You are on page 1of 43

ASEAN Farmers Organizations Support Program (AFOSP)

Medium Term Cooperation Program Phase 2 (MTCP2)

Annual
Report
June 2016 to June 2017

reported by the Consortium


Asian Farmers Association for Sustainable Rural Development (AFA)
La Via Campesina (LVC)
in behalf of various FO partners in asean region
ABOUT ASEAN FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS SUPPORT PROGRAMME (AFOSP)

The ASEAN Farmers Organizations Support Programme (AFOSP) is an EU and IFAD grant funded multi-stakeholder project
that aims to improve the livelihoods and food security situation of smallholder farmers and rural producers in ASEAN
countries. The project will run from 2015 to 2019.

The overall programme goal is for ASEAN FOs to evolve into stable, performing, accountable organisations capable of
providing effective and sustainable services to their members and of influencing policy and corporate processes on
agriculture and food security issues at local, national, ASEAN regional and global levels.

With a total fund of 16 million EUR, AFOSP supports two complementary actions:
i.Support to the Medium Term Cooperation Programme phase II and regional policy dialogue in ASEAN
region MTCP2/ASEAN; and
ii.Farmers Fighting Poverty Food Security Initiatives of Farmers Organisations in a Regional Perspective
programme (FFP/ASEAN)

The two actions share the same objectives and components although the approach and the level of intervention are
different yet complementary.
MTCP-ASEAN operates at the continental, regional and national levels, supporting FOs platforms at regional,
sub-regional and national levels and to create institutional linkages between these platforms and ASEAN
Secretariat
FFP/ASEAN mainly involves local FOs and value chains specialised FOs from the local to the national level. In
fact, one of the main pillars of the FFP is the funding of small organisations and local associations. Such funding
is directly contracted with the local organisations (not via national organisations).
MTCP-ASEAN would primarily focus on those activities that can benefit all members platforms towards
building common agenda for policy dialogue and joint action both for economic and political actions
FFP/ASEAN would tailor its support to the specific needs of individual FOs in terms of organisational strength
and inclusiveness, institutional development, business development (economic services), policy elaboration
and advocacy
A strategic fund of Euro 700,000 is provided to the ASEAN Foundation to facilittate the promotion of policy
dialogues and interactions between farmers organisations and the ASEAN level institutions.
It was officially kicked off on 15 October 2015.
A contractual agreement between AFA&LVC and AF was signed in January 2016 for a period until 31 December
2016. This was because there was a lack of clarity on the exact duration of the AFOSP which would impact on
the fund transfer over the programme period.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 1


Table of Contents
Table of Contents 2
List of Tables 3
List of Figures 3
Acronyms Used 4
Executive Summary 5
Achievement from June 2016 to June 2017 8
Component 1. Institutional Strengthening of FOs and their Networks 8
Cambodia 10
Indonesia 11
Laos 13
Myanmar 15
Philippines 16
Vietnam 18
Component 1 Photos 20
Component 2. FOs Participation in Policy Process 22
Cambodia 23
Indonesia 24
Laos 25
Myanmar 26
Philippines 27
Vietnam 28
Component 2 Photos 29
Component 3. FOs Services and Involvement in Agriculture Development Programmes 30
Cambodia 31
Indonesia 32
Laos 33
Myanmar 34
Philippines 35
Vietnam 36
Component 3 Photos 37
Component 4: Support ot ASEAN Foundation 38
Knowledge Management 38
Monitoring and Evaluation 38
Program Management 39
Regional Activities 39
FInancial Management 40
Photos from the Regional Activities 41

2 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


List of Tables
Table 1. Component 1 activities in Southeast Asia 9
Table 2. Scope of Membership and Operations of FOs per Country 9
Table 3. Percentage of gender and youth participation in component 1 per country 10
Table 4. Number of FOs and their members in Cambodia 10
Table 5. Number of FOs and their members in in Indonesia 13
Table 6. Number of FOs and their members in in Laos 14
Table 7. Number of FOs and their members in Myanmar 16
Table 8. Activities per component, Philippines 16
Table 9. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 1, Philippines 17
Table 10. Number of FOs and their members in the Philippines 17
Table 11. Activities per component, Vietnam 18
Table 12. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 1, Vietnam 18
Table 13. Number of FOs and their Members, Vietnam 19
Table 14. Component 2 performance per country 22
Table 15. Gender and yout participation in component 2 per country 23
Table 16. Percentage of component 3 activities per country 30
Table 17. Gender and youth participation in component 3 per country 31
Table 18. Number of FOs accordting to type 33

List of Figures
Figure 1. Activities per component, Cambodia 10
Figure 2. Youth and Gender Participation in Component 1, Cambodia 11
Figure 3. Activities per component, Indonesia 12
Figure 4. Gender and Youth participation in Component 1, Indonesia 12
Figure 5. Activities per component, Laos 13
Figure 6. Gender and Youth participation in Component 1, Laos 14
Figure 7. Activities per component, Myanmar 15
Figure 8. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 1, Myanmar 15
Figure 9. Youth and Gender Participation in Component 2, Cambodia 23
Figure 10. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 2, Indonesia 24
Figure 11. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 2, Laos 25
Figure 12. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 2, Myanmar 26
Figure 13. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 2, Philippines 27
Figure 14. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 2, Vietnam 28
Figure 15. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 3, Cambodia 31
Figure 16. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 3, Indonesia 32
Figure 17. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 3, Laos 33
Figure 18. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 3, Myanmar 34
Figure 19. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 3, Philippines 35
Figure 20. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 3, Vietnam 36
Figure 21. Funds and Utilization from June 2015 to June 2017 37
Figure 22. Financial Performance per Country from June 2015 to June 2017 37

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 3


Acronyms Used

ACEDAC ASEAN Center for the Development of Agricultural Cooperatives


ADB Asian Development Bank
AF ASEAN Foundation
AFA Asian Farmers Association for Sustainable Rural Development
AFFM Association of Farmers Federation in Myanmar
AFOSP ASEAN Farmers Organisations Support Programme
AMAF ASEAN Ministers of Agriculture and Forestry
ASEAN Association of Southeast Asian Nations
ASWGAC ASEAN Sectoral Working Group on Agricultural Cooperatives
BAFF Bago Aplaya Free Farmers (a member of FFF)
CFAP Cambodia Farmer Association Federation of Agricultural Producers
DILP DOLEs Integrated Livelihood Program - Kabuhayan
DOLE Department of Labor and Employment
DOST Department of Science and Technology
FACT Farmers Advocacy Consultation Tool
FAO Food and Agriculture Organization
FFF Federation of Free Farmers
FNN Farmers and Nature Net
FO Farmers Organization
FU Farmers Union
GA General Assembly
GAFSP Global Agriculture and Food Security Program
ICRAF International Centre for Research on Agro-Forestry
IFAD International Fund for Agricultural Development
IUCN International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
KAMMPIL Katipunan ng Maliliit na Magniniyog sa Pilipinas
KM Knowledge Management
LFN Lao Farmer Network
LURAS Laos Upland Rural Advisory Service
LVC La Via Campesina
MoE Ministry of Environment
MTCP2 Medium Term Cooperation Programme Phase 2
MTR Medium Term Review
NIA National Implementing Agency
NIUGAN Nagkakaisang Ugnayanng Maliliit na Magsasaka at Mangggagawa sa Niyugan
PAKISAMA Pambansang Kilusan ng mga Samahang Magsasaka
PCA Philippine Coconut Authority
PCW Philippine Commission on Women
PDA Provincial Department of Agriculture
PKSK Pambansang Katipunan ng mga Samahan sa Kanayunan
RIA Regional Implementing Agency
SCP Smallholder Commercialization Program
SDC Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation
SRSC Sub-Regional Steering Committee
VNFU Vietnam Farmers Union

4 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Executive Summary

1. The year 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). It
coincides with the 40th year of partnership between EU and ASEAN. This is an auspicious year for the
project as it operates at a celebratory time that specifically commemorates partnership, cooperation and
harmonization.

2. Towards the end of 2016, representatives from government cooperative and related agencies, farmers
organizations, agri agencies and international partners including the International Fund for Agricultural
Development (IFAD) and the European Union (EU) convened during the 6th ASEAN Cooperative Business
Forum (ACBF). The event was led by a Steering Committee headed by the Philippines Cooperative
Development Authority (CDA), where Asian Farmers Association for Sustainable Rural Development (AFA)
and Asian Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Asia (AsiaDHRRA) took an active
role in designing, facilitating and documenting. Plans to conduct the 7th ACBF in 2017 are underway.

3. Major improvement in programme management this year was the implementation of monthly submission
of the Summary of Activities with Gender Disaggregated Data (SAGDD). Despite the delay, three out of six
AFOSP countries were able to submit six SAGDDs from January to June 2017 and the other three were able
to submit up to May 2017 SAGDD.

4. Monthly submission of reports facilitated the updating of the website and other social media accounts of the
programme at the regional and national levels. RIA staff made it a habit to request for details of interesting
stories from the SAGDD. Consequently, NIAs are able to identify the stories for the KM fair early on, giving
them time to further develop the presentation of their good practice.

5. Component 1 still has the largest chunk of the pie across the three components, except for Laos and Vietnam
where component 3 is the highest. Myanmar has the highest component 1 activities among the six countries
in Southeast Asia. Under component 1, FOs were able to strengthen their ranks through expansion,
crafting their strategic direction, enhancing the skills of leaders and members, and forging solidarity among
themselves.

6. Philippines conducted the highest percentage of activities in component 2. Component 2 activities were
instrumental to awareness raising of farmers and the general public as well as in bringing forth the issues and
problems of small farmers to the government, most common of which has to do with rice tenure, seeds,
inputs, post-harvest facilities, and market.

7. Laos has the highest percentage of component 3 activities. Component 3 activities helped FOs to consciously
seek for partnership with government agencies, development partners and civil society organizations to
better provide economic services to FO members.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 5


Photo 1. Field visit during the SRSC-Southeast Asia + China in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 22 July 2017

6 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Photo 2. Group photo inside the SRSC SEA+China Venue

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 7


Achievements from June 2016 to June 2017

This section would look into the activities and their results according to the following programme components and
sub-components:

Component 1. Institutional Strengthening


Sub-component 1.1. Strengthening of FOs and their Networks
Sub-component 1.2. Operational Strengthening
Component 2. FOs Participation in Policy Process
Sub-component 2.1. Participation in National Platform
Sub-component 2.2. Participation in Regional and Sub-regional platform
Component 3. FO Services and Involvement in Agricultural Development Programme
Sub-component 3.1. Development of Services
Sub-component 3.2. Collaboration with agricultural development

An overall status will be shared at the beginning of each component before going into the details of activities and
achievements per country. The overall status will focus on the percentage of component activities per country and
the percentage of gender and youth participation. The same structure will follow on a per country level and would
end in a summary of key accomplishments per component. In cases where available, first year data will be compared
to second year data to see how each component per country progressed from year 1 to year 2.

Component 1. Institutional Strengthening of FOs and their Networks


Component 1 aims to strengthen the organization and management of FOs, thereby increasing their capacity to better
serve the interests of their members and improve their professional capacity. This is further divided into two sub-
components:

Sub-component 1.1. Institutional Strengthening. This sub-component aims to enable the FOs to effectively
fulfill their development mandates.
Sub-component 1.2. Operational Strengthening. This sub-component aims to build the management
capacity of FOs, structuring their services towards becoming more responsive to members needs, and
strengthening their competitiveness to support their members to become profitable players in the
agribusiness value chains.

Except for Laos, the other five countries conducted over 40 percent of activities under component 1, with Myanmar at
the highest of 72 percent.

8 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Table 1. Component 1 activities in Southeast Asia

Country Component 1 Performance


Cambodia 42%
Indonesia 43%
Laos 17%
Myanmar 72%
Philippines 47%
Viet Nam 38%

Most of these activities were directed towards institutional strengthening which include organizational strategic planning and regular meetings
and assemblies. Leadership trainings and organizational orientation were also among the activities implemented under this component.
Myanmar focused a lot of its effort at expanding their reach throughout the country which is why they have the most number of sub-national
organizations.

Table 2.Scope of Membership and Operations of FOs per County

Cambodia Indonesia Laos Myanmar Philippines Viet Nam


National FO 2 5 1 1 9 7
Sub-National FO 40 33 668 17
Individual Members 139,099 17,581 35,000 11,585 13,100,00
Total Provinces Covered 17 30 11 40 40 63
Total Provinces in the Country 25 34 18 81 81 63

Actual count of individual members remains a challenge across countries. The same is true for Thailand, which started AFOSP implementation
in June 2016. During the orientation meeting with the National Steering Committee, each of the five national FOs shared varying means of
counting their membership usually estimates on the number of family members, or estimate population of certain tribal groups or fishing
communities. The same is true with other countries. Some FOs adopted the unwritten policy of no dues, no membership to properly account
for real members who have stake on the organization by means of membership fees. Other FOs started creating a database of members like
Laos Farmer Network, Pambansang Kilusan ng mga Samahang Magsasaka (PAKISAMA) and LAKAMBINI in the Philippines.

Vietnam and Indonesia had the highest youth participation while Cambodia and Vietnam had the highest women participation under
component 1. Engaging youth and women farmers would be an interesting area of learning and sharing among countries in the future. There
should also be a way, however to gauge the level by which women and youth are able to influence the organizations decisions, plans and
direction, instead of mere attendance to activities.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 9


Table 3. Percentage of gender and youth participation in component 1 per country
Comp 1 Cambodia Indonesia Laos Myanmar Philippines Viet Nam
Youth Male 7 20 15 13 6 7
Youth Female 10 6.3 9 8 7 27
Total Youth 17 26.3 24 21 13 34
Male 20 57.7 57 59 39 38
Female 63 16 19 20 48 33
Total Female 73 22.3 28 28 55 60

Cambodia.

Cambodia experienced major change when NIA position was relinquished to FNN from CFAP, as previously agreed in the national platform.
CFAP took the NIA position from September 2013 until the middle of 2016. FNN has taken over from mid-2016 and will be the NIA until end of
the project in mid-2019.

Despite the transition, MTCP2 in Cambodia was able to expand to five national federations, an increase in the number of FOs at the national
platform, from two to five. The programme was also able to extend to 17 provinces, which is 68 percent of the total 25 provinces in the country
(Kindly refer to the table below for details).

Level of FO 2016 2017 Difference


National 2 5 Increase of 3
Federation
Sub-national
Individual 139,099 No data in
members 2016
Total provinces 11 17 Increase of 6
covered
Total provinces 25 25
in the country

Table 4. Number of FOs and their members in Cambodia Figure 1. Activities per component, Cambodia

10 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Activities conducted under component 1 comprise 42 percent of the total, same as component 3. This includes general assembly where busi-
ness reports were presented and new plans were approved; meetings to finalize AWPB especially at the steering committee level; and visit to
local FO members. While participants to component 1 activities remain to be largely male, there is considerable female participation at 30 per-
cent to include both young and adult. However, FOs need to put more effort in engaging young farmers, which at present remain at 17 percent,
young male and female alike.

Figure 2. Youth and Gender Participation in Component 1, Cambodia

Component 1 achievements in Cambodia include:


conduct of training-workshops on leadership, TOT and value chain;
registration of FOs under the agriculture cooperative law;
discussion on regrouping and building the capacity of specialized production groups;
updating of national FO profile and commodity-based FOs rice producers, vegetable farmers, chicken
group);
support to FOs strategic and business planning processes; and
FOs established mechanism on women and youth organizing 1,766 women and 441 youth

Indonesia.

Component 1 activities in Indonesia comprise 43 percent of the total. These activities include strategic planning, FO consultation, leadership
training, website development, and support to agricultural cooperatives among others.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 11


Youth participation reached a total of 26.3 percent for both young male and female. Total women participants
reached 22.3 percent, youth and adult female combined.
Figure 3. Activities per component, Indonesia

The five national FOs in the steering committee was able to expand to additional ten sub-national FOs reaching a total
of 40 in 2017. Membership increased by over 2,000 farmers in 30 out of the total 34 provinces in the country.

Figure 4. Gender and Youth participation in Component 1, Indonesia

12 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Table 5. Number of FOs and their members in Indonesia

Level of FO 2016 2017


National Federation 5 5
Sub-national 30 40
Individual members 15,507 2,074
Total provinces 14 30
covered
Total provinces in the 34 34
country

Major outputs of component 1 activities include the following:


five FOs were able to prepare their profiling system
formulated strategic action of national FOs and their members
trained 95 FO leaders and members to increase their capacity to manage organizational affairs and projects

Laos.
Component 1 activities of Laos Farmer Network comprise only 17 percent of the total. These activities include financial management, provin-
cial network workshops, strategic planning session, and management systems training.

Figure 5. Activities per component, Laos

Total women participation, including both young and adult reached 28 percent. Total youth participation reached 24 percent. Laos was able to
start gathering data on youth participation only in July 2016, but they have consistently been engaging the young farmers especially in the use
of technology to share and exchange information among farmers and in the promotion and marketing of agricultural products.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 13


Figure 6. Gender and Youth participation in Component 1, Laos

Efforts at component 1 resulted to increase in number of FOs from 2016 to 2017 and expanded to another province in Sayaburi. Presently, LFN
is working in 11 out of 18 or 61 percent of the total provinces in the country.

Table 6. Number of FOs and their Members in Laos

FO Level 2016 2017 Remarks


National Federation 0 0 LFN started in
2014 already
Sub-national level 0 0
Individual level 23 33 16 FOs in 2015
Total provinces where FO 10 11 Sayaburi
operates province
Total provinces in the country 18 18

Key outcomes of component 1 in Laos include:


Directory of farmer experts of the Lao Farmer Network a dossier of farmer experts available on the website. Farmers can check
on the expertise of other farmers through the directory, thus enabling them to tap human resources who have hands-on
experience in farming for a minimal fee.
Supporting visits to new members in Vientiane and Hoaphan provinces for mutual learning and exchange of experience.
Provincial consultation workshop for farmer network in Xiengkhouang province where vegetable producers shared production
techniques and marketing strategies
Strategic planning and partner workshop for FO member-FASAP
Study visit for FO member on agro-tourism (Houyon vegetable producers)

14 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Myanmar.
Component 1 gets the biggest chunk at 72 percent in Myanmar. Some of these activities include (1) solidarity meeting where leaders of village
and township FOs are convened for a meeting and get-together at the level of region and/or state to get to know each other and develop a
deeper bond and solidarity among each other; (2) village level FO formation and meeting; and (3) leadership training.

Figure 7. Activities per component, Myanmar

Youth participation decreased by four percent from last years 24 percent to this years 21 percent. Female participation remained at 28 percent
from first to second year of AFOSP implementation in Myanmar. To encourage more young farmers, the Association of Farmers Federation
in Myanmar (AFFM) partnered with Network for Environment and Economic Development (NEED) Myanmar in a six-month organic training
programme for young people. AFFM recommends young farmers to be sent to the training center of NEED Myanmar for hands-on training on
organic farming.

Figure 8. Gender and Youth participation in Component 1, Myanmar

Component 1 activities led to an increase in number of members from 32,000 in 2016 to 35,000 in 2017. They are now present in 12 out of 15
(80 percent) regions/states in Myanmar.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 15


Table 7. Number of FOs and their members in Myanmar

FO Level 2016 2017 Increase


National Federation 1 1
Sub-National level 11 region/state 11 region/state 50 local
618 Local 668 local
Individual level 32,000 35,000 3,000
Total provinces where FO 11 region/State 12 region/state 1 regoin/state
operates increase
Total provinces in the country 15 Region/State 15 region/state

Key results of component 1 in Myanmar include the following:


43 leaders were trained on SWOT analysis
registration of FOs at the township labor office
trained 390 farmers on organic farming
organized 1 regional, 10 township and 13 village level FOs

Philippines.
A total of 48 percent of activities were conducted under component 1 in the Philippines. Activities under component 1 include organizational
and programme meetings, organizational review and planning, congress and assemblies, and case documentation (specifically in Jaro, Leyte and
Labo, Camarines Norte).

Table 8. Activities per component, Philippines

Female participation is nine percent higher than that of male participation. The next level of improvement that can be done would be in terms
of women leadership and governance. Even at the level of the National Steering Committee (NSC), women representation remains at 1/9 or
11 percent. Youth participation reached a total of 13 percent, both young male and female included. It is an area where the Philippines needs
improvement.

16 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Table 9. Gender and Youth participation in Component 1, Philippines

There is remarkable decrease in the number of individual farmer members from 2016 to 2017. The previous data is based on old documents
and estimates by the national FOs. Some of the FOs started to encode members profile in their database to have a more accurate count of
farmer members.

Table 10. Number of FOs and their members in the Philippines

FO Level 2016 2017 Remarks


National Federation 9 9 Targets achieved
Sub-national level Data being finalized yet
Individual level 55,266 11,585 Does not include yet estimates # of individuals
reached and benefitted by advocacy and
economic services
Total provinces where 40 No data yet for 2017. Target for project is 50
FO operates
Total provinces in the 81
country

Component 1 outcomes in the Philippines include the following:


organizational development activities including meetings at different layers of the organization national, regional, municipal and
chapter level
conducted organizational capability building in the areas of office management, directorship and managerial skills development,
and proposal writing.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 17


Vietnam.
Component 1 comprises 38 percent of the total activities in Vietnam. These activities include meetings with partners like Arrowfield Japan,
Dutch Postharvest Network, Netherland Water Partnership, Agriterra, ICRAF, International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural
Resources (IUCN Viet Nam), VietDHRRA, AsiaDHRRA and Nestle to discuss possible cooperation; workshop on cooperative planning and
resource mobilization; annual planning; and conduct of training on cooperative development, marketing and enhancing farmers capacity in the
use of internet in partnership with Google.

Table 11. Activities per component, Vietnam

VNFU consistently exert effort at engaging young farmers and women. Youth participation decreased from 24 percent in 2016 to 17 percent in
2017. Women farmers participation also decreased from 44.7 percent in 2016 to 36 percent in 2017.

Table 12. Gender and Youth participation in Component 1, Vietnam

VNFU was able to set up Womens Union among other national federations in 2017. Their membership increased by nearly three million and
has expanded its operations in all the 63 provinces in Vietnam.

18 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Table 13. Number of FOs and their Members, Viet Nam

FO Level 2016 2017 Increase/ Remarks


decrease
National Federation 05 07 02 VNFU, Womens Union, Gardening
Association, Organic Association, Farm
and Rural Enterprise Association,
Cooperative Alliance
Sub-national level 46 63 17
Individual level 7.500.00 10.300.00 2.800.00
Total provinces where 46 63 17
FO operates
Total provinces in the 63 63 -
country

Major outcomes of component 1 in Vietnam include:


discussed possible cooperation of VNFU and IUCN on project related to the development of the Mekong River Delta;
drafted 12 cooperative plans in six provinces during the planning meetings;
discussed the setting up of VNFU policy research center, voluntary resource mobilization and international integration center; and
organized training courses on cooperative development, enhancing marketing capacity of VNFU staff and cooperatives; and
planning workshops for cooperative groups

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 19


Component 1 Photos

Upper-leftmost.
Sample profile of a farmer-expert
as included in the Directory of
Farmer Experts in Laos

Upper-rightmost.
Coconut and rice forum in the
Philippines

Bottom.
Coconut and rice forum in the
Philippines

20 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Young farmers in Myanmar share
in the house chores

Study visit on
agro-tourism in Oudomxay

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 21


Component 2. FOs Participation in Policy Process

Component 2 is aimed at promoting the interests of smallholders at the national, sub-regional and regional levels by strengthening FOs capacity
to participate in the policy process. This is further divided into two sub-components:

Sub-component 2.1. Participation in national platform. This sub-component aims to promote the creation of an enabling


environment that would allow farmers and FOs to realize their full potential in influencing local and national agriculture-related
policies.

Sub-component 2.2. Participation in regional and sub-regional platform. This sub-component is aimed at leveraging the

institutional and technical expertise of the platforms to link with relevant regional and inter-governmental organizations and
development agencies such as ASEAN, GAFSP Smallholder Commercialization Program (SCP), IFAD, and the Asian Development
Bank (ADB).

Philippines naturally reflected the most number of component 2 activities because all of the nine FOs in the platform conduct their own
advocacy at the local level while pursuing national advocacy at the national level. Most of the activities are policy forum on specific
commodities, follow up activities and workshops on the issue of coco levy, dialogue on agrarian case, and conference on fishery protection
among other advocacy activities.

Like the Philippines, other countries used similar forms of engagement dialogue, consultation, and policy review. Rice is the common area of
advocacy across countries with varying campaigns land tenure security, support for production such as irrigation, and price protection policy.

Table 14. Component 2 performance per country

Country Component 2
performance
Cambodia 16 %
Indonesia 16 %
Laos 18 %
Myanmar 11 %
Philippines 26 %
Viet Nam 13 %

Philippines has the highest women participation while India and Laos got the highest youth participation in component 2. Cambodia needs to
catch up both on youth and women participation.

22 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Table 15. Gender and youth participation in component 2 per country

Comp 2 Cambodia Indonesia Laos Myanmar Philippines Vietnam


Youth Male 0% 22% 16% 4% 7% 8%
Youth 3% 5% 11% 14% 11% 11%
Female
Total Youth 3% 27% 27% 18% 18% 19%
Male 85% 57% 58% 60% 42% 46%
Female 12% 16% 15% 22% 40% 35%
Total Female 15% 21% 26% 26% 51% 46%

In general, component 2 remains to be the domain of men. However, FOs and NIAs consciously put more effort at engaging women and youth.
There have been concrete gains from this component such as resolution to debt problems of Laos farmers and representation of farmers voice
in the review of agriculture and related policies across countries.

Cambodia.

Component 2 comprise 16 percent of the total activities in Cambodia. Among these activities are global youth forum, policy review, forum and
workshops on issues like rice policy, poverty and food security.

Data shows that component 2 remains to be predominantly a male domain. There is little participation of women and almost negligible
participation of youth. Both youth and women participated in two meetings one by the National Advisory Committee (NAC) and another on
reviewing the rice policy. Cambodia needs to strategize on how youth and women can be involved more meaningfully in the programme.

Figure 9. Youth and Gender Participation in Component 2, Cambodia

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 23


Key achievements of Cambodia under component 2 are the following:
better cooperation is achieved among FOs at the national platform;
30 farmers joined the review workshop on rice policy organized by the Supreme National Economic Council;
registered FOs under the Provincial Department of Agriculture (PDA) at Banteay Meanchhey province; and
re-grouping of farmers into 150 production groups, based on priority commodities.

Indonesia.

Component 2 activities in Indonesia comprise 16 percent of the total. Some of the activities conducted under this component include
preparation of policy paper on different topics such as value chain on coffee and organic agri-enterprise; dialogue with representatives from
different Ministries (Agrarian and Spatial, Agriculture, Human Rights Commission, Agrarian Reform, and Food Sovereignty; and discussion on
geographic indication certification of gayo coffee.

Youth participation in component 2 is higher by 0.7 percent than that of component 1. On the other hand, women participation in component
1 is higher by 1.3 percent that that of component 2. Youth and women participation focused on attending assemblies, consultations and
dialogues.
Figure 10. Gender and Youth participation in Component 2, Indonesia

Component 2 achievements in Indonesia include the following:


200 farmers recommended four resolutions to the different government ministries land protection and distribution to farmers;
seed and fertilizer access and support to farmers; support to farmers cooperatives; and support to strengthen food sovereignty;
1,030 farmers expressed to the Regent of Indramayu District to protect small rice producers through development of good
irrigation system, resolution of land conflict and improvement of access to land;
preparation of 5 case studies and modules on constraints and challenges of robusta coffee value chain in Malang district and
Dampit sub-district; case study of organic rice enterprise model in Tasik Malaya and Boyolali district; increasing rice farmers
income through the application of multi-quality government purchasing price and improving the quality of rice mill; and small
scale farmers innovation in seed development towards seed sovereignty.

24 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Laos.

18 percent of the activities that Laos Farmer Network conducted are under component 2. These activities range from organizing a meeting on
cooperatives to dialogue with government officials on key issues such as farmers indebtedness. LFN has also creatively utilized social media to
reach the government and solve the issue of farmers debt.
Figure 11. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 2, Laos

While women are kept involved in all components, they are least involved in component 2. This is true for both youth female and adult female.
On the other hand, youth and adult male have the highest participation in component 2.

As a result of component 2 activities, LFN achieved the following:

The government agreed to give loans via DaoHueng Company to do contract farming with Jice Coffee Cooperative in Champasack
province;
Prime Minister- H.E Thongloun Sisoulith instructed relevant organizations to protect domestic producers after the meeting on
indebtedness with farmers groups on rice, pig and fish. It is worth-noting that his attention was caught by the video posted by
LFN on their facebook page regarding the debt issue.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 25


Myanmar.

18 percent of the activities that Laos Farmer Network conducted are under component 2. These activities range from organizing a meeting on
Component 2 comprise 11 percent of the total activities in Myanmar. These activities include paralegal training, representation of farmers to
the Migration Committee of ILO-ILC in Geneva, dialogue with township administrator of Moe Nyin to access the virgin and fallow land for the
farmers and to maintain community forestry project.

There has been conscious effort at engaging the youth and women in programme activities. Women are actively taking part in paralegal training
and forum discussing agricultural cooperative

Figure 12. Gender and Youth participation in Component 2, Myanmar

Major accomplishments under component 2 include the following:


Government is now monitoring companies that sell fertilizer and pesticide
Youth farmer is now representing AFFM to the Migration Committee of the ILO-ILC. Discussion in the committee covered social
protection measures for farmers children who go to other countries to work
research paper on cooperatives in Myanmar has been done highlighting the challenges and opportunities of farmers to access
government services
farmers representation at the minimum wage committee in Yangon region (Sec Gen U Tint Lwin of AFFM is currently representing
the farmer in the regional committee)
submitted farm land law paper, but for further study and discussion prior to finalization

26 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Philippines.

25 percent of the total activities in the Philippines are under component 2, the highest among the six countries in Southeast Asia. Activities
conducted under component 2 include the continuation of the coco levy campaign, commodity forum (rice and coconut), advocacy forum
against the construction of coal-fired power plant in Quezon province (Southern Luzon), identifying priority plans and direction for the fishery
sector, gender equality and drafted the market intervention studies on seaweeds and organic vegetables.

Women participation totals to 51 percent, youth and adult alike. Youth participation reached 18 percent, with youth female 4 percent higher
than youth male (11 percent and 7 percent, respectively).

Figure 13. Gender and Youth Participation in Component 2, Philippines

Outcomes from component 2 activities are as follows:


Coconut Committee meetings on Coco-Levy issue, planning of actions for coco-levy
Preparatory initiatives on QR on Rice issue, started engagement with national legislature on Pro-farmer Rice Sufficiency and
Competitiveness
Provincial-Municipal policy forums on local issues (e.g. proposed Atimonan Coal Plant, LGU engagements for commitment to agri-
development via local special bodies)
Fisherfolk issues and concerns identified, discussed and five areas were chosen for piloting under the AFSC and 4 areas under
HUDCC

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 27


Vietnam.

13 percent of total activities conducted in Vietnam are under component 2, the lowest across components. Activities under component 2
include policy dialogue to address land use planning problems, training on farmers advocacy consultation tool or FACT, workshop to review and
comment on draft agricultural cooperative policy, and the conduct of case study on farmer households livelihood from 1995 to 2016.

Participation of women in component 2 reached 46 percent, adult and youth included. Dialogue on different farmers issues got the highest
participation of women. Highest number of youth participants is in the workshop to review and comment on cooperative policy.

Figure 14. Gender and youth participation in component 2, Vietnam

Key results of component 2 in Vietnam are as follows:


improvement on the implementation of agriculture policies including land use planning, development of cooperatives and policy
to support farmers with machinery and farm inputs are underway after the dialogue with government
comments improved the draft outline of the study on the farmers livelihood from 1995 to 2016
government accepted the ideas and comments from VNFU representatives, IFAD, Vietnam Cooperative Alliance (VCA), Vietnam
Women Association, enterprises and cooperatives for the decree/policy to be formulated

28 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Component 2 Photos

LFN conducts a study


on youth involvement in
agriculture

VNFU attending
FACT training

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 29


Component 3. FOs Services and Involvement in Agriculture Development
Programmes
This component aims to enable the FOs and their networks to deliver relevant services to their members and to actively participate in agriculture
and rural development, especially under the framework of IFAD country programs. This is further divided into two sub-components:

Sub-component 3.1. Development of services. This sub-component aims at reinforcing the preparedness of FOs in their future
involvement in the agriculture development programs.

Sub-component 3.2. Collaboration with agriculture development programs. This sub-component supports the FOs participation
in agriculture development programs including that of IFAD and EU funded programs (e.g. actions in the framework of bilateral
programs in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar).

Laos conducted the highest percentage of component 3 activities. The manner by which LFN is organized facilitates component 3 activities
because the members are grouped according to commodity produced by farmers.

Having the youngest farmers organization, Myanmar conducted the least percentage of component 3 activities. Its focus right now remains to
be in expanding and strengthening its base organizations.

Table 16. Percentage of component 3 activities per country

Country Component 3
Performance
Cambodia 42%
Indonesia 41%
Laos 58%
Myanmar 17%
Philippines 27%
Viet Nam 49%

Laos also has the highest youth participation while Vietnam has the highest women participation. Most countries have surpassed the target
women participation (25 percent) for component 3. But much work is needed to work the same thing out for youth participation, especially in
the case of Cambodia.

30 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Table 17. Gender and youth participation in component 3 per country

Comp 3 Cambodia Indonesia Laos Myanmar Philippines Vietnam


Youth Male 0% 22% 16% 4% 7% 8%
Youth 3% 5% 11% 14% 11% 11%
Female
Total Youth 3% 27% 27% 18% 18% 19%
Male 85% 57% 58% 60% 42% 46%
Female 12% 16% 15% 22% 40% 35%
Total Female 15% 21% 26% 26% 51% 46%

There have been concrete results in component 3, foremost of which is forging of new partnerships at the country level. Most FOs and NIAs
were able to leverage the MTCP2/AFOSP funds to strengthen their economic support to members through partnership. Most countries have
also formed production and commodity-based groups to eventually facilitate value chain analysis and planning. Study or learning visit is
another common activity under component 3; farmers learn more if there is actual on-site exposure to successful farmers organization or
cooperative that implements similar project that they would like to also engage in.

Cambodia.

Component 3 comprises 41 percent of total activities in Cambodia from June 2016 to June 2017, including business forum and network meeting
(with IFAD country programme, Grow Asia, AsiaDHRRA, government ministries, and other development partners).

Women farmers are more active in component 3, compared to the other components. Large chunk of women participants are from those who
attended the workshop on regulations related to the laws on agricultural cooperatives and marketing for 2016.

Youth participation is however, lowest in this component even zero for young male farmers. Youth engagement is limited to meeting with
partners like AsiaDHRRA, UNESCO and AIMS at the Provincial Department of Commerce.

Figure 15. Youth and Gender participation in Component 3, Cambodia

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 31


Component 3 achievements in Cambodia include:
Re-grouping of producer groups where a total of 150 farmer groups were formed based on FOs priorities;
Four-day training on trainers to key farmers who would echo the training to members of producer groups;
Researched in aid of policy proposal relevant to agriculture which is expected to be completed in August;
Study visits of FOs leaders to learn from successful cooperatives first visit was in a rice mill coop and in a marketing coop in
Kampong Cham province; second visit was in vegetable-growing and chicken-raising cooperative;
Conducted research on successful cooperatives in Cambodia (which is expected to be completed in August). A workshop will be
conducted to share the results of the study to five national FOs and some of the provincial FOs.
Started four commodity groups: (1) organic and conventional rice with 50 groups producing 1,000 tons and is now linked in the
district market; (2) organic chicken with 50 groups with volume of 3,000 head per month which is being supported by agri coop
business on animal feeds; (3) organic vegetables with 50 groups producing 2,000 kilograms monthly; and (4) community seed bank
with five agricultural cooperatives selling rice seed varieties: Phka Rumdoul, Sen Kroob, Senpidor

Indonesia.

Component 3 activities comprise 41 percent of the total activities in Indonesia. These are mostly agriculture related training like agri-ecology,
post-harvest processing, value chain, agri-enterprise and marketing; meetings and roundtable discussions with partners including EU, ITPGRFA
and IFAD Indonesia; and market surveys to identify market opportunities for farmers.

Participation of youth and women does not vary much across components and stayed steady between 21 to 23 percent. It is predominantly
male who take part in programme activities in Indonesia

Figure 16. Gender and Youth participation in Component 3, Indonesia

32 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Component 3 activities resulted to the following outcomes:

increased market linkage of 166 farmers in seven locations;


partnership discussed with AsiaDHRRA for cooperation in FFP and RECUERDO programs; review workshop with IFAD Indonesia;
two national FOs established market information center and coffee hub as a result of market distribution mapping, market
channeling and agri-coop promotion;
three national FOs established market information system for rice farmers; and
restructuring of farmers organizations (into association, cooperative, commodity or production groups) provided leverage for
farmers to expand market linkage, decrease the cost of production through the use of new technology, increase their access to
credit and access government support.

Table 18. Number of FOs according to type

FO type of organization 2016 2017 Remarks

Farmers Association 11 12 - Increased market linkage


- Decreased cost of production
Farmers Cooperative 6
with new technology
Commodity Coffee Coffee - Increased access to credit
Cluster/Production Group Rice Rice - Government support
Vegetable Vegetable
Cocoa Cocoa

Laos.

Component 3 captured the most number of activities at 58 percent. It is also the highest across Southeast Asian countries. Most of these are
planning meeting/workshops (pig production group, provincial bamboo network); video shoot (bitter bamboo value chain, bio-herbicide and
turmeric tea, youth in agriculture in four provinces), partnership meetings, review of organizational structure and regulations, training on bio-
pesticides and study visit on agro-tourism.

Component got the highest participation of women and youth. Most youth took part in the planning and monitoring visit to members in the
provinces of Vientiane, Bolikhamxay, Xiengkhouang and Hoaphan.

Figure 17. Gender and Youth participation in Component 3, Laos

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 33


Outcome of component 3 activities in Laos are the following:
50 farmers were trained on pest control, compost making and integrating farming
value chain analysis for bitter bamboo in Oudomxay conducted; improvement of value chain to improve packaging and marketing
of rice in Ban Jeng; and farmer basket as a means to market vegetables from Thongmang group
Participatory Action Research (PAR) on rice growing technique and integrated fish pond.
video footages of youth in agriculture and bitter bamboo for promotion and awareness raising
prioritized three commodities: rice, vegetable and coffee.
improved processing, packaging and marketing of rice including brown and black rice
two organic vegetable youth group established; farmer basket system of marketing in place
established coffee learning center at Jice coffee cooperative

Myanmar.

Component 3 comprise 17 percent of total activities in Myanmar. These activities include meeting with partners (AFA, We Effect, MERN, NEED
Myanmar, and CCS), conduct of soil test in the field, training on mushroom production, and organic farming training programme.

Across components, there is constant women and youth participation at 21-28 percent for youth, male and female combined; and 28-36
percent for women, young and adult combined. Women tend to engage in component 2 activities such as meeting with partners while youth
took more part in organic farming training in partnership with NEED Myanmar.

Figure 18. Gender and youth participation in Component 3, Myanmar

Component 3 activities achieved the following:


Trained four young famers on organic farming who are now providing training to their co-members
Started the community seed system with 36 trainees (16 female, 20 male); seed club or seed bank groups formed in Dawei
township in Thaninthari, Mrauk U in Rakhine, and Hmawbi in Yangon
25 farmers collaborate in preparing 100 acre land (collective land preparation)
Provided tractor for the farmers (especially those who are recovering from flood)

34 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017
130 cooperatives formed; 1 commodity cluster group formed (coffee)
farmers learned participatory soil testing in the field
We Effect committed to support organizing activities of AFFM
got the support of the Ministry of Industry who committed to assist the farmers in their enterprise in the future, after they have
cultivated 340,000 hectares of reserved forest

Philippines.

27 percent of the total activities in the Philippines fall under component 3. All the nine FOs exerted efforts towards engaging different
government agencies and development partners to be able to provide economic services to their members.

Component 3 marked the highest participation of youth and women; women participation is in fact the highest across components. This is
because one of the nine national FOs in the national is an all-women federation: LAKAMBINI Pilipinas, an affiliate member of PAKISAMA.

Figure 19. Gender and Youth participation in Component 3, Philippines

Major outcomes of component 3 activities in the Philippines are as follows:


initiatives for cooperation and partnership between government, development partners and national farmers/fisher
organizations were discussed during coconut forum
IRRI-CURE formalized their partnership by co-organizing a training activity that will address one of the challenges of rice
production - producing quality seeds of most preferred, appropriate, and climate-ready varieties
identified strategies to implement community-based seed system consequently enabling the farmers to plan how to produce good
quality seeds and establish CBSS
farmer-to-farmer exchange visit among three national FOs (NIUGAN, PAKISAMA and KAMMPIL) visited the copra facility in Jaro,
Leyte
moisture meters and mobile soil testing kits were turned over to farmers groups in region XII.
chili processing project in Sultan Kudarat was able to secure DOST certification
established mangrove seedlings nursery through Bayanihan (volunteer work) of members of Bago Aplaya Free Farmers (BAFF)
complied the initial steps for transforming into cooperative through the CDA training on governance and cooperative management
course for farmer leaders
forged project with DOLEs Integrated Livelihood Program or DILP-Kabuhayan
PCA RegionVIII will provide decorticating and twining machines for KAMMPIL agricoop
We Effect granted PHP1.35M to LAKAMBINI for gender equality programme for 2018-2022
PHP 5.4M agri-loan was granted to Bulan Chapter of LAKAMBINI for palay, vegetable and livestock production

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 35


six FOs from Yolanda areas in Eastern Samar and Leyte arestarting their community-based cassava enterprise after gaining the
competencies on cassava and cacao value chain

Vietnam.

Component 3 has the highest percentage of activities in Vietnam at 49 percent. Activities include meeting and proposal preparation on
partnership with Arrowfield Japan, Netherlands, and IFAD; review of last years collaboration and planning for the following years opportunities
for cooperation in 15 FUs;

Component 3 has got the highest percentage of participation in Vietnam, at 39 percent. Even with youth, female participation is way higher
than the percentage of youth male. Like most countries, Vietnam has to strategize to enhance youth participation in farming.

Figure 20. Gender and youth participation in component 3, Vietnam

Key outcomes were achieved from implementing this component:


prepared materials on cooperatives on themes like international integration, farmer-to-farmer training models and business
planning for farmer households;
participation in development partners activities (IFAD country programme review, commercial smallholder support project, etc.)
review of relevant materials in pursuit of a VNFU policy research center and voluntary resource mobilization and international
integration center
enhanced skills of leaders and staff on listening, questioning, negotiation, policy dialogue, executive and feedbacking.
agreement signed between VNFU and Arrowfield Japan
provided inputs during the consultation workshop on Decree Draft on the guidance of cooperative group organization and
operation held by Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI) in collaboration with IFAD Tra Vinh project Coordination Board in Tra
Vinh province
two groups of vegetables in the delta areas (Thai Binh in the North, Quang Binh in the Middle) and four groups of orange, beef
cattle, lonely banana, coffee in the poor and ethnic minority areas (Tuyen Quang in the north, Ninh Thuan, Lam Dong, Gia Lai in
the highlands) were organized and provided with training on business planning and market research, cooperative development,
and enhancing marketing capacity
six more cooperative groups of vegetables, goat in three provinces of Thai Binh, Bac Giang and Thanh Hoa will be selected to
support after the initial survey

36 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Component 3 Photos

Farmer basket delivered to


customers

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 37


Component 4: Support to ASEAN Foundation
ASEAN Foundation organized and/or took part in activities to push for farmers agenda at the ASEAN; these activities include:

1. Roundtable Discussion (RTD) on strengthening the agricultural cooperatives and attracting youth in agriculture. The RTD highlighted the
importance for ASEAN Member States to promote Geographical Indication products and common learning exchange platform;

2. 24th Meeting of ASEAN Centre for the Development of Agricultural Cooperatives Board (ACEDAC) to summarize feedbacks from AFOSP
2016;

3. 19th Meeting of ASEAN Sectoral Working Group on Agricultural Cooperatives (ASWGAC) on 16 19 May 2027 in Vientiane, Laos. ASEAN
Foundation presented major AFOSP activities for 2017, namely: (a) ASEAN Learning Series, (b) development of ASEAN Roadmap on
Agricultural Cooperatives document, and (c) one day exhibition on the Trade and Marketing of the ASEAN Agriculture Cooperatives
Product;

4. The ASEAN Learning Series on 19 21 July 2017 in Yogyakarta focusing on the Inclusive Agricultural Value Chain for Coffee. The output of
ASEAN Learning Series is a proposal to conduct one day exhibition on Trade and Marketing of the ASEAN Agricultural Cooperatives Product
(coffee) in conjunction with the PrepSOM-39th AMAF and 39th AMAF Meeting in September 2017. ASWGAC will submit the proposal to
the Senior Official Meeting on Agriculture and Forestry (SOM-AMAF) for consideration. In parallel, AFOSP/ASEAN Foundation supports
ASWGAC on the development of the ASEAN Roadmap for Agricultural Cooperative (the Roadmap). The Roadmap will serve as the Key
Deliverables of ASWGAC cooperation in 2018.

Knowledge Management
KM Fair. Months prior to the sub-regional steering committee for Southeast Asia, the KM officer sent out invites for a maximum of three
entries on any of the four themes women and youth; processing, marketing and financing; networking and partnership; and sustainable
production. Myanmar won the first place for their entry on women and youth category where young farmers adopt their skills learned from
a six-month training conducted by NEED Myanmar. Laos bagged the second place for their entry on networking and partnership where they
uploaded online the directory of farmer experts who could provide agriculture and related consultancy to other farmers. Philippines got the
third place with their entry under the processing, marketing and financing category where coconut farmers in a village in Bicol, Philippines
process coco husks into coco fiber and rope.

Sharing of good practices among FOs inspire farmers as these provide them with fresh ideas on how to improve their own activities in their
countries and FOs.

Monitoring and Evaluation


Monitoring and Learning Visits. The RIA team conducted visits not only for monitoring purposes but also to provide assistance to NIAs
regarding program implementation which include: Sharing of good practices among FOs inspire farmers as these provide them with fresh ideas
on how to improve their own activities in their countries and FOs.

1. Mentoring and Planning Visit to Myanmar, February 2017. The visit was aimed at providing program, KM and M&E orientation to the new
NIA team. The Central Committee members of AFFM joined the programme team composed of the Coordinator, M&E Officer, KM officer,
Finance officer, administrative staffk and some volunteer staff. First day was spent visiting the new office of CTUM which will also house
AFFM and the MTCP2/AFOSP program orientation. The team, including the CC members also worked on the Annual Work Plan and Budget.
M&E and KM orientation was done in the afternoon of day 2 in preparation for the best photo which will be taken from the field visit on
day 3. The entire day was spent in the field on day 3, with the team talking to the farmers about their farm and the activities that they have
conducted in relation to MTCP2. The remaining two days were spent finalizing the AWPB 2017 and the annual SAGDD for 2016. LOA was
also signed by the President during the last day.

38 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


2. Learning Visit of Myanmar to Cambodia. Farmers from Myanmar visited the different cooperatives in Cambodia. They learned how
farmers in Cambodia run their coop businesses like organic farm, rice mill, savings and credit and marketing of agricultural products

Reporting. The monthly submission of SAGDD as agreed during September 2016 SRSC-SEA facilitated the updating of activities in the website
and social media accounts as well as in choosing potential stories. There are also good practices on how the NIAs work on the SAGDD. Laos
encoded the AWPB in excel and uploaded it in the googledocs for regular updating. This way, monitoring of activities and expenses vis--vis
plan and budget is easily done.

Indonesia collates the FOs SAGDD in one excel file, putting each in a worksheet and consolidates everything in one uniform format for easy
consolidation and creation of pivot charts. Philippines does the same but failed to consolidate the nine FOs SAGDD due to varying formats.

NIAs need to improve not only in terms of following the format, but more so in putting more details especially under the column RESULTS as this
describes the effect or outcome of the activity that was conducted.

Management Information System (MIS). With assistance from IFAD, AFA and LVC contracted out the services of Cambodia-based IT
consultant in designing the MIS for MTCP2/AFOSP. In April 2017, the consultant oriented RIA staff on the features of the system and guided the
team on how to use the system encoding of AWPB, updating of activities and budget, encoding and updating of the logframe, and viewing the
summary per country and at the regional level. The system was launched during the SRSC-SEA in Yogyakarta in July 2017. Further improvements
were made based on the comments from NIAs.

Program Management
Expansion to Thailand. AFA and LVC representatives conducted a scoping study in Thailand in March 2017. The study ended up in a meeting
and programme orientation of five national FOs in Thailand where they selected the national implementing agency Assembly of the Poor or
AoP. An orientation on AWPB and LOA completion, monthly reporting of activities and expenses was conducted in April 2017 together with the
leader representatives from five FOs and the staff from NIA.

Sub-Regional Steering Committee Meeting. Two SRSCs were conducted for the period being reported. Second SRSC for SEA for the year 2016
was conducted a day before the 6th ACBF in Manila last November. This served as a follow-up to the Myanmar SRSC in September 2016. NIAs
provided updates on the activities conducted for the period and the preparations done on the annual work plan and budget. This facilitated the
consolidation of AWPB for 2017.

Regional Activities
6th ASEAN Cooperative Business Forum. The Cooperative Development Authority convened the Steering Committee for the 6th ACBF where
AFA took active role in, together with other development partners and successful cooperatives in the Philippines. The steering committee
collectively designed and implemented the program for the ACBF. CDA sought the help of ACEDAC in inviting the government representatives;
AFA mobilized the FOs from different ASEAN countries; and AsiaDHRRA mobilized the agri-agencies. A resolution was reached during towards
the end of the conference. This resolution was forwarded to the ASWGAC and ACEDAC for possible inclusion in the ASEAN Roadmap.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 39


Financial Management
Since the program started in June 2015, RIA received a total of USD 3.2M and has released to NIAs 92 percent of the received amount total
amount of USD 2.9M. However, only 67 percent of it (or a total of USD 2.1M) has been spent
Figure 21. Funds utilization from June 2015 to June 2017

Figure 22. Financial Performance per Country from June 2015 to June 2017

Laos has the highest absorptive capacity, with total expenditure of 93 percent vis--vis budget released. Vietnam comes next at 83 percent.
Myanmar is lowest at 45 percent due to several factors including change in program coordinatorship twice within the reporting period. Thailand
signed its LOA with RIA in June 2017 which explains their zero expenditure as of reporting period. Philippines and Indonesia encounter similar
concerns of liquidation delay from the FOs to the NIA note that Indonesia has five FOs and Philippines has nine FOs in the national platform.

40 AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017


Photos from the Regional Activities

Photo on the center right.Farmer leaders engage in a discussion


after the ACBF

Picture Above. Panelists during the 6th ACBF Press Conference

Young farmers who are not only good in organic farming but
also in singing their way to practice English. They sang to the
SRSC participants during the visit to Organic Farming Training
Center of NEED Myanmar where AFFM sends young farmers.

AFOSP Second Annual report, June 2016 to June 2017 41


Contact Us
Asian Farmers Association for Sustainable Rural Development (AFA)
Esther Penunia <afaesther@asianfarmers.org>
Lany Rebagay <afalany@asianfarmers.org>
Rm 206 Partnership Center, 59 C. Salvador St., Loyola Heights,
Quezon City 1108 Philippines
www.asianfarmers.org

La Via Campesina (LVC)


Henry Saragih <hspetani@gmail.com>
Zainal Fuad <zainal@spi.or.id>
Jakarta, Indonesia
www.viacampesina.org

Development Partners
ASEAN Foundation (AF)
Elaine Tan <elaine.tan@aseanfoundations.org>
Jakarta, Indonesia
www.aseanfoundation.org

International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD)


Benoit Thierry <b.thierry@ifad.org>
Rome, Italy
www.ifad.org

Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC)


Alexandre Ghelew <alexander.ghelew@eda.admin.ch>
Bern, Switzerland
www.eda.admmin.ch/eda/en/home.html

European Union (EU)


Franck Viault <Franck.VIAULT@eeas.europa.eu>
Jakarta, Indonesia
www.europa.eu