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PEER PRESSURE

Author(s): Antoni Calv-Armengol and Matthew O. Jackson Source: Journal of the European Economic
Association, Vol. 8, No. 1 (March 2010), pp. 62- 89 Published by: Oxford University Press Stable URL:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/40601214 Accessed: 29-08-2017 06:02 UTC

Abstract We present a model where agents care about their neighbors' actions and can pressure them
to take certain actions. Exerting pressure is costly for the exerting agent and it can impact the pressured
agents by either lowering the cost of taking the action (which we call "positive pressure") or else by
raising the cost of not taking the action (which we call "negative pressure"). We show that when actions
are strategic complements, agents with lower costs for taking an action pressure agents with higher
costs, and that positive pressure can improve societal welfare. More generally, we detail who gains and
who loses from peer pressure, and identify some circumstances under which pressure results in fully
(Pareto) optimal outcomes as well as circumstances where it does not. We also point out differences
between positive and negative pressure. (JEL: 13, D62, C72, D

Conformity to Peer Pressure in Preschool Children

Author(s): Daniel B. M. Haun and Michael Tomasello Source: Child Development, Vol. 82, No. 6
(NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011), pp. 1759-1767 Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research
in Child Development Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41289880 Accessed: 29-08-2017 06:05
UTC

Both adults and adolescents often conform their behavior and opinions to peer groups, even when they
them- selves know better. The current study investigated this phenomenon in 24 groups of 4 children
between 4;2 and 4;9 years of age. Children often made their judgments conform to those of 3 peers,
who had made obvi- ously erroneous but unanimous public judgments right before them. A follow-up
study with 18 groups of 4 children between 4;0 and 4;6 years of age revealed that children did not
change their "real" judgment of the situation, but only their public expression of it. Preschool children
are subject to peer pressure, indicating sen- sitivity to peers as a primary social reference group already
during the preschool years

Peer Group Pressure within and outside School

Author(s): Cedric Cullingford and Jenny Morrison Source: British Educational Research Journal, Vol. 23,
No. 1 (Feb., 1997), pp. 61-80 Published by: Wiley on behalf of BERA Stable URL:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/1501523 Accessed: 29-08-2017 06:07 UTC
Peer Group Pressure Within and Outside School CEDRIC CULLINGFORD & JENNY MORRISON, University
of Huddersfield ABSTRACT This paper is based on an empirical study of a sample of 25 young people
who have all had the experience of being excluded from school (and who are all young offenders). The
research was based on qualitative explorations and memories of the subjects' overall experience of
school, through lengthy semi-structured interviews. These interviews were designed to elicit
information in an open way through the encourage- ment to talk confidentially and anonymously. There
were no pre-set hypotheses, so that the consistency of the responses, including the terminology used, is
significant. Amongst others, four main themes emerged; the experience of bullying; the significance of
home life and its relation to school; the pressure of peers; and the relationship between truancy and
exclusion. It is the issue of peer group pressure in particular that will be explored here. As the case-
studies reveal, the relationship between peer pressure and deviancy is a complex one. It did, however,
emerge from the analysis that the peers are a powerful influence on the behaviour of adolescents,
although in some ways these are unexpected. The paper explores the way in which peer group pressure
relates to the counter influences of home and school

Effects of Peer Pressure on Disruptive Behavior of Behaviorally Disordered Classmates

Author(s): Allen G. Sandler, Leslie B. Arnold, Robert A. Gable and Phillip S. Strain Source: Behavioral
Disorders, Vol. 12, No. 2 (February 1987), pp. 104-110 Published by: Council for Exceptional Children
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23882309 Accessed: 29-08-2017 06:09 UTC

Effects of Peer Pressure on Disruptive Behavior of Behaviorally Disordered Classmates Allen G. Sandler,
Leslie B. Arnold, Robert A. Gable, and Phillip S. Strain ABSTRACT The effect of a peer confrontation
procedure on the disruptive classroom behavior of three behaviorally disordered classmates was
evaluated. Immediately following each episode of disruptive behavior, the classroom teacher prompted
the target student's peers to (a) label the target behavior, (b) indicate why the behavior was
unacceptable, and (c) suggest an alternative appropriate behavior. The results suggest that peer
confrontation may be an effective procedure for decreasing inappropriate classroom conduct of children
with behavior

Peer Education:

The Unauthorised Version Author(s): Jo Frankham Source: British Educational Research Journal, Vol. 24,
No. 2 (Apr., 1998), pp. 179-193 Published by: Wiley on behalf of BERA Stable URL:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/1501773 Accessed: 29-08-2017 06:13 UTC

Peer Education: the unauthorised version JO FRANKHAM, Centre for Applied Research in Education,
University of East Anglia ABSTRACT Peer education-where people are equipped to educate their
contempo- raries-is an increasingly popular strategy amongst providers of personal and health
education in the UK, especially amongst those who work with teenagers and young adults. This article
takes an irreverent look at the premises on which peer education has been founded and considers
whether the approach is the panacea that so many claim.

Quality of ParentChild Relationship, Family Conflict, Peer Pressure, and Drinking Behaviors of
Adolescents in an Asian Context:

The Case of Singapore Author(s): Hyekyung Choo and Daniel Shek Source: Social Indicators Research,
Vol. 110, No. 3 (2013), pp. 1141-1157 Published by: Springer Stable URL:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/24719096 Accessed: 29-08-2017 06:17 UTC

Quality of Parent-Child Relationship, Family Conflict, Peer Pressure, and Drinking Behaviors of
Adolescents in an Asian Context: The Case of Singapore Hyekyung Choo Daniel Shek AcceDted: 5
December 2011 /Published online: 17 December 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011
Abstract Analyzing data from a probability sample representative of secondary school students in
Singapore (N = 1,599), this study examined the independent impact between the quality of mother-child
relationship, the quality of father-child relationship and family conflict on the frequency of drinking and
drunkenness, and whether each dyadic parent child relationship quality and family conflict moderate
the effect of direct peer pressure on the frequency of drinking and drunkenness among Singaporean
adolescents. A series of ordered logit analyses revealed the following results: The quality of father-child
rela tionship had no main effect on either drinking behavior, yet had a moderating effect on the
association between direct peer pressure and drunkenness, with the stronger effect of direct peer
pressure for adolescents on good terms with their fathers than for those on poor terms with their
fathers. Family conflict had a main effect on drunkenness and a moderating effect on the association
between direct peer pressure and the frequency of drinking, with the stronger effect of direct peer
pressure on the frequency of drinking for adolescents experiencing high family conflict than those
experiencing low family conflict. The importance of the father-child relationship quality and family
conflict for adolescents' well-being in Singapore as an Asian context was discussed. Keywords Singapore
Adolescent drinking Father-child relatio