicn causes a cnoir
choir 01
of sn -

PTER
- i i-;

(II A
|

pant of soldiers to more together a- em vote*, ^r with ont tltp, Again, you will E VI.
advantage in dispensing vita the term " Rhythm," when yon speak oi Tbne, as H will free
the minds of your achoun from all ambiguity of meaning on your part) and render you at
odm mdei MELODY.
5
XXVI V is represented by these characti |\ (' (rjV or
(_* /

' ^ XXVIII Musical sounds e high or loto} forming a i part-


V^' ' 8
by
')
S
%
) I 1 *? 'i (' f ment, relative to their ill< d .1/
rarefl thus.
fig 5 I ! 3 . V ur by figures with a .small
'2 1 9 I 9 1 8 1

(Ton. Teacher hei iay be long and thort.
note under them, thus. ^ 3 -2 :* forming the departmi .
.ng an
mrampTe frafn voice or instrument i
; this forms the secojid'd<.\ vuhYd Jd<lody."

$ XXVII. Iii this work, the figure in all cases denotes the number of ^S XXIX There are but & /' s Is, from which all music
beats to a measure, and the sin ill note under the figure is the note which The Eighth but a repetition of the
is derived. is first, and forma, with the
tec ives a beat, and is called the beat note. seven, an Oct
When the time changes after the commencement of a piece, the figure
onhj (without the note underneath,) will be tirv I
^ XXX The S lie consists of the Octave, or eight sounds.

MANNI.-R OF BEATING TIME. *5> XXXI. An Interval is the difference in pitch between any two sounds .

as, from 1 to 5 is an interval of the 5th, &C The from one sound
Two quarter time, - - - ? , down and up to another in ascending or descending the scale will here be called a Degree,
instead of tone" or - slcj).''

Three quarter time, -


y, down, left, up.
S
S XXXII, There arc two Bcales in music, the Major and Minor

Two quarter dotted, p. i


down and up. U OF Tim HAJOB SCALE.

Three quarter dotted - "p.", down, left, up. im 7 ( & to 8, a halt degree.

From 6 S degree.

QUESTION& From 5 -s- to 6, a degree.

im \ -s- to ice.
26. Sow
1
s 25, What department is derived from the difference in the
i

'

isTimerepi Which of these three methods is used in this work t ?'-'" What From Z(&\ I, half degree.
the figure over the amall note denote 1 What is Dndentood by the small note under the 2 . degree.
tigura t

From l ^ to 2, a degr
10 ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC
XXXIII. Major Scale applied to the Staff first commences on C.
Note. Teacher refer the class to tunes in the book, beginning with those in the natural
signature, and call their attention to all the different signatures in use, saying, " What sig-
nature has this tune ? What has this ?" <tc. Do the same with Time, saying, " What time
APPLICATION OF THE MAJOR SCALE TO THE STAFF.
has this tune ? what is its signature," &.C., until both are understood.

XLI. Accidentals are flats, sharps, and naturals placed before notes in
->
i3
Syllables,
13
Do Re Mi Fa S.il La Si Do La Sol Fa Mi Re Do
a tune, and they affect all notes on the same letters with themselves in the
measure, unless contradicted by a natural, flat, or sharp.
Pronounced, Dot Kan tfei Faw Sole I. aw See Law Sole /a ii l/i- Ray Doe
Numerals, 1 A 3 1 5 6 7 8 6 4 :s 1 Natural accidental. Flat ACCIDENTAL.
Letters, C li E F G A B C A F E C
2 -tS>- : ^==^*
e ** f
-

F 3 fc4Hw^Si + i I
Sharp ACCIDENTAL. accidental contradicted.
Note to Teacher. N. B.
All of you who have had sufficient experience will readily
bear testimony to the servitude a class of singers are under to the use of syllables before
*
applying the words to a piece of music. Whenever an untried tune is named, the first and
universal feeling with singers unaccustomed to a different practice is," Let us first sing it by
note, until we have got the run of it." Many of the most eminent and successful teachers
mt igETgj^E
with whom we have of late conferred on the subject, agree that it is far preferable for a XLII. Accidentals extend their influence to a succeeding measure when
ela^s never to use syllables at all, even in singing the scale. Consequently, when tunes the note in it is the same as the
first last in the preceding.
are taken up, there is no embarrassment attendant on the transition from the use of sylla-
bles to the immediate application of words.
Thus, Or thus.

fy
XXXIV. A Sharpy #, placed before a note, #, raises its pitch half a
degree.
iSt g-R-sE J33E
XXXV. A Flat, b, loivcrs the pitch of a sound half a degree.

XXXVI. A Natural, fef, restores a note having been made flat or sharp
to its original pitch. QUESTIONS.

XXXVII. A Double S/tarp, x, raises the pitch of a sound a whole 28. What the department relative to the pitch of sounds called ? 29. How many
is

degree. Primary Sounds are there ? From what is all music derived ? By adding the eighth to
the seven sounds, what is formed? 30. Of what does the scale consist? 31. What
XXXVIII. A Double Flat, tjb, lowers the pitch of a sound a whole is an Interval? 32. What two scales are there in music? 33. On what letter does the
degree. scale commence when first applied to the staff ? 34. What character placed before a note,
raises it half a degree ? 35. What lowers it half a degree ? 36. What restores a sound
XXXIX. A Signature is the flats or sharps placed at the commence- made flat or sharp to its original pitch? 37. What raises a sound a whole degree?
ment of a tune. 38. What lowers it a whole degree ? . 39. What is the signature to a tune ? 40.
What constitutes the natural signature ? 41. What are Accidentals ? How far do they
$ XL. A
Natural Signature is where tunes have neither flats nor sharps extend their influence ? 42. Under what condition does an accidental extend its influence
at their commencement. into a succeeding measure ?
ELEM 1 1 NTS OP V O C A L M U SIC. 11

OHAPTEB VII. Four Sharps, I". C, 0, and I. - -


:#E^r
.
I
THE SIGNATURES SHOWING THE COMMENCEMENT
OF THE SCALES. Five Sharps, I'. 0, '.. D, and A. -

fr/=^:'. 1

$ XI.I1I The Scale is always the sunn-, let it commence upon what let-

lei it may. Six Sharp-. 1". ('. A. and B,


Q, I>.
|l
g * ft

^ XLIV. Do is always the first syllable of the Major Scale, and La of


the Minor.

^ XLV. The Key-note of a piece is Mr /

Major scale
in the Base, from which
always Do, in
Seven Sharps, F, C, G, D, A. E.and V,
((
%V ' 2 ft 1

the several parts derive theii pitch; in the it is

the Minor hi

XLV1 To change the place of the scale (or the Byllable Do) upon the One Flat, B.
stall", the signature must change, as the scale takes a new signature every
time it is moved from one letter to another
Nora Wli.'ti oommences " ng"g bj note in the different signatoree (if you adopt
;i elaai
the practice k thej will often saj npon taking a new rignatnre, " Where is Da in this tuner
1 Two Flats. H and E, . |> ^ i>..

To answer this question, lei them always rent to the (allowing table of signatures, ^howim?
the oommencement of the scales.
\nzc^ '.,

Thr- 15. K.an.l A, - - - & * 1

Do AXD h
SIGNATURES SHOWING THE TLACE OF La. I-

^
Natural Signature, gS Do
r, La Four Flats, B, E, A, and D,- - -

One Sharp. F, - - - -
Five Flats. K. A. D, and G,
Do 15. - -

1.

Two Sharps, F and C, -


2 !!'.'
Six Flats. B, E, A, D, G. and 0, -

bt) 1
I' g-gr-4
Three Sharps, F, 0, and (J,
s Flats. B, i:. A. D,G, 0,and F. [!' r !".'
1 fcl' b | ||
::: I
12 ELEMENTS OF VOOAL MUSIC.
CORRESPONDING SIGNATURES. XL
VII. Transposition is the moving of the scale from one letter to
another upon the staff by changing the signature.
Natural Signature and Seven Flats

SZDo
La

One Sharp
s

and
Hr ht
Six Flats.
-2-
<^
Do
La
^ XLVIII. Do
fve letters above
is
(or four
always thefirst letter above the last added sharp, and
below) the last added flat.

QUESTIONS.

X>o-
La-
^ k g-p-
,^-L.a- i
always of the same form, whatever letter it may commence upon ?
43. Is the scale
44. What syllable is always the first of the major scale ? What of the minor ? b 45.
What is the key note to a tune ? What syllable is it in the major scale ? What in the
minor ? 46. In order to change the place of the scale upon the staff, what else must be

changed? Natural signature, where is Do? One Sharp, where is Do? Two Sharps,
Two Sharps and Five Flats. where ? Three Sharps ? Four ? Five ? Six ? Seven ? One Flat, where is Do ? Two
Flats? Three? Four? Five? Six? Seven ? Do on C, what signature ? Do on G, what
--Do-
~^V- -5*-Lia- signature? On D, what? On A ? On E ? On B ? On F#? OnC#? Do on F, what
-g&^L,a-
\
'
b
I signature? On Bfj? Efj ? Afo ? Dfj ?
48. How may the place of Do be found ?
Gfo? C\) ? 47. What is Transposition?

Three Sharps and Four Flats.

CHAPTER VIII
FORCE.

Note. Teacher says " We have seen that sounds may be long and short, forming Time ;
:

high and low, forming Melody now in the last instance we notice that they may be soft
:

Five Sharps and Two Flats.


and loud, forming the third department, Force or strength of sound" giving an example
of the last, by striking a sound soft and loud.

%-#-&
S-
Do- -i9-Do
-La-
1
to end.
XLIX. An Organ Tone is a sound of uniform power from beginning

Six Sharps and One Flat. L. An Increase for Crescendo) commences soft and ends loud.
Do-
it i^-ff^g^Lia- -L.a-

I *
$ LI. A Diminish (or Diminuendo) begins loud and ends soft.

Seven Sharps and Natural Signature.


LII. A Swell combines the Increase and Diminish.
<Mi db:
a
I
E LEM E N T S OF VOCAL MUSIC. 13

A Whole V
MIMICAL CHARACTERS EXPLAINED.
Rest, -W, denotes a silent measure in all varieties
CHAPTER IX
$ LTII.

of time. MINOR AND CHROMATIC SCALES.


$ LIV. A double bar seldom divides the time in a measure. When the
$ LVII I In all cases. Tji. the 6th of the Major iken as in 1

measure before a double bar is/////, it then divides the time Minor Scale; M
the thai is, in singin th< 8 tie by numerals, when you
n

arrive at 6 (La) ii 1 1 1 1
i_r
it 6, chan( e il U of the
Here double bar (brides the time. In lii instance <!<>es not.

sgffl
ill.- r it

Minor Scale, th< a the new (Minor the same

*..m--m i? number of intervals


Seal*' i its

rom the Major >


that thi M
intervals do not occur in
S Bear in mind that
ord< r as in
thi
the Major,

None. Una explanation of the double bai is desig (her work*, uo\ 1 1 1 i.
->.

ascending the Minor Scale, the 7th interval (Sol) is raised


LIX. In
$ l,V \ suspension of the time is allowable at the double bar. hall a degree ;
in descending, it is Bung as Sol, tin- 5th in Major Scale.

$ 1,\ I A Hold. iCs, ]ilaced over notes, rests, bars, or a vacant part of the MINOR SCALI. ING. VG.
sare, denotes e suspension of the time, at the discretion of the performer
82 !
to a degree
From 7 5 to Q a hall
I \ LMPLE
.

! i70to6,a degree.

From 6 2 to a degree and a half From IJ5I" degree

m
7. If

From 5 ^ to From 5 C to
-F^r H*^ 6, a half dej 1. a degree.

From 4 2 to .">.
a degree. From 1 c i degree.

From 3 2 to 4. a decree. From 3 c . half degree.


$ LVII A Repeat shows what part of a piece is sung twice, and is
From 2 2 to 3, a half degree. I . 5lo l,a degree
marked by dots in th^ following manner:
'
From 2 to 1 2, a degree. 1 c
:-

MiNi Arpi.irn to thi: -


2 :
.

Asc

19, What ia an Organ


QUESTIONS

60 An Increase or Crescendo? 61. A Diminish C o


sz^ As
5 I
fc g ^g I"
g
Swell! 53. What rest i- oaed to till a ailent measure in ;ill
or 7','i/iiii'i-rn/..

varieties of timel
\

Under what cirenmstances does a double bai divide th<- time


? .'!
La
1-4
A
81

B
|s.i

34D R Ml

E
56Fa I
Sol I.a
7bA
G
I

-7
.a

A
B..I
05
Ft
ii
Ml K-
i

u
Do
a
o
SI

I
La
i
,,f .v aanrel \ 66 When is a suspension of the time allowable 1 g 66 Whateha
over notes, rests, 1
1 denotes a suspension of the timel 67, How is a part &z
of a piece of mu-ii- marked, that is to he sung twice *
fc c.
Tzcz&i I & I'
14 ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC.
MAJOR AND MINOR SCALES. 1th (Sol) ? How
far from 1 to 2 is it in the minor Scale ? From 2 to 3 ? From 3 to 4 ?
From 4 to 5From 5 to 6 ? From 6 to 1 ? From 7 to 8 ? Descending, how far from
?

Minor Ascending. Major Ascending. 8 to 7 ? From 7 to 6 ? From 6 to 5 From 5 to 4 ? From 4 to 3 ? From 3 to 2 ?


?

From 2 to 1 ? The minor 3d is equal to what numeral in the major scale ? The minor

1 ?5-#S>* ^ ^r&zr&z <z>


& SB-!* I 5th equals what numeral in the major scale? 60. Of what is the chromatic scale

I -^r-^ 5 .-G\
formea ?

Minor Descending. Major Descending.

CHAPTER X.
i.
^ i
EXPLANATIONS IN FORCE AND TIME.
LX. The Chromatic Scale is formed by dividing the five degrees and LXI. Accent is a stress of voice given to the down beat.
adding to them the two half degrees of the Major Scale making twelve in- ;

Loud Loud Loud -<^>-


Soft Soft Soft Loud Soft Soft Loud Soft Soft
tervals and thirteen sounds.
Note.
Ac.
Sing the syllables to the chromatic scale without changing
The acute
the vowel, as Do, Bee,
ear of any Teacher will soon convince him of the propriety of this course,
if he will try the experiment of having his class practise the chromatic scale, alternately
i^SJgjf^^Sr^^fei
LXII. In the following forms of y time, the accent gives place to the
changing the vowel, and singing it the same, as Do, Do, to the natural and sharp intervals.
The objection to changing it is, the scholar is too apt to mistake a change of the vowel for
Swell tone.
a change in the sound. Soft -=^~>- Soft

CHROMATIC SCALE.
!

s> ^=is: 3E2 LXIII. In beating time, the hand should move promptly, and not over
^ =' ts? :
I
eight inches of space.
Do
C
Do
C#
Re
I)
Re
D#
Mi
E
Fa
F
Fa
F#
Sol
G
Sol La
A
La
A#
Si
B
Do
C LXIV. A beat consists of its motion and point of rest.
! LXV. In singing two notes at a beat, the first is sung to the motion

h=^=^^B^^=^ i
j- I I 1 r-FE
(or first

$ LXVI
half), and the second to the_?>oi7t of rest (or second half).

A
tune commencing in the following form of measure, would
be said to commence at the left point of rest.
Do 81 SI La La Sol Sol Fa Ml Mi Re Re Do.
B Bb Ab Gb E Eb D Db
EXAMPLE.

58. What interval


ing the Minor Scale,
in the
what
major scale
interval is made
QUESTIONS.
is taken as one in the minor ? 59. In ascend-
sharp ? In descending, how do yon sing the
FZ=tfr=Z=G
=
&
V, \, V. M K NTS OP VOCAL Ml SIT
1
15
At the point of rest Tmiiii: (Sing Quarters, and What noUtt

00000
?//? uvj i

\rt' rx. oiie beat to a



Eighths, and say) What m '
Class. Eighth*, because two note* at >
y~" i r i
Ti.m in i; teentha, an aaj I |
WK U
Class. Sixteenth*, tout at a beat : &, Ac
At the down point of rest

mi-i i:i i

fry
i c crtr^ Teacher aing the following, while 1 th the class, and qi II HI re. Class

QUESTIONS
, what |
0000 0000 0000 U U what
i. Wliu Accent 1 69 Measure in three quarter time commencing with a half
is
~/mt it thonged tot i 68. In what manner should (he hand move hi beat-
the to tan
* * * *. what '
ing timet 64 Of what does a beat consist 1 66. Which of two notes sung at a beat
is sung to the motion t What h the wo;,,/ rang to I
J , v
tf W W Of
, , what notes ? After proceeding in thi* manner until the clas.* understand
practieatty the application of time to rose*.

DIRECTIONS PREPARATORY TO BEATING TIME.


CTI A PTEB XI.

P> P P
^ .
-

p
V
-
i
p
PI

the cl
Ti m
a practical

ot uniform
a a


have only
bi
Inert fore, re von to commi nee singing tui es
knowledge of time.
ana beat '
ii
you would at once perceive that they know nothing as vet
-

them this, yon most require them to beat, whi


I
;

play some spirited air; when you perceive thej can a r, then introduce tl
1 to a

EgSj^i^g^^ I .| I

of Old Efundred, Dundee, or other melody they are familiar with

quainted with the tune.


I

notes, ask
-- describing correct time.


in
Teacher and Class commence beating time;
as follows :
this they can beat while
they ring, a-* their undivided attention can I"' directed tn the time alone, it" they an
This incipient pro -- of leading them to knoffi
and enabling them to appreciate a aiven movement, will eventually insure their coin

when all nvu,


;

;>
'

her sing whole


1
'

/'
BE
p
ss p
T v lit a. What nob do su 9
I

'n a note
r ,
H
e :

(Sing Halve*, two, three, ox more, and a*j


lose two beats to note \
|
Wh i i r
1 #

ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC.


EASY EXERCISES IN FOUR PARTS.
No. 1.
Ml.

d '0-
sv-
9 g ^JEJg ^g^^^^^itEfe ggE^ ^^gEg
Do.
A
!)<>.
-f* > ** V
"25" "*- " -0T
yr&r J^W^aPj^W^ ?^^^ I
r-r-f^-fe 1

i s>~ 9 #~ ^^^^^^^^^^fe^^^^PI
^^^^^^PI=#^=^^^^^g^^^^^^|?^Plt
Io. 2.

E3^^^ eE E^& SEE^3E


^ippPpS 3=3=^p^ ^5^%^-:
3t3t 1 ijzzs: =J=s: a -py-p F j~H~
=
1
1
[ i l-l-

jl..
-0 0-
:
"<2_ EpEpi 3=:.
BL i;.M ENTS F V <)('A I, M USK 17
*o. 8.

^^fel'lH'l-H"*!--- & ^E^iE 5 * ? * o . 1


1'

i^UUJ^U.U s 5 -
3= =3= ***
3
* ..L-'Hiil
s^ -IH".-r 1M" ^ mign l-vp/l ;'!'' HI
ivi^i":r^r:'L'S:':.vr- y^n^ s^
r = I-

"Vo. 1. Pay attention to the time in this exercise.

E?.-.J...p3gfe tp

p- -f -<g- -p
r
? * 5
I"

'

...
s
J.-.\L.J s I. J. ..! - -L/Uej s =7 o o UUUU'
p mugm eF^
r-

(S
- ffirRm T' "
*hl<

#-# #
U'rnTnm'M S^.*
*i
S^k-li
r

18 ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC


No. 5. Be careful to get this correctly.

Sfe
E *5> -^ m^^^\sm^m^^s^\^WE3m^s^mw^
&1
B * **
-
s_ b*-n ;-:

339 sMa I
^==^^w^mmM^m^3:
is:
BggSS^^is LIB 32
22 iP I

f?: ^3- 2 sgsss 2=* WZSi
i
31
I U 1 L#^J
IV. 6.

l^pi^^^Z^^^S^^^^^^B^ ^g^:
? i

t^-
^=
rSt
SSl piEei^:
^fe
0o-6-
3?
!

*
!
tC:
23
3 ~Fn=^ 5 *jt
IfM
3 3=1
iE^^ffiE
rife-
'
^pg^fep^^g^g tfltt
5fl

^ag^pgg^^s^^^^^p i t

at k-
-u
/HE

!
ELEMENTS 1' VOCAL MUSIC 19
No. 7.
r }

,

M^ifej|, .gs^g *
*-s i
r

k.kl"
i i i

^^

^ -

9
?- JJJrUJrTJ^B
"-CL
s=* - *
I

fei&J h-3
I I I I

3 - *
ZCI2Z -
5 I

-
I ?Je!3
S^H
I t

*. :fa^
1

5 f=r- lc
,5>-*- # r~r - b^: s - '

No. . SOLFEGGIO.
This exercise may be sung cither by the syllables, or by the single syllable L\ : if by the latter, repeat the syllable for each note. Practise it with
peneYerance ami care.
Sninruliiil i limit Medium. ! I t I I I I II I ! I I

Ipl * #(# /|# Jjtg| 00 #[# "I" '* |# " ["'" # *'~
f
### '|
_ ^^ r*m J_J_J_

i i i i ' i
i > ' ' ' '
_!

I
m
.Hl-fe r-

Crcn. / m Ji - - m
i i i i

ps -I. :\A .=^> *\-~- ''1--%'


_ I I I I III
i i i i
I i
I i
I _ !JL_
i i t ill
i i i ' ' '
,
20 ELEMENTS OF VOCAL MUSIC
Pay attention to the Dynamic directions.
UJ_ M It tit M M II 1 II II I l_

^gJ^jgg^^^^^gPEEJEE^te^^^-l^q^^^^^
I L J t J I I

l
_ N^ 1 _ 1

mmE^-M
I I I I 1 i t i i
j

F^ I

^^^wm^Mmmm
ff Crcs.
mi it i

II
II I I

I I I I MJ I ,_ _L'J_l_l_ I I I J LJ_ 1 L_ I I I >

with a thorough acquaintance with the science of music, constitute the chief
CHAPTEK XII. requisites to good singing.

GENERAL REMARKS UPON SINGING. LXIX. The Voice.


The necessary qualities of the Musical Voice are
fulness, flexibility, and purity. To acquire these, it is important to practise
the Swell and Explosive tone. In the former, great care is necessary to
^ LXVII. Expression is of no less importance in singing -

, than Elocu- avoid changing the quality of tone. To prevent this, the organs of sound
tion is to reading or speaking. should be held firmly without change or relaxation while the sound con-
tinues.
^ LXVIII. To sing with expression, requires a knowledge and observa-
tion of those principles in music and language, upon which a correct taste is LXX. Taking Breath, in singing should be done as seldom as possible,
founded. The proper use and control of the voice, a distinct articulation of and never between the syllables of a single word, nor where it will inter-
words, and strict attention to the rules of accent and emphasis, together rupt and destroy the meaning of a sentence.
ELEMENTS OF VOi \ I. Ml SI<
g]
\N LXX1 no one direction more necessary
ftftt \Iouth. There is than in reading; and such is the construction and adaptation of the m
to !)' complied wiili in singing, than opening the month bo far as to bo measure to that of poetry, that it is seldom i
,
the
able to utter a sound in a free and unrestrained manner The impossibility regular accentuation rmer, to accommodate th< >
there
of attempting to articulate distinctly .til words in speaking, with the mouth i- not an tent of the two however, the ac thi
hj opened, is eater than in singing Experience shows, that y& tola / that
of Hu

of the most prominent faults


mouth too little open, and in too
i

fix< I
nerally, is

and uniform a position


the habit ol keepin the
LXXV1
singing than
/.'

be used as the seven Byllabli s


to
If i
ry for
ar.-.
any other purpose
m<
in

$
-'
LXXI1
In music ol ordinary rapidity, or of the chant-
Articulation. to, it is tainly of imp that it should I"
ant hould never be a want of distinct in articulation -
manner as to convey to the mind the true im]
Choral music, the sound being sustained so long up.ni the different i imbodii - To this i nd let it ng which i

do! admit of giving language so perfect an utterance To render artic- portance demands.
ulation bo distinct in sin to make words intelligible, the speaking
ins must I"' used in Buch a manner that their app LXXVU /' -When it is said of a note in music that it should
.without \ve a given amount of time, tb not be understood in
an unqii I -

S
S
IA'XIII \ rule in singing which should never be deviated from in thiswould then !>' th< cas but, - we depart from the rules of
'

king of words, is I i
commence and sustain a sound without vari- music when m ite that i
-
with r<

ation, on the I sound of the vowel leaving its to the final \\ henever thi
articulation of the syllable. The word " day," for instance, should not be itcan generall) be produced by shortening the " it without
da
'">''' I
j as would I"- the case if the vanish of tl interrupting the til E imetimi - the rhi lorical cons
be dwelt upon, instead of its first element or radical part This defect is oce maj require a temporal
not unfrequently carried to the extreme in - En tho following lines, at the a ding the final word ("d a -

merely the radi ..I portion of a vowel, but of empli following suspension of tin' time would be m cessary to gi to the s I

manta to sustain a sound upon. For example the words "fire, adi
retire," and others similar, are rendered y?r des/V - &c., instead of t,'riint,
till r,

ft- - - re, den - - -


re. S5

LXXIV. C fs Tu ^
insure good articulation, the cons LXXVII1 MEn order to sustain Choir fi
^

must be quickly, distinctly, and forcibly ottered Tier, i- nothing in tho highly important that -
ciently, it is i moot qoently I

amstance ol
circumstance having the organs of the voice employed in producing a
of hav And while doing this let the tim< to the object h I

music
ucal sound, which need interfere at all with those required for articula- with clos ion to the subjeel nd not at

tion Hie location ol the tw remote from each other, that if both

recreation And finally never at any tine


are confined to their resp no hindrance will be found to exist
b, trivial, allow the habit of singing without n <

mst a clear y articulation while singing, any more than in as it impairs the taste and renders om I

speaking. musical attainmi nt


^ LXXA i
It is no less important to accent words in Bulging
; 8

EXPLANATION OF MUSICAL TERMS.


Accelerando. Accelerating the time by degrees, faster and Da Capo. From the beginning, and ending at the word Ottava Alia, (abbreviated 8va.) To be played an octave
faster. " Fine." above, until contradicted by the word loco ; which see.
Adagio. As an adverb meaning moderately slow. As a
; Deelamando. In a speaking or declaiming style. Overture. An introductory symphony to an oratorio,
substantive, designating a piece of music of a particular Dcvozione. Devotional. opera, <fec.
character, in a slow movement ; as, an " Adagio by Dolce. Sweet, soft and delicate. Pastorale. An elegant movement written in 6 8, or 12
Haydn," &c. Duo. (Ttal.) In English, Duet or Duetto, for two voices. time.
Ad Libitum. At pleasure without respect to time.
;
Espressivo. With expression. Pietoso. In a religious style.
Affeluoso. Denoting the character of a piece of music Fa/set, or Fcdsetto. A term applied to that register of the Portamento. The manner of sustaining and conducting the
meaning tenderly and affecting. male voice above its natural compass, which resembles voice from one sound to another.
Allegretto. Less quick than Allegro. a female voice. Hence, called false or assumed. Presto. Quick.
Alhgro. Quick and sprightly movement. Fine, or Finale. The end. Prestissimo. Very quick.
Alto. The Second Treble. Forzando, forz., or fz. See Sforzando. Primo. The first or leading part.
Andante. In a distinct and exact manner, like the steps in Fitgata. In the style of a fugue. Quartette. A
piece of four parts, for a single voice, or in-
walking as a grade of time, it indicates a movement
; Fugue. A musical composition in which the subject or strument to each part.
between quick and slow. theme is sustained by one or more of the parts alter- Quiritettc. A piece in five obligato parts, each performed by
Anthem. A musical composition set to words of the Sacred nately throughout the piece. a single voice or instrument.
Scriptures. Grazioso. With grace and smoothness. Rallcntando. Softer and slower by degrees ; abating, re-
Arioso. In a light, airy manner. Imitation. Music in which there is a repetition of the same tarding.
Arpeggio. In the manner of the harp; chords struck in melody in the various parts, without preserving that Recitative. A species of music between singing and speak-
quick succession. exactness in the intervals which is required in a Fugue. musical declamation in which the singer uses the
ing, or
A tempo. In time. Interlude. An instrumental passage introduced between two inflections and tones of the speaking voice in which ;

Baritone. A
voice whose register is between the Base and vocal passages, or between the singing of two stanzas also lie is not restricted in sound or time, so long as he
Tenor. in church music. keeps to the harmony of the measure.
Base. The lowest part in harmony. Interval. The distance between any two sounds in music. Rehearsal. A private execution of music before performed
( 'ad' nee, or Cadenza. The closing of a strain. Also, a fan- Lamentabile, Lamentcvolc. Mournfully. in public.
ciful extemporaneous strain introduced at the close of a Larghetto. Slow, but not so slow as Largo. Rinforzando, Rinf. Increasing suddenly in power, -c;^
song, or melody. Largo. A very slow, and rather soft movement, in which Risoluto. Resolute, bold.
Cantabilc. In a graceful, flowing style of performance. the tones are sustained in their full length, and exe- Sentimento. With feeling, tenderly.
Cantata. A
vocal composition of several movements. cuted with the utmost taste and expression. Sforzando. Suddenly diminishing a sound. ^~_
( Iftntant. In the style of a chant. Legato. In a smooth, gliding manner. Solfeggio. A
vocal exercise sung witli the syllables, Do, Re,
Choir. A
company of singers also the part of the church
;
Loco. As written. &c, or to a single word, as Amen.
which they occupy. Maestoso. Majestic, with dignity and grandeur. Soli. The plural of Solo, one voice or instrument to a part.
i horal. A slow style of music, written mostly in notes of Melody. An agreeable succession of sounds ; or, any succes- Solo. Apiece or passage for a single voice or instrument.
equal length, but sometimes applied to all varieties of sion of sounds. Sostenuto. In a sustained manner.
in slow movement.
measure Modcralo. In moderate time. Spiritoso. With spirit.
Chromatic. Ascending or descending by half-tones. (See Motet, Motetto. A piece of sacred music in several parts Staccato. Notes struck in a quick, short, and detached
Rudiments, Chromatic Scale.) and movements. manner.
Chromatic Interval. An interval between a note and the Obligato. Indispensable; applied to accompaniments which Subject. The leading idea, or text, in a piece of music.
same letter flatted or sharped. cannot be left out without destroying the intended effect Symphony. An elaborate composition for instruments.
' 'oda. A passage at the end of a composition which forms of the piece. Tempo. Time.
a final close. Oratorio. A sacred musical drama. Tempo Primo. The original time.
Con Bpirito.With spirit, animation. Orchestra. That part of a concert-room, theatre, etc., ap- Trio. A
composition for three voices or instruments.
Contralto. The Alto, or Second Treble. propriated to musical performers; also the body of the Vigoroso. Vigorous, bold.
Cnro. Choriu performers themselves. Vivace. Sprightly, cheerful, and quick.
THE d OLDEN LYRE.

ADDISON. L. I. \ . t . T.
Of variable eliaraeten Soft nut! flowing t hold and animated.

P L=? ^=tf WM+\>&^^m When anfcU. 4c.


sfe'/b'i'l'-'l-
^
. -U.Uli
i 0, sweetly breathe the lyres a bore, When an gels touch the quivering string, And wake to chant the Father's love, Such strains as an gel lipacani
j And sweet, on earth, the cho ral swell Frommor - t;il tongues, of gladsome lajs ; When pardoned souls their raptures tell, And grateful, hymn the Saviour's prabe
Fr. m DO lJ. *' r

r I

"'/' s_/ \_/ v5 ( i es.

! 31 i^E^.b-d'-^-'h-H
_i ]_
J. - iiijji .
. .
S
.JU p. .y< . .. .
5
** ^
r
24 With spirit, but not boisterous. Staccato. MILGROYE. L, M. Flora
M1LGROVK.
"From heaven the'loud," &c.

w 1.

_
sch:


Stand up, my soul shake off
1

o-

thy fears,
^f^^^^ntttrt^x^3^^m.
-

And gird the gospel ar mor on


- March ; to the gates of endless joy, Where Jesus, thy great Captain's gone.
1
4. There shall I wear a star - ry crown, And triumph in al - might y grace; While
- all the armies of the skies Join in my glorious Leader's praise.

-9-
^r

f Soli, or Semi-Coro. ~ Repeat Coro if


i


fa*:
j. JJ 1 i
r
-f-.-J- J- i

J
i i

-J-.
:*
Ba:
n_rzt
When this measure is snng to a word of two syllables, as "Jesus, thou everlasting King," &c, sing the last note as a quarter P.
:=i=c F
Quite fast, with majesty. GAUDIANA. L. M. V. C. T.

1 i
r
i
Ntr 5^=! ._.

* 2. The Lord proclaims his power a loud, Through, ev - ery o - cean, ev


- - ery land; His voice divides the wa-tery cloud, And lightnings blaze at his com - mand.
3. The Lord sits sovereign on the flood, O'er earth he reigns for - ev - er king; But makes his church his blest a - bode, Where we his aw-ful glories sing.

>N ?E|E3^E^^E3^3^Pygp3^fe^5g i^pg


q=*
Crcs. /
-
/

----- K I Unisons
Unssoi
g"
HV -t
ST fe^EEgg^;
*
Sing the last stanz'i of this hymn to the tun "REPOSE."
Sin on 111 mid rim lire style. Heui \ ii-.-.
I! L I V ! !!. L. M
I i';l II
the third (train k , 1 1
>J . . t * I O. RHAWi \. )

^'l-'h'h -U H"-l" *U .U
hope, and joj
b, heavenly guest, Come, fix thy mansion
cere,
in my breast;
' t .1 I
..
-.-h
1 my do
\ |vrl-''l
;
H ..U ;

iling in - (
dwelling Si ill lei your p
'' Qod or hope and peace divine, Make thou these sacred p hum-' "- ">' fcai irt with joy and love

: !
^ -
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Mrillum linn . Qenemll] DD wifl be better Uwn the given key |


ZEPB Vlt. L. H. Frooi
ii. it. nn \i)in \ .

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*
'l'"U I- FEgEgm-::\. I
' Jraa dj ing bed I. down-y I
pillows are, Whili I, And breatl
I. Why shouldjve start and fear to die! What timorous worms we mortals are I b.is the gate of
- rh !, the groana, and dy - ing strife, Fright our np - preaching soulsa-way; Still shrink we baci

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26 Choral, with

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2.
3.
\jthou
uiou that
awe

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Em
uiul solemnity.

neai st when
mat hear'st sinners
wiien muuerts
Cre - ate my na - ture pure with
I can - not live with - out thy
-
Quite slow.

cry, Though
wy,
in,

light,
Jt>

nioui^ii an
all
And form
my
DANUBE,

crimes be
ue - fore thee
lore
my soul a - verse to sin ;
Cast out and banished from thy sight
nice lie,

;
Be
L. M.

-noiu them
i3e hold muni not with
Let thy good Spi
wuii an gry

Thine ho - ly joys,
- rit
my
PEgSEHS
ne'er
-

de
God, re
-

-
look,
iook,
part,
-)art,
store,
tore,
But blot
rtui uiot their
ineir
Nor hide thy presence
And guard me that I
*
from my
memory irom thy
from
fall
S
my
w
book,
'
heart,
no more.

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Slowly, with fc< Uni;. SEVERENCE. L, M, V. C. T.

1.
^feag^feg^l^;
.My righteous Judge my gracious God, Hear when I spread my hands a -broad; I cry for
?je
hBE?E pSis^^E^fe^
sue - cor from thy throne, O make thy truth and mercy known.
2. For thee I pray
for thee I mourn; When wilt thou, gra-cious Lord, re -turn? Shall all my joys on earth re - move ? Wilt thou for - ev - er hide thy love 1

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1

i M v c, ;u- i, . rrpt imv ear-ly tows, Lake morning incense in thine house; And lei my nightly worship rise, Bweet u the evening wc ri

2. Watch o'er my lips, and guard them, Lord, From ev-ery rash and heedless word; Hoc let my feet in - dine to trad The guilt
y path, where sin-

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praise we 11 sing till na-tnre ceaae, Till sense ami language be no more; And .if - t<r c!>-.ith.
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thv Ixmndless grace


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L A WS N . L . M The Aim. Tenor
strains must be
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v.c'd
Bass in the 'M and 4th
sustained to give eilect- V. C. T.

lSlsP^Sliiffi&^ B z~~ r~~<g


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:

Foundation for his heaven -ly praise; He likes the tents of Ja - cob well, But still in Zi on loves to dwell.
1 God earthly temple lays
in his
9 Him, Tf v vis - its ev-erv house That pay their night and morn- ing vows; But makes a more delight- ful stay, Where churches meet to praise and prav.
bode Shall walk all day beneath his shade, And there at night, shall rest Ins head.
1 He who hath made his refuge God, Shall find a most se - cure a - ;

3 Thrice lnppy man '-thy Maker's care Shall


keep thee from the tempter's snare God is thy life-Ins arms are spread, To shield thee with
;
a

Kit. null Dim.

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ANDOVER. L.M. Be careful not to sine the triplets in this tune too
fast; hut make the notes in them of equal length. V. C. T.

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^SSfeiHow
i~i
earing breast!
TlwTe is the scene when Mans die, When ho - ly souls re - tire to rest: How mildly beams the
gently shuts the
do sing
-

eye of
eye!
day, So
gent-ly heaves
dies a wave a
th'
long tne snore.

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2. So fades a summer cloud a -
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1. E ter - n.il Qod les - ti.il Kin..-, ! glorious na . Let boats in heaven thj
1. \ fixed 'ii my
tli i, I [ rest l on thee a Ion . 1 11 spread thy -a cred truths To all mankind llij
:;. \-.\ ake, m\ ion-Hi awake, my lyre, With mornin ngsof ;

in -spire, Ai c t-i U
I With those, who in thy grace a -bound, To thee I U raise mj thankful voice; Wl rth a -round, S -and in thj
<* _ . . . . . . .

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*

IrrfTTr^ rWi^rmf^lfls^P
l. Qreal is the Lord! -what i n honor qua] | name ! How awful I in
8, \ .i I are th;. works, al - ii nature rests up- on th\ ': . . . ,
nil -
i

I. Thy glo - ry, fear - h i


' . Lord, shall cv - er shine : Thy praise *! ithempl
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30 Allegretto.
HONDURAS. L. M. V. O. T.

IHi 1. What are those soul-reviving strains, Which echo Ihus from Salem's
2. Lo! 'tis an infant chorus sings Ho- san-na to the King of
3. Nor these alone their voice shall raise, For we will join this song of
plains'!
kings:
praise;
What anthems
Still
SeP 3i -*-!*-
3? n
g~~g~
zta= S Ititarcl.

and louder still, So sweetly sound from Zion's hill 1 So sweetly sound from Zl on's hill?
loud,
The Saviour comes ! and babes proclaim Sal-vation, sent in Jesus' name, Sal vation, sent in Je - sus' name.
-

Israel's children forward press To hail the Lord their righteousness, To hail the Lord their righteousness.
4. Mes - siah's name shall joy im - part A * like to Jew and Gentile heart: He bled for us he bled for you, And we will sing ho - san na too, And we will sing ho - san na too.
- -

5. Pro- claim hosannas loud and clear; See David's Son and Lord a p -pear! All praise on earth to him be given, And glory shout through highest heaven And glory shout through highest heaven
! !

Uitarri.

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S3=M B p^te
1. Oh hap - py day, that fixecrmy choice On thee, my Saviour, and my God; Well may this glow - ing heart re - joice, And tell its rap - tures all a - broad.
2. Oil hap - py bond, that seals my vows To him who mer- its all my love Let cheerful an - thems fill the house, While to his
! al - tar now I move.
3. Tis done the great transaction's done; I am my Lord's, and he is mine: lie drew me, and I followed on, Ite-joiccdto own the call di - vine.

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With . nini ii ion Slnccnto. BLANFOBD. L. H. (Three plain lanes.) 31
_ m "if*, IS IS ^ v in I
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l. Ihe hearero declare thr glo - rv, Lord, In er- ery tar tliv wis - dom abinea ; But when om bold thj word, We read thy name in fair - >r

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With Implicit)-. LAWRENCE. L. M,
7/1

We've a- bt ding d ty hero;


hero We
Wo seek
sick u
a land lie von
on
be-yond our
onr sight;
sight
aiirht Zi-on
Zi on it- name, the Lord dure,
there; with
shine* ei er-la
l. in its i-

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1. Je bus, and shall it ev - or be, A mi ir-til man a-shamed of thee I Ashamed of thee, whet an '

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LIMEHOUSE. L . M .
(SACRAMENTAL.) J. HUSBAND.
English-
probably, no better piece extant for
communion occasions.)
Medium. (There is.

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MONMOUTH, L. M.
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With
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and
a nd gi ving tq_it
giving va riety.
consid erab le variety.
to it considerah
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Though I bar* mod unfaithful been
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b) pcnxu*uoo.

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o\ cry ki'.m y wind that blows, From e\ > iy swelling tide of woes, There ia a calm, a sure re - treat Tis found beneath the mer - cy -

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34 Medium time and Staccato. AVON. L. M. V. C. T.

H5^-
1. With one consent, let all the earth To God
I
their cheer-ful ces raise;
voi -
r_C ^ ^Ird-EI^ ^^
Glad hom-age pay, withaw-ful mirth,
'
I
* *
And sing be - fore him songs
=eNS of praise.
3. Oh en - ter then his temple gate, Thence to his courts de-vout-ly press, And still your grate - ful hymns re - peat, And still his name -with prai - ses bless.
4. For he's the Lord, su - preme-ly good, His mercy is for - ev - er sure ; His truth, which al ways firm - ly stood,
- To end - less a - ges shall en - dure.

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KINGSBRIDGE. L, M.
p*^
Ratlier faster titan medium. Anonymous

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?S3 ^&
1. Shall man, O God of light and life, For-ev - moulder in
er the grave ? Canst thou forget thy glo - rious work, Thy promise, and thy power to save ?

2. In those dark, si - lent realms of night Shall peace and hope no more a - rise ? No fu - ture morning light the tomb, Nor day - star gild the darksome skies ?

3
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Milium. \K\V HAVEN. L.M. 35
Boll. O Coro, HE /' N (lr. Kll.ii il.
\ . . I .

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B, He guides oar feet, he guards our way ; His morning smiles adorn the day ; B spreads the ei '..v. !!; i - lent hours while N - rael sli

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(iiild fal niul Stnccato TILSIT. L. 31. V. C. 1.

Tim- my My name is Dwell my own

^
1. saith the liiu'h an lf r. "I i np <m ho ly throne; God, I <l well on high, in e - ter - ni - tv."

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1 ( (real shep
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36 PORTLAND. L. M. MEINEKE,

^S
Choral. C. Baltimore.

P^^^pE^EEgE|E^E^ppEEgEgEgg SEE
P
1. He reigns! the Lord, the Saviour reigns Sing to his name in lof - ty strains; Let all the earth in songs re - joice,
! And in his praise ex - alt their voice.
2. Deep are his counsels, and unknown But grace and truth support his throne. Though gloomy clouds his way surround,
; : Jus - tice is their e - ter - nal ground.
3. In robes of judgment, lo he comes, Shakes the wide earth, and cleaves the tombs ; Before him burns de - vouring fire
! The mountains melt the seas re - tire.

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See gen - tie patience smile on pain; See dy - ing hope re-vive again: Hope wipes the tear from sorrow's eye, While faith points upward to the sky.

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all,
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with b it
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A.U things are Bub-ject


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I. With, all my powers of heart and tongue, Til prai d iker in my aong; Ai 11 hear the notes 1 i

". To Ood 1 cried, when troubles rose ; Heni b dued By :

4. rilling thy truth and mercy, Lord; I'll ^ing thi rs of thy word ; Not all the u

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SLUMBER.

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38 M i-iillc. In medium time and < >.(>n sii < .
L. M. V. C. T.

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( 1. A - sleep in Je - sus blessed sleep, From which none ev - er wake to weep:


i

A calm and un - dis-turbed re - pose, Un-bro-ken by the last of foes.


3. A - sleep in Je - sus ! peaceful rest, Whose waking is su premely blest - No fear, no woe, shall dim that hour, That man-i-fests the Saviour's power.
4. A - sleep in Je-sus! O, for me May such a bliss -ful ref-uge be; Se-cure-ly shall my ash - es lie, And wait the summons from on nigh.

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Rather slowly, and the B*(hs very short REPOSE, L. M. I. B. "IVOODBTJRY,

m . <=-- ---__ mp m f*
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By permission.

I lay my bod - y down to sleep, Peace is the pil


nil - low of my head, While well - ap - pointed an - gels keep Their watchful guard a - round - my bed.

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Easy anil flonin; style. ROXBURY. L. M. V. C. T.


m

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Soli. fl
covo.

i^iiiaisp? r -
-^T^-f^fxtr
1. Thou great In - structor, lest I stray, Oh teach my err - ing feet thy way! Thy truth, with ev er fresh de
- - light, Shall guide my doubtful steps a right.
'J. How oft my heart's af-fec-tions yield, And wander o'er the world's wide field ! My ro-ving passions, Lord, re - claim ; U - nitc them all to fear thy name.
3. Then, to my God, my heart and tongue, With all their powers, shall raise the song; On earth thy glo-ries I'll de - clare, Till heaven th' immortal notes shall hear.

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II I L LI.AH. L. M. Duulilf. * 39

1. l'.ir from my thought", vain world, bc-gone; Let my re - li-gious hoi < ; Fain would my eyea my Saviour I wait a \ .1

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!
s * * * * BE I f*
-
* 1

f=f^ *=^r

ES
2, i>li! warm my heart with ho - ly
a
fire, And kin-die there a pure de
1
p |p g-p-^
3pi - rit,
*

from
*

n
*

bo 1 fill my boo! v
i- n ii

plUSP^ls v,,: .
-
ra^s^f-
< Ol II.
E giU Sp '

ml
i'

/
fcz= s
s a
K- S>_ j_l y^F^ jgpg: ^
A-s*- I
^ ' irk'.\-:.
/^V J J

" ~
40 Medium timet MEDINA. L. M. Double, Not an original melody.

IffiE
1.

3. Ei'o
=tz

sin was born, or


' SlZZW.

Sa - tan fell, He
6>

led the host of


3333=3=:
m
Before the heavens were spread a - broad, From ev-er - last - itig -was the Word With God he
morn - ine stars : His gen - e
tt
;

-
i
was
ra
the Word was God
- tion who can
==5:

tell,
! And must
5:

di
Or count the num
-
#=^cfi^:5-
vine
3
- ly
- bcr
bo a
of
-

his
dored.
years?

w
>f-:zz
: sfegfeiS SUM ^^^M^^^MM^t^^^
^3
ZBr^ZjZ? ^:^gE^^^^p;p^^^^E^i|Ep^Eg a It

^ 1 1 1
sqPr p=jE=
J L
:z:#
1
J

1
, J
-i-
P- J

f
j

g-b
i

2.
4.
By
But
fefe3c=c
his
lo,
own power were all things
he leaves those heavenly forms
mad e ;

:
fttt
By lum sup-port ed, aU things stand ;
-

The Word descends and dwells in clay,


He is the whole ere - a - tion's head, And an - gala fly
""

nt
That he may con - verse hold with worms, Dressed in such feeble
1"

: znzzffr
Ps=
his
flesh as
com -

they.
H
mnnd.

:C3!ci:
2 I'^s'tqzz:

fs^P33 '.
loll
04
Coro. f

i3

_J_ J J
1

J"
J
pn - J
-J-
-
J M
J -i t_L L_i_-_zl- Ji-aj-D Jr-
E=a:
1
,

nrr=
'
I 1 I I I
lowly, l(r vrt-cntlnl nu<I thoughtful. BOAUDON. L. M. V. C. T. 4t

HHg
1.

%,
Fa

Lord .in
tlxT,
ik-
n -

"ur daj
-|*
ilorcil in
lv
W"rM<
wants thy
Hi iH
a l">vi>
hn;
!
I
Tliv
Pot
rio-fiow BUM b*
give (he iioj which
.1-
ha]
we
Mr
lowed
for
kilt ;
sake:
i
Toy
to
j
tbj
Jr-fiU
tdlUr-dom OOflM
oon dm
M 'H
in
rioo
tnilli anl
lot at -K n
l"\v
.
; An
At
*

M
;

I. nil.

;
hi

low
1
"><'i>
W 311
ol
- l

obm
y iliv

|-"
*
tuko
ill.

m
B, B m!
-
'

cv orv hour; "Tliv kiii<I [><> - ti tioii \r> im plmv, Tliiiu' i- the kingdom, thilM 1 1 - poTO, The (fa> TJ ll I"
t..r i.,-.r.

. 3 1 j. i'

i
- .j J
i
i


i i

J- J
i
"*"
.
i
-ir
1

-
j j. j j
.ii.
j -j- j j
,

jj
w
.
, _
n j
.
,

n
f)
_
j

M< llunv time. ST. PAUL'S. L, M,


Much mnrf
ini, that Ii
nwlnriv It hcr gttea iho
Ibaad laothtf knutfvnnau.
M
Dr. ORKKNBi

l. Where
i -\\:\\\ we
~\\>r\- shall ii>
ir-i Mk and
to seek
t" ami timl
find A\ nab
liah i
i - ta
la - ti"ii
lion for OUT
(br our Qod
<;"! I! A dwelling
A. dwelling* for tli' .> trr nalraind,
th'-tr A n-.'.iv* ill" *c>n
- wxl rain-i. llrli ana
sons of flesh M--"!'I
nivT blood
i. Tin- Qod Ja-eobch
<!" the lull < >f Zi on for hit ancient \ml Zi -on ii dwelling atill
hi* Hit church ii niih !.
:

i. Han will I fix my graeioas throne, And reign t'"r ti -


er taith tho Lord Hero shall my power and lore bo known. And bleating* shall atteod mj wonL
r .
I- o
-^r-a^-f^h^zhqv- tS I
J. J
#
I'i'mln;' nn Imh

HUSS.: '
rrTtrnYr-fQ
3 3J i_JLJ3JLiS ^. i

Lfci
f

SURREY. L, M. Re-arrangcd from Costellow.


Medium

!^5^^
time.

JU -Nor
tress- ^01
t rP = s sin
sin, nor death shall reach the place; No groan
min
shall min - gle

No more - tigue, no more dis -

g
1. fa

5E^E:
5ipili=3di=
-^ <
=S=
=^=5 ^=5= :
mf
?
mf
=E3
s=ee gmyi= i r

i i

J_1_JJ
i r
T
J
^-rfttZ*-
:^E==EE 1
ii3 ^^^^^^^^^
songs, Which war ble from - im - mor - tal
=^
tongues, Which war
SIH^^^S
- - ble from im -
mor -
tal tongues.

with the

^5^3: 335E
r=H: jEfe^^EE^il
^i=?- 3T v 1 -& Dim.

L-JUJ^U-tJ
-r^isiz!-* i ^ 1

- r ^ r
JSLS
V
It .ih. i
Itowlj | Willi .11.; nil)
HEMANS. L. M. 43
Kg JHJ.JJ ^IrTTO # *
S3 j-;Ti ; u ;r; * 'lie
1 M\ Qod, my King, thy
va-rious praise Shall fill the rem-nant of m\ days; Thy grace employ mj hnm-bl .
the nog.
2 The m irv hour shall bear Some thankful trib- ute

to thmeearl And er-ery Bet ting nmahallaee New works of du-ty done t*"i- tl

ih. works with boundless g}o - ry duns, And speak thy maj-es -
ty Tine; Lei or- ery realm with joy proclaim The aound and hoo-or
1 i. <'f ihy name.

log
r. n
^^^^sfc^T ^gljlp^ j

<

Calm .mil serene. HUMILITY. L. M.


*
Efaf
1 Eap pj
differ *
the meek, whose gentle
Wtt=Z
l>rea.st. Clear as the summer's evening
*
ray,
I

Calm
^

as the
*

re-gions of the

blest,
!
En joys on
-
ff
earih cc - les

- tial
"l<
day.

7/J

3 r^^^3^sgs^^iBP^^^^5& fVrsr *
.-[ # *

-J- -J5
i
I .
#j ; - j j - j. - ,- -
J
J- J J
/ #~*
In
>'* t E3E
<*>~mzg FP=^ s^#:
e * 'I"
f r I'
!

44 With iplrit.
Be careful to obeervo the direction. "
cIobc of the tune,
Slow," at the
and keep together in the time
W A V I J A N I) . \l . 1VI .
V. C. T.

ia ztt
Now to
mE& =
the Lord a no - ble
^
song!
r-
I
, - Soli. ,

b
-i
i?er?3 :<?=-
i-

Now to tlie Lord a no - ble song A - wake ! my soul, a - wake, my tongue ; Ho - san - na to th' e - ter - nal name, Ho -

D~ b'o~~g~rTg^ i T~ i~~ r~
r
Soli.

m
I
1
;
l n r ^~a r~1 !
~; I
i '
i

z

J J Soli.

321
-Hr-
.

fl_*..
-is : f-J: 3=C:
Now to the Lord
P
a no - bio song Ho - san - na to th' e - ter - nal name,

JL SL cizz#zij
SlOW. >_
StfC
15=
E = T--
- -Tg- fb^jjEp
^
Coro.
Slow. >

H
P
san -
3
na to
^c

th' o - ter
9=i
- nal name,
~i
zfbatb

And
)

all his
s
boundless lovo pro - claim,
t
And all
EfS 50-
liis boundless
3:
love
pH*
pro - claim.

W^
^4 Z1SL
Cor

fEg
^_Jl_

EfepggEJj
__j 0j.

J*:
.SJow^
=m
VIZTJf-
Slow.
IO\V. |
^-^-FFgb I
J__ Jl
SEE
^EF^FFF^ _. ez S

*= Ill
J^nrghrtto con rcprclvo DEPARTURE. L. M. Double.
T 45
m
V. ( .

Sweet
i
^^febffi^fgjp^f^fe ^
. #
SI I

]. is the scene wh< mi I'lin-mui. die, When ho - iy


lv soula
souia rrti to
retmtO mt<
n n.,aji.i
How m.ldly beams ,, ,
* ex-p.nn-

sS^^^HS&k- i^p
the clo - s.ng rye ! IIow gently heave* }. T .

ife^ra -'.
i i
r-r
-2. L - -
C *

P=n s =B= ^H "g~y


******
!J

c
Is - I
' g =* .
'

Bo Cadet a summer cloud a- way. So sinks the gale when storms are o'er So gen-tly ahtrts the eye of d,
j
\ wave a loog the -

E3 ^_z5c_ # -# I
*=*

^^i m^^UM^m m
b
~- 0.
HH I rt*r?\
. -

46 Sot too slow. Close, gliding style. ARNON. L. M. Arranged anew, and harmonized to a
melody by BOST, of Switzerland.

2.
3.
'I r
Come, wea- ry
^zpz^^^pzg^E^jgEL^Ir^
with sin oppressed, Oh come ac - eept the promised rest
souls,

Oppressed with guilt a painful load,
The Sa-viour's gracious call
!

O come and bow be - fore your God ? Di-vine com - passion, might, - y
o

Here mer - cy's boundless o - cean flows, To cleanse your guilt, and heal your woes Here's pardon, life, and endless
:

;
^p^^-^I^^^^S^ - bey,
love,
peace
And
Will
How
cast your
all the pain
rich the gift
gloom-y

!

-
fears a - 'way.
load re - move.
ful
how free the grace !

m 9
=3Bt
'&-
fe#^^fe=|lifer3^r|^i g -0^ -gr s>-

E#E 3ffi^g^^^^feg
3- O
rJ- -i. -j-

lz
J J

&-r
IZZL
J J
1
&--
J

'-'&.
,

EE
J

:<5
-
O0-

p
E3 E f
:?:
j. j-

f=m frrrlr~rft
r ?

^^g f

Medium. In this key better as a Quartette.


Tenor.
FUTURITY. L. M. No. 1. V. C. T.

Bttt
JJd

3^3: <J J J-J EH


j^gdE3=pES-P^=
\ l>
EJjSppi
| |
:
1. E - ter-ni- ty is just at hand, And shall I waste my ebb-ing sand ? And care-less view de - parting day, And throw my inch of time a - way?
2. E - ter-ni- ty ! tre - mendous sound ! To guilt- y souls a dread-ful wound But oh, if Christ and heaven be rarae,
I How
sweet the ac- cents how di - vine 1 1

3. Be this my chief, my on - ly care, My high pur- suit, my ar - dent prayer


An interest in the Saviour's blood, My par- don sealed, and peace with God.
1st Tenor
tenor. ^_ __ ^_ __ a \w\ ^ *n |

i


Alto.

-< _
Crcs r==- m '
Dim Wf =T ==
Me j- j
j y j- j j. j
1"
j
i j
'
j.
j l j j V j Li L. S-fl-.j ft ,j i
T

Mrillum. In tlili U-cy, lng lit Coro FUT l R T


I V. L . M . No. 2.
47
Egg
l. l'lun.- t-.irthl\ s.ii. Initio, l.onl. w- love no bier rest a
"it there's
:i bove; To that our 1<>ii~ - a With eheet fa] hope, and
no more
; I

_'
No more (a - tigui dis-tre nor death shall reach the place; No groans shall min-gle with the songs
tin, Which warble from im -
n
... rode a -hums of r.i ging foes, No cares to break the long re No mid
|

OT t
^
r^^^^p^^^^S.'^l;;!-.
<,..-_-_
_ - -
f.mmm. m ^a_
- I
| +
-* Dim.
1>1... ...
__ _ _
H
iH .\>..\- -\^:\' :'|'^^^^SS:'I ^ #

^
Jij|i p -L r.J ^
S
r :
'''_^
'is - j rjjP ai i
-i 1 > p. i
H 11
! i ^H I f I f f Sli*'
r=f
*EE
1 a i
*

;
*
h
r

M.i. into. With cue rjcy, tint not too fnO. ARCTURUS. L. M. V. < I

3. There ii stream, whose gentle flow


i-< Supplies the d ty- of our God! Life, love, and joy still gliding through And wa-tering our di-vine a bo -

I. Thai sa-cred stream thine holj word, Supports our faith, our fear con trols; Sweet peace thy promises ai ford, A"l give new strength to fiuntii
:>. X.i -on en-joys her Monarch s lore, Se cure a -gainst a threatening hour J Nor can her firm foundation more
Built on bis truth, and armed with power.

>n>f -j-
fe&Jr. ^ > n s n ^ ^: == *> | 5 i* > r* < s
^lj .Ar>J .gH 1 > >

s
I : l -

^=^ #
=J^a^ #### - 1
!

48 Medium tlinr. CUYLER. L, M. Thtm from


Arranged
n Sacred Melody.
for (his work.

From cv - cry stormy wind that blows, From ox-cry swelling tide of woes, There is
SiPlHilSSif*
a calm, a sure re - treatTis found be - neath the mcr
cy seat.

Medium Gentle And flowing


t.el the feeling enter deeply into the musk and
style.
sentiment. LOUVAN. L, M,
V. c. T.
Words by Thomas Moore.

1. There'* nothing bright, a- hove, be low. From flowers that bloom to stars that glow, But
-
in its light my soul can see
se< Some fea-ture of the Do - i - ty

m
2, There's nothing dark, be - low, a - fcove, But in its gloom I trace his love, And meekly wait that mo-mentw hen His touch shall turn all bright a - gain!

||w-
\^
Moderate. Close mid DOWlWlllIll sfjl. H E S H E M

US -IS-
li . I, .

49

" "'' '


'"""V

gllSgSiSigS^SIE
'' ">'_%--'jrojo-lH.,,.'. , ,, ;.,.,
'I'

'.'

'/.j..-iiiaiii
( i. >.
mi 1

">'vS';
7 2 j.
-..;
r-'SM^^S
j E J;jj
j^- ^ "

E =
Pita
* 1' r*
#

IWtak Smoothly, in (well tone. BARQl'ETT. L. H. Ai rnns;. ,1 from ORIATOH \

K5
I . .

cr^-
i;r, ' lt
&d
,; '"'-
'" ''
? #
ring km g with hum- blegrst -i
^^t:>f>_ !
m
- to I
let thy mer-cy tone my tongue, And till my heart with live lv ;

IIP
s
m .^P&3 .
< i . ..

'T
:;-kM* |i

^E^FTg^U*mH%.
:

]
*
1 =
- -'
1 i []*
& faffed
:!;[- i
. JJ'J .."-

T^ FT
3
"
'.

''
' I
5 I'
*
/RJ Meamm time. Smooth and flowing style. MARIETTA. L, M V. C. T.

j^JE^gg^J m %$ezzc jZ I I.
EgppE
1. My dear Re-deerner, and my Lord, I read my du - ty in thy word; But in thy life the law ap - pears Drawn out in liv - ing char - ac - ters.
2. Such was thy truth
and such thy zeal, Such deference to thy Father's will, Such love and meekness so di - vine, I would and make them mine.
transcribe,
4. Be
thou my pattern make me bear More of thy gracious im - age here Then God, the Judge, shall own my name
; A - mong the followers of the Lamb.

53 ^^l^^^^^fefe^i == *~
rn
C'res
rnf

r
' ^
i . n CI
r J n I J. J n -J, j> j-
J]
. J-
i
j
?-
,

^Pi^^ :
p
Ratlin- slowly. BARCELONA. L. M. V. C. T.

wimm^Wj&s. ^"F^-^F^^P
a*~g~^~ ryi :s 22:
I
1. There isa land mine eye hath seen In vis-ions of en - raptured thought, So bright that all which spreads between, Is with its ra - diant glo-ry fraught.
2. A. land upon whose blissful shore There rests no shadow, falls no stain There those who meet shall part no more, And those long part
;
- ed meet a - gain.
3. Its skies are not like earthly skies, With vary - ing hues of shade and light It hath no need of suns to
; rise To dis - si - pate the gloom of night.

^-EO=qrftrTi- -> -
i^i^^feJ^^^iiife:
w "^ > Cres.
ffi
7;i
Cres.
F3E '

:S=5g
-

Dim.
s=?a 3
3ES

-OJ^
With tonlMMH anil pnlhoi, < on ol< m nl tc .} R E M A , L . M
51
ppS^
>
poweranaiove Have mad<
** A '"' !
the mourning J! r^zirt;.
h 2
h ^f J.fee' J

^^
|

"~
? CTHiHc t=r ' I

**? J -*- -
>:<
* 33&^S
' .
^ !'

I HUoili.

Esse V-^
. - r r

I h
* =
SE eg p *-3e??^^ee=p=*?^ icccE == -f= Se ?==

Italli, i f,it.
TALAHASA, L. M.

1. U ,, " ,A " ll
Mnnd ' l, ,, l ''" "
i...,v. i: r i_ i

,""Y '""'V
iheavenheeame.ofheavenhespoke, 1
, :

Tohea
I
When listening
listening thousands
the g . an ,l glad -nees filled the nliee I
Dark clouds of

SPH 3 =93
Li I F^-ttrrtefc
" --
jl^ulj-J-uLA .

T Tr f T h
-
(This tun must be sung by flexible, TWILIGHT. L. M. V. C. T.
52 Medium. well-disciplined voices.)

, Ho. ,weet a, fa. of M, <Uy. Wb {Ul -J* ^^S^lSSK^SSSLiSii 1%|j

^ss^fe ^=3-
=S ^^fe^fe^ii^
,v

^ _N IiEJ-j-^
iqjg- J"H

si
. J! i
. ". h J -1 I"
-T-: j J i J

>->-
I=f
]F
f
"

B-

KNIGHT.
Staccato.
MARTYN. L. M. A. M.
P upjl_ofthe_Editor.
Pupil ofthe_Editor;. I

Medium.
llSSIlIilillll
31111 ^, ^ - ^*- *->- ^- *
^zr..*-.iV
^p^^P^ii
B.. y
*
Crcs.
i i s
^^ J..
- - J-.
J PJiXj: f_J t-ZJ-A-
sH
..fc J-
J-
s=:*
^^^iiiik^iS =tzp
EL El (ill. L. M.

i^rti^Wfr
li
Mixl. r.iCi l) . Kiitootli nml gH<Hm

i
r-irrifft
[. Hot blest the sacred tie, that binds loi munion kindred minds ! li they run. We
j. To each, the irl
Whal tender love! what ho-ly fear! Hoji docs tl .within Re fine from earth, and cl
:: Their son getherflow Por ha nun guilt, and ha-man woe; Their ar-dent pi .t rise, Like min-gling flam
I. To getb-er oft they seek the place Where God re-veals In-* ami-ling bio How high, 1 ' their rapl I
i
un

|^gB m Soil. toro. r


S-WJ 1

U- : Ge n :

fcE=B
^^r^ifW ^^: 1
Willi rrvirrnrc

_'.
A-
iiik! a\\> .

sem-bled ;ii thy great oommand,


Moil, ruto Sil< unto.

'
m ATHOL.
S
L.

We meet, through, distant lands to spread The truth for which the mar-tyrs bled; A long the line, to ei-ther pole,
ir prayers aa-eisi pt our praise, Our hopes re rive, our cour-ege rait els aid, to
M,

Be -fore thy nice, dread King I we stand: The voice that marshalled every Btar

each im- part


3

Has called tl
The thun-der
The sin
of
from
thy praise to
V. O. T.

tb-fttl
-

i
f.ir.

roD.
I'
I. Porta with thy chosen her - aids come ; Ete call the wandering spir-itB home: Prom Zi-on's mount send fort! rtb a - i
54 Hut lit

Si^feteSS
1.
2. The

m
i' slower than medium,
-a-

There seems a voice in


birds that rise on
ev -eryr gale,
soar - ing
g wing,
A tongue in
Ap -
HZ*:

pear to hymn
ev -
CASINl.

ery open
their Ma -
- ing
fees
flow-er,
ker's praise,

P<
L. M.

Which
And
tells,
all

?=1
O
f
-*~~

Lord, the wondrous tale,


the mingling sounds of spring
9
^^Of thy
To thee,
in -

a gen
diligence, love,
- eral
V. C. T.

pas -

Ritard.
and power.
an raise.

^B--E?-^ :3*;#-
m=
iz^ar
J.
g^ife^
J-
Sgggii
?J J- J-i-
" ^ r^ *- #f p

f#1"^ *? t^~ rfr *3?*-r*- t- r*?
yr FT3 PP^P f3
I

y~ar

gjgggg i
"I fT

r
gr FI
3

Medium. MONDAY. L. M. X-

i^EL^i^^^s^BE^pSi
Behold, the blind their sight receive Behold, the dead awake and live The
;
V-sr-

;
r-i 1
iH^-iV
E Eg
dumb speak wonders, and the lame Leap like a hart and bless his name, Leap like a hart and bless his name
z?z?z
1
uss:

m Soli *-
So,i
^ Coro
or
ff
"

3 N *L 'f

K K

fzt
tt= 'S~~
nzE I
I

&- - I!

#
uli, i

'"
fnnlrr lliau iiickIIuiii. 1 . -,i . . , . MOHAN, L, H, Stogie or double

I*;:|*:|^Ki;L
! Iv.
Arrtocetl, with a.l

i g
MCMl \\. 55

|..d
1
J S5L ?';," ., *!,.;

1SeL: :

rv
,-
.
'" " i: "k - '
"
~v.ii ,,...,.

,,.n,., ,. ,,
"" "
I--|.-i:|'':!--
mic muruiug xorcu
,
mm
';;>.;.

>>" C.iro.m * ^
J I"'
I,
I.
ZI__
-I -I- -Tsrr-r>Ar_ . ^ r- ..- . , ^ - , ^ jf .

Cl
*'l
isi iimi
1st iiml ;,l
;,i Base*.
llus.-.. i^,l s i
i * ^~

s V.Tl.-Smjth.Sthvi.n.of.hi.
N'iitk. flini IhaSlh vnriorihi( hv.nn
hvmn [11Q r.n,l,
Pliurirh P...I
11!) Cfauefa n, Iv i. ,,.,,
,,;..,Vr ,i.
With ,>..
(fa*
ti 4th.
3d. i.i. ._,-.,. ^.v.i.^n
Ud 5Ul Of 1 , .. .... > -'
56 KaUicr slowly. ITALIA. L. M. (Quartette.)

^gS^^i^lig^fe^g^fegp^
Tenors.
-fc

1.
..'

There seems a
.

voice in
^fet
ev ery gale,
- A tongue
Ap
in ev - ery opening flower, Which
pear to hymn their Maker's praise, And
tells, O Lord, the wondrous tale
g.
*< <

Of thy in - dul - gence, love, and power.


the mingling sounds of spring To thee a gen - eral pa? - an

lw
2. The birds that rise on soar - ing wing, - all raise.
/Ts < <
s B
. .

&s3
^r ^=5 =F ff :*

m r Cres. Ritard. f
J
< <

&m Or- ,

TO-rG ;ii
SE
^OJ"
aggg^fe^^gpg^a ft

< <
pi
^ =
r. i

m- 7p|
^-r-
>
"
I

J.* I * P r-
f

v_
1-8

i
< <
This tune requires high anil flexible Tenor and Treble voices. Its true character will not be discovered, if sung mechanically, and devoid of expression.

With thoughtfulness. SOLITUDE. L.M. (Quartette.) V. C. T.

^
(Do not change the key.) (Written at midnight.)


efc
1. 'Tis midnight; and, on
3 5^5
n
g 6>~ s:t
Ol-ive's brow, The star is dimmed that lately shone ; 'Tis midnight; in the gar -den, now, The suffering Sa - viour prays a - lone.
^_!_?:
I
-fg I-
5p
2. 'Tis midnight; and, from all re -moved, The Saviour wrestles lone, with fears E'en that dis - ci - pie, whom he loved, Heeds not his Mas-ter's grief and tears.
;

3. 'Tis midnight ; and, for oth - er's guilt, The man of sorrows weeps in blood ; Yet he that hath in an - guish knelt, Is not for - sa - ken by his God.
# rrs #
113
ffi^ezn*
Solo. o 1
< ^ o T^ ffi S is:
mf . Dim. - -
dp
3
Slow.
1

pgp^g^^ jSL gSJ^^g^^g^iPI^


/^
Staccato. -
-U- ii.
*f Et -^-- ^= -^ = 3 =Sft 3?e: 3B 5ii= j&
: z :

To other than the words


p
set, sing
f^f 1

T^ *I=SZZS
the small notes in these measures of the Alto and Treble.
# - .

Medium. Smoothly In hwi-II lojir. BANJO CO URN. I,. M.


57
gpppf -
m~^<\

e
1
* bnghtm ,te in light onr

-f===n=rr s '<
> I -F -l-T-l- =F =F -I r ^i . i r n . h i s
515'
7///'
5 t
-<2>

"*=
~=r son.*-* *

fePPjg I > ^
^.
'*':'

,->; ^ .^LjJU^i,:. jTJ JJ J
5
],JQ-p
*..
-_ ^
7 J ^ =
A
-^-[-~
\
=-
< nilc, lit n coiini'itid, iloMin:;
l> I. >oi (o<> Mow.
. SI LOAM. L. M. From "Man
< JT. \\
Cod
BBBi
" Ur i-Tmiwon.
&
'
= _ ^M'^lpi * o S
* '.U/-lv>|[i
o p. ii to onr vi.-w. ,
d| Life.love.an
.

ppj state.
'- '

res the poor m their diatn

llPiS ^-^SSi a
=f=f
*
^3" _- ///' ,___- T w ;/, - = i;,i .,.i.

-;['-S mVs.Y'A
==!= a r
r.== *i -
P"~
58 Choral. Slow nnd dignified.
ALDEBARAN. L. M. V. C. T.

S
From morning dawn
jEJ gg^EE^
evening close, On O

M
Lord, our hopes re pose
E
To thy
mB great name, with joy, we'll raise
Sli Tri
;r=^
umphant songs
5 f=

m
3. to thee, - : - of grateful praise.

3E
m
P^iSi^p^ (Melody dispersed.)
dat
L
^f *-j| *-0 *
S 7i- 2=2=
(Melody dispersed.)

=Sh
m. a^i J J J. '
, j 1 j

|ee^=k
r
PORTUGAL. L. M. THORLEV,

M^m&^m^s^mm^i
Medinni lime. .) T.

|
( ),could I soar to worlds a - bove The blest a peace and love, How gladly would I
- bode of mount and fly,
-f-f-f
-l^-K*-^- -k- r kk
On angel's wings, to joys on high.]
^ir^P S * 3

1. Up to the fields where an - gels lie, And liv - ing gen - tly roll, Fain would my thoughts as - cend on
wa - ters high, But sin hangs hea - vy on my soul.
2. Oh might I once mount up and see Theglo-ries of th'e-ter-nal skies! How vain a thing this world would be! How empty all its fleeting joys!
3. Great All in All e - ter - nal King
! ! Let me but view thy love - ly face, And all my powers shall bow and sing Thine endless grandeur, and thy grace.

mf ^ '

Soli. Coro. *

ggp^iigill * G -r-

J*
^5 sees g^ga^n
J" J- J*

-f-H J i
J ^tO-;

Hlowly, Willi mn J <-!). OLD HUNDRED. L. M. Attributed to
(icrnmn
LB
C Itnrttl.
1 IN l.tTMKH. 59
. i
< EBr2*S
I'
! i; thou, Godl il -
ed Inu'li . And aa glo-ry fills the sky,
thy So let it oa earth dispJ
be thoo art here, aa I

i \. in Hon- round the earth, re jatce Be bra the Lord, your sovereign king Berve him with choeiful heart and voice, With all your tongues his glory sing.

ft I

^
I

.
. '- . .
P ,
|P
s 3
//(
< II-..

l:> A. 0\m ^gEjEgEg =3Trn3fc [. ,|.]|

( y
Mimic, OLD III \I>KKI>.
=ta SE
i i
f=f-
T
THE UPAS TREE."
j i .1

*EE
*
1 i

Temperance Ode.
- +- fc^
EfS

s
Words by Mrs. L.
j .;

il.

BIOOI
1

km
.

^
.

.
I'

l. Then sprang a tree of dead name, lv [tapoiso lew, Scor earth, like lava-flame, And er-ery plant of mer
_'.
Prom clime to clime in branch es spread - 1 Ik ir loar-ful fruite of iin and woe,
The prince of darkn hade, And to sow. :

:i. Faith poored her prayer at mid - night hoar, The hand of z-ul atnoondaj wrought, And ar-mor of ce - lea tial power The children of the Croat besought
4. Be -hold! the axe ita pride shall wound, Through il ughs the annbeama shine, [ta blast-ed blossoms etrew the ground, Give glory
:< And still Je h" vah'a aid im-plore,
-
From isle to
a; From peo-pled earth'a re - mo-teat anore, I i root that dead -ly [T-paaTi

M.iliiiri in. i. . ( h. ml. ml. NEEDH A.M. L, M. !Vot Klrlrlly <n um .1.

++
Is?
; ; ;
^lf =f%^%=*=%^fi^
We
*
j=t
Trtt
t
the Lord
Pmg-:T:*hli
We've n.i a hi- ding ci - ty here; seek a land be - yond our eight Zi on ha name i- It shines with ev - er - las - ting light

V
I, ; I

\
SV: S
5 ^
5
v'|:'|..l'
0-
^ r r r w ^ r- r i

Oh poaco and


Where Had Id and rest
I sweet a-bode of lore, pilgrima freed from toil, are blest I I the pin-ions of a dove, fly t.. ihcc, l>e at
#
jgp I f g-fi * r ~?T~ -a I- r* b r-p
* 0* + g 1 U 1
J > .
*-
SUNDERLAND. L. M.
60 Allegretto. tVitli majesty.

f^t^hT^^
P f-
*~
S=
' K
?tfE=e
:
-n r '

- vah thee
I my s^ngth
my
I claim ; My
In
rocj
thee
my
E
forces, where I
trust- n
Se? 3ES
fly ; ^ grease
~~0

.*., a^ays
S g.
im - part The strength that cheers lading he. rt 1
shaU pluck me thence.
2 Mv God '
thy names of grace _ hell

gracious Lord, nasi nearu my uira , ^-= j r ./ o


^ ^ , p r

" ^ m/ Cres. - - - Dim. - - -

pqi i d=tAp^f:xz: r*~~gt


-w 1 I I

^ "! '
El

_0Ji-fi-J J-

^E O

13 S |S=gr^lfer^feP
KOSSUTH. L. M. V. C. T.

t"^""^ l= L rrST *-. tt;


w;
ana i
&1o y hines , with beams so bright,
rv s.thine*
tarn the sight
No mor-tal can sus - tain sight.

1. Je - hovah reigns-his throne is high, His robes are and ma- jes-ty
light
guards hia ho - ly law
.
^.^ f His truth and promise seal the grace.
2. His ter - rors keep the world in awe ; His jus - tice ,

ES g^^H^p B'

JT3 fep^i
i 3
~-i-
^feip
mf _
|-
' ^FE
:#

^ti
gg#^ii^l#4i*Wii^^ :zz

f-T^f-
>l.>\\ ; tin- /tin nhort uixl light. EVENING, L. M.
V. I . T. (>l
* * * .nt r e j i :* ;
*
-. |._.|i
1. S .|,x, .,,'..,.-. with em of balm; Fromtofo laadanii v-v.h,
:
:
' '' '>, ".' ''"
j
tie mormurs .
r the field* the I \>\v
And darkness marks the loved retread Where plea
!

Re-ta i

enm.yel - rene, And ondiaturbed > ,.


Aad I

^^^^.! ."l^iipt.Ui

With HinootliiK -. ; Honnr nml it]ircshc. WA1 EN. L. M.


V. ( . I .

my bod -y down to sleep, Peace is the ,,il - low of l,Whilewel] p Theirs

k.LJ'^L>/t.L
g
62 Medium time. BEliNSDOFF. L. M. IIXYTHS.

zjzlJ
1.
2.
[To thee, O
Come, gracious
To us
'
'

the
r
God, with - out de - lay,
o

Will I my morning

Spi - rit, heavenly Dove, "With light and comfort
light
age pay
from a - bove:
of truth dis-play, And make us know and choose thy way
w eIs!
hom - ; For thee I
o
thee I
r

long, for look



Be thou our guardian thou our guide
Plant ho -ly fear in ev - ery heart,
i^^S^^PP So
!
pilgrims seek the cooling
O'er every thought and step pre side.
That we from God may ne'er de - part.
brook.]
-

3. Lead us to ho - li - ness
the road Which we must take to dwell with God Lead us to Christ, the liv - ing way, Nor let us from his pastures stray.

3=
3:E
Abridged from here, and the 4th line added nnew.

5
H
g ^^ggPlg^i^^fe
In cliorol
!
I

style. Modcrato.
,

J-
11 J J
.ill
I J J

NEW HARTFORD,
-J.


J~i , II

L. M.
J
I

J
i
J
I
J o
ii-J-
:z

E
=?:

Ti-
f
V. C. T.
1
S
"

p p- i

^fcL*
::=
i=g?r se
_e_-_Ji!z:
4-
El=g an 3=i:
1. Judge me, Lord, and prove my ways,
O And try my reins, and try my heart: My faith up - on thy promise stays, Nor from thy law my feet de - part,
3. I love thy hab - i - ta-tion, Lord, The temple, where thine honors dwell ; There shall 1 hear thy ho - ly word, And there thy works of won -dor tell.

mr ;;
^^|EF^^^|^|aggg^|^^t^g^^P
^
betsr-
f i

*
f
r fr r


r ?'
r
r rn r
* * :
rf r
<

' j* j j IT~ n r-
^.
j r n ^
-r- -r- r rp-r-^ ri ^-i" - 1
1 ^-^ - ~J -, ~J- r J_^_ _J_J_ r J____
Ml'; l .iiii.il.il. . PARADISE. L. M.

8.

'*

Mfaii rh er pun and bright,
b, the wed ,,!,,,
Thither lei fa vent faith as
N ""' """^ "

""'" bmdat'
:
,, \\
pire,
u itl , n
ith hi.

* A '"' "
I

Our treat ure


Whow
.;
lin . /.I.

"
;.
...I

''""" "
I
,

j
...

<*
M.m '
^
^^
rtrauu make glad the heavenly plains. Where, in

hurled .' Hi- ,


,;,;;,;. ;;

pie amile a
.,tv

of

mid "the
,

-
;

^ Utht The

.ho* The}
ci

iook be" ^dibit^.

Mnjtstlc. A \ GELO. L. M. Altered from < hkktii am

^--^P^- gg * \:?\. H
>-<-<<->-

j
i .,.,jv.,,.v,., :nUL.;;;r; ahX^tsrwctva? &earS

i I'Sp^SEpB^^g .|;-|-M'IM
1 -q n r
j .zp=t i

. ;. if
i

J
rr~*- J.J ^..j)
J J J J
- j - -
ij
s=t ;.
2=tL

f 1 IS=I. l* J L Jl
64
|w,
Medium

1.

4.
5.

My God,
timt.

dE
my
^-?^^^-^^^^^I
3 Efe^E
Let distant times and nations raise The long succes - sion of thy praise; And un-born
HURON.
^T^^
_^V>_
King, thy various praise Shall fill the remnant of my days; Thy grace employ my humble tongue, Till death and glo
a-ges make my song The joy and tri
But who can speak thy wondrous deeds ? Thy greatness all our thoughts exceeds ; Vast and unsearchable thy ways Vast and immor
-
L. M.

!
r s =

umph
-

ry raise

tal be
V. C. T.

of
the
S song,
their tongue,
thy praise

pg^P^i m
tfcifc:
tt
E I

Crcs.
igzas:
^m
gg^s^^m^g
i
P=kFH-M ^tfeP
. ^

ieH l_ __._ ,- _ x-rx


#~ -

^
. *
fcfl*
.

# 1

-p- :' -

r-^T^FF
f=
Z^l^I
r-

STONEFIELD. L. M. .TOHTV STANLY. (Enarland.)

S S-
JS^^fe fe ^^g^p^gE
God of the seas, thine aw - ful voice, Bids all the roll - ing waves re-joice ; And one soft word of thy com-mand, Can sink them si - lent on the sand.

giiFJi^i
m
sh* I
mf
~ I
r -

Soli,
^H^P 1

Cuni.
I 1
<
f-f-
"I T ^ 3 -.] gzpgc?=gSS ^[pgfegfs ES l

fiU. ^LJ. jjj j


*- iT-r
P=+: i r
^fel^ EEffiE
. =
ii..i.i a.i M .i.-t..-.i.

gEgE^^E/
i>.-,i.,m.....i,,.

s s s
^
s
'

1
L

.
li

t
i
E N \

:
|
I

~
^^|/ p / /[-

I , Or sllOll

.
AlllllC

|,^ V. C. I .
65

Through all mil - li'.!.- of t!..

L.S ^
*
i a
" # .
__^|
Jn:iv tii lasi !. I SODg .i i ,-li :11 -
tl't- ... .... ,i. a;,..
sic-, song of

i J
0-
-}
.- ; . ^jE^E ^ E f
s

^^S
i

A* .

\ fe T= ?

Through


all mil - lions <>f the

-^

n u ..a Lh
1RENA. L. M. V. C. T.
UU 3 B___HB
Medium
KeeSS^
time. (Better upon Db.)
#
^|SS y -*>->-*- 3 :*__.
P? '^Jtrjrr
Zi-( 'ii
fefcl
loves to dwell.
T^ntJ^^le^^^
1 (J od in his earuny --mpi- wjo t u ^ -. ,

*J
,
S- -9-
iii -=
__
m
r ^=- m f

-
_X-J
- '

,
r
.L_J_J-
,
s s
,

.U

QUITO. L. M, (The beautiful Air of this tune is supposed to be of English origin )


* uaiuur slowly.
Rather iu">j _

fe L
3| -- J '
-HJ 1
6 <^~ <^ --'- ,,
f^^l^^^^^^^^Q^^m^^Y^^l^'
.

praise ; He likes the tents


, ,
'

11
] ^
God earthly tem-ple lays Foun-da-tion for his heavenly
in his
mercy vUitsevery house That pay their right and morning
vows, But makes a more delightlu ^^** ^ J U
th a glory raise the song. Till death and
glory raise the song.

\
p
3
\;:M,,., lV l^; hvv,, praLshaUnll.^
t

Thv works with boundless glory shine, And


:i

peak thy majesty di - vine ,


Let eyeiy ieaim wunj j i
^ Dm

I &33-p_-f__E &
O O
>> ;==- SoU. >
> >
Y
_.
Coi-o.
""T _ ,-

WL ZZZ o
first published in this country on
,. F nftcrwai on Eb *,
;
; In* the present elevation of the Concert
Filch." il is here given in D.
. . . .

All. ft Tito. S V L I . L \ . < . i

::
^ s
l-l-'l-:.:fj:i^:k vu^- iSS^SiSl,
1. R< On thy AJ-migh-ty Father's breast; The boui

j - x>

2 c f
U1 2* '!,_% 3 -i "I

1 -''"i*'
.-" , m ' .

r-W
" . .
.- .

S E

l~

''
Medium

'
#
naoi tmenti

- /--.!....

'

I
-;*r-
lid. and
e
iliall

BLENDON.

(|ual
for-
up - on
to


1 I
!

How aw

i
i
L. M.
i

Ail
lling
fcra
^-TF'UJriP
| and 'nil
m
1
r.l.YitniM.

in
round

> t t

}..}. A.L.. i pCTjjC


/
Him J.. ;

I-:- :ez# *
.-
J J ;
.....
>H"'r'K
.

' * ' x= * *

I -f^
68 Slowly. AVHli feeling aud simplicity. AUSTIN. L. M.

t
0Z
iEl^^i^SS^fe
I

rt? E i
1. Stretched on the cross, the Saviour dies ; nark Ins
Hark! his ex
!
- pi - ring groans a - rise ! See, from his hands, his feet, his side, Descends the sa - cred, crimson tide.
3. Can I ev this scene of woe,
sur - vey Where mingling grief and mer - cy flow, And yet my heart so hard re - main As not to move with love or pain ?

S
JL .
SSI I
|S
is S
s !
P* J** I
-J- J*
--* J*
* I I I*
0
I* I
S iw / ^>
-9- r 9-&A
'^J&3E
f- T~ ^ t
-%-
JE "

P W
E
i
Slowly; witH e\'ircssion.
HALLOWELL. L. M,
Soli. JS Coro. w S N ^ . Cres.
e
^ii-i
n r r
( r_
E rzrrt
1. How sweet to leave the world a - while, And
seek the presence of our Lord Dear Saviour on thy people smile,
! And come ac - cording to thy
2. From bu - sy scenes we now re - treat, That we may here converse with thee Ah ! Lord, be - hold us at thy feet, Let this the gate of heav -en
3. Chief of ten thousand, now ap- pear, That we by faith may see thy face; Oh! speak, that we thy voice may hear, And let thy presence fill this
S N
J?A
IS fS IS
h
I I I I

JL JLJL
.

m
"
JL JL JL
& c -0- -s e
> 2 :p=? JLZJL
m^ --&E
T -B.
.01 ?~-
It -&
--f~ f~f~F>'
t
Medium. In Cliantant style. KENYON. L. M.
-------
m mf IS f Ores.

1. My thy great Crc -a - tor praise


soul,
r
When
S C E * E
clothed in his ce-les-tial rays,
C Er ^^ ""T
Ho in full ma-jes-ty
C -p-
C
ap- pears,
Y -p J
And like
& u t^i
robe his glo - ry
a
r '

wears,
2. How strange thy works! how great thy skill
;

While cv - ery land thy rich - es fill Thy wisdom round the world we see This spacious earth is full of thee.

h > > N *-
(SJLh JL JL JL
s r* *

^S
i
r
JL JL JL 3l [S JL JL JL
- r*~
'<%?
$
:ziz^zr - m r^ - ^~*~r r ZMt *
pfef!
f^k=5=E
1
I
1 1 .

Mmlrrato.
ANiUliniEDA. L. M. Tu bv used wily n* d Q,uaj
Hinging it imt oji.i luu.l would I u

f ^i
jJE^teE^pEgfcg
' - i' - - - '
.: -

l Bweel I- ice of conscience, heavenly gue -


man-don in my 1 doubts, mj Ind heal the an
-mi ling hope, and joy >, make 3 intdwellii -
part
i) 1.., 1
of hope and peace di rine, Make thou thi art with

''^ fed l rnDl^tei


-'* 1 1 ill J '
1 il : rFHTTt" i 1 1 J l j J I j J I
h

3ia P^JJBJjl, !
gigi
<%
#
D ._i ^ j fl ,

j-r-r-
J
.
Jj
. .
nA .

31111111 ^EiES

E f1 1 *
f
hoini-iik. . Hajeatle. ST. MARK'S. L. .11. 1 ! ( KEY.

i-:j
1
>:irk
,..
nees unci clonda "i"
^
s #ZI2ZI
aw - t'ul shade
ggg^^gsE^
z^zl * !

i
Jus- tioe
' I
* >
gg
and truth his guards are made,
l-S ait.]

1 Be thou 1 al ted, 1 1 1 mj Qod, ive the heavens whi all; Thy power on earth 1 land to land
I thy -

on - -hall raise lor-tal hon-ora to thy namo; A.wa and his praise, Mj tongue the -

8, 1 1: -h o'( c the earth ln> mer cy - r And reach 1


.. . BGs truth to ana I remains, '-

W^- }s. I'

e *

1 "
*
P
I
fit N i
_ pZ=tf *
*
OBERLIN. L. M.
__
Medium.
=t=5=IS=5=G1*
fi^SllIlilll^
^^-^ T - ^t

re vwe

g a,n Hope
a -gain-
s -
wipes the tear from sorrows eye;
While faith points upward to the sky.

pa-tience smile on pain See dymg hope


fc vive
-
?_^___
See gen-tle ; ,

r=r=I=S=: ri=+3^=^F=E

i
& v i
i
r
FARMINGTON. L.M. V. C. T.
Modcrato

IS

Gentle and flowing style.
-^

**- ST*-

Lt =isKnaraB *s&^ *
IIIJLXP- " &
!
icsLp2 :
izzfczzsis,

^
1

; :
ray So sinks the gale wnen storms arc u ci ,
-. 6 ~~ ~, -
^ ~ f^ TIZIZip^lZ

r iiim A D P /" ^ i I

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S^^l
.Mllil niul gentle, . i

\
]
- I

I
eeei a ^S ; e ': i
-
3rl *
1. Where can we hide, or whither fly, I
and nighl
2. Where'er we go, whal e'ei | u ae, Ooi ways ire o pen read, our thoughts explored, Our hi
.'(. I- there, throughout aH worlds lonely wild, where thou art not I The bosl An I
tl i of hell know thou :>ri

l. A-wake, tvsleep, where none intrude, Or midst mul-ti-tade, In ev-eryland, on ,1 with

111
9 O
PS
Soil.
"5" S0 2 Coro.
o * * 9
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.

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Medium.

/*

8. Till, filled
stum,
^ *

<
i

with
Lord,
light,
our
and j
ui
pir-
uij
it
grace
rr~s

re, Thy
mj
i
biuuujue -
TRENTON.

uuiu uij

low, liki
*n
L. M,

re nare we seen
..,,. an I let I
tuv

lu
uune

jahs raise,
si^s Altered from ib English Kelod)

Whil
wn

1
I =?-\m T 4 H* i
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.

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ii
72 Medium
ASHTABULA. L. M. V. C. T.

^l^^i&^^^S^S
time.

^=ir=Bz ti

P^MIP^
Soli.
~i TZS
Tutti.
3*?Ih=^ r
3=5 s
w^ ggHmgjSj - 1e$B #~#~iL 9~

g^^Bpg :d~? :*=t


*Ii

and connected.
IOWA. L. M. V. C. T.
Rather slowly ; close
__^__ ^L

^H Ll LC L KCL _
^^^g^ ^ ^, ^ lSk^ S
1
ff '
. ., ,. .;. i;
,
par - Iv dew.
"l.
2.
MyGod,
Thou
hawend-les9
spread's! the curtains of
is thy love ! Thy gifts are ev
the night, Great Guardian of
- ery
my
eve
sleep
-

-
ning new;
ing hours ;
And
Thy sovereign word le sto ress
g^, q
4
^ J
drow powlra
| [

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Ullltr r.i.l. PUTNAM. L. M. A no ii \ mm... I t

/>'l-.l...
m marn-ing dawn to eve
-
= 'i-i.:.'i j
' 5
M<
ring dose, Lord, oar 1 To tfa Tri-nm-phant aoogi ol

;!
i I J... 1.
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so

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BRISTOL.
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.
T=Z
= *1
l Lord, when
nsz T=
my thoughts delight A. - mid the won-ders of thy lo -
I

ethopei
*
fee -k"l"l'
-t. And bids in - tru-di

m
' Bor-rowflUH tny heart, ;Ungjoy al- lavs the smart; O, may my fu- tore life d I row and the

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tipanlmsnt on pi n. Or the Treble ... cbro-
rustic Interval! inuit bo long Willi care and accuracy to give .! .'iftcl.
74 With pathetic expression. Messa di voce. COLUMBIA, L , M . (responsive.) V. C. T.

fofe
j$tz =||E|gE^^f^|g^p|EggE f
ZL
1. Come, weary souls, with sin oppressed, Oh come accept the promised rest
! The Saviour's gracious call o- bey, And cast your
; gloomy fears a - way.
2. Oppressed with guilt, a painful load, Oh come, and bow before your God Di - vine cornpas-sion, migh - ty love, Will all the
! painful load re -"move
S. Here mercy's boundless ocean flows, To cleanse your guilt, and heal vour woes; Here's pardon, life, and endless peace, How rich the gift! how free the grace.

3d
TT 41
m I
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S CHATHAM. L. M.
i
->_

This tune
r

is adapted
*"

to words
it
, I

Q,uite slow and distinct. (ITn poco Staccato.) suitable for Old Hundred. V. C. T.

1. Be thou, O God! ex -
^^S^^^^g^pgggggg=g;p^^gpgH
alt - ed high; And as thy glo - ry fills the sky, So let it be on earth dis-played, Till thou art here, as there, o-beyed.
BE

3. Thy prai-ses, Lord, I will re-sound To all the listening na - tions round : Thy mercy highest heaven transcends, Thy truth beyond the clouds ex - tends.

= j-l ? I jj^^^^^^^^ fe#^fe ^f^


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NEWBURN. L. H, M tody In pari fniin tin Frrnfh. / ( )
Wl(l> niilinntlon. tfa kUi|Kiiaiau ul lluir at tilt- Harmonized and arroi

W* : I =
rise!
* *, a^
- wv
!

I
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pg
the
i.
Lit
m^s r \ I
sen
I up, my bouI, Ehake off - - - thy f<:ir~, A ii' 1 LTinl the j. I ar March t<>

the faith of j"\ i - - to come W e \sa!k tin- dark as Till


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Which marks at band a ri - sing sun.
i
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Which marks
r
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hand
-.;
n
i

of i - lose joy, Where J< bos, thy great cap - tain's gone, Where Je - thy
.it heaven, our home, Faith i> our guide- and faith our ught, Faith our guide- and faith our

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76 WitU
MANCHESTER. L, M. (fitgata.)
*"*
V. C. T.

^SS E S
spirit.

3 g

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r J* *- -J-
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^^^^^^^m
Vivace. (Keep correct time in the second strain.)
LUZERNE. L. M. (fugata.)

K^ V. C. T.

^^fe every age thy prats -e


fJUfS ieShon-Ss crown ihy head; Let

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M A KULAK I). L. If,
Auf Jin. 1-Jl

l^'|-.[I I*
Sprinklii
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alnm-ber
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mid i!..
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7/;
or Treble.

- ir' mn O
O
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8

sunn Ikii f.i.td Uliii Medium. BEIN. L. M. rirl two mcaiurri Ixm.

... ::

H

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BLANNETT. L. M.
/ O Tranquil.

T2=
raplllllllilli
-*-*
:
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Ran
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,

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FAIR HAVEN, L. M.
V,-
an Medium. Plain style.
sj jT
J
I
P"Fr
I^Hfcii:
ic
^ *"
7^ , ... x j ,.,;n ,,+! lins. Too dark to view with fee - We eensa

l ^v ^-
:
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--- -'2 -.

* v w v Coro.
Soli,
1
or Semi-Coro.
.'

F- -fF -

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Solum } . tliotl^lll fill. rf ll.-rlK r. M I DNIG II T. In M. \ t . T. ?<>

^-|--|-;l"l-'-^ - - r .,. .|.!-[ - |- -|.


?V
[jl
1 1 1 mi Inight ; on
;ui>l ' I he -:.ir is dimmi I that lately sh /lit ;
in
2. Ti- ii ml from all removed, The Saviour wrestles lone with K'cm thai ili- ri -
pie whom he U>\ > I Bee I- nol lii-

l
In lil
;

, that hath in miUIi knelt It

i i nd from e ther plains Is borm ; 1 1 i;i t an - geli ki Unheard by moj the strains Til I

~i..\ . <m

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-
1"

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. .

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/
35
^ 5 c *
The Base of this tunc requires n ileep, nrli \. . tadofverj Ion . mi pass.

Bather slowly : gliding tj i .


OSWEGO. L, M. 1 ill | I In mi

i
J.

:;.

Dear Lord,
Oh let
to thee
thj love,
^f;
would re torn,
1

with sweet con-trol,


.
. i
-

tad
Bind
at thy feet repenting
rionof
mourn
my
:

ml;
i

There
Bid
let
*

-;
me
Hi
view thy par-doning

de
love,
part,
i
#

And nev
AjkI dwell
*

er
i-

m
m
mj
i
!

- -- - zEc
but.
pug '.-I- J..:L J. I
!

m
Boll.
s 15
&;|. ;i- ;i;-:i. ;|.^|.J.I
J

H
J n J

M-vl;':-!.
J IJJ J

'.*
' i3. .
j

'
j j j
so Kill lii T faster than medium.
CALEB. L. M. v. c. fy

i^^Etea^t^ Like morning cense in thine house And let my nightly wor-ship
-^ZZWZ

rise,
FS=?
Sweet
ZiiU}\)
as the eve -
ning sac -
ACT
ri - fice.
1. My God, ac-ceptmy ear -
ly vows, in - ;

f|fe|=^
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4ca=tffl , l i

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3= -p 3^3 s=j ;_ 9
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m -w Soli. Coro.

HS
P* *
J* J_jL L-j ji. i X_ JU
J J J i n J
a
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JEjE
=w w 0$-
izzt
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Witli anlinatioiii
ROTHWELL. L. M. Anonymous.

_
rrj-l i f
fe llgfa*^ i**

jM^
'
,

eyes behold thy word, We read thy name in fair-er lines We read thy name in fair - er lines.
W(
1 The heavens declare thy glory, Lord, In every star thy wis-dom shines But when ourmakes ;

the simple w.se Thy laws are Pre-thy Thy laws are pure thy judgments right.
G?eat Sun of auThteousnels, a rise Oh bless the world with heavenly light Thy gospel
renew, And make thy word my guide to heaven, And make thy word my guide to
- :
I.
!
heaven.
6. Thy noblest wonders here we view, In souls renewed, and sins forgiven :-Lord, cleanse my sins-my soul

mf
W sou.
Soli. tr
"<r Coro. s
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Allegretto. DUlimt. pointed HOLSTEIN, L, .M


SI
V
IS 8 *3
:i. I will not mill vie with the throng, Whose guilt their sorrow mul-ti - |>lir^; I will not name them with r join their bloody
: ;
no-
-^k ri
I'

l i- my pot tion here be low; Tis he, who hallmj lol main -tain: His boun-ty makes my cap o'er -flow, And
5. Thou shall onto my Long-ing eyes The path of play; Where, in thy pi i Whichnei thei

u a

Vnrlnlilc ; adapted to unrili of tile


IIAMIM R(JI1. L. M. I oni i .i 1. 1 . gm i.i ii < limit.
i; mi range sfdum fa First arranged In M.n. I>> M\-l)\. Hoiton.

M
i . -.i I..

B.-.-?. ;>\~Ete$3&^ ^
ff g -
1 '.!'-' I
I'
I. Kingdoms and thro be -long; I
Grown him, ye na your song: His wondroi
tions, in Dors shall en -rich
'-'.
Be rides and thunders through the sky, His name, Je ho-vah sounds on hign Praise him a -
of i^r.i

when
: I

Sod is our shield, our joy, our ri-t; God is our Km:
proclaim him bleat: When terrors riai nations faint, He is I f ev-erj taint

?
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Soli.
H A =9 W h
(Hit can bo well sun;:.) < inn,

vl-:l.;Lfe 9 I
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r':.V^A'^'::\':\''':UY-:/ \'-\'A''\':'X
. j . . . . . .
.
--

' l<
t
82 Ratlin- slowly.
FOLGER. L. M. V. C. T.
m Cres.
: m w/
tiSfc
i

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r*
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h_
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HI
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p
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2
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,


T f?tffrY
kftj
r
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l =
H%Hr-
1. When sins and fears pre - vailing rise, And fainting hope al - most ex-pires, To thee, O Lord, I lift my eyes, To thee I breathe my soul's de - sires.
If my im - mor-tal Saviour lives, Then my im - mor - tal life is sure : His word a firm foun - da - tion gives Here I may build, and rest se - cure.

JI
m.
|

m
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J_-J- J, =j
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m^ -
I
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m ~~
MSU 1
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'0


0~9~ .01

^^fe^p ==
i
Medium. Avoid a heavy, dragging manner. TEMPLE STREET. L. M, (FUGATA.) V. C. T.
^ Soli.
fc
1
.
'
w ^
f*e^
f_ f n s. ^ Co rp. ^ h r
.pN

1. Sal - va - tion is for - ev - cr


SiiHT
nigh The souls who fear and trust the Lord And grace, descending from on high, Fresh hopes of glo - ry shall af - ford.
;

Mer - cy and truth on earth are met, Since Christ, the Lord, came down from heaven By his o - bedience, so complete, Jus - tice is pleased, and peace is given.
;

His righteous - ness is gone be - fore, To give us free ac - cess to God Our wandering feet shall stray no more, But mark his steps, and keep the road.
;

r r>, r- -&-
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rl ft
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Slowly. Tranquil and gentle. BELZONI.
" " " " u L1 x ' L. M.
*-*"*- ' '

fe Dim.
V. C. T.
-----

my

^
Je - sua can make a <ly - ing bed Feel soft as downy pillows are, While on his breast I lean my head, And breathe life out sweet - ly there.

P* I ^ in
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With rrloiiKiieis. Audnntc. INTERMENT. L. M From


II \.M)i:i..
cliutl ni.ir.
QQ
i>
li in "SMU." *

I.

::
I

B
n veil

Je
thj
pain, nor
ma
bo
grie/,
torn,
not
sleptGod's dy