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SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide

by

Courtney Morrison

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 2

Table of Contents The Residences Introduction Cleaning the Kitchen

Table of Contents The Residences Introduction Cleaning the Kitchen
Table of Contents The Residences Introduction Cleaning the Kitchen

4

5

6

Cleaning the countertops

6

To clean the countertops

6

Cleaning the sink

6

To clean the sink

7

Cleaning the microwave

7

To clean the microwave

7

Cleaning the stove

7

To clean the stove

8

Cleaning the refrigerator

8

To clean the refrigerator

8

Cleaning the floor

8

To clean the floor

9

Cleaning the Bathroom

10

Cleaning the sink

10

To clean the sink

10

Cleaning the toilet

10

To clean the toilet

11

Cleaning the shower/bathtub

11

To clean the shower/bathtub

11

Cleaning the Common Room, Living Room, or Lounge

12

Cleaning the television

12

To clean the television

12

Cleaning the table

12

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

To clean the table

12

Cleaning the seating

13

To clean the plastic seating

13

To clean the fabric seating

13

Cleaning the floor

14

To clean linoleum floors

14

To clean carpeted floors

14

Cleaning the Dorm Room

15

Cleaning mirrors and windows

15

To clean mirrors and windows

15

Cleaning the shelves

15

To clean the shelves

15

Cleaning the desk

16

To clean the desk

16

Cleaning the floors

16

To clean linoleum floors

17

To clean carpeted floors

17

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 4

The Residences

The Towers Shell House Mc-Taggart- Cowan House The Townhouses Hamilton Hall
The Towers
Shell House
Mc-Taggart-
Cowan House
The Townhouses
Hamilton Hall

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

Introduction

Welcome to Simon Fraser University! Whether you're just starting out or working on your final semester, your time here will be an adventure. I encourage you to explore all university has to offer, both inside and outside the classroom.

You've decided to live on campus this semestera great choice. Not only will you be close to everything, you'll be able to experience the excitement of dorm living too. It won't be easy though, especially when it comes to keeping things clean. That’s where this guide comes in.

Between classes, homework, recreational activities, and social events, there isn't much time for cleaning. But you don't need a lot of time. This guide shows you how to tackle cleaning in 30 minutes or less. It doesn't matter if you're new to cleaning or an expert. This guide has something for you.

You may ask, why should I keep things clean? There are two reasons to keep your space clean:

1)

Clean rooms keep you healthy.

2)

Germs, mould, bugs, and vermin love dirty rooms. Maintaining cleanliness keeps these pests away, which reduces your chances of getting sick. Clean rooms have a positive psychological effect. If you can find what you need immediately, you won't stress out. Also, clean rooms help you concentrate, which means you can get more work done.

But what does it take to keep your space clean every day? Not much at all. If you do a little cleaning weekly, you’ll keep your space looking great. Just follow this guide.

The guide is divided into four sections, one for each room you’ll be cleaning. These rooms are the kitchen, bathroom, common room, and your dorm room. Each section has easy-to-follow steps that make cleaning simple and quick. You won't have to spend more than 30 minutes cleaning any room if you use this guide. With less time cleaning, you'll have more time for other things. Awesome, right?

So, what will you need to clean these rooms? Well, I’ve make a list of ten items you'll need. I've also included approximate prices for each item too. Here's what you'll need:

Dish Soap ($1)

All-Purpose Cleaner ($3)

Toilet Bowl Cleaner ($4)

Toilet Brush and Holder ($1)

Paper Towels ($1+)

Cotton and Microfiber Cloths ($2+)

Dish Towels ($1+)

Broom and Dust Pan ($2+)

2- or 3-in-1 Vacuum (prices may vary, but can be as low as $30)

Bucket ($2 and can be used to store cleaning supplies)

These are just some suggestions. If you need additional suggestions or advice, ask your parents. They may even have items you can have or borrow.

Now that you know what tools to use, you can start cleaning!

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 6

Cleaning the Kitchen

The kitchen can quickly become one of the messiest rooms in any residence, especially when it's shared by many people. A little cleaning goes a long way to keeping this space clean for all.

When should you clean your kitchen? Well, it all depends on the task. Some tasks should be done daily, like cleaning the countertops, sink, microwave, and stove, while others, like cleaning the floor and refrigerator, should be done weekly or monthly.

My advice is to clean as you go. Clean up spills when they happen and tidy whatever you've used before leaving the room. Doing this maintains cleanliness in your kitchen, so you won't have to dedicate a lot of time to cleaning it later. Even at its messiest you'll only need 20 minutes to clean your kitchen. The steps below show you how.

Note: If you're living in the Towers, you'll have to clean the countertops, sink, microwave, refrigerator, and floor.

If you've living in Shell House, McTaggart-Cowan House, the Townhouses, or Hamilton Hall, you'll have to clean the countertops, sink, stove, microwave, refrigerator, and floor.

Cleaning the countertops

Kitchen countertops are easy to mess up, but they're also easy to clean. A simple wipe down after every use will keep debris and germs away.

All you'll need for this job is two minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, and all-purpose cleaner.

To clean the countertops

1. Remove any items and appliances from the countertops.

2. Put items either back where they belong or out of the way.

3. Wipe off any crumbs from the surface with the cloth.

4. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the countertops, and allow it to sit for a few seconds, especially on sticky or stained areas.

5. Wipe down the countertops with the cloth using an s-pattern.

6. Dry the countertop with the towel.

7. Put appliances back where they belong.

Cleaning the sink

The sink is perhaps the most used part of any kitchen. That means grime and gunk builds up fast. Counteract it by cleaning the sink after each use. The steps are below.

All you need for this job is five minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, and all-purpose cleaner.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

To clean the sink

1. Spray some all-purpose cleaner into the sink and onto the faucet.

2. Wipe down the inside of the sink with the cloth.

Pay particular attention to the drain, as it is often the dirtiest part.

3. Wipe around the edges of the sink and the faucet.

4. Turn the sink on and rinse the cloth.

5. Swish water around to remove any remaining cleaner and grime from the sink.

6. Dry the inside of the sink and the faucet with the towel.

Cleaning the microwave

All university students appreciate the convenience and importance of the microwave. The microwave is particularly important for students living in the Towers, as this is their only kitchen appliance. Since microwaves are a staple for university students, they become dirty quickly. The best way to keep microwaves clean is to clean up spills immediately. However, if you can't do this, follow the steps below. Your microwave will be spotless again instantly.

All you need for this job is two minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, dish soap, a bowl, and water.

To clean the microwave

1. Fill a bowl halfway with water, and add a small amount of dish soap to it.

2. Place the bowl in the microwave, and turn it on for 30 to 60 seconds.

3. Remove the bowl from the microwave carefully and set it aside.

4. Dip the cloth into the water, and wipe the inside of the microwave, including the turntable plate (if there is one).

If the turntable plate is really dirty and can be removed, remove it and hand-wash. Replace when dry.

5. Remove any excess soap and water with the towel, and dispose of the water.

Cleaning the stove

For those living in Shell House, McTaggart-Cowan House, the Townhouses, and Hamilton Hall, the stove is an essential part of cooking. The stove, however, isn't as easy to clean as a microwave. It isn't hard to clean though. Just follow the steps below and you'll have a clean stove in no time.

All you need for this job is two minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, and all-purpose cleaner.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 8

To clean the stove

1. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the cloth.

Do not spray cleaner directly onto the stove. The cleaner could get on the burners, which could cause smoke and odour when turned on.

2. Wipe down the stove from back to front with the cloth.

Make sure to wipe around the knobs and burners, as they tend to get the dirtiest.

3. Remove any excess cleaner with the towel.

Cleaning the refrigerator

Cleaning the refrigerator may seem like an impossible and time-consuming task, but it doesn't have to be. And you don't have to do it very often either. Cleaning your refrigerator monthly is perfectly fine.

Note: Most residences have refrigerators in the dorm room rather than the kitchen. The same steps apply to both dorm room and kitchen refrigerators.

All you need for this job is five to ten minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, a bucket, dish soap, and water. The time you'll need to clean the refrigerator depends on its size.

To clean the refrigerator

1. Fill the bucket with some dish soap and warm water.

2. Remove all food items from the refrigerator, and put items out of the way.

3. Throw out any mouldy food.

4. Dip the cloth into the soapy water and wring it out.

5. Wipe down the inside of the refrigerator, including drawers, nooks, and crannies.

For a more thorough clean, remove all shelves and drawers and hand-wash them. Replace when dry.

6. Remove any excess soap and water with the towel, and dispose of the water.

7. Put food items back into the refrigerator.

If any items are dirty, wipe them down and dry them before putting back.

Cleaning the floor

Our floors are probably the most unappreciated things in our lives. We step all over them, tracking dirt as we go. Let's appreciate our floors for once with a weekly cleaning. We owe them at least that, right?

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

All you need for this job is five to ten minutes, a broom, and a dust pan. The time you'll need to clean the floor depends on your kitchen’s size.

To clean the floor

1. Remove any large items from the floor that will block your path.

2. Choose a starting point (preferably a corner), and then divide the room into sections in your mind.

Sweeping smaller sections makes the task more manageable.

3. Begin sweeping outwards from your starting point, making sure to sweep in corners and under furniture.

4. Create a small dirt pile at the end of your section.

5. Sweep the dirt into the dust pan and throw away.

6. Move on to your next section.

7. Repeat steps 2 to 6 until the floor is clean.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 10

Cleaning the Bathroom

The bathroom is an essential part of our lives. We do so many things in our bathrooms, yet we show them little respect. It's time to change that. Our bathroom might not care what we look like in the morning or how bad our breath is, but we should care about how it looks and smells. Luckily, less than 20 minutes is all you need to make your bathroom look and smell great.

Cleaning the sink

We use our bathroom sinks for many things, like brushing our teeth, washing our faces, and cleaning our hands. Our sink does so much for us, but what can we do in return? Well, we can treat it to a weekly cleaning. It won't take much time or effort to treat your sink to some pampering.

All you need for this job is two minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, and all-purpose cleaner.

To clean the sink

1. Spray some all-purpose cleaner into the sink and onto the faucet.

2. Wipe down the inside of the sink with the cloth.

Pay particular attention to the drain, as it is often the dirtiest part.

3. Wipe around the edges of the sink and the faucet.

4. Turn the sink on and rinse the cloth.

5. Swish water around to remove any remaining cleaner and grime from the sink.

6. Dry the inside of the sink and the faucet with the towel.

Cleaning the toilet

Cue the horror movie music, because our next task is cleaning the toilet. I'm only kidding. Well, about the music anyway. Cleaning your toilet may seem like a nightmare, but the steps below will show you how much of a dream it can be. All you have to do is find five minutes a week. That's it! Simply follow the steps below.

Note: Students in the Townhouses and Hamilton Hall are responsible for cleaning their own bathrooms, while those in the Towers, Shell House, and McTaggart-Cowan House have their bathrooms professionally cleaned daily; however, if these students wish to clean their toilets themselves, they can use the following steps.

All you need for this job is five minutes, paper towel, all-purpose cleaner, toilet bowl cleaner, and a toilet brush with a base. You can use rubber gloves and/or a bathroom-specific cleaner if you choose.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

To clean the toilet

1. Spray the entire toilet from top to bottom with all-purpose cleaner.

2. Squirt toilet bowl cleaner under the rim on the inside of the bowl.

3. Wipe down the outside of the toilet with paper towel, working from top to bottom.

4. Scrub the inside of the toilet bowl with a toilet brush, working from the rim to the drain.

5. Flush the toilet with the brush in the water to rinse it off.

6. Place the handle of the toilet brush in between the seat and the toilet with the brush inside the bowl.

7. Allow toilet brush to air dry, and return it to its base.

Cleaning the shower/bathtub

One of the most dreaded chores is cleaning the shower/bathtub. The shower is such a large area, and people often feel too overwhelmed to tackle it. Don't worry though, because you'll only need to clean your shower monthly. The steps below will show you how to clean your shower easily, quickly, and thoroughly. It's not as hard as you think.

Note: This section is for students in the Townhouses and Hamilton Hall, as they are responsible for cleaning their own showers/bathtubs. Students in the other residences have professional cleaning staff to tidy their showers daily. If students in these residences wish to clean their shower, the steps below will help.

All you need for this job is ten minutes, a cotton cloth, a bath towel, all-purpose cleaner, and a bucket. You may want to use a sponge, rubber gloves, and/or a bathroom-specific cleaner for this job.

To clean the shower/bathtub

1. Spray the walls of the shower with all-purpose cleaner, working from top to bottom.

Allow the product to sit for a few minutes.

2. Wipe the walls, corners, and edges with the cloth using a circular motion.

3. Spray the shower base/bathtub with all-purpose cleaner.

Allow the product to sit for a few minutes.

4. Start from one end of the shower base/bathtub, and scrub until you reach the other.

5. Wipe down the shower head, faucet, knobs, and shelves.

6. Fill the bucket with water and then pour the water down all the walls to remove any excess cleaner.

7. Dry the walls, fixtures, and shower base/bathtub with a bath towel.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 12

Cleaning the Common Room, Living Room, or Lounge

Common rooms, living rooms, and lounges are very active places in your residence. From parties to meetings to study sessions, everything happens here. This includes messes too. Don't worry though, because cleaning these spaces is easy. You won't have to spend more than 25 minutes a week cleaning them, which will leave you plenty of time to do whatever it is you do in your common area.

Note: Each residence refers to this type of room as something different, although I've categorized them as the same thing. The name of the room doesn't matter. Simply apply the relevant information to your common area.

Cleaning the television

Our televisions get a lot of use, especially during our free-time. Televisions aren't places you think to clean very often, but dust can quickly fog up your screen. Clear the fog in one minute once a month using the steps below. Once you're done, you can go right back to enjoying your game, movie, reality show, or sitcom in less time than it takes to watch a commercial.

All you need for this job is one minute and a microfiber cloth.

Note: Do not use paper towel or an abrasive cloth for this job, as they can scratch your screen and leave lint behind.

To clean the television

1. Turn the television off, as dirt and dust are more visible on dark surfaces.

2. Wipe the screen with the microfiber cloth, moving from top to bottom.

Do not press hard when cleaning the screen, as too much pressure can cause damage.

3. Wipe around the frame of the screen.

Pay particular attention to the top of the television, because it is often the dustiest part.

Cleaning the table

Tables are the ultimate multi-purpose item. We eat on them, study on them, rest our feet on them, and even sit on them sometimes. All this use is bound to lead to a big disaster. To clean up this disaster area, simply follow the steps below.

All you need for this job is two minutes, a cotton cloth, and all-purpose cleaner. If you choose, you can use a disinfecting spray instead.

To clean the table

1. Remove any items from the table.

2. Put items back where they belong.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

3. Wipe off any crumbs from the surface with the cloth.

4. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the table, and allow it to sit for a few seconds, especially on sticky or stained areas.

5. Wipe down the table with the cloth using an s-pattern.

6. Allow the table to air dry before using it.

Cleaning the seating

The life of a student revolves around many things, like books, lectures, exams, and chairs. Our chairs support us in everything we do, yet we give them no appreciation. A simple five to eight minutes once a month will fix that. Follow the steps below and you'll show your chair the appreciation it deserves.

Note: All residences have different types of chairs/seating in different locations. Some students may have plastic chairs in their common room, while others may have fabric chairs. Below are two sections for types of seating. Use the section(s) that apply to you.

All you need for cleaning plastic seating is five minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, and all- purpose cleaner.

All you need for cleaning fabric seating is eight minutes, a cotton cloth, a dish towel, a vacuum, a bucket, dish soap, and water.

To clean the plastic seating

1. Wipe off any debris from the chair with the cloth.

2. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the chair, making sure to cover the back and seat.

Allow the product sit for a few seconds, especially on sticky or stained areas.

3. Wipe down the chair from top to bottom with the cloth.

4. Dry the back and seat of the chair with the towel.

5. Wipe down the metal legs with the cloth.

6. Dry the metal legs with the towel.

To clean the fabric seating

1. Vacuum the fabric on the seat, working from the back of the chair to the seat.

Make sure to vacuum in between cushions too.

2. Fill a bucket with some dish soap and warm water.

3. Dip the cloth into the water and wring it out well.

4. Wipe down the fabric with the cloth, working with the grain of the fabric.

Make sure to scrub away any stains or dirty spots.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 14

5. Wipe down the arms and/or legs of the chair with the cloth.

6. Dry arms and/or legs of the chair with a towel, and dispose of the water.

7. Allow the fabric on the seating to air dry.

Cleaning the floor

Floors in common areas can get pretty disgusting if left unchecked. Before you know it there's a monster at your feet and you don't know how to fight it. Worry no more because I have the solution. Simply follow the steps below and you'll tame the savage floor beast in no time.

Note: All residences have different types of flooring in their common areas. The two sections below detail how to clean linoleum and carpeted floors. Use the section that applies to you.

All you need for cleaning linoleum floors is ten minutes, a broom, and a dust pan.

All you need for cleaning carpeted floors is ten minutes and a vacuum.

To clean linoleum floors

1. Remove any large items from the floor that will block your path.

2. Choose a starting point (preferably a corner), and then divide the room into sections in your mind.

Sweeping smaller sections makes the task more manageable.

3. Begin sweeping outwards from your starting point, making sure to sweep in corners and under furniture.

4. Create a small dirt pile at the end of your section.

5. Sweep the dirt into the dust pan and throw away.

6. Move on to your next section.

7. Repeat steps 2 to 6 until the floor is clean.

To clean carpeted floors

1. Remove any items from the floor that will block your path or jam your vacuum.

2. Choose a starting point (preferably a corner), and then divide the room into sections in your mind.

Vacuuming smaller sections makes the task more manageable.

3. Begin vacuuming outwards (using a w-pattern) from your starting point until you reach the end of the section.

Make sure to vacuum in corners and under furniture.

4. Move on to your next section.

5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 until floor is clean.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

Cleaning the Dorm Room

Our dorm rooms stay at home and keep our stuff safe while we’re off doing other things. We might visit them often, but who has time to clean them? You do! All it takes is a total of 30 minutes! If you don’t have that much time at once, space out the tasks. Each task will take you ten minutes or less, so you can get back to work or play.

Cleaning mirrors and windows

They say that seeing is believing, but what happens if you can’t see yourself in the mirror or what the weather’s like outside? I guess you’d say, “I can’t believe I can’t see through the grime! It’s cleaning time!” Well, you might not say that, but you’ll believe in clean again when you can see through your mirrors and windows. Simply follow the steps below.

All you need for this job is five to ten minutes, a microfiber cloth, and all-purpose cleaner. The time you’ll need depends on the amount of mirrors or windows you have.

To clean mirrors and windows

1. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the frame of the mirror or window, and allow it to sit for a few seconds.

2. Wipe down the frame with the microfiber cloth.

3. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the glass, and allow it to drip down the surface.

4. Wipe the glass with the microfiber cloth from top to bottom using an s-pattern.

5. Make sure all cleaner is removed.

6. Repeat steps 3 to 5 if you have multiple mirrors or windows.

Cleaning the shelves

Shelves provide us with valuable storage space and places to showcase our memories and personalities. Unfortunately, dust and grime tend to settle on our shelves, making our rooms look dingy. Keep your room looking great with a simple ten-minute cleaning once a month.

All you need for this job is ten minutes, a cotton cloth, a microfiber cloth, a dish towel, and all purpose-cleaner.

To clean the shelves

1. Remove all items from the shelf.

2. Put items out of the way.

3. Wipe off any debris from the surface with the cotton cloth.

4. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the shelf, and allow it to sit for a few seconds, especially on sticky or stained areas.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison 16

5. Wipe down the shelf with the cotton cloth, working from end to end.

6. Dry the shelf with the towel.

7. Put items back onto shelf, dusting them with the microfiber cloth if needed.

8. Repeat steps 2 to 7 until all shelves are clean.

Cleaning the desk

Our desks get a lot of use in a semester, so they can get dirty fast. Papers, books, clothes, and odds and ends can quickly make our desks disappear. Become a cleaning magician by following the steps below. You'll be making your desk reappear in five minutes or less once a week. And then you can go back to pulling that rabbit out of your hat, a.k.a. that thesis statement.

All you need for cleaning the desk is five minutes, a cotton cloth, and all-purpose cleaner.

To clean the desk

1. Remove any items from the desktop.

2. Put items either back where they belong or out of the way.

3. Wipe off any crumbs from the surface with the cloth.

4. Spray some all-purpose cleaner onto the desk, and allow it to sit for a few seconds, especially on sticky or stained areas.

5. Wipe down the desk with the cloth using an s-pattern.

6. Allow the desk to air dry before using it.

7. Put items back where they belong.

Cleaning the floors

Dorm room floors are one of the messiest things about dorm living. Dust, hair, and debris seems to appear out of nowhere, and soon your room is overrun by dust bunnies. Banish those pesky rabbits with a painless weekly cleaning. Ten minutes is all you need to get rid of those unwanted roommates.

Note: All residences have different types of flooring in their dorm rooms. The two sections below detail how to clean linoleum and carpeted floors. Use the section that applies to you.

All you need for cleaning linoleum floors is ten minutes, a broom, and a dust pan.

All you need for cleaning carpeted floors is ten minutes and a vacuum.

SFU Residence Cleaning Guide by Courtney Morrison

To clean linoleum floors

1. Remove any large items from the floor that will block your path.

2. Choose a starting point (preferably a corner), and then divide the room into sections in your mind.

Sweeping smaller sections makes the task more manageable.

3. Begin sweeping outwards from your starting point, making sure to sweep in corners and under furniture.

4. Create a small dirt pile at the end of your section.

5. Sweep the dirt into the dust pan and throw away.

6. Move on to your next section.

7. Repeat steps 2 to 6 until the floor is clean.

To clean carpeted floors

1. Remove any items from the floor that will block your path or jam your vacuum.

2. Choose a starting point (preferably a corner), and then divide the room into sections in your mind.

Vacuuming smaller sections makes the task more manageable.

3. Begin vacuuming outwards (using a w-pattern) from your starting point until you reach the end of the section.

Make sure to vacuum in corners and under furniture.

4. Move on to your next section

5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 until floor is clean.