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US 2017025310741 us) United States 2) Patent Application Publication co) Pub. No.: US 2017/0253107 Al CASTIGLIONI et al. (43) Pub, Date: Sep. 7, 2017 (4) THERMAL systeM wir 2) use. RATIO VEST CPC BOOM 12414 2013.01; BOOHT TOS64 131) Rd 1247 (20130. ant (71) Appin: Tela Motor, Ic, Palo A, CA (US) 100828 2013 01 BOON HOMH7T 20130) 2013.01 (72) vemos, Gacome CASTIGLIONE Gram, OU GOs hat 1202 01801) CATUSY Rafacle Ne RUSSO, Samiyvai, CA (US), Joseph MARDALL, Sin France CA (US) Nichols MANCINI Sun lose CA 67) ABSTRACT A thermal system with high aspect ratio vents for a vehicle 21) ‘ The thermal system comprises: at least one FIVAC unit 3 (22) Filed: Man. 3, 2016 first vent with a frst high aspect ratio, the first vent coupled ae {o the HVAC unit and configured to generate a first plane of Publication Classification sir in a passenger compartment ofthe vehicle; and a second (1) meer. vent coupled to the FIVAC anit and configured to generate Boon 134 (2006.01) a second plane of air in the passenger compartment, the B6OH 124 (2005.01), ‘second veal positioned so that the second plane of air oO 1/00 (2006.01) intersects the fist plane of air, Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 1 of 12 US 2017/0253107 Al yy” 106 104 atent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 2 of 12 US 2017/0253107 A1 Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 5 of 12 US 2017/0253107 Al Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 6 of 12 US 2017/0253107 Al Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 7 of 12, US 2017/0253107 Al Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 8 of 12, US 2017/0253107 Al AG.8 Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 9 of 12 US 2017/0253107 Al AG.9 Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 10 of 12 US 2017/0253107 Al Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 11 of 12 US 2017/0253107 Al FG. 11 Patent Application Publication Sep. 7, 2017 Sheet 12 of 12 US 2017/0253107 Al US 2017/0253107 Al ERMAL SY: EM WITH HIGH ASPECT RATIO VENT BACKGROUND 10001) Air supply forthe benefit ofa person is used in a variety of contexts. One such area is the passenger com- partment of a vehicle, where air is typically introduced through one or more vents, For example, sich vents caa be positioned in the instrument panel for use primarily by the font seat occupants, and sometimes also in a second (oF higher) row of seats for other passengers as well. The vents are usually conrolled to regulate the fow of ir entering the ‘cabin, aod the diretion thereof, The vents are connected to the vehicle's heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system so that hoter, colder andor dehumidified «ean be supplied as desire. 10002] Traditional automotive vents have 2 1ow aspect ratio, meaning that thir width is relatively similae to theie height. For example, ciecilaro¢ rectangular vents are com- ‘mon. These vents are generally positioned flush with the surface ofthe instrument panel. However, these point-like ‘outlets are not optimized for distributing the ar overa wider area, which necessitates the use of multiple vents foreach passenger. Also, the appearance of the venls may be unsightly and ean disrupt an otherwise uniform design ofthe instrument panel or other interior surface. SUMMARY, 10003) In frst aspect, a thermal system with high aspost ratio Vents for a Vehicle. The thermal system comprises: at Feast one HVAC uni @ first vent with a fist high aspect ratio, the frst vent coupled tothe FIVAC unit and configured to generate a first plane of arin a passenger compartment of the vehicle; and a Second veat coupled tothe EIVAC unit and ‘configured to generate a second plane of arin the passenger ‘compartment, the second vent positioned so thatthe second plane of air intersoets the first plane of sr. 10003} Implementations can include any or all of the {ollowing features. The second ventas a second high aspect ratio and wherein the first high aspect ratio is different from the second high aspect rao. The second vent includes :nitipte vent outlets, and wherein each ofthe vent outlets is shorter than the first vent. The thermal system further ‘comprises a common duct supplying air from the HVAC Unita first dct leading from the common duct tothe frst vent, a second duet leading from the common dot to the second vent, and a valve in the second duct, The thermal system father comprises a curved duct Jeading t0 the fist Vent, and a vane positioned in the curved duct away from a fine of sight entering the curved duct from the passenger ‘compartment. The thermal system further comprises a duct Jeading tothe first vent, anda step inside the dct that faces toward the passenger compartment. The thermal system further comprises one or more ribs partially covering an ‘opening ofthe second vent, The ist and second vents ae Positioned in an instrument panel ofthe vehicle. The insra- ment panel comprises first structure ona Jong side of the fist vent, and a second structure on an opposite side of the Jong side, wherein an angle between the fst steeture and the fist plane of air is greater than an angle between the second structure and the first plane of air, and wherein the second vent is positioned in the second structure. The frst plane of sir forms a reduced air pressure zone atthe second Sep. 7, 2017 stevetur, and whecein the second vet is positioned so that the second plane of ir feeds into the reduced sie presure ‘one, The second vents poson so that he seco plane Gf air pushes the fist plane of air sway rom the second Strveture. The fist vent and the sooond_ vent have to adjusiment mechanisms visible on the iastrumeat panel Respective openings forthe fst vent and the seeond vent are cxtcotally poral cach oll The ist vet is ‘outed above the second vent {0005} Ina second aspet, a thermal system fora vehicle comprises: atleast one HVAC unis fist means coupled to the HVAC unit for generating first plane of ar with a fist igh xpos ati i's passenger compartment ofthe vehicle: ann second means coopled tothe FTVAC unt for generating fr sccond plane of air wih a second high aspoct ratio inthe passenger compartment, wherein the second plane of air dntercets the fist plane of ai {0006} Implementations can inciede any or all of the following fentares. Tho frst means comprises ist vent aad the second means comprises a second vent, the fst Vent ‘mounted above the second vent in aa instrument panel of the ‘hile, The sccond veot cludes maltinle vent outs td ‘herein each ofthe vet outlets shorter than the first ent The fst vent is oriented so thatthe fist plane Of ai is essentially horizontal, and wherein te sed veat is ated upward so thatthe second plane of ai ater frst plane of aie {0007} Toa thied aspect, a method comprises: proving a supply of si using a HVAC unit ols vehicle: generating fit plane of air ino passenger compartment ofthe vehicle ‘rom the supply of athe fist plane fat having fit high aspect ratio: and generating x second plane of ai into the passenger comparimeat rom the supply of sx the second Plane of ar having a second high aspect rato, wherein the Second plane of ai nterscets the first pane of sie {0008} Izplementons can include the following Feature ‘The method fare comprises contoling a dveton ofthe {int plane ofr inthe pansenger compartment by relating a fow of air of the second plane of i the BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS [0009] FIG. 1 shows a cross section of an example of thermal system, [0010] FIG. 2 shows across section of another example of | thermal system. [O11] _ FIG. 3 shows another cross section ofthe thermal system in FIG. 2 [0012] FIG. 4 shows another view ofthe thermal system in FIG. 2 [0013] FIG, § shows another eross section ofthe thermal system in FIG. 2 [0014] FIG, 6 shows across section of another example of | thermal system. [0015] FIG. 7 shows an example ofthe duct withthe vane tom FIG. 6 [0016] FIG. 8 schematically shows the duct forthe vent of | the thermal system in FIG. 2 [0017] FIG. 9 shows an example of ribs on a vent. [0018] FIG. 10 shows an example ofa step within a duct [0019] FIG. 11 shows a cross section of another example fof a thermal system, 0020] FIG. 12 shows another example of a duct with secondary vent US 2017/0253107 Al DETAILED DESCRIPTION 10021] This document describes examples of systems and techniques for providing a supply of air to condition an ‘occupant space, In some implementations, a system is provided that allows 2 vent to have a high aspect ratio. The system can provide good contol ofthe vertical postion of the planar jet of air also when the vent is mounted in @ rnon-fush position with regard to an instrument pane] or ther structure. This ean be accomplished by a secondary ‘outlet dowastream of the main vent, For example, the secondary outlet can control the main ar jet by feeding a low pressure zone that would otherwise Keep the min jet attached to the instrument panel. As another example, the secondary outlet can push the min jet away from dhe structure, thereby adding momentum to it, in analogy with Iree ar jets eoliding 10022] "Some examples herein refer toa passenger vehicle {or illustration, such vehicle having a front seat with an rumeat panel positioned in froat of ether or both af the first row occupants. Other implementations, however, can be used with vehicles that are not conventional passenger vehicles, or ean be used elsewhere inthe vehicle than in a fist row, such as in a sesond oF higher row of seats 10023] Examples ate mentioned herein where a vent gen- ‘rales «plane of air into the passenger compartment. Planes ‘of ar can be generated by vents that have high aspect ratios, such as a lange width and a narrow height. Vents with high aspect ratios generate sir streams that have special hid ‘dynamic behavior. In general, the core of a fd jet ean be regarded 2s two dimensional when the aspect ratio of the jet ‘above eight. That is if the vent is more than eight times ‘wider than itis tal, then te airstream produced by the vent ‘ean be considered as « two-dimensional surface in certain regards [0028] The two-dimensional ar jet can behave in paricu- Jar ways relative to nearby structure, some of which may’ not be desirable, This ean oceur when the Vent is not mounted ‘Mosh with the instrument panel, hut rather the instrument pane] has stracture extending forward from the vent along- side the generated jet. I the angle between te jet and such ‘Hructure is leis thin @ particular value (eg. on the onder of (64 degrees) the jet ean tend to bend from influence of the structure and travel along the surface thereof. This is some- times referred to asthe sream sticking to the surface, with the understanding that ar continues to low inside the sream but thatthe stream as a whole as been diverted in another (here undesirable) direction, Generally, seh plane of ait ives rise 10a region where the ar has lower pressure than Jn the immediately surrounding areas. That i, the aspect ratio ofthe air steam influences the angle at which the jet ‘would begin sticking to nearby structure, The term Coanda effect is sometimes used for this phenomenon, 10025] | Moreover, this effect is dgpravated if the structure ‘of the instrument panel that encloses the non-flush vent is not symmetrical on both sides of the vent. Consider a ‘eximple where instrument pane! strcture extends forward along the jet stream on one side thereof (eg., Below the vent) but onthe other side (e-2, above the vent) the stracture does not extend forward tothe same degree, or not tall. This ean resiuce the angle at which the jet stream tends to stick to the ‘instrument panel, AS such, non-symmetric surounding strvctures can complicate the contol ofan air steam from ‘4 non-tish sie veal, Sep. 7, 2017 [0026] As a particular example, ifthe vent in an instru ‘meat panel were to generate a plane of air, but the location fof the vent (eg. in non-lush position) caused such ‘unwanted sticking of the air stream, the ar stream could end ‘up aimed at only one area inside the cabin (e, toward the ‘ccupants" legs) with litle or no opportunity to contra its direction. If the orientation of the non-flish vent were changed to overcome this problem, such as by aiming the vent further upward and away from the interfering surface, then the jet ca end up aime! essentially toward the eciling ofthe vehicle and may therefore stil miss the intended target ‘one, Such an approach can result i veal that at best as ‘binary behavior and does not provide adequate passenger feomfort. [027] Based on the foregoing, the present description ‘exemplifies thermal systems with one or more main vents that have high aspect ratios, For each main veat, there is at Jeast one other, secondary vent oriented so that the plane of air it generates will intersect the plane of air from the high aspect ratio vent, As used herein, a high aspoct ratio refers to a relationship where one dimension ofthe thing (eg, the ‘width of a ven!) is more than eight times greater than a siferent dimension thereof (eg, the height of the vent). For ‘example, a vent has a high aspect ratio when it is capable of producing an ai stream that ean practically be regarded as ‘4 Wvo-dimiensional surface for purposes of analyzing its aid ‘dynamic behavior [0028] That is, iPthe main veot hd a greater ange (such as above 60 degrees) relative tothe instrument panel, or if the aspect ratio were less uch as below six) the sticking srablem could be reduced or eliminated, However, with high Aspect ratios and shallow angles it becomes challenging t0 ‘canto the dreetion of the sie flows, Therefore, the s¥stems and techniques described herein provide contol of sch a jet also when the angle betwaen the outlet and 2 nearby’ strve- ture (eg. he instrument panel) is relatively shallow, such as less than 30 degrees 0029} The secondary vent can, but does not necessarily, have a high aspect ratio, The socondary vent should cover ‘essentially the eatire width of the main vent and be relatively ‘arrow so that the outlet area reaisins small, This ean be accomplished by either a single secondary vent that as @ high aspect ratio, oF by a series of vents spaced across essentially the entire width such that the secondary vent effectively has a high aspect ratio. [0030] FIG. 1 shows a cross section of an example of ‘thermal system 100, The system can be installed in any type of vehicle, such as in a passenger vehicle. For example, the system can be located toward the font of the vehicle. Here, the system includes an HVAC unit 102. Different types of THIVAC units ean be used in various implementations. For ‘example, the operation ofthe HVAC unit is regulated using ‘one or more controls (aot shown) sas to selectively provide heating, ventilation and/or air conditioning 10 vehicle ocew- pan. [031] An instrument panel 104 is here provided in the vehicle the panel facing » passenger eompartment 106, Por ‘example, the passenger compartment has seats (€.2, one or more chairs andor benches) that accommodate occupants. Te instrument panel can provide vent openings for the purpose of endonng te arn he pssenger compar [0032] Here a fist vent 108 and a second vent 110 are provided through the instrament panel. In this example, the US 2017/0253107 Al Vent 108 is regarded as the one that produces a main ai Stream, in form of a plane of air 112, and is therefor Sometimes reared to a the wave vent, The Vent 110, on the fiber hund, is here reganled as the one that produces secondary ai steam, in form of a plane of air 114, and is therefore sometimes refered to as the bleed vent. Ia this ‘example, the wave vent is oriented essentially in a horizontal direction (eg, being horizontal or a few degrees above oF below horizontal) and the blood vent is oriented in an upward direction such tha the second plane of ai intersects the frst plane of ait 10033] The supply of air from one or more HVAC units {eg the unit 102) to the respective vents can be facilitated in any of a number of ways. In some implementations, a ‘common duct 116 originates atthe HIVAC unit and hs one ‘oF more branch points 118. For example, the branch point ‘ean create a wave duct 120 ands bleed duct 122. The wave ‘duct can lead to the wave vent 108, and the bleed duct ean lead to the bleed vent 110 10034) The flow rate can be controlled in one oF more ‘ways. In some implementations, a valve 124 ean be post tioned in the common duct 116, or i the FIVAC unit. Por ‘eximple, this can regulate the overall air flow that is available to be split between the wave duct and the bleed ‘duct. In some implementations, a valve 126 ean be tioned inthe bleed duct 122, This ean be used to contra the ‘amount of flow through the bleed vent, Combinations of these approaches can he used. That is the present example trates the common duct 116 supplying ai fom the HIVAC unit 102 into the dct 120 leading to the wave vent 108, and into the bleed duct 122 leading to the bleed vent 110, 10035] The amounts of air Now through the respective ducts can be set toa varotyof levels relative to each other ‘depending onthe particular implementation andthe situation jn which the system is being used. In some implementations, the flow through the bleod vent can be regulated to control the relative postion and direction of the airstream generated by the wave vent. For example, inereasing the flow trough the bleed vent ean ruse the Wave air stream, and decreasing the flow ean lower the air stream, 10036) That is, the foregoing illustrates an example of the thermal system 100 having de vents 108 and 110. The vent 108 has a high aspect ratio and is coupled tothe HVAC snit 4102 so as to generate the plane of air 112 in the passenger ‘compartment 106. The vent 110 also has high aspect ratio ‘ands coupled to the HVAC unit 102 to generate the plane fof air 114 in the passenger compartment 106, Finally. the vent 110 is positioned so thatthe plane of air 114 intersects the plane of air 12, 10037] The foregoing also illustrates an example of @ ‘method that can be performed in a vehicle. Such a method ‘can include providing a supply of si using the HVAC unit 02. 10038] The method can include peneratng the plane of ait 112 into the passenger compartment 106 from the supply of wherein the plane of air 12 has a high aspect ato. The method can also include generating the plane of air 14 into the passenger compartment 106 from the supply of az, The plane of i I intersects the plane of air 12. [0039] FIG. 2 shows. eros setion of another example of ‘thermal system 200. Some components of the system 100, (FIG. 1) ean also be used in the system 200 and these ‘components will not be described in detail. Here, an instru Sep. 7, 2017 onc 202 is partly shown, the instrament panel foward the ile of the cabin of vchitle 204, An HVAC unit 26 is partly shown. For example, the HVAC tii is configured for resving air trough one or more inland conditioning the sir none or more ways before intodcing iit te Cabin. A panel door 208 relates it flow from the HVAC unit to the insment panel. For came, the door can nso» at meer that con tolled to pivot relative fo an ot ofthe HVAC wn ‘uu th ai spl thereto Able door 210 regultes, the amount of air ow into ables! duct 212 which n um leads toa bleed outlet 214. For example, te bled door an be pivoted roative to the Blocd duct ad the ott of the HVAC unit 0 st allow varying amotmts of at fw int that dt [0040] A wave outlet 216 is here partially shown. The ‘wave outlet ean provide the main air stream fom the instrument panel toward the oceupani(s), and can be fed throvgh a wave duct 218 coupled to the HVAC unit, The ‘wave outlet andthe bleed outlet can both have high aspect ratios. For example, this can allow the wave outlet to be positioned asa non-itsh vent that generates a first plane of sir into the passenger compartment, and the bleed outlet can ‘act as a secondary vent generating a second plane of air that intersects the first plane, [0041] The ducts leading to ether ofthe vents, or both ean have one or more vanes to control a direction ofthe ar flow. Here, the wave outlet 216 has a guide vane 20, In this ‘example, the wave vent is positioned above the bleed vent fon the instrument panel 202. For example, the guide vane 220 controls the left-right direction, wherens the bleed vent an regulate the up-down direction, of the air jet from the ‘wave outlet, The user can change these settings (ele right or up-down directions) using one or more viral controls presented on a touchsereen ia the vehicle. A user input made using such conteol(s) ean then tigger @ contol signal that changes the orientation of the vanes (for left-right iretion) andor a control signal that changes the amount of flow through the bloed outlet 214 (for up-down direction), [0042] The wave outlet 216 and the bleed outlet 214 here each has a high aspeet ratio. While the eatire wave outlet is ‘ot visible de tothe section (which is done for illustrative purposes), the figure shows that the respective vents are ‘essentially paralle! to each other, and thatthe wave veat is longer than the bleed vent, In some implementations, the problem of a planar air stream from a non-flush vent sticking to the instrument panel can be satisfactorily addressed also ‘when the secondary vent (that here generates the bleed stream) i shorter than the main vent. In some implement ‘ions, mtiple bleed vents can be used with one wave vent, or vice versa. In other implementation, the vents can have approximately the same size as each other. For example, the bleed outlet eannot be more than sbout 30% narrower than the wave outlet. [0043] This figure illustrates an exaumple ofa benefit that ean be obtained using high aspect ratio vents: that an instrument panel (or other sueface inside the eabin) can be ‘made witha clean design that is ree of obinisive mechanical features and other primarily functional elements, For ‘example, the vents here presen streamline horizontal open- ings that give a rich different visual impression than the traditional vents that have significantly lower aspect ratios. As such, the vents may have no mechanical adjustme US 2017/0253107 Al mechanisms visible on the instrument panel. Rather, the vents can be regulated using virtual controls [0044] FIG. 3 shows another ross section of the thermal system 200 in FIG. 2, The illustration shows thatthe wave ‘duet 218 can have a relatively fat configuration nearest the ‘wave outlet 216. For example, this can be done © meet packaging constraints, Here, this end of the Wave duct is Somewhat curved, resulting in the vent being oriented essen- Wally in a horizontal direstion, 10045] FIG. 4 shows another view of the thermal system 200 in FIG. 2, Ths illustration shows the wave oullet 216 land the blood outlet 214 somewhat from above 80 a 1 present more of the wave duet 218 ato view. Ia particular, the wave duct here has «voluminous portion 400 nearest the HVAC unit, which portion then Feeds into narrower wave duet 402 that leads to the wave outlet, For example, this ean improve the characteristics ofthe air low into the main vent [0045] _ FIG. 5 shows another eross section of the thermal system 200 in FIG. 2. This illustration shows the wave outlet 216 and the bloed outlet 214 more from the side $0 a8 10 present more of the IIVAC unit 206. In particular, the HVAC Tit can inelude a filter scction S00 that can facilitate String of one oF more ar streams. For example, afresh filer (@.2, a HEPA filter) can be applied to at that is drawn from an inlet of the HVAC unit (eg.. from outside the vehicle) before that air is supplied into the ducts) for the passenger compartment As another example, a recirculation ‘ie iter can be appli to ait thatthe FIVAC system draws Tom the cabin before ce-supplying that ai into the eabia again [0047] FIG. 6 shows a cross section of another example of ‘2 theemal system 600, The system includes an instrument pane] 602, a glove compartment door 64, a vent 606 tat is rnon-flush with regard tothe instrument panel, another vent 608 in the instrament panel. a duct 610 leading to the vent 606, duct 612 leading 10 the vent 608, and a vane 614 in the duct 612 for controlling the ow of air through the vent 606. As such, the vent 606 can receive air supplied from an HVAC unit (aot shown) and as a result generate a frst plane ‘of ae that emanates from the insteumeat panel 602, The veat 608, moreover, can also be supplied with air (eg. from the same FIVAC unit) and can generate a second plane of ar that Jnersects the first plane [0048] FIG. 7 shows an example ofthe duet 610 with the vane 614 from FIG. 6. Here, the vane includes a body 700 (exp, arelatively at member) that is pivotable about at last ‘one point 702. control shaft 704 can he used to set the vane Jina particular direction rltive tothe duet. For example, the ‘contol shaft can be actuated sing a motor that is eontolled directly by a user, or indirectly by the vehicle's contol system. One or more vanes ean be used in the same duct such as side-by-side with eaeh other [0049] The duct 610 is curved. For example, this ean ‘accommodate a particular orientation of the vent relative 10 the instrument panel andlor can secommodate a desirable placement of the rest of the ductwork and the HIVAC unit relative to the vehicle interior As another example, the ‘curvature can facilitate an aesthetic appearance to the vent such that the vane and other functional elements are not ‘immediately visible. For example, Tines-of-sight 706 are here indicated, corresponding to the extrome angles from Which a person ean look into the duct. In some implemen- tons, the curved duct and the vane are arranged so thatthe vane is away from the linesfsaht Sep. 7, 2017 [0050] step 708 is here provided inside the dct 610. For ‘example, this can prevent that liquids, debris or other objects ‘aceideatally fall into the vent and its duet, The step can have ‘any suitable shape and can be formed from the material of the duct, of as a separate pies. [0051] “FIG. ® schematically shows the duct 218 for the Vent 216 of the thermal system in FIG, 2, The duct here includes the voluminous portion 400 and the narrower wave ‘duct 402, The voluminous portion 400 ean be the one placed ‘nearer the HVAC unit ofthese to components, whereas the ‘narrower wave dct 402 can foe air fom inside the portion 4400 toward the vent 216 [0052] As indicated, the interior ofthe voluminous portion 40 js hollow so as o accommexdate a volume of ait. Her, the interior shape of the portion 400 is schematically rep resented by profil ines 800, In particular, profile lines 800A ‘and BOOB indicate the temsverse size and shape ofthe lange duct, and how it feeds into the narrower wave duct 402. prafle line 800C, moreover, indicates the longitudinal size and shape of the larger duct from one end (eg, near the FHIVAC unit tothe other (ew, farthest from the FIVAC unit [0053] FIG, 9 shows. an example of ribs 900 ona vent 902, In some implementations, the vent can he considered the secondary vent in gard to a main vent (not shown), such that the vent 902 i configured to provide a plane of sir that affects he direction and flow of the plane of air generated by the main vent. For example, the vent 902 can be located oa an instrament panel of a vehicle, such as ina position below fad parallel 10, the main vent. The ribs ean prevent that ‘debris or other objects accidentally fll into the vent and its suet. [0054] The secondary vent can have any suitable shape. In some implementations, the secondary vent can include a rmesh-covered opening that extends over part or all of an interior surface in the vehicle [0055] FIG. 10 shows an example ofa step within a duet 1000. Hero, the duct leads to a vent 1002. For example, in ‘an instrument panel where a min vent generates plane of fir, the vent 1002 can serve as a secondary vent that guides the main plane of ait. The inside of the duct is at least partially Hollow and forms @ plenum inward of the vent 1002. The interior shape of the duct is here schematically indicated by a profile line 1004. The hollow interior ean have atleast one step 1006. In some implementations, when items ‘or lguid enter the duct through the ven, the step ean prevent itor them from passing furdier into the thermal system, For ‘example, ifthe items were to pass all the way into the HVAC ‘unit this would require a more complex service procedure ‘The step can have any suitable shape and ean he formed ‘rom the material ofthe duet, oF asa separate piece. In son implementations, the ribs 900 (FIG. 9) are provided on the vent 1002, [0056] FIG. 11 shows a cross section of snother example ‘ofa thermal system 1100, The system includes an instrument ‘panel 1102, a vent 1104 that is non-fush with regand to the Jstrument panel, another veut 1106 inthe instrument pane, duct 1108 leading tothe vent 1104, a duct 1110 leading 10 ‘the Vent 1106, snd 3 common duet L112. valve 1114s here positioned in the duct 1110. As such, the vent 1104 can receive ai sipped from an HVAC unit (aot shows) and as ‘result generate a first plane of air that emanates from the ‘instrument panel 1102, The vent 1106, moreover, ean also be supplied air (eg., ffom the same HVAC unit) and can szenerate a second plane of air that intersects te fst plane US 2017/0253107 Al 10057] In examples above, i has been mentioned that when a high aspect raio vent is non-flush with the instru ‘ment pane it can tend to stick to the surface thereof under certain circumstances. A region 1116, which is here sche- matically illustrated as rectangle, is yenerated by the ai stream. Such a region, which occurs in this implementation and the other examples described herein, can be considered a reduced air pressure zone at or near the instrument panel ‘an can cause the above situation of sticking. The vent 1106, ‘moreover, ean be positioned so that it feeds into this zane of Tower air pressure, This can tend to reduce the sticking of the ‘main ae steam to the surface and therefore ficlitarea more elletve directional control thereof, Accordingly this is one mechanism by which the vent 1106 or corresponding stroc- tures can provide a useful advantage. In a sense, the bleed vent can then be placed before the point where the main jet sreum would atch to the surface of the istrument pas, to prevent or rede the occurrence of this. [0058] Another mechanism by which the vent 1106 can provide a useful advantage is by way of collision between the respective planes of air (eg. from the vents 1104 and 1106), which can allow the secondary eto push the primary toward a desired direction, for example so that it becomes ‘aimed at an occupant, or a particular place on that occu. ppan’s body. In a sense, the bleed vent can then be placed after the point where the main jet stream attaches to the surface of the instrument pane, 1 facilitate a de-ttachment therefeom, [0089] The duct 1110 forthe vent 1106 is here shown as having a separate piece downstream of the valve 1114, For ‘example, this can facilitate substitution ofa dillerent piece to relocate the secondary vent, such as 10 obtain a different instrument panel configuration, for example wit a different ‘ypelmodel of vehicle [0060] FIG. 12 shows another example of doct 1200 with 4 secondary vent 1202. For example, the secondary vent 1200 can serve to guide a plane of sir generated by a main ‘duet in an instrument panel, The secondary veat can do so by generating plane of air that intrsoots with the jet stream from the main veat, The secondary vent 1202 here includes number of vent outlets 1202A. In this example, each individual vent outlets does not have a high aspeet ratio. Rather, the grouping of multiple vent outlets within the secondary vent 1202 effectively gives this venta high aspect ratio, These vent outlets are essentially circular but can have ‘a dilferent shape in another implementation, including but not limited to, square [0061] 1 was mentioned earlier that one or more high aspect ratio vents ean be used in an instrument panel, among ‘ther places ofa vehicle, Moreaver, some examples above (eg, FIG. 2) have illustrated vents directed. primarily toward a right side seat in the first row (which is the passenger seat in certain countries, such as the US). Hows= ‘ever, vents can also or instead be provided for the seat on the ‘oppesite side. In some implementations, a similar or iden= tical set of vents are provided for each seat in te first row. For example, the driver side ean have one min vent with ‘one or more secondary vents, and the passenger side ean, have one main vent with one or more secondary vents. A ‘central interruption between the sets of vents can thea, fsocommodate other strvture in the insimiment panel, including, but sot limited to, 8 touehsereen contr panel. Sep. 7, 2017 [0062] A number of implementations have been deseribed as examples. Nevestheles, other implementations are cov- fered by the following claims. ‘What is claimed is: 1. A thermal system with high aspoct ratio vents for a vehicle the thermal system comprising: atleast one LIVAC uni a fist vent with a first high aspeet ratio, the frst ve ‘coupled to the HVAC unit and configured to generate first plane of air in a passenger compartment of the vehicle and 1 second vent coupled to the HVAC unit and configured to genemte a second plane of air in the passenger ‘compartment, the secotxl vent positioned so that the Second plane of air intersects the first plane ofa. 2. The thermal system of elaim 1, wherein the second veat thas @ second high aspect ratio and wherein the first high aspect ratio is diferent from the second high aspect ratio. 3. The thermal system of claim 1, wherein the second vent ‘includes multiple vent outlets, and wherein each ofthe vent cutlets is shorter than the fist vent 4. The thermal system of elaim 1, further comprising a ‘common duet supplying ae from the FIVAC unit, fist duet leading from the common ductto the fist vent, 2 Second duct leading from the common duct to the second Vest, aad @ valve in the second duct. '. The thermal system of elaim 4, further comprising a ceuved duct leading tothe fist vent, and a vane positioned in the curved duct away from a Tine of sight entering the ceurved duct from the passenger compartment 6. The thermal system of elaim 1, further comprising a ‘duct leading tothe first vent, aad a step inside the det that Toes toward the passenger compariaeal, "7. The thermal system of claim 1, further comprising one ‘or more ribs partially covering an opening of the second '8. The thermal system of claim 1, wherein the first and second vents are positioned in an instrament panel of the vehicle, 9. The thermal system of claim 8, wherein the instrument panel comprises a first structure on a long side ofthe first vent, and a second structure on an oppesite side ofthe long side, wherein an angle between the fist structure and the fist plane of iris greater than an angle between the second structure and the fist plane of air, and wherein the second vent is positioned in the sscond structure. 10, The thermal system of claim 9, wherein the frst plane of air foms a reduced air pressure zone at the second structure, and wherein the second vent is positioned so that the second plane of air feeds into the redueed aie pressure 1. The thermal system of claim 9, wherein the second vent is positioned so thatthe second plane of air pushes the fist plane of air away from the second structure 12. The thermal system of claim 8, wherein the first vent ‘and the second veat have no adjustment mechanisms visible ‘on the instrament panel. 13. The thormal system of claim 1, wherein respective ‘openings forthe frst vent and the second vent ae essentially parallel to each other. 14, The thermal system of clan 1, wherein the first vent js mounted above the second vent. 15, A thermal system for a vehicle, the thermal system comprising US 2017/0253107 Al at least one HVAC un first means coupled tothe HVAC unit for generating first, plane of sir witha firs high aspect ratio ina passenger ‘compartment of the vehicle: and second means coupled to the HVAC unit for generating 9 ‘Sevoad plane of air with a second high aspect ratio in the passenger compartment, wheeein the second plane of air intersects the first plane of air, 16. The thermal system of claim 15, wherein the fist means comprises a fist vent and the second means com- prises second vent, the fist vent mounted above the second ‘ent in an instrument panel ofthe vehicle, 17. The thermal system of elsim 16, wherein the second vent includes multiple vent outlets, and wherein each of the vent outlets is shorter than the first vent 18, The thermal system oF claim 16, wherein the fist vent js oriented so that the fist plane of air is essentially Sep. 7, 2017 the second veat is oriented upward Far intersets the frst plane of i. 19, 4 method comprising providing a supply of sir using an HVAC unit ofa vehicle, generating a fist plane of sir into a passenger compart- ment of the vehicle from the supply of ai, the first plane of sie having a fst high aspect ratio; and generating @ second plane of air into the passenger ‘compartment from the supply of ar, the second plane fof air having a second high aspect ratio, wherein the second plane of air intersects the first plane ofa. 20. The method of elaim 19, futher comprising control- ling a direction of the fist plane of air in the passenger ‘compartment by regulating » ow of sr of the second plane of ain,