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Sacred Ordinary Days, a liturgical day planner Jenn Giles Kemper

Copyright © 2015 Jenn Giles Kemper All rights reserved. Anything other than brief quotations should not be used without prior permission.

All daily prayers are taken from Common Prayer: a Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals. Copyright © 2010 by The Simple Way and School for Conversion. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

Planner design and liturgical season artwork by Hayley Johnson

Created and designed in Waco, Texas Printed in Austin, Texas Bound in San Antonio, Texas

SacredOrdinary Days.com JennGilesKemper.com

October 2015

I’ve been dreaming of spending my morning with a liturgical planner in one hand and a cup of Earl Grey in the other since I first read Girl Meets God. That was 10 years ago. Lauren Winner’s memoir is structured according to the liturgical year, and reading along felt like being invited into a new ordering of time. As a weary student, I longed for time liberated from the all-mighty semester. My dad let me borrow his Book of Common Prayer and cerebrally I started learning about the liturgy Lauren’s book introduced me to. But my own life felt oh-so-far from the meaningful reordering I craved, because liturgy is “the work of the people,” and I wasn’t working with any real practice of this knowledge, yet.

Though I studied in the religion department, thinking I’d graduate, go on to seminary, and be a

pastor the rest of my life, that hasn’t been my path. Burnt out on school and the ministry life, I knew

I needed a non-ministry job so that I could stay at the little contemplative, liturgical Baptist church I’d found toward the end of college, which was restoring my life. So, I started a business, and be- fore long people started asking for help building their own businesses and organizations. I ended up transitioning into coaching and consulting full-time. My years of learning and experience as a minister and as an entrepreneur led me to the heart of all my work – helping people of faith discern and do what they were uniquely created and called to do: effectively, joyfully, and sustainably. With that mission clear, creating this planner was the next step. Every element of this planner serves a purpose and has been carefully curated with those things in mind. It’s the result of my desire for a rich spiritual formation resource and a simple, practical tool to use each day.

Sacred Ordinary Days, draws from spiritual formation and productivity practices I’ve adopted and

loved. It also seeks to supply what I found missing in other resources, tools, and practices. For years

I used Morehouse’s Episcopal Liturgical Appointment Calendar, which helped me start living into

this reordered time based on the life of Christ. Finding a liturgical church to walk alongside the past eight years has helped the practice become deeper still. Our former housemate and dear friend, Bethany Bear Hebbard, shared Common Prayer: a Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals with me, and it’s been used in our house since for daily prayer and for weekly small groups. Whitney English’s Day Designer taught me to work with focus and purpose. Don Miller’s Storyline Productivity Schedule showed me the value of alternating projects with a “rest” or “reward.” I’m so grateful for each of these resources, which have been both a foundation and a springboard for my work in Sacred Ordinary Days.

My goal for this planner is to help the Church become who she was created and called to be, by helping you become who you were created and called to be. My congregation has adopted the phrase, “Our prayer is our work and our work is our prayer.” It’s our version the Benedictine saying, “Ora et Labora.” My prayer for you is that using Sacred Ordinary Days helps you offer your work as your prayer and your prayer as your work, living a fully integrated and embodied faith.

Alongside you, Jenn Giles Kemper

prayer as your work, living a fully integrated and embodied faith. Alongside you, Jenn Giles Kemper

RESOURCES

Rule of Life

While many are setting goals or intentions for the new year, both seem to have limits when it comes

to establishing lasting habits and rhythms that help you “become,” rather than merely “do.” Goals

and intentions are task-based and work best with a quantifiable measure of success and an easily marked ending point. Something more process-oriented is helpful when you’d like to reorient toward “being” over “achieving.”

A “rule of life” is one way of fostering an integrated and embodied life of faith, through a life-long

process of formation. The first example of a Christian rule of life came from the Desert Fathers, a monastic community of mystics living in Egypt around the third century AD. The most well known

is the Rule of St. Benedict, written 1500 years ago. Created to help Benedict’s community translate

their faith into the habits and rhythms of daily life, the Rule has since inspired many communities, families, and individuals to develop intentional, challenging, daily ways to practice their faith.

Our English word “rule” is derived from the Latin regula, meaning “a straight piece of wood, a

ruler,” and, by extension, “a pattern, model, or example.” Some writers have likened the role of

a regula to a trellis or banister, guiding you as you climb. Esther De Waal, a longtime student of

monastic spirituality, writes that “regula, a feminine noun, carries gentle connotations: a signpost, a railing, something that gives me support as I move forward in my search for God.” A helpful nuance to consider, I believe.

Most of us are not a part of communities, monastic or otherwise, which give us a rule to follow, per se. But, all communities and families have shared values and expectations, clearly articulated or not. These are deeply formative, often without our consent or awareness. Cultivating an integrated life requires examining our formation so that we can see which pieces are missing and seek them out. A rule of life offers a rich tradition for doing that.

Consider allowing this practice to develop slowly over time. Begin with the rules of life from other individuals, families, and communities. Listen for God and realize that the unique expression of Christ in you, your family, and your church will likely look different from the expression of Christ in others. The Kingdom is built by the whole of the Church body, so you need only seek to be a faithful hand or foot.

You may choose to approach your rule as a living document, taking pause once a year to closely examine it and the life it helps you lead. Use the next few pages to journal, compile examples, and then create a rule of life to start working with this year. Consider crafting a rule of life with your family or community. However, if no one else around you is interested, press on and start building the trellis for yourself. As you grow, the fragrance of your blooms will likely invite curiosity and interest from others who may want to build a trellis of their own or grow into yours. If nothing else, invite a wise and trusted confidante to journey alongside you – a close friend or spouse, your small group, or your spiritual director.

RESOURCES

Rule of Life

RESOURCES

Reflect on 2015

RESOURCES

Reflect on 2015

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

REFLECT

RESOURCES

Reset for 2016

RESOURCES

Reset for 2016

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

RESET

RESOURCES

How To Use Your Weekly Pages

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RESOURCES

How To Use Your Weekly Pages

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HOLY DAY or LITURGICAL SEASONS The top inside corner of each weekly page is marked with the specific week in the current liturgical season. The liturgical year, also called the church year or the Christian year is an ongoing cycle that begins with the season of Advent. Each Sunday and each week is vital. You can reference the liturgical wheel calendar on the front inside cover to see where we are in the cycle and visualize it more clearly, remembering that the purpose is to invite the church into the life of Christ.

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QUOTE Each weekly plan page features a quote drawn a variety of Judeo-Christian voices. Some are from hymns, songs, and chants, as well as a variety of texts. My hope is that these provide additional voices to stay with you throughout the week, engaging your emotions, thoughts, and actions more deeply. You may naturally connect with some, while others may prompt immediate dismiss- al. By noticing your first response to a quote, consider what invitation it might be extending to you in that moment.

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WEEKLY LECTIONARY TEXTS The lectionary is a three-year cycle used to guide churches across the world through the Christian scriptures in corporate worship. There are many lectionaries to draw from, depending on your denomination, country, and the preference of your church. For Sacred Ordinary Days, we’ve drawn from the Revised Common Lectionary (RCL), in an attempt to choose the most widely used set of texts. There is typically one set of readings per week, although special weeks with feast days might have additional lectionary passages, and those have been included on the appropriate days. For most of the year, the four lections, or texts, include a reading from the Old Testament, a Psalm, an Epistle, and a Gospel.

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REFLECT & RESET RUBRIC On each weekly page, you will see a rubric to reflect and reset. Use this to pause and examine the six areas of your life: spirit, body, mind, relationships, home, and work. Ask yourself how you are embodying your rule of life, values, and other practices and priorities, and how you would like to embody them more fully moving forward. In the first column, reflect back on the previous week, maybe even checking your prior reset column. In the second column, make a plan and reset your- self for the coming week.

This same rubric is used in practices elsewhere in the planner. It’s included in the beginning of the planner to reflect on 2015 and reset for 2016, at the end of the planner to reflect on 2016 and rest for 2017, as well as the beginning of each liturgical season.

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INTENTIONAL WHITE SPACE At the bottom of each page, there is intentionally flexible white space. Draw or doodle, track your water intake, make a nightly gratitude list, plan meals, or whatever else seems helpful.

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LECTIONARY REFERENCES Easily see which year in the three-year cycle is current for the lectionary – A, B, or C.

RESOURCES

How To Use Your Daily Pages

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RESOURCES

How To Use

Your Daily Pages

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ADD YOUR OWN CELEBRATIONS & DAYS OF REMEMBRANCE Use this space to note your own celebrations and days of remembrance. Start with birthdays, anniversaries, milestone moments, and shared holidays with your community or church. Even so, don’t forget to create space for days of grief or remembrance such as the anniversary of a death or an event in the life of your community or the world.

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HOLY DAY or LITURGICAL SEASON The top inside corner of each daily page is marked with the specific week in the current liturgical season. While many holy days fall on Sundays, some fall on weekdays as well.

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from COMMON PRAYER This daily prayer comes from Common Prayer: a Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals by Shane Claiborne, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, and Enuma Okoro. We’ve shared each day’s repeated prayer.

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LECTIONARY On most days you will only have Daily Office texts. Occasionally a holy day will fall on a weekday as opposed to a Sunday, and in these instances, the lectionary for that holy day will take precedent over the daily office. For those who like consistency, however, we have included both texts.

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DAILY OFFICE The Daily Office is a two-year cycle of texts for personal devotional reading. Advent 2015 is the beginning of year 2. The daily office texts in Sacred Ordinary Days came from the Book of Common Prayer, an Anglican/Episcopal resource.

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PRIORITIZED PROJECTS Choose three priorities to focus on each day. The project cue helps you see and then prioritize what the catalyst is for that project, avoiding bottlenecks, and capitalizing on good workflow. Alternating projects with a rest or reward is a sustainable way to keep you from burnout.

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JOURNAL or TO-DO LIST The lined section of the daily pages were added with flexibility and focus in mind, for journaling or a to-do list. Add check boxes if you need them.

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SCHEDULE Many of us use a digital device for scheduled appointments, with the benefit of reminders or the ease of sharing our schedules. However, with digital scheduling, it’s easy to go a long time without noticing a disparity between your schedule and your prioritized projects.

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INTENTIONAL WHITE SPACE At the bottom of each page, there is intentionally flexible white space. Draw or doodle, track your water intake, make a nightly gratitude list, plan meals, or whatever else seems helpful.

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DAILY OFFICE REFERENCE Easily see which year in the two-year cycle is current for the daily office – 1 or 2.

RESOURCES

2016

Holidays & Holy Days

People of our time are losing the power of celebration. Instead of celebrating we seek

People of our time are losing the power of celebration. Instead of celebrating we seek to

be amused or entertained. Celebration is an active state, an act of expressing reverence or appreciation. To be entertained is a passive state—it is to receive pleasure afforded by an

amusing act or a spectacle

transcendent meaning of one’s actions. — Abraham Joshua Heschel

Celebration is a confrontation, giving attention to the

actions. — Abraham Joshua Heschel Celebration is a confrontation, giving attention to the SacredOrdinaryDays.com
actions. — Abraham Joshua Heschel Celebration is a confrontation, giving attention to the SacredOrdinaryDays.com
actions. — Abraham Joshua Heschel Celebration is a confrontation, giving attention to the SacredOrdinaryDays.com
actions. — Abraham Joshua Heschel Celebration is a confrontation, giving attention to the SacredOrdinaryDays.com
actions. — Abraham Joshua Heschel Celebration is a confrontation, giving attention to the SacredOrdinaryDays.com
actions. — Abraham Joshua Heschel Celebration is a confrontation, giving attention to the SacredOrdinaryDays.com

RESOURCES

Holidays & Holy Days

2016

RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
RESOURCES Holidays & Holy Days 2016 Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with
Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with national holidays for the US

Holy days in the liturgical calendar are included, along with national holidays for the US and Canada in Italics. Add your own celebrations and days of remembrance.

ADVENT

November 29 to December 24, 2015 4 Sundays preceding Christmas

Advent inaugurates the progression of seasons and holy days that form the liturgical year. The invitation of Advent is waiting for the coming of a Savior Christ. We remember how those before Jesus groaned and longed for a new order in creation. We join them in waiting, too, for a time when He will come again to restore the Kingdom of Heaven on earth.

THEMES

wait

hope

long

anticipate

prepare

watch

expect

joy

COLORS

Purple cloaks the season, and is a visual reminder that we wait for the Royal one of God coming in Christ. Some also decorate with blues – another color for royalty, and a reminder of the sky surrounding the star of Bethlehem.

HOLY DAYS

Christmas Eve – December 24 Advent technically ends the afternoon of the 24th since that evening, Christmas Eve, begins the Christmas season.

SacredOrdinaryDays.com

Advent

Each season in the liturgical year offers its own distinct invitation into the life of Christ—a way to live into part of the story. The wheel calendar on the front inside cover may help you see the story unfolding in a new way or imagine another way to approach the cycle. Before the season begins, envision how you want to embody into this season yourself and with your household in the six areas of your life: spirit, body, mind, relationships, home, and work. Consider your rule of life, values, and other practices and priorities. Don’t forget to go back to reflect on the previous season.

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

ENVISION

Advent

At the end of this season, use the first column to reflect back on your experience and then reset for next year while it’s still fresh in your mind and heart, before you’ve forgotten. Incorporate what you’ve learned or make a note about a resource you’d like to use.

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

REFLECT

RESET

DECEMBER SacredOrdinaryDays.com
DECEMBER
DECEMBER
DECEMBER
DECEMBER

WEEKLY PLAN Nov. 29– Dec. 5, 2015

First Sunday of Advent

DECEMBER

Nov. 29– Dec. 5, 2015 First Sunday of Advent DECEMBER Begin Lectionary Year C and Daily

Begin Lectionary Year C and Daily Office Year Two

As long as there are people, Christ will walk the earth as your neighbor, as the one through whom God calls you, speaks to you, makes demands on you. That is the great seriousness and great blessedness of the Advent message. Christ is standing at the door; he lives in the form of a human being among us. —Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Weekly Lectionary

   

Jeremiah 33:14-16

Psalm 25:1-10

1 Thessalonians 3:9-13 Second Reading

Luke 21:25-36

First Reading

Psalm

Gospel

 

REFLECT

RESET

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

Advent |

| SUNDAY November 29, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Teach us, Lord, every day : the duty of delight.

Daily Office

Psalm 111, 112, 113, 146, 147, Amos 1:1-5, 13—2:8, 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11, Luke 21:5-19

Amos 1:1-5, 13—2:8, 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11, Luke 21:5-19 Sabbath is not dependent upon our readiness to

Sabbath is not dependent upon our readiness to stop. We do not stop when we are finished. We do not stop when we complete our phone calls, finish our project, get through this stack of messages, or get out this report. We stop because it is time to stop. Sabbath requires surrender. If we only stop when we are finished with all our work, we will never stop—because our work is never completely done.

—Wayne Muller

MONDAY November 30, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

If we are in the light as you are in the light : we can find our way together.

Daily Office

Psalm 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, Amos 2:6-16, 2 Peter 1:1-11, Matthew 21:1-11

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Advent |

| TUESDAY December 1, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

May we cry the gospel from the rooftops : both with our words and with our lives.

Daily Office

Psalm 5, 6, 10, 11, Amos 3:1-11, 2 Peter 1:12-21, Matthew 21:12-22

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WEDNESDAY December 2, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

O Lord, listen to the song : of your saints who cry, “How long?”

Daily Office

Psalm 12, 13, 14, 119:1-24, Amos 3:12—4:5, 2 Peter 3:1-10, Matthew 21:23-32

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Advent |

| THURSDAY December 3, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

O come, O come, Emmanuel : and ransom captive Israel.

Daily Office

Psalm 18, Amos 4:6-13, 2 Peter 3:11-18, Matthew 21:33-46

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FRIDAY December 4, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Praise to you who lift up the poor : and fill the hungry with good things.

Daily Office

Psalm 16, 17, 22, Amos 5:1-17, Jude 1-16, Matthew 22:1-14

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Advent |

| SATURDAY December 5, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

You speak in my heart and say, “Seek my face” : your face, Lord, will I seek.

Daily Office

Psalm 20, 21:1-14, 110:1-7, 116, 117, Amos 5:18-27, Jude 17-25, Matthew 22:15-22

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WEEKLY PLAN December 6– 12, 2015

Second Sunday of Advent

DECEMBER

December 6– 12, 2015 Second Sunday of Advent DECEMBER Waiting is an art that our impatient

Waiting is an art that our impatient age has forgotten. It wants to break open the ripe fruit when it has hardly finished planting the shoot. But all too often the greedy eyes are only deceived; the fruit that seemed so precious is still green on the inside, and disrespected hands ungratefully toss aside what has so disappointed them. —Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Weekly Lectionary

   

Malachi 3:1-4

Luke 1:68-79

Philippians 1:3-11

Luke 3:1-6

First Reading

Psalm

Second Reading

Gospel

 

REFLECT

RESET

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

Advent |

| SUNDAY December 6, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Remember your little ones, Lord : and give us courage to stand for them.

Daily Office

Psalm 114, 115, 148, 149, 150, Amos 6:1-14, 2 Thessalonians 1:5-12, Luke 1:57-68

149, 150, Amos 6:1-14, 2 Thessalonians 1:5-12, Luke 1:57-68 Sabbath becomes a decisive, concrete, visible way

Sabbath becomes a decisive, concrete, visible way of opting for and aligning with the God of rest. —Walter Brueggeman

MONDAY December 7, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

You, O Lord, are king of all : ruler of every nation.

Daily Office

Psalm 9, 15, 25, Amos 7:1-9, Revelation 1:1-8, Matthew 22:23-33

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Advent |

| TUESDAY December 8, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Your glory, Lord, lights up the world : where love is real, it shines.

Daily Office

Psalm 26, 28, 36, 39, Amos 7:10-17, Revelation 1:9-16, Matthew 22:34-46

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WEDNESDAY December 9, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised : in the city of our God is his holy hill.

Daily Office

Psalm 38, 119:25-48, Amos 8:1-14, Revelation 1:17—2:7, Matthew 23:1-12

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Advent |

| THURSDAY December 10, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Behold, God is my helper : it is the Lord who sustains my life.

Daily Office

Psalm 37, Amos 9:1-10, Revelation 2:8-17, Matthew 23: 13-26

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FRIDAY December 11, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Rouse yourself! Come and see! : Save us, God, from the enemy.

Daily Office

Psalm 31, 35, Isaiah 7:10-25, 2 Thessalonians 2:13-3:5, Luke 22:14-30

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Advent |

| SATURDAY December 12, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

In the light of the morning, Lord : tune our hearts to sing your praise.

Daily Office

Psalm 30, 32, 42, 43, Isaiah 8:1-15, 2 Thessalonians 3:6-18, Luke 22:31-38

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WEEKLY PLAN December 13– 19, 2015

Third Sunday of Advent

DECEMBER

December 13– 19, 2015 Third Sunday of Advent DECEMBER Advent is the perfect time to clear

Advent is the perfect time to clear and prepare the Way. Advent is winter training camp for those who desire peace. By reflection and prayer, by reading and meditation, we can make our hearts a place where a blessing of peace would desire to abide and where the birth of the Prince of Peace might take place. —Edward Hays

Weekly Lectionary

   

Zephaniah 3:14-20

Isaiah 12:2-6

Philippians 4:4-7

Luke 3:7-18

First Reading

Psalm

Second Reading

Gospel

 

REFLECT

RESET

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

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Advent |

| SUNDAY December 13, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God : have mercy on me, a sinner.

Daily Office

Psalm 63:1-11, 98, 103, Amos 9:11-15, 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3, 13-17, John 5:30-47

Amos 9:11-15, 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3, 13-17, John 5:30-47 If you keep the Sabbath, you start to

If you keep the Sabbath, you start to see creation not as somewhere to get away from your ordinary life, but a place to frame an attentiveness to your life. —Eugene H. Peterson

MONDAY December 14, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Where there is no love, let us put love : and so, by your power, draw love out.

Daily Office

Psalm 41, 44, 52, Zechariah 1:7-17, Revelation 3:7-13, Matthew 24:15-31

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Advent |

| TUESDAY December 15, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Shepherd us, Lord, with your faithful hand : and guide us gently into your land.

Daily Office

Psalm 45, 47, 48, Zechariah 2:1-13, Revelation 3:14-22, Matthew 24:32-44

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WEDNESDAY December 16, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Rise up, O Lord, and rule the earth : every inch of it is yours.

Daily Office

Psalm 49, 119:49-72, Zechariah 3:1-10, Revelation 4:1-8, Matthew 24:45-51

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Advent |

| THURSDAY December 17, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

We bow before your throne, O Lord : to rise and see your face.

Daily Office

Psalm 33, 50, Zechariah 4:1-14, Revelation 4:9—5:5, Matthew 25:1-13

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FRIDAY December 18, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

The Lord is King! Let freedom ring! : Let freedom ring! The Lord is King.

Daily Office

Psalm 40, 51, 54, Zechariah 7:8—8:8, Revelation 5:6-14, Matthew 25:14-30

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Advent |

| SATURDAY December 19, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

May your justice be a light to guide us : and your mercy a help along the way.

Daily Office

Psalm 55, 138, 139:1-23, Zechariah 8:9-17, Revelation 6:1-17, Matthew 25:31-46

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WEEKLY PLAN December 20– 26, 2015

Fourth Sunday of Advent

DECEMBER

December 20– 26, 2015 Fourth Sunday of Advent DECEMBER Not everyone can wait: neither the sated

Not everyone can wait: neither the sated nor the satisfied nor those without respect can wait. The only ones who can wait are people who carry restlessness around with them. —Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Weekly Lectionary

   

Micah 5:2-5a

Psalm 80:1-7

Hebrews 10:5-10

Luke 1:39-55

First Reading

Psalm

Second Reading

Gospel

 

REFLECT

RESET

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

Advent |

| SUNDAY December 20, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Christ is coming. Christ has come : Christ will come again.

Daily Office

Psalm 8, 24, 29, 84, Genesis 3:18-15, Revelation 12:1-10, John 3:16-21

29, 84, Genesis 3:18-15, Revelation 12:1-10, John 3:16-21 We are living in a time when all

We are living in a time when all around us old stories are dying and new stories are struggling to be born. It is by story that we understand who we are, how we came to be and what we are about. We all live by story, and we are in trouble just now because we do not have a good story. New story emerges in many ways—as we let go of the old story and attend to ancient wisdom, to essence, to Sabbath rest, to dream, to song, to ceremony. Mostly it emerges as we try to live it out in the midst of the old story still around us, a process often filled with risk and conflict. —Jim Hall

MONDAY December 21, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Come now and join the feast : right here in the belly of the beast!

Daily Office

Psalm 61, 62, 112, 115, Zephaniah 3:14-20, Titus 1:1-16, Luke 1:1-25

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Advent |

| TUESDAY December 22, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

In your mercy, help us, Lord : to prepare the way for your coming.

Daily Office

Psalm 66, 67, 116,117, 1 Samuel 2:1b-10, Titus 2:1-10, Luke 1:26-38

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WEDNESDAY December 23, 2015 |

| Advent

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Come now, bless the Lord : he is our help and our shield.

Daily Office

Psalm 72, 111, 113, 2 Samuel 7:1-17, Titus 2:11—3:8a, Luke 1:39-56

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Christmas Eve |

| THURSDAY December 24, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

O Light that shines in our darkness : come and free us from our sin.

Daily Office

Psalm 45, 46, Galatians 3:23—4:7, Matthew 1:18-25, Psalm 89:1-29, Isaiah 59:15b-21, Philippians 2:5-11

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CHRISTMAS

December 25, 2015 to January 5, 2016 12 days, starting on Christmas day

Christmas is the celebration of the birth of Jesus. The invitation of Christmas is to feasting and celebrating that God has fulfilled his promises in sending a savior. In the 12 days of Christmas, we celebrate and walk with the incarnated Jesus. The season of Christmas, or Christmastide, begins with Christmas Eve.

THEMES

 

birth

Emmanuel

peace

incarnation

arrival

fulfillment

 

generosity

celebration

COLORS

White and gold are used for the season of Christmas, symbolizing joy and the brightness of day.

HOLY DAYS

Christmas Eve – December 24 Advent technically ends the afternoon of the 24th since that evening, Christmas Eve, begins the Christmas season.

Christmas – December 25 Christmas Day is the celebration of the birth of Jesus.

Holy Name – January 1 The Holy Name of Jesus is a feast day celebrated eight days after Christmas to commemorate the day Jesus is presented at the temple, circumcised and named in Luke 2:31. An angel foretold this to Mary in Luke 1:31 and to Joseph in a dream in Matthew 1:21.

SacredOrdinaryDays.com

Christmas

Each season in the liturgical year offers its own distinct invitation into the life of Christ—a way to live into part of the story. The wheel calendar on the front inside cover may help you see the story unfolding in a new way or imagine another way to approach the cycle. Before the season begins, envision how you want to embody into this season yourself and with your household in the six areas of your life: spirit, body, mind, relationships, home, and work. Consider your rule of life, values, and other practices and priorities. Don’t forget to go back to reflect on the previous season.

Spirit

Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

ENVISION

Christmas

At the end of this season, use the first column to reflect back on your experience and then reset for next year while it’s still fresh in your mind and heart, before you’ve forgotten. Incorporate what you’ve learned or make a note about a resource you’d like to use.

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Body

Mind

Relationships

Home

Work

REFLECT

RESET

FRIDAY December 25, 2015 |

| Christmas Day

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

O Word, now wrapped in human skin : speak peace on earth through your children.

Lectionary for Nativity of the Lord

   

Proper I

Isaiah 9:2-7

Psalm 96

Titus 2:11-14

Luke 2:1-20

Proper II

Isaiah 62:6-12

Psalm 97

Titus 3:4-7

Luke 2:1-20

Proper III

Isaiah 52:7-10

Psalm 98

Hebrews 1:1-12

John 1:1-14

First Reading

Psalm

Second Reading

Gospel

Daily Office

Psalm 2, 85, 110:1-7, 132, Micah 4:1-5, 5:2-4, 1 John 4:7-16, John 3:31-26

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Christmas |

| SATURDAY December 26, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

In the morning when we rise : may your image shine in us.

Daily Office

Psalm 28, 30, 118, 2 Chronicles 24:17-22, Acts 6:1-7, Acts 7:59-8:8

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WEEKLY PLAN Dec. 27– Jan. 2, 2015

First Sunday of Christmas

DECEMBER

Dec. 27– Jan. 2, 2015 First Sunday of Christmas DECEMBER Once in our world, a stable

Once in our world, a stable had something in it that was bigger than our whole world. —C. S. Lewis

Weekly Lectionary

   

1 Samuel 2:18-20, 26 First Reading

Psalm 148

Colossians 3:12-17

Luke 2:41-52

Psalm

Second Reading

Gospel

 

REFLECT

RESET

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Home

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Christmas |

| SUNDAY December 27, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Overwhelm us, Lord : with the weight of your glory.

Daily Office

Psalm 34, 93, 96, 1 Samuel 1:1-2, 7b-28, Colossians 1:9-20, Luke 2:22-40

96, 1 Samuel 1:1-2, 7b-28, Colossians 1:9-20, Luke 2:22-40 The Sabbath is a weekly cathedral raised

The Sabbath is a weekly cathedral raised up in my dining room, in my family, in my heart. —Anita Diament

MONDAY December 28, 2015 |

| Christmas

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Remember the lives of your little ones, Lord : and break the sword of the oppressor.

Daily Office

Psalm 97, 98, 145, Proverbs 8:22-30, John 13:20-35, Isaiah 44:1-8, 1 John 5:1-12

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Christmas |

| TUESDAY December 29, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Listen, Lord; listen, Lord : not to our words but to our prayers.

Daily Office

Psalm 18 2 Samuel 23:13-17b, 2 John 1-13, John 2:1-11

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WEDNESDAY December 30, 2015 |

| Christmas

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

The Lord lifts up the lowly : but casts the wicked to the ground.

Daily Office

Psalm 20, 21:1-14, 23, 27, 1 Kings 17:17-24, 3 John 1-15, John 4:46-54

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Eve of Holy Name |

| THURSDAY December 31, 2015

DECEMBER

from Common Prayer

Shout the glad tidings o’er Egypt’s dark sea : Jehovah has triumphed; his people are free!

Daily Office

Psalm 46, 48, 1 Kings 3:5-14, James 4:13-17, 5:7-11, John 5:1-15, Psalm 90, Isaiah 65:15b-25, Revelation 21:1-6

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JANUARY SacredOrdinaryDays.com
JANUARY
JANUARY
JANUARY
JANUARY

FRIDAY January 1, 2016 |

| Holy Name of Jesus

JANUARY

from Common Prayer

Jesus, teach us not to shun : what is of God in everyone.

Lectionary for Holy Name

Numbers 6:22-27

First Reading

Psalm 8

Psalm

Galatians 4:4-7

Second Reading

Luke 2:15-21

Gospel

Daily Office

Psalm 103, 148, Isaiah 62:1-5, 10-12, Revelation 19:11-16, Matthew 1:18-25

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Christmas |

| SATURDAY January 2, 2016

JANUARY

from Common Prayer

Lord, help us believe : that we might see you come.

Daily Office

Psalm 33, 34, 1 Kings 19:1-8, Ephesians 4:1-16, John 6:1-14

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