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The

FIFTY CENTS

Volume One, Number Two December, 1958

Including:

Jazz
Review
lATS N A V A R R O by B i l l C r o w ; J E L L Y
Extended Improvisation and F o r m

by Martin Williams

R O L L M O R T O N by G u y . W a t e r m a n ; Du Cote de Chez Basie


MARY ANN McCALL by Glenn
C o u l t e r ; M U G G S Y S P A N I E R by L a r r y by Andre Hodeir
G u s h e e ; J A M E S P . J O H N S O N by D i c k
Wcllstood; B E N N Y C A R T E R and A R T
T A T U M by J u l i a n Adderley. A L L T O O
S O O N bv Stanley D a n c e . A selection o f T h e N e g r o C h u r c h : Its I n f l u e n c e o n M o d e r n J a z z , II
Blues L y r i c s ; J A Z Z I N P R I N T by Nat
Hentoff. by M i m i Clar
great artists...
great jazz...
great sound...
on

C O N T E M P O R A R Y sonny
CONTSMPORARY

a great catalogue! ROLLINS H H W r s t T * ... mi Samr .

everybody l i k e l
H A M P T O N HAWESS

the modern tenor "colossus" with the


nation's poll-winners: Shelly Manne on
' H i e drums; Ray Brown, b a s s - i n , to quote the
C u r t i s New Yorker, " a fascinating new tour de
force from the Coast" C3530
C o u n c e
G r o u p

contemporary C3523
the vital young Jazz pianist in his third
great CR album. "He plays with driving
abandon!"Metronome Yearbook. Red
a n d c h u c k T h o m p s o n >

Contempio r f y C 3 5 2 6

"Shelly Manne & his Friends (Andre Previn, and


i Leroy VinnegarH Modern jazz performances of their first recording, " a n d everything
songs from |J^ cooked!" Counce on bass; Jack Sheldon,
trumpet; Harold Land, tenor sax; Carl

Barney Kessel, g u i t a r ; Shelly Manne,


drums and Ray Brown, bass 1956 and
1957 top stars in the 3 major polls: Down
Beat, Metronome, and Playboy! Billboard
says: "consistently fine performance tabs
this package a m u s t . . . o n e of the best
small group works in many a moon"
C3535

Contemporary C35JJ:; each

the nation's #1 drummer, Shelly Manne, 12" hi-fi


with Andre Previn, piano and Leroy V i n -
negar.bass, in a wonderful follow-up hit
to t h e i r best-selling " M y F a i r L a d y " ! long-playing
" . . . j u s t about the last word in modern
romantic Jazz piano playing." Saturday album $U.98
ReviewC3533
at dealers
spontaneous combustion! T h e West
Coast's great alto star meets the East and distributors
Coast's great R h y t h m Section (Paul
Chambers, bass; Red G a r l a n d , piano; everywhere,

sri^EorSsS a n u n i n h l b
- or write

C O N T E M P O R A R Y R E C O R D S 8 4 8 1 m e l r o s e p l a c e , los a n g e l e s 4 6 , California
In F u t u r e Issues:

Ella Fitzgerald by Bill Russo


Fletcher Henderson by Gunther Schuller
T h e Style of D u k e E l l i n g t o n b y M i m i C l a r
T h e Blues J u m p e d A R a b b i t : T r u e Stereo b y T o m Dowd
G a r v i n B u s h e l l a n d N e w Y o r k Jazz i n the 1920s b y N a t Hentoff
E l l i n g t o n ' s Black, Brown and Beige by Gunther Schuller and A r t Farmer
L e o n a r d F e a t h e r ' s The Book of Jazz b y B e n n y G r e e n a n d R a l p h B e r t o n
Anita O'Day, June Christy and Chris Connor by Glenn Coulter
T h e J a z z C o m p o s i t i o n s of A n d r e H o d e i r b y B i l l R u s s o
H o w to W r i t e a R e c o r d L i n e r b y H s i o W e n S h i h
Cecil Taylor by Gunther Schuller
Charlie Parker by D i c k Katz
E r r o l l Garner by M i m i Clar
Jazz i n Italy by A r r i g o P o l i l l o
Some H a r d Bob Reedmen by Bob Wilber
K i n g Pleasure and A n n i e Ross by Hsio W e n S h i h
An I m p r e s s i o n of J a z z i n N e w Y o r k b y J o s e de M e l l o
The Miles Davis Ouintet Recordines bv B o b Brookmever
T h e S c h o o l of J a z z b y B o b B r o o k m e y e r and J i m m y Giuffre
T h e S u b s i d i z a t i o n of Jazz on G e r m a n R a d i o b y J o a c h i m Berendt

. J p ,je yno ,uue, i us, a


George Russell by John Benson Brooks

A n d The Regular Departments.

Reviews
Reconsiderations
The Blues
Jazz i n P r i n t

1
P l e a s e e n t e r a s u b s c r i p t i o n to T h e J a z z R e v i e w : 0
E a c h i s s u e o f T h e J a z z R e v i e w i s $.50. A y e a r ' s s u b s c r i p t i o n , 12
issues, is $ 4 . 5 0 ; t w o y e a r s ' s u b s c r i p t i o n , $8.00.

Name..

Address

City Zone State

T h e Jazz R e v i e w , V i l l a g e S t a t i o n , P . O . B o x 128, N . Y . 14, N . Y .


T H E J A Z Z REVIEW is a monthly edited by Nat Hentoff and Martin Williams.
T H E J A Z Z REVIEW covers all schools and styles of jazz. It is written for listeners and
musicians (professional and amateur) who have felt a need for a publication that deals
with jazz on a level other than that of a "fan" or news magazine.
T H E J A Z Z REVIEW is a forum for musicians, musicologists, critics, historians and
specialists in fields like psychology and sociology who have contributions toward the fur-
ther and deeper appreciation of jazz by listeners and jazzmen.
T H E J A Z Z REVIEW has the largest staff of contributing reviewers and critics of any
jazz publication. The editors do not - and in fact, could not - impose their views on any
contributor. This magazine is not a single channel for any one person or school. A wide
range of opinions is represented - opinions of qualified writers.
T H E J A Z Z REVIEW'S contributors include Gunther Schuller, Frank Driggs, Mimi Clar,
William Russo, Dick Katz, Glenn Coulter, Bob Brookmeyer, George Russell, Bill Crow,
L a r r y Gushee, Art Farmer, Guy Waterman, Hsio Wen Shih, Orrin Keepnews, Benny
Green, Andre Hodeir, Bob Wilber, Dick Wellstood, Stanley Dance, Julian Adderley,
Ralph Berton, Joachim Berendt, Horst Lippmann, Arrigo Polillo, Tupper Saussy, and
others.
T H E J A Z Z R E V I E W S coverage of books and records includes both new releases and
those previously issued but worth re-examination. The same recording, for example,
may be reviewed by more than one reviewer in more than one issue.
T H E J A Z Z REVIEW'S regular features include Reconsiderations of celebrated r e c o r d -
ings; selections of blues l y r i c s ; and Jazz in Print (a critical report on the press) by Nat
Hentoff.
T H E J A Z Z REVIEW'S initial issues have included analyses of Sonny Rollins and Theolo-
nious Monk by Gunther Schuller; the stories of Walter Page and Buddy Tate as told by
them to Frank Driggs; a continuing series by Mimi Clar on The Negro Church: Its Influ-
ence on Modern Jazz; an appraisal of the Count Basie band by Andre Hodeir; the first
analytical study of the music of E r r o l l Garner - by Mimi Clar - to have appeared in
print; reviews in depth and at length of the work of Miles Davis, Billie Holiday, John
Lewis, Horace Silver, Jimmy Giuffre, King Oliver, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Jimmy
Rushing, Mudd Waters,MuggsySpanier, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Jelly Roll
y

Morton, Willie "The L i o n " Smith, and many others. There have also been interviews
with Miles Davis, Garvin Bushell, and John Coltrane.
T H E J A Z Z REVIEW will print the work of internationally known musicians and writers,
but will also introduce - as it already has - several new names in jazz criticism and
historiography who have new insights.
The
Jazz
Review Volume 1, N u m b e r 2, December
Contents:

1958

D u C o t e de C h e z B a s i e b y A n d r e H o d e i r 6
A n A f t e r n o o n w i t h M i l e s D a v i s by N a t HentofT 9
Extended Improvisation and F o r m : S o m e Solutions by M a r t i n W i l l i a m s 13
A l l Too Soon by Stanley Dance 16
M y S t o r y b y B u d d y T a t e as t o l d to F r a n k D r i g g s 18
T h e N e g r o C h u c h : Its I n f l u e n c e o n M o d e r n J a z z . R h y t h m ,
p a r t 2, by M i m i C l a r 21
T h e C u b a n Sexteto by R o g e r P r y o r D o d g e 24
O n B i g B i l l B r o o n z y a n d the B l u e s b y S t u d s T e r k e l 28
The Blues 29
Reviews: Recordings
R e d A l l e n by L a r r y Gushee 30
Louis Armstrong by M . W . 30
Dave Brubeck by Julian Adderley 32
Billy Eckstine by M i m i Clar 33
W . C. H a n d y J a m e s P . Johnson by D i c k Welstood 34
M a r y A n n M c C a l l by Glenn Coulter 35
Jackie M c L e a n by Bill C r o w 35
Jelly R o l l M o r t o n by G u y W a t e r m a n 35
Fats N a v a r r o by B i l l C r o w 38
W i l l i e "the L i o n " S m i t h by G u y W a t e r m a n 39
M u g g s y Spanier by L a r r y Gushee 40
Benny Carter by Julian Adderley 42
Ragtime by Guy Waterman 42
Reconsiderations 2 by E d w y B. Lee 43
Reviews: Books
Count Basie and his Orchestra by Hsio W e n Shih 44
Jazz In P r i n t by N . H . 45

Editors: Nat Hentoff, Martin Williams


Publishers: L e o n a r d F e l d m a n , Israel Young
Art Editor: Hsio Wen Shih
Advertising Manager: Richard Joseph

T h e J a z z R e v i e w is p u b l i s h e d m o n t h l y by

T h e Jazz Review, Inc.,

Village Station, P . O . B o x 128, New Y o r k 1 4 , IN. Y .

E n t i r e contents copyrighted 1958.


Du Cote de Chez Basie

An Appraisal of the Count Bash

by Andre Hodeir
It has taken more than twenty h i s t o r y of j a z z ? H o w c a n X the saxo- o r c h e s t r a u s i n g the seven brass a n d
years f o r C o u n t B a s i e ' s o r c h e s t r a to p h o n i s t o r Y the t r o m b o n i s t p r o v e five s a x o p h o n e s , t h r o u g h o u t t h e c l o s -
d e v e l o p i t s s t y l e . T h a t i s n ' t so l o n g . i n o n e s o l o t h a t he i s i n c a p a b l e o f i n g e n s e m b l e , as o n e s i n g l e w i n d
M a n y others, n o lesser m u s i c i a n s , p r o j e c t i n g the r h y t h m i c excitement section.
never got that f a r . that a l l great j a z z m e n breathe ( a n d T w o f a c t o r s w o r k t o g e t h e r to r e -
I f we c o m p a r e B a s i e ' s p r e - w a r rec- w h i c h H a m p t o n a n d Jacquet, despite i n f o r c e the i m p r e s s i o n o f l a c k o f
o r d s to h i s recent ones, a shift i n their l i m i t e d invention, have forged m o t i o n I m i g h t almost say of i m -
the center of interest is o b v i o u s . into a tool for creation) and five m o b i l i t y ; the c h o i c e o f t e m p o a n d
Lester Y o u n g , B u c k Clayton, D i c k i e m i n u t e s later, i n the c o m p a n y of other the density of the w r i t i n g . T h e t e m p o
Wells, H a r r y Edison, and Hershel X s a n d Y s , s u d d e n l y c o m e to l i f e i n i s h a r d to p i n d o w n : i t l i e s b e t w e e n
E v a n s h e l d o u r interest t h e n ; n o w an e x t r a o r d i n a r i l y s w i n g i n g ensem- m e d i u m slow a n d slow. B u t the tempo
we l i s t e n t o the o r c h e s t r a as a w h o l e . ble? ( J = 68) permits a perfect balance of
Works l i k e Doggin Around and t h e t r i p l e t s a n d t e r n a r y figures, s o m e -
Swinging the Blues, dazzling strings times syncopated, w h i c h Basie never
of solos w i t h the ensemble a p p e a r i n g gave up, and w h i c h his influence has
only i n i n t r o d u c t i o n a n d support, not T H E MASSIVE PHRASE d o n e m u c h to restore to a p l a c e of
f o r its o w n sake, have been replaced honour i n m o d e r n jazz. T h e strong
b v a m o r e Durel'v o r c h e s t r a l c o n c e p - B a s i e a n d h i s a r r a n g e r s seem rec- t w o - b e a t p u l s e a l s o h e l p s to r e i n f o r c e
tion w h i c h is most h i g h l y developed o n c i l e d to a s c h i s m i n f o r m , i f n o t the s t a t i c q u a l i t y . O v e r t h i s f o u n d a -
i n the fine F r a n k F o s t e r a r r a n g e - actually i n style; their conception is t i o n the p h r a s i n g c o u l d not a v o i d be-
m e n t Shiny Stockings. N o w the solo b a s e d o n a p e r e n n i a l c o n t r a s t be- i n g open a n d a i r y i n its h o r i z o n t a l
h a s b e c o m e a n i n l a y f i r m l y set i n t h e tween two w o r l d s . Phrases scored for u n f o l d i n g n o r t i g h t a n d d e n s e i n its
a r r a n g e m e n t - i t seems c a l l e d u o b v b i g b a n d ensembles have always been v e r t i c a l v o i c i n g . A n d the s o l o i s t m u s t
the a r r a n g e m e n t r a t h e r t h a n c r e a t i n g t a i l o r e d differently f r o m those that free h i m s e l f o f t h i s s t r a i g h t - j a c k e t
it t h o u g h i t i s a c t u a l l v n o t so w e l l soloists p l a y ; a n d arrangers have a l - a n d make a try for greater m o b i l i t y
integrated as t h e best s o l o s by w a y s h a d to t r y to b r i d g e the g a p - by j u m p i n g into double time in a
Cootie Hodses or Risrard with s o m e t i m e s g o i n g as f a r as to s c o r e s e e m i n g d e n i a l o f the i n f r a - s t r u c t u r e .
Ellington. ' h a r m o n i z e d versions of f a m o u s solos T h e result is an absolute contrast.
T h e q u a l i t y of the solos t h e m - ( t h o u g h this o n l y w o r k e d f o r the S t i l l , let's t r y t o i m a g i n e a s w a p .
selves, let's a d m i t i t , doesn't j u s t i f y section of the o r i g i n a l solo i n s t r u - W o u l d the p h r a s e t h a t F o s t e r g a v e
serious study of the B a s i e orchestra. ment a n d never helped the w r i t i n g of t o a l l the w i n d i n s t r u m e n t s , w h i c h
B u t that i n itself suggests a q u e s t i o n t u t t i ) . T h e present Basie b a n d shows t h e y c a r v e o u t so n e a t l y , s o u n d l i k e
that lies o n the b o r d e r of m y s t e r y . its o r i g i n a l i t y b y g o i n g i n e x a c t l y t h e g o o d jazz if it were played by a
T h e question is t h i s : h o w can twelve opposite direction, w h i c h appears i n s o l o i s t ? A b s o l u t e l y n o t ! W i t h o u t its
m e n ( l e a v i n g out the r h y t h m section) t h e i r best a r r a n g e m e n t s I m i g h t a l - s p e c i f i c g r a v i t y i t l o s e s its f u l l m e a n -
three-quarters of w h o m cannot p l a y most say the o n l y g o o d a r r a n g e m e n t s i n g , a n d that w e i g h t c a n ' t be p r o -
a s w i n g i n g s o l o , c o m b i n e to b e c o m e i n t h e i r b o o k . Shiny Stockings, after d u c e d b y less t h a n ten o r t w e l v e
the most m a g n i f i c e n t w i n d section, a labored opening e x p l o i t s t o the h o r n s . It w o u l d s e e m f e a t h e r - w e i g h t
a n d the m o s t s w i n g i n g one, i n the u l t i m a t e the static q u a l i t y of the w i t h e v e n t h r e e b r a s s a n d t h r e e saxes.

6 THE JAZZ REVIEW


Orchestra

It d e s e r v e s to be c a l l e d the massive
phrase.
H e r e we have esthetic evidence that
f o r c e s us t o r e - e x a m i n e the m e r i t s o f
the b i g - b a n d c o n c e p t i o n s o f K e n t o n ' s
b a n d ( B i l l H o l m a n ' s ) a n d the c u r -
rent E l l i n g t o n b a n d (Billy Stray-
h o r n ' s ) w h i c h are still i n the e x p e r i -
m e n t a l stage, a n d w h i c h have never
m a n a g e d , to m y k n o w l e d g e , a c o m -
plete t e c h n i c a l a n d esthetic success.
Contrapuntal writing for b i g bands,
especially when such w r i t i n g reduces
the specific g r a v i t y of the w i n d i n -
struments, a n d therefore dilutes the
phrase instead of d e n s i f y i n g it, c a n
a l r e a d y be c o n s i d e r e d a d e a d - e n d
c o n d e m n e d b y h i s t o r y , as m u c h as the
old fashioned scoring " b y sections".
T h a t k i n d of c o u n t e r p o i n t has no
p l a c e , i t seems, e x c e p t i n m i d d l e -
s i z e d ( s i x to t e n h o r n s ) g r o u p s ; t h e
b i g b a n d s h o u l d c o n c e n t r a t e o n the
massive phrase, though an intermedi-
ate s o l u t i o n i s p o s s i b l e f o r b a n d s t h a t
can be b r o k e n d o w n i n t o s e v e r a l
smaller groups of musicians in con-
t r a s t t o the e n s e m b l e . T h a t w a s the
s o l u t i o n o f the s e v e n t e e n t h c e n t u r y
I t a l i a n c o m p o s e r s i n t h e i r "Concert]
G r o s s i " , adopted by E l l i n g t o n , how-
ever t i m i d l y , i n Jam-a-Ditty.

CIVIL S E R V I C E SWING

The i d e a o f the m a s s i v e p h r a s e
suggests the a n s w e r to o u r o r i g i n a l

DECEMBER 7
question. T h e musicians i n Basie's t o m a k e s w i n g t h r o u g h s o m e o n e else's B u t h e ' l l get a l o n g ; he h a s a great
orchestra, u n q u e s t i o n a b l y v i c t i m s of ideas a n d sensibility, like w e a r i n g a d e a l o f t a l e n t , a n d y o u d o n ' t get b o r e d
deficiency i n r h y t h m i c i m a g i n a t i o n u n i f o r m n o t just a tunic but a coat with that.
( t h a t ' s t r u e of m o s t o f t h e m a n y w a y ) , of a r m o u r or a d i v i n g s u i t : he can't A p p a r e n t l y B a s i e ' s o r c h e s t r a has
who s w i n g o n l y moderately i n solo, be recognized as an individual t r o u b l e finding n e w w o r k s to a d d to
are perfectly c a p a b l e of performing t h r o u g h it. H e is consecrated to the t h e b o o k . P e r f e c t i o n o f style i s a
accurately a different k i n d of phrase a n o n y m o u s a n d endless r e p e t i t i o n of h a r d t h i n g to m a i n t a i n ; i t depends
w h e n they have been c o n d i t i o n e d b y the s a m e p i e c e s w i t h the s a m e effects o n m a n y c i r c u m s t a n c e s , a n d besides
m a n y r e p e t i t i o n s a n d they m a n a g e to e v e r y n i g h t , a n d e v e r y n i g h t he p u t s t h e w o r k s a r e n o t the w o r k of a
produce a nearly mechanical surface. o n the same u n i f o r m l i k e a n actor s i n g l e p e r s o n . B u t p e r f e c t i o n of style
W h o has not been s t r u c k b y the m a k i n g up f o r the t h o u s a n d t h per- is t h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t t h i n g . T h e c u r -
s m o o t h o p e r a t i o n of the B a s i e o r - f o r m a n c e of the same p a r t . O f course r e n t b o o k i s n o t a l l o n the same l e v e l .
chestra, that jazz m a c h i n e the spontaneity has no place i n this l i f e : S o m e p i e c e s a r e r e a l l y b a d , l i k e April
phrase is not n e w , but have we ab- t h e j o b c o m e s first. The job of swing- in Paris, w h i c h i s B a s i e ' s biggest
sorbed its h u m a n m e a n i n g ? w h i c h ing! T h e r e a r e p a r a d o x e s i n j a z z , t o o . c o m m e r c i a l success s i n c e Every Day,
c a n p r o d u c e intense s w i n g , n i g h t after b u t w h i c h h a s n o m u s i c a l m e r i t . It
n i g h t , but a l w a y s the same a m o u n t is s a d t h a t t h e u s u a l l y d i g n i f i e d B a s i e ,
without ever exceeding itself? A l l
F O R C E S H E L D IN R E S E R V E
one must a d m i r e his s m i l i n g com-
signs of o r i g i n a l i t y , of freshness, of posure, allows himself, while playing
O f course this is not an attempt
d i s c o v e r y m u s t t a k e a b a c k seat i n a " b a l l a d " o n w h i c h the a r r a n g e m e n t
to m a k e l i g h t of i n s t r u m e n t a l i s t s w h o
t h e l i f e o f these m u s i c i a n s w h e n t h e y d o e s n o t fit t h e t h e m e , n o r the theme
w o r k at s u c h a h i g h l e v e l o f j a z z a n d
p l a y n e a r l y the same t h i n g s every h i s o r c h e s t r a , t o flatter the p u b l i c : i t ' s
of m u s i c . O n l y p e r f o r m e r s , but w h a t
t i m e . T o place the same accent i n the h a r d t o see t h e p o i n t of, l i k e L o u i s
performers! The extraordinary pre-
s a m e p a s s a g e w i t h the s a m e f o r c e i n A r m s t r o n g , re-doing "one more once"
c i s i o n o f Shiny Stockings can only
the s a m e c o n t e x t i s a j o b f o r .super- the last b a r s of a n a r r a n g e m e n t , an
be t h e w o r k o f m a s t e r c r a f t s m e n . B u t
civil-servants with a patience and a u n w o r t h y t r i c k . L e t u s h o p e t h a t the
the even m o r e e x t r a o r d i n a r y i d e a be-
passivity that r i v a l s that of s y m p h o n y C o u n t w i l l give u p such easy empty
h i n d t h e m , the a s t o n i s h i n g l y m o d e r n
orchestra musicians. ( B u t really they s u c c e s s e s a n d t h a t he w i l l a g a i n p r o -
w o r k , so r e s t r a i n e d i n e x p r e s s i o n ,
go f u r t h e r : whoever h e a r d a s y m - g r a m h i s p e r f o r m a n c e s as s e r i o u s l y
m u s t be c r e d i t e d to F r a n k F o s t e r
p h o n y orchestra that d i d n ' t have a as he d i d d u r i n g h i s last P a r i s i a n
( a n d p e r h a p s also to B a s i e ) . H e r e
more v a r i e d r e p e r t o r y t h a n C o u n t visit i n October 1956.
Basie's band breaks through f r o m
Basie?) I n spite of the g e n e r a l l y
n e o - c l a s s i c i s m to h a m m e r o n t h e d o o r A t t h e r i s k o f m o n o t o n y , let m e
accepted i d e a that a j a z z m a n must
of m o d e r n jazz. T h i s force held i n repeat that Basie's orchestra s h o u l d
be s o m e h o w a creator j a z z now h a s
reserve was b o r n i n 1950 i n " c o o l " only p l a y blues or arrangements
m u s i c i a n s who are purely performers
j a z z : w i t h o u t t h i s t h e first t r e m o l o strongly saturated i n blues feeling.
w h o a r e n e v e r t h e l e s s g e n u i n e jazz
of the w i n d s w o u l d have been p l a y e d F r a n c y B o l a n d has written some for
men.
f o r t e , as i n " h o t " e x p r e s s i o n i s m , a n d B a s i e , a n d t h e r e m u s t be m a n y o t h e r
If' they c a n s w i n g then they must w e w o u l d h a v e lost the final i m p r e s - a r r a n g e r s w h o don't feel that the
be j a z z m e n , n o o n e c a n d e n y t h a t . s i o n of a g r a d u a l b u t effective l o o s e n - blues are a d e a d letter. P e r h a p s we
B u t i f t h e y h a v e n o creative powers i n g of the a c c u m u l a t e d energy. s h o u l d a l s o h o p e f o r the e l i m i n a t i o n
then, h o w e v e r m u c h they s w i n g , the
of fast t e m p o s w h i c h the o r c h e s t r a
whole question is open again. I think T h o u g h he i s g e n u i n e l y c r e a t i v e
has t r o u b l e i n s u s t a i n i n g : doesn't it
that's the w r o n g a p p r o a c h . T o say with pen and manuscript, Frank
s w i n g most on m e d i u m slow pieces
creation is to say change, experience, Foster showed little d a r i n g when he
l i k e Shiny Stockings a n d Every Day?
sorties i n t o the u n k n o w n . N o n e of soloed with Basie's orchestra d u r i n g
T h e best h o p e o f t h e B a s i e o r c h e s t r a
t h a t a m o n g the B a s i e m u s i c i a n s : t h e y a r e c e n t s t a y at B i r d l a n d . T h e c i v i l
s h o u l d n o t be t o e x t e n d its r a n g e ;
l i v e i n f r o z e n p e r f e c t i o n , a l w a y s the service j o b - h o l d i n g attitude i n the
it s h o u l d be t o t a k e t h e g r e a t e s t p o s -
same. B u t d i d they create that per- b a n d has infected a l l the soloists ex-
sible advantage of the p o s s i b i l i t i e s
fection? N o m o r e t h a n the m a s o n cept Joe N e w m a n a n d T h a d Jones.
a v a i l a b l e w i t h i n its l i m i t e d range,
creates the b u i l d i n g . T h e y didn't N o t o n l y d o the soloists r a r e l y t r y
w i t h i n w h i c h it has no peer.
t h i n k it u p t h e m s e l v e s : s o m e b o d y , the to d o s o m e t h i n g n e w , b u t e v e n w o r s e
T o e x p e c t B a s i e to p r o d u c e the
arranger, d i d that; and Basie's care- t h e y a r e so c a r e f u l t o a v o i d r i s k s t h e y
m o d e r n b i g b a n d we have a l l been
ful supervision played a perhaps a r e s a t i s f i e d w i t h the m e d i o c r e . T o
awaiting, and w h i c h neither Stan
e q u a l p a r t . P r o b a b l y a l l the w o r k was hear solos repeated note for note
K e n t o n nor D i z z y Gillespie have given
d o n e i n a d v a n c e , a n d t h e first p u b l i c o v e r a n d o v e r seems a n i n s u l t f r o m
us, w o u l d be a m i s t a k e . T h e C o u n t
p e r f o r m a n c e w a s as finished as the s u c h a fine b a n d . T h e n t o o J o e W i l -
and h i s o r c h e s t r a are g i v i n g us a
latest. l i a m s seems to h a v e p e r f e c t e d t h e a r t
m a g n i f i c e n t lesson i n c l a s s i c i s m ; even
F r o m there o n the m u s i c i a n s just of r o u t i n e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . T h e r e is
more, they are still e v o l v i n g and even,
perform, like their symphonic col- n o t h i n g more like his performance of
on a purely instrumental level, i m -
leagues. T h e r e ' s o n l y one difference Every Day t o n i g h t t h a n l a s t n i g h t ' s
p r o v i n g . T h a t is a unique situation.
between the w o r k of a B a s i e r e e d m a n p e r f o r m a n c e , unless it's the one he is
T h e revitalization of b i g b a n d jazz
a n d a c o r n e t i s t i n the o r c h e s t r e de l a g o i n g to d o t o m o r r o w n i g h t . T h e
w i l l take place elsewhere: we'd like
S u i s s e R o m a n d e : the l a t t e r " r e c r e - most obviously spontaneous touches
t o bet t h a t t h e s p i r i t o f D u k e E l l i n g -
a t e s " D e b u s s y a c c o r d i n g to t h e m e n - i n Every Day, l i k e a t o u c h o f h o a r s e -
ton, i n h i b e r n a t i o n n o w f o r fifteen
tal picture of Ernest A n s e r m e t while ness o n t h e w o r d " m e " i n h i s f o u r t h
years, w i l l play a m a j o r role.
the f o r m e r recreates w o r k s of F r a n k chorus, reappear every day with
F o s t e r o r E r n i e W i l k i n s u n d e r the deadly sameness. Joe W i l l i a m s , a (This article is reprinted from
guidance of Basie a n d his arrangers. m o d e l B a s i e a s s o c i a t e , seems t o s i n g J a z z - H o t , November, 1957 by per
T h a t g u i d a n c e u n d o u b t e d l y m u s t be o n l y to r e p r o d u c e h i s r e c o r d s . C l o s e mission of the author and of
s t r i c t a n d d e f i n i t e ; o u r m a n i s left y o u r e y e s q u i c k , is it W i l l i a m s i n Charles Delaunay, directeur. It is
w i t h no r o o m f o r i n i t i a t i v e . H e has p e r s o n o r is it the r e c o r d s p i n n i n g ? translated by Hsio Wen Shih.)

8 THE JAZZ REVIEW


A n Afternoon with Miles Davis

by Nat Hentoff M i l e s lives i n a relatively new


b u i l d i n g on T e n t h A v e n u e near 57th
Street. T h e largest area i n his apart-
ment is the l i v i n g r o o m . L i k e the
o t h e r r o o m s , i t is u n c l u t t e r e d . T h e
f u r n i s h i n g s h a v e been c a r e f u l l y se-
lected a n d are spare. M i l e s has a
particular liking for " g o o d wood"
a n d e x p l a i n s t h e r e b y w h y h i s Down
Beat p l a q u e s a n d even his F o u r
Roses A w a r d from the R a n d a l l ' s
Island " f e s t i v a l " a r e all displayed.
Don Hun*! c o u r t e s y of C o l u m b i a R e c o r d s
H e h a s a g o o d p i a n o a n d a n ade-
quate non-stereo record p l a y e r .

T h e i d e a o f t h e a f t e r n o o n t h e first
of a s e r i e s o f o b s e r v a t i o n s b y M i l e s
to be p r i n t e d at r e g u l a r i n t e r v a l s i n
t h i s m o n t h l y w a s to p l a y a v a r i e t y
of r e c o r d i n g s f o r h i m a n d t r a n s c r i b e
his reactions. T h i s was not a b l i n d -
fold test, f o r w h i l e I find those
a d v e n t u r e s i n skeet s h o o t i n g e n t e r -
t a i n i n g I doubt i f thev serve m u c h
purpose except t r a n s i t o r y t i t i l l a t i o n .

First was B i l l i e H o l i d a y ' s 1937 /


Must Have That Man w i t h W i l s o n .
Clayton, Goodman, Young, Green,
P a g e a n d J o Jones. " I love the way
B i l l i e sings," M i l e s began. " S h e sings
like Lester Y o u n g and L o u i s A r m -
strong p l a y , but I don't like a l l that's
g o i n g o n b e h i n d h e r . A l l she needed
was L e s t e r a n d the r h y t h m . T h e p i a n o
was a d l i b b i n g w h i l e she was s i n g -
i n g , w h i c h l e a d s to c o n f l i c t , a n d the
" u i t a r w a s t o o l o u d a n d h a d too m u c h
accent on every b e a t . "

M i l e s was a s k e d w h e t h e r he agreed
w i t h m o s t o f the w r i t e r s o n j a z z t h a t
the B i l l i e o f 2 0 y e a r s a g o w a s the
" b e s t " B i l l i e a n d t h a t she i s n o w i n
decline. " I ' d rather hear her now.
She's become m u c h m o r e mature.
Sometimes v o u can sine w o r d s everv
n i g h t f o r five y e a r s a n d a l l o f a
s u d d e n i t d a w n s o n y o u w h a t the
sone means I n l a v e d My Funny
Valentine for a long t i m e a n d didn't
like it a n ( J H
a 0 f a s u d d e n it m e a n t
something. So with Billie, you know
s h e ' s n o"tL t" h
' ii"n"k- <
i nr5r n o w uwnai
/W S M P was
=nc was
in 1937 a n d she's p r o b a b l y learned

DECEMBER 9
m o r e a b o u t d i f f e r e n t t h i n g s . A n d she
still has c o n t r o l , p r o b a b l y m o r e con-
trol now than then. N o , I don't think
she's i n a d e c l i n e .
" W h a t I l i k e about B i l l i e is that
she s i n g s i t j u s t the w a y she h e a r s i t
a n d t h a t ' s u s u a l l y t h e w a y best s u i t e d
for her. She has more feeling than
E l l a and more experience i n l i v i n g
a certain way than E l l a . Billie's pretty
wild, you know.
" S h e sings w a y b e h i n d the beat
a n d t h e n she b r i n g s i t u p h i t t i n g
r i g h t o n the b e a t . Y o u c a n p l a y be-
h i n d the beat, but every once i n a
w h i l e y o u h a v e to c u t i n t o t h e r h y t h m
section o n the beat a n d that keeps
e v e r y b o d y together. S i n a t r a does it
b y accenting a w o r d . A lot of singers
t r y to s i n g l i k e B i l l i e , b u t just the
act o f p l a y i n g b e h i n d t h e b e a t d o e s n ' t
make it sound soulful.
" I don't think that'guys like B u c k
C l a y t o n a r e t h e best p o s s i b l e a c c o m -
panists for her. I'd rather hear her
w i t h B o b b y T u c k e r , t h e p i a n i s t she
u s e d to h a v e . S h e d o e s n ' t n e e d a n y
horns. S h e sounds like one a n y w a y . "
M i l e s ' r e a c t i o n to C l i f f o r d B r o w n ' s
Joy Spring as p l a y e d b y the O s c a r
P e t e r s o n T r i o o n The Modern Jazz
Quartet and The Oscar Peterson Trio
at the Opera House (Verve M G - V
8269) was intensely negative. " O s c a r
m a k e s m e s i c k b e c a u s e he c o p i e s
e v e r y b o d y . H e e v e n h a d to learn h o w
t o p l a y the b l u e s . E v e r y b o d y k n o w s
t h a t i f y o u flat a t h i r d , y o u ' r e g o i n g
to get a b l u e s s o u n d . H e l e a r n e d t h a t
a n d r u n s it i n t o the g r o u n d worse
t h a n B i l l y T a y l o r . Y u d o n ' t h a v e to
0

do that.
" N o w t a k e t h e w a y he p l a y s the
song. T h a t ' s not what C l i f f o r d meant.
H e passes r i g h t o v e r w h a t c a n be d o n e
w i t h the c h o r d s , " a n d here M i l e s
d e m o n s t r a t e d o n t h e p i a n o , as h e d i d
frequently d u r i n g the afternoon. " I t ' s
m u c h p r e t t i e r i f y o u get i n t o i t a n d
h e a r the c h o r d w e a v i n g i n a n d out
like B i l l Evans and R e d Garland
c o u l d d o i n s t e a d o f b e i n g so h e a v y .
O s c a r i s i a z z v he i a z z e s u d t h e t u n e
A n d he sure has devices, like certain
s c a l e p a t t e r n s , t h a t he p l a y s a l l t h e
time.
" D o e s he s w i n g h a r d like some
people say? I don't know what
they mean when they say ' s w i n g
h a r d ' a n y w a y . N e a r l y e v e r y t h i n g he
p l a y s , he p l a y s w i t h the same degree
of force. H e leaves n o holes f o r the
r h y t h m section. T h e only t h i n g I ever 1
h e a r d h i m play that I l i k e d was his
first r e c o r d of Tenderly.
" I love R a y B r o w n . A s for H e r b
E l l i s , I don't l i k e that k i n d of t h i n g
with guitar on every beatunless
y o u p l a y i t &e F r e d d i e G r e e n does
now. Y o u listen and y o u ' l l hear how

10 THE JA
much Green has lightened his sound two c h o r d s for a l l of that. A n d i n tato Head Blues of 1 9 2 7 w i t h L i l
t h r o u g h the y e a r s . I f y o u w a n t to see Summertime, there is a l o n g space Armstrong, K i d O n , Johnny Dodds,
h o w i t feels w i t h a h e a v y g u i t a r , get w h e r e we d o n ' t c h a n g e the c h o r d at J o h n n y St. C y r , Baby Dodds. and
up to p l a y sometimes w i t h one of a l l . It j u s t d o e s n ' t h a v e to be c l u t - Pete B r i g g s o n tuba. " L o u i s has been
them behind you. H e ' l l drive y o u nuts. tered u p . " t h r o u g h a l l k i n d s of styles." M i l e s
" B a c k to O s c a r . H e p l a y s p r e t t y F r o m the same V e r v e O p e r a H o u s e b e g a n . " T h a t ' s g o o d t u b a , b y the w a y
g o o d w h e n he p l a y s i n a n A r t T a t u m L P , I p l a y e d the M o d e r n J a z z Q u a r - . . Y o u know you can't play any-
f o r m of b a l l a d a p p r o a c h . A n d I heard tet's v e r s i o n o f Now's The Time. "If t h i n g o n a h o r n that L o u i s hasn't
him p l a y s o m e b l u e s o n c e at a I w e r e J o h n , " M i l e s b e g a n , " I ' d let p l a y e d I m e a n even m o d e r n . I love
m e d i u m tempo that sounded pretty M i l t p l a y m o r e t h i n g s h e ' d l i k e to h i s a p p r o a c h to the t r u m p e t ; he n e v e r
g o o d . B u t for p l a y i n g l i k e that w i t h get l o o s e o n a n d t h e n p l a y these s o u n d s b a d . H e p l a y s o n the beat a n d
a g u i t a r I p r e f e r N a t C o l e . I feel t h i n g s . It w o u l d be a l l the m o r e effec- v o u c a n ' t m i s s w h e n v o u n l a v o n the
t h o u g h t h a t i t ' s a waste to use a t i v e b y c o n t r a s t . Y o u c a n d o a lot b y beatwith feeling. That's another
<*uitar t h i s w a v I f v o u t a k e t h e g u i t a r setting up for contrast. Sometimes p h r a s e f o r s w i n g . I a l s o l o v e the w a y
and have h i m play l i n e s l i n e s like I ' l l s t a r t a set w i t h a b a l l a d . Y o u ' l l be he s i n g s H e a n d B i l l i e n e v e r m a d e a
Georee Russell G i l E v a n s or J o h n s u r p r i s e d at w h a t a n effect t h a t i s . " record d i d t h e y " M i l e s was i n -
9

Lewis could m a k e t h e n a trio can T h e conversation turned on p i a n - f o r m e d t h e y h a d b u t the m a t e r i a l w a s


sound wonderful. ists. " B o y , I ' v e s u r e l e a r n e d a l o t nanr ir f R i l lie's Thj> Rlup<! Arp
T h e next r e c o r d was a t r a c k f r o m f r o m B i l l E v a n s . H e p l a y s the p i a n o Brewin 7
Decca D L 8707)
Kenny Clark Plays Andre Hodeir t h e w a y i t s h o u l d be p l a y e d . H e p l a y s " T h e r e ' s f o r m there, a n d y o u take
( E p i c L N 3 3 7 6 ) . It w a s M i l e s ' o w n all k i n d s of scales; can play i n 5 / 4 ; s o m e o f t h o s e e a r l y f o r m s , p l a y it
Swing Spring a n d these a r e H o d e i r ' s and a l l k i n d s of fantastic things. today, and they'd sound g o o d . I also
n o t e s o n the a r r a n g e m e n t : "Swing T h e r e ' s such a difference between h i m l i k e a l l those little stops i n h i s solo.
Spring i s a l s o t r e a t e d as a c a n o n , and R e d G a r l a n d w h o m I also l i k e a W e s t o p , b u t we o f t e n let t h e d r u m s
after an i n t r o d u c t i o n f e a t u r i n g an lot. R e d c a r r i e s the r h y t h m , b u t B i l l lay out altogether. If I h a d this rec-
e l a b o r a t i o n o f the m a i n e l e m e n t o f u n d e r p l a y s , a n d I l i k e that better." ord, I'd play i t . "
the t h e m e , t h e s c a l e . M a r t i a l S o l a l ' s M i l e s w a s at the p i a n o a g a i n , i n -
Before f o u r bars of A h m a d J a m a l ' s
b r i l l i a n t solo is f o l l o w e d b y a para d u l g i n g one of his p r i m a r y pleasures
But Not for Me o n A r g o L P 6 2 8 ,
phrase with integrated d r u m i m p r o - h e a r i n g what can be done w i t h
M i l e s s a i d h a p p i l y , " T h a t ' s the w a y
visations. Both Armand Migiani v o i c i n g s , b y c h a n g i n g a note, s p r e a d -
to p l a y t h e p i a n o . I f I c o u l d p l a y l i k e
( b a r i t o n e sax. ) a n d R o g e r G u e r i n i n g o u t the c h o r d , r e s h a p i n g i t . " Y o u
A h m a d and Bill Evans combined with
(trumpet) take a short solo." k n o w , y o u can play chords on every
o n e h a n d , t h e y c o u l d t a k e the o t h e r
M i l e s h a d n ' t l o o k e d c a r e f u l l y at n o t e i n the s c a l e . S o m e p e o p l e d o n ' t
off. J a m a l o n c e t o l d m e he's b e e n
the l i n e r n o t e s a n d w a s p u z z l e d f o r s e e m to r e a l i z e t h a t . P e o p l e l i k e B i l l ,
p l a y i n g i n n i g h t c l u b s s i n c e he w a s
t h e first f e w b a r s . " T h a t ' s m y t u n e , Gil Evans and George Russell know
e l e v e n . L i s t e n to h o w he s l i p s i n t o
isn't i t ? I forgot a l l about that tune. w h a t c a n b e d o n e , w h a t the p o s s i -
the o t h e r k e y . Y o u c a n h a r d l y t e l l i t ' s
God d a m n ! K e n n y Clarke can swing, bilities are."
h a p p e n i n g . H e doesn't throw his tech-
can't he? T h a t boy S o l a l can play, M i l e s r e t u r n e d to t h e M J Q r e c o r d -
nique around like Oscar Peterson.
but the p i a n i s t I l i k e i n E u r o p e is ing. " J o h n taught a l l of t h e m , M i l t
T h i n g s flow i n t o a n d o u t o f e a c h
Bengt Hallberg. D a m n ! Y o u know, c o u l d n ' t r e a d at a l l , a n d P e r c y h a r d l y .
other. A n o t h e r reason I like R e d
I f o r g o t I w r o t e that. T h a t ' s the w r o n g A l l J o h n h a s to d o i s let M i l t p l a y
G a r l a n d a n d B i l l E v a n s is that when
middle i n the p i a n o s o l o w h y does w i t h j u s t a sketch of a n arrangement.
t h e v n l a v a c h o r d t h e v n l a v a tnund
he d o t h a t ? B e c a u s e i t ' s e a s i e r , I T h a t ' s w h a t w e d o a l l the t i m e . I
more than a chord.
suppose. T h e arrangement is terrible. never have anybody write up any-
It w a s n e v e r m e a n t to be l i k e t h a t . t h i n g too difficult for us, because then " L i s t e n to the w a y J a m a l uses
It s o u n d s l i k e a t i r e d m o d e r n p a i n t - musicians tighten up. s p a c e . H e lets it g o so t h a t y o u c a n
ing wj t nskeletons i n it H e writes " I love the w a y J o h n p l a y s . I've feel the r h y t h m s e c t i o n and the
p r e t t y g o o d i n s p o t s , b u t he o v e r - g o t t o get t h a t r e c o r d w h e r e he p l a y s r h y t h m s e c t i o n c a n feel y o u . It's n o t
c r o w d s it. K e n n y a n d S o l a l save it by himself. I usually don't buy jazz crowded. Paul Chambers, inciden-
I t h i n k I ' l l m a k e a n o t h e r r e c o r d of r e c o r d s . T h e y m a k e m e t i r e d a n d de- t a l l y , h a s s t a r t e d to p l a y a n e w w a y
t h i s t u n e It w a s m e a n t to be j u s t l i k e pressed. I ' l l b u y A h m a d J a m a l , J o h n w h e r e b y he c a n s o l o a n d a c c o m p a n y
Lewis, Sonny Rollins. Coltrane I hear h i m s e l f at the s a m e t i m e b y u s i n g
the n i a n o a n d n i r p dv ZtLZTlJt e v e r y n i g h t . A n d I l i k e t o h e a r the space well.
l v "itt k3r z rrr^ things that M a x R o a c h writes h i m - " A h m a d is one of m y favorites.
and w b W n w v n 5n thlt self. A d r u m m e r m a k e s a v e r y g o o d I live u n t i l he makes another r e c o r d .
1P nrl I n n Tin l!i At w r i t e r . H e h a s a sense o f s p a c e a n d I gave G i l E v a n s a couple of h i s
W n t H a 1f LTth , t R A k n o w s w h a t i t feels l i k e to be p l a y i n g a l b u m s , a n d he d i d n ' t g i v e t h e m b a c k .
TW1I h A V 1 T i l A around an arrangement. Philly Joe Red G a r l a n d knew I liked A h m a d and
timl" p l a y s tenor a n d p i a n o , a n d he's start- at t i m e s I u s e d t o ask h i m t o p l a y
M i l e s started to t a l k a b o u t h i s i n g to w r i t e . " l i k e t h a t . R e d w a s at h i s best w h e n
strong preference for w r i t i n g that T h e t a l k "came to C o l t r a n e . " H e ' s he d i d . B i l l p l a y s a l i t t l e l i k e t h a t b u t
isn't overcrowded, especially over been w o r k i n g on those a r p e g g i o s a n d he s o u n d s w i l d w h e n he d o e s a l l
c r o w d e d w i t h chords. H e f o u n d some p l a y i n g c h o r d s that lead into c h o r d s , those little s c a l e s . "
acetates o f h i s f o r t h c o m i n g C o l u m b i a p l a y i n g t h e m fifty d i f f e r e n t w a y s a n d M i l e s b y n o w w a s b a c k at the
/'orgy and Bess L P w h i c h G i l E v a n s p l a y i n g t h e m a l l at o n c e . H e ' s b e g i n - piano, talking with gathering intensity
had a r r a n g e d but f o r the s c o r i n g of n i n g to leave m o r e space except w h e n about the need f o r m o r e space a n d
w h i c h M i l e s h a d made a n u m b e r of h e gets n e r v o u s . T h e r e ' s o n e frantic- les c h o r d - c l u t t e r i n g i n j a z z . " W h e n
suggestions. H e p u t / Love You t e n o r i n P h i l a d e l p h i a , b y the w a y G i l w r o t e t h e a r r a n g e m e n t o f / Love
Porgy on the m a c h i n e . Jimmy Oliver." You, Porgy, h e o n l y w r o t e a scale
" H e a r that passage. W e o n l y used T h e n c a m e L o u i s A r m s t r o n g ' s Po- f o r m e to p l a y . N o c h o r d s . A n d that

DECEMBER
11
other passage w i t h just two chords a n d scales c a r r y t h e t u n e . J . J . t o l d " T h e t h i n g that M o n k must realize
gives y o u a lot m o r e freedom a n d m e , ' I ' m not g o i n g to w r i t e a n y m o r e i s t h a t h e c a n ' t get e v e r y b o d y to p l a y
s p a c e to h e a r t h i n g s . I've been l i s t e n - c h o r d s . ' A n d l o o k at G e o r g e R u s s e l l , his songs right. Coltrane, M i l t Jack-
i n g to K h a c h a t u r i a n c a r e f u l l y f o r s i x H i s w r i t i n g is m o s t l y scales. A f t e r a l l , son a n d m a y b e L u c k y T h o m p s o n are
m o n t h s n o w a n d the t h i n g that i n - y o u c a n f e e l the c h a n g e s . t h e o n l y o n e s I k n o w t h a t c a n get t h a t
t r i g u e s m e a r e a l l t h o s e d i f f e r e n t scales " T h e m u s i c has gotten t h i c k . G u y s f e e l i n g o u t o f h i s s o n g s t h a t he c a n .
h e uses. B i l l E v a n s k n o w s t o o w h a t give m e tunes a n d they're f u l l of A n d he needs d r u m m e r s l i k e D e n z i l
c a n be d o n e w i t h scales. A l l c h o r d s , chords. I can't play them. Y o u know, Best, B l a k e y , S h a d o w , R o y H a y n e s ,
a f t e r a l l , a r e r e l a t i v e to scales a n d w e p l a y My Funny Valentine like and Philly.
c e r t a i n c h o r d s m a k e c e r t a i n scales. I w i t h a scale a l l the w a y t h r o u g h . " " I love the w a y M o n k plays a n d
wrote a tune recently that's m o r e 3 T h e n e x t r e c o r d w a s Ruby, My writes, but I can't stand h i m behind
scale t h a n a l i n e . A n d I was g o i n g Dear w i t h T h e l o n i o u s M o n k , C o l e m a n me. H e doesn't give y o u any s u p p o r t . "
to w r i t e a b a l l a d for C o l t r a n e w i t h Hawkins, W i l b u r Ware and A r t Blakey T h e final r e c o r d w a s B e s s i e S m i t h ' s
just two chords. ( f r o m Monk's Music, Riverside R L P Young Woman's Blues, 1926, with
" W h e n y o u go this w a y , y o u can go 12-242). Fletcher Henderson, Joe S m i t h and
o n f o r e v e r . Y o u d o n ' t have to w o r r y " I learned h o w to p l a y ballads f r o m Buster Bailey.
about changes a n d y o u can do more C o l e m a n H a w k i n s . H e p l a y s a l l the " L i s t e n to J o e S m i t h ' s t o n e . H e ' s
w i t h the l i n e . It b e c o m e s a c h a l l e n g e c h o r d s a n d y o u c a n still hear the got s o m e f e e l i n g to i t . " M i l e s l a u g h e d
t o see h o w m e l o d i c a l l y i n v e n t i v e y o u ballad. Who's p l a y i n g bass? He w h i l e l i s t e n i n g t o t h e l y r i c s (c.f. t h e
are. W h e n you're based on chords, doesn't k n o w that tune. A s f o r the first i s s u e o f The Jazz Review).
y o u k n o w at t h e e n d o f 3 2 b a r s t h a t performance as a w h o l e , t h e t u n e " T h e y ' r e p r e t t y h i p . T h i s i s t h e first
the c h o r d s have r u n out a n d there's w a s n ' t m e a n t to b e p l a y e d t h a t w a y . time I've h e a r d this r e c o r d . I haven't
n o t h i n g to d o but repeat w h a t y o u ' v e I g u e s s H a w k i n s figured t h a t w i t h h e a r d m u c h of Bessie, but I l i k e her
just d o n e w i t h variations. y o u n g cats, he s h o u l d p l a y ' y o u n g - ' e v e r y t i m e I h e a r h e r . S h e affects m e
" I t h i n k a movement i n jazz is It's a very pretty b a l l a d a n d s h o u l d l i k e L e a d b e l l v d i d the w a v s o m e of
b e g i n n i n g a w a y f r o m the conven- be played just even. T h i s w a y y o u P a u l Laurence D u n b a r ' s poetry d i d .
tional string of chords, a n d a return can't hear it the w a v it i s - I ' d d a v I read h i m once and almost c r i e d .
to e m p h a s i s o n m e l o d i c r a t h e r t h a n it m o r e flowing. M o n k writes such T h e N e g r o southern speech.
harmonic variation. There will be Drettv melodies and then screws them " A s for those l y r i c s , I k n o w w h a t
fewer chords but infinite possibilities up. she m e a n s a b o u t n o t b e i n g a h i g h
as t o w h a t t o d o w i t h t h e m . C l a s s i c a l " Y o u h a v e t o g o d o w n to h e a r h i m yellow a n d being a % b r o w n or some-
c o m p o s e r s s o m e of t h e m h a v e been to r e a l l y a p p r e c i a t e w h a t he's d o i n g . t h i n g l i k e that. I n those d a y s h i g h
w r i t i n g this way for years, but jazz I ' d l i k e to m a k e a n a l b u m of h i s tunes y e l l o w w a s as c l o s e t o w h i t e as y o u
musicians seldom have. i f I c a n e v e r get h i m u p h e r e . c o u l d get. I t ' s g e t t i n g m o r e a n d m o r e
" W h e n I w a n t J . J . J o h n s o n to h e a r " M o n k has really helped me. W h e n m i x e d though and pretty soon when
s o m e t h i n g o r he w a n t s m e t o , w e I c a m e to N e w Y o r k , he t a u g h t m e y o u c a l l s o m e b o d y a n m.f., y o u w o n ' t
phone each other a n d just p l a y the c h o r d s a n d his tunes. A m a i n i n - k n o w w h a t k i n d to c a l l t h e m . Y o u
m u s i c o n t h e p h o n e . I d i d t h a t the fluence h e h a s b e e n t h r o u g h t h e y e a r s m i g h t h a v e t o c a l l t h e m a g r e e n m.f.
other d a y w i t h s o m e of the K h a c h a - h a s to d o w i t h g i v i n g m u s i c i a n s m o r e " I ' d love to h a v e a little b o y s o m e
t u r i a n scales; they're different f r o m f r e e d o m . T h e y feel t h a t i f M o n k c a n d a y w i t h r e d h a i r , green eyes a n d a
the u s u a l W e s t e r n scales. T h e n we got d o w h a t he d o e s , t h e y c a n . M o n k h a s black facewho plays piano like
to t a l k i n g a b o u t l e t t i n g the m e l o d i e s been u s i n g space f o r a l o n g t i m e . Ahmad Jamal."

FTP*

12 THE JAZZ REVIEW


n
Extended Improvisation and Form:

Some Solutions

by
Martin
Williams
Jimmy Yancey at Home l'hoto by William Russell

I
I n 1939 i n a d i s c u s s i o n of J i m m y T h e s e t w o a t t i t u d e s a r e n o t neces- M y s u b j e c t is the p r o b l e m o f f o r m
Y a n c e y ' s style, W i l l i a m R u s s e l l said, s a r i l y o p p o s i t e s . It s e e m s t o m e t h a t i n e x t e n d e d s o l o s . I b r i n g i t u p be-
"the usual ending, with an abrupt o n e o f Y a n c e y ' s best r e c o r d i n g s i s t h e cause (aside f r o m a rather classic
m o d u l a t i o n a n d final d i s s o n a n c e , n e e d one c a l l e d (after the fact b y the rec- bent of m i n d of m y o w n ) c e r t a i n
not surprise anyone who remembers o r d c o m p a n y ) How Long #2; it has h o r n - m e n have n o w d i r e c t l y faced it
that N e g r o i m p r o v i s e d folk music a d i s c i p l i n e of f o r m . E a c h c h o r u s is a n d it seems to me that i n the w o r k
h a s n o fixed b e g i n n i n g n o r d e f i n i t e based on a separate a p p r o a c h to the of b o t h M i l e s D a v i s a n d S o n n y R o l -
e n d , a n d its f o r m a l l e n g t h of no m o r e simple eight-bar blues melody, a n d l i n s , we hear m e n a t t e m p t i n g u n i q u e
consequence t h a n the title. S u c h a the w a y Y a n c e y handles the i m p r o v i - s o l u t i o n s to i t , w i t h a n awareness of
d a n c e as Yancey Stomp [The Fives] sation makes it clear that his unit is continuity and inner-structure. I think
c o u l d p r o b a b l y go on a l l n i g h t w i t h - a p a i r o f c h o r u s e s . T h e first b a s s t h a t a n a c c o u n t o f t h e i r efforts w i l l
out decrease i n effectiveness." F o r m , figure is the " f o u r - b e a t w a l k " ( l i k e have m o r e m e a n i n g if they are placed
i n other w o r d s , is a q u e s t i o n of the one " L u x " L e w i s used i n h i s i n t h e c o n t e x t of t h e p a s t i f o n l y t o
length a n d length is almost entirely Bear Cat Crawl). A t the t h i r d c h o r u s , support m y c o n t e n t i o n of t h e i r value.
a m a t t e r o f t h e e m o t i o n a l c l i m a t e of Y a n c e y begins a m o r e elaborate base I do not i n t e n d w h a t f o l l o w s to be
t h e m o m e n t w h i c h m a y e v e n be i n - l i n e , o b v i o u s l y i m p r o v i s e d , as a n i n - exhaustive, but I hope it w i l l i n c l u d e
dicated on a physical level. t e g r a t e d r e s p o n s e t o w h a t he i s b u i l d - s o m e e x e m p l a r y s o l u t i o n s to the p r o b -
H o w e v e r , w r i t i n g at a b o u t t h e s a m e i n g i n his treble. T h e right h a n d l e m . I h a d best a d d t h a t I d o n o t
time, Russell could praise Meade c o n t i n u e s to b u i l d i n c o m p l e x i t y , t h e n i n t e n d to discuss f o r m a l c o n c e p t i o n s
" L u x " L e w i s ' s Bass on Top o n t h e i n t e n s i o n , a n d b y c h o r u s five t h i s w h i c h s e e m t o m e to be i m p o s e d f r o m
basis of its " m o t i v a l d e v e l o p m e n t . " tension has p r o d u c e d a series of b y w i t h o u t . T h a t is, if the p r o b l e m of
" T h e g e r m m o t i v e itself is d e r i v e d n o w s i m p l e trills a n d the m a i n i m p r o - f o r m does not arise after the " r o m a n -
f r o m the bass a c c o m p a n i m e n t figure. v i s a t i o n is i n t h e bass l i n e . B y c h o r u s t i c " facts of inventiveness a n d con-
It i s t r e a t e d b y e x t e n s i o n ( c h o r u s 2 ) eight, Y a n c e y a b r u p t l y breaks the v i c t i o n , then it does not really arise
by d i m i n u t i o n and inversion (chorus m o o d , descends to the m i d d l e of the at a l l . L i k e " s t y l e " i n p r o s e , i t m u s t
4 a n d 6) twisted about u n t i l its pos- k e y b o a r d , decreases his d y n a m i c ten- u l t i m a t e l y be a c o n s e q u e n c e o f h a v i n g
sibilities of e l a b o r a t i o n are seemingly s i o n b u t he h a s p r e p a r e d f o r t h i s s o m e t h i n g t o s a y . It c a n n o t be a k i n d
exhausted. F i n a l l y , i n the eleventh descent p r e v i o u s l y b y g r a d u a l l y s i m - o f m o l d w h i c h needs o n l y t o be filled
chorus there begins a l i q u i d a t i o n i n p l i f y i n g t h e b a s e l i n e u n t i l he h a s out f o r a m a n to have p r o d u c e d s o m e -
w h i c h not o n l y the m e l o d i c but the r e d u c e d i t t o t h e figure he b e g a n t h i n g of value.
rhythmic motive and accompanying w i t h . A t the e n d , this pensive m o o d is
bass figure, as w e l l , a r e r e d u c e d t o c h a n g e d : t h e b r i l l i a n t flash of t h e T h e m a n w h o has l o n g been f a c e d
their most essential features." m i d d l e of the piece returns m o m e n - w i t h t h e p r o b l e m of e x t e n d e d i m p r o -
B e h i n d R u s s e l l ' s first s t a t e m e n t , o f t a r i l y to the treble, but w i t h the open- v i s a t i o n is, of course, the solo p i a n i s t ,
course, l i e the " r o m a n t i c " s t a n d a r d s i n g bass figure s o l i d l y a n c h o r i n g t h e a n d he f a c e d t h e p r o b l e m of c o n -
of i m a g i n a t i o n , inventiveness, emo- u n i t y , a n d the piece ends suspended t i n u i t y quite e a r l y . O n e of the reasons
tional projection, power, etc.even, on an odd-numbered chorus which f o r this is that i n his i m m e d i a t e back-
perhaps, of endurance. B e h i n d his e c h o s t h e t o n e he h a d set i n t h e b e g i n - ground lay both a vocal tradition and
second, " c l a s s i c a l " standards of f o r m , n i n g . T h u s , by a reiteration and over- the c o m p o s i t i o n a l a p p r o a c h of r a g -
inner cohesion, development, struc- l a p p i n g of m o t i f s , Y a n c e y m a i n t a i n e d t i m e , a n d it w i l l help i f we briefly
ture. a continuity. review ragtime.

13
i n t e n d that d e s c r i p t i o n to m e a n that f o r e ) , C , C (a v a r i a t i o n ) . A a n d B
R a g t i m e is a s o p h i s t i c a t e d a n d for- the m u s i c a l s e n s i b i l i t y that chose a n d a r e e a c h s i x t e e n - b a r t h e m e s i n E flat.
m a l m u s i c , f u r t h e r r e m o v e d , i n sev- j u x t a p o s e d the themes of Memphis C has a n u n u s u a l twelve-bar structure
eral respects, f r o m the basic blues Blues, Beale St. Blues, a n d St. Louis w i t h " b r e a k s " i n bars one a n d t w o ,
t h a n i s t h e p l a y i n g of, s a y , C h a r l i e Blues was an excellent one. W h a t seven a n d eight ( m a k i n g t w o s i x - b a r
Parker or M i l t Jackson. Today, it such a description of "ragtime-blues p a r t s ) , i n A flat. W h e n M o r t o n e x -
may seem a tangental movement w r i t e r " m i g h t not i n c l u d e is i m p o r - t e n d e d t h i s , he p l a y e d A , A ' ( a m e -
w h i c h , h o w e v e r s t r o n g l y it c o n t r i b u t e d tant h o w e v e r : there are r h y t h m i c a n d lodic v a r i a t i o n ) , B , B ' (a v a r i a t i o n ) ,
to jazz ( a n d still contributes i n d i - h a r m o n i c d e v i c e s t o be f o u n d i n t h e A " (another v a r i a t i o n ) , C , C (a v a r i -
r e c t l y ) a n d h o w e v e r m a n y fine i n - w o r k of H a n d y a n d his followers that a t i o n ) , A ' " (a t h i r d v a r i a t i o n ) . N o t
d i v i d u a l p i e c e s i t p r o d u c e d , w a s , as a a r e at least r a r e i n r a g t i m e a n d , m o r e o n l y is the r o n d o c o m p l e t e d ( i n the
movement, a k i n d of b l i n d alley. i m p o r t a n t , t h e r e c a n be a d e e p p a s - final r e t u r n t o A h e uses t h e " t u n e u p "
P e r h a p s one of the reasons for its s i o n , even i n the most r i g i d l y c o m - i n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e p i e c e as a t r a n s i -
u l t i m a t e f a i l u r e was its f o r m a l r i g i d - p o s i t i o n a l blues, that r a g t i m e seldom tional and modulational interlude),
ity a n d its c o m p o s i t i o n a l removal captured. b u t i n e a c h r e t u r n t o e a c h t h e m e he
f r o m the folk-blues. Ill plays a v a r i a t i o n on that theme. T h i s
I t h i n k t h a t t h e f i r s t of t h e g r e a t T h e next d o m i n a n t movement was effort t o h a n d l e i m p r o v i s a t i o n o n
r a g s , S c o t t J o p l i n ' s Maple Leaf, i s w h a t c a m e t o be c a l l e d t h e " j a z z " o f m u l t i t h e m a t i c m a t e r i a l seems t o m e
t y p i c a l e n o u g h f o r us i n i t s f o r m , N e w O r l e a n s . I n this context, i t is surpassingly successful, and, of
b u t I h o p e I c a n be f o r g i v e n i f a n v a l i d to say that t h i s m u s i c represents course, i f a y o u n g m u s i c i a n were even
exposition of this w e l l - k n o w n piece a c o m b i n a t i o n of elements i n two t o u n d e r t a k e s u c h a t h i n g t o d a y he
f o r c e s m e to repeat a few t r u i s m s . previous movementsa combination w o u l d be h a i l e d as a n " e x p e r i m e n t o r "
R a g t i m e is a multi-thematic, com- o f r a g t i m e a n d b l u e s c o n c e p t i o n s . It or " s e a r c h i n g i n n o v a t o r . "
positional music with rather limited seems t o m e t h a t J e l l y R o l l M o r t o n ' s O n the other h a n d , a p e r f o r m a n c e
r h y t h m i c resources, frequently d o m i - w o r k reflects t h e m a t u r i t y o f an l i k e the p i a n o v e r s i o n of Hyena
nated b y o n l y one k i n d of syncopa- e a r l i e r stage i n t h i s s t y l e I m e a n Stomp, based o n one f a i r l y s i m p l e
t i o n . A l t h o u g h there is evidence that earlier t h a n the w o r k of K i n g O l i v e r ' s theme, reveals another k i n d of struc-
i m p r o v i s a t i o n ( o r at least e m b e l l i s h - Creole Jazz B a n d a n d it is the one tural ingenuity.
m e n t ) w a s at l e a s t s o m e t i m e s a p a r t we s h a l l e x a m i n e . There are eight choruses, one
theme a n d seven variations. The
! of r a g t i m e p e r f o r m a n c e s , neither i m -
p r o v i s a t i o n n o r w r i t t e n v a r i a t i o n is
O b v i o u s l y there are some
t h i n g s : there is a developed
new
poly- theme-statement is gently m e l o d i c a n d
essential to i t . T h e f o r m of Maple p h o n y ; there is a great extension of carefully harmonized, played i n time
Leaf is b a s i c a l l y A , B , A ( a l l i n A rhythmic resources (undoubtedly but w i t h the pulse almost i m p l i e d .
flat), C ( a m o d u l a t i o n to D flat), D a d a p t e d a n d a s s i m i l a t e d directly from T h e first v a r i a t i o n i s a m o r e r h y t h m i c
( a r e t u r n t o t h e o r i g i n a l k e y ) . It gets f o l k b l u e s a n d c h u r c h m u s i c , as w e l l a n d b o t h the m e l o d i c l i n e a n d the
its f o r m , its f e e l i n g of completeness as t h e " L a t i n " r h y t h m s i n t h e m u s i c s h a r m o n y are drastically s i m p l i f i e d i n
f r o m the thematic a n d t o n a l relation- of t h e c i t y ) , t h e r e a r e s o m e w h a t d i f - a k i n d of b a r r e l h o u s e " d e s t r u c t i o n "
s h i p s . T h e m e C is m e l o d i c a l l y related ferent k i n d s of m e l o d i e s (of F r e n c h of a l l the elements of the piece, w h i c h
to B a n d b o t h are a k i n d of cake- a n d S p a n i s h o r i g i n s ) , etc. M o s t i m - are subsequently rebuilt i n v a r i o u s
walk-like strut. T h e m e A falls into two p o r t a n t t h e r e is v a r i a t i o n a n d i m p r o - ways. W e next hear an elaborately
p a r t s : t h e first i s a k i n d o f i n t r o - v i s a t i o n . E v e n i f we were, t h r o u g h a l y r i c t r a n s f o r m a t i o n of the theme,
ductory " c a l l " (again suggesting B c o m p a r i s o n of v a r i o u s r e c o r d i n g s a n d l i g h t l y d a n c i n g after the p r e c e e d i n g
i n q u a l i t y ) a n d the second a " r e - p r i n t e d scores, to subtract e v e r y t h i n g and singing by complexity i n both
s p o n s e " r a t h e r l i k e the r o m p i n g , a l - f r o m M o r t o n ' s music that c o u l d con- e c h o of a n d c o n t r a s t t o t h e w a y t h e
most s w i n g i n g , D theme. B u t D almost c e i v a b l y be i m p r o v i s a t i o n , w r i t t e n o p e n i n g statement h a d s u n g b y s i m -
c o m b i n e s t h e q u a l i t y of a l l t h e t h e m e s . v a r i a t i o n w o u l d s t i l l be a p a r t o f i t s p l i c i t y . F r o m this p o i n t o n , we g r a d u -
I f one w a n t e d to d e s c r i b e t h i s piece, s u b s t a n c e . F u r t h e r m o r e , these v a r i a - a l l y r e t u r n to a n d b u i l d o n the pulsat-
a l m o s t m e t a p h y s i c a l l y , as a k i n d o f tions are o n theme a n d they are not i n g r h y t h m of the second v a r i a t i o n ,
thesis, antithesis, deliberation, syn- embellishments or decorations; in with an increasing melodic simplifica-
thesis, I w o u l d t h i n k the d e s c r i p t i o n M o r t o n ' s compositions, even his most tion and dynamic building. The
v a l i d ; at a n y r a t e , i t s h o u l d be c l e a r rag-like m u l t i t h e m a t i c pieces, there is f o u r t h v a r i a t i o n is an excellent stroke
t h a t , as i n s e v e r a l W e s t e r n f o r m s , at least o n e c h o r u s o f m e l o d i c v a r i a - f o r it t r a n s f o r m s the t h i r d , b y s i m -
some k i n d of statement a n d resolution tion. If such a conception is extended, plification, and makes a two chorus
of opposites is i n v o l v e d i n its e x p o - it o b v i o u s l y raises the p r o b l e m of unit w i t h it. A l s o i n the latter part
sition. o v e r - a l l f o r m . It i s q u i t e p o s s i b l e , of it, M o r t o n begins a p o l y p h o n i c
When the ragtime movement s i n c e these v a r i a t i o n s a r e m e l o d i c , t o bass figure. T h i s p r e p a r e s f o r v a r i a -
waned, it was replaced by a "blues d r o p t h e p r o b l e m of f o r m at t h e l e v e l t i o n f o u r w h i c h is a c o n t r a s t i n g i m -
c r a z e " , a n d w h e n we r e m e m b e r that of a chorus-by-chorus conception p r o v i s a t i o n i n the bass. T o w a r d its
W . C. Handy's publications announced w i t h o u t t a k i n g u p the question of the end, M o r t o n introduces simple brass-
i t , i t s h o u l d be o b v i o u s t h a t at least d e v e l o p m e n t a l r e l a t i o n s h i p o f these like figures. I n the final chorus,
t h e public face of this m o v e m e n t was choruses. B u t M o r t o n d i d not stop M o r t o n ' s r i g h t h a n d not o n l y lays
i n s o m e w a y s as f o r m a l l y c o m p o s i - there a n d it is a great t r i b u t e to h i s down more simple brass-like " c a l l "
t i o n a l as t h a t of r a g t i m e . H a n d y ' s m u s i c a l s e n s i b i l i t i e s t h a t he d i d n o t . riffs but also reed-like " r e s p o n s e s " ,
best blues are, like rags, multi- An e x p l i c a t i o n of the r a g - l i k e a l s o r e m i n d i n g us o f t h e w a y h i s left
t h e m a t i c a n d d e p e n d o n i n t e r n a l con Kansas City Stomps i n t h e l o n g v e r - a n d r i g h t h a n d s h a d p r e v i o u s l y con
trast a n d p a r a l l e l , chiefly of melodies, s i o n on the L i b r a r y of Congress versed.
for their form. L i k e many ragtime r e c o r d i n g s w i l l s e r v e as g o o d t r a n s i - The performance reveals more
men, H a n d y began by w r i t i n g down t i o n to h i s most a m b i t i o u s p e r f o r m - s t r u c t u r a l p r i n c i p l e s . T h e c h o r u s is
a n d m o r e o r less f o r m a l i z e d t h e m u s i c ances. A s p u b l i s h e d , the piece consists sixteen bars i n a sequence c o m m o n
around h i m . W e might almost call of three themes, t h u s : A , A (an exact i n r a g t i m e . A s w e h a v e s e e n , these a r e
h i m a ragtime-blues writer, and I r e p e a t ) , B , B ( a r e p e a t ) , A (as b e - often m a d e into d o u b l e choruses:

THE JAZZ REVIEW


v a r i a t i o n s f o u r a n d five, a n d the t w o r h y t h m i c variations on theme, and i n , he r e - e n t e r s at t h e e n d , he t a k e s t h e
final " b r a s s " c h o r u s e s . H o w e v e r , e a c h s a y , Just You, Just Me, a set o f m e - changes a n d g r a d u a l l y and logically
chorus may readily fall into two l o d i c v a r i a t i o n s of a k i n d no c o n t e m - r e b u i l d s the i n i t i a l m e l o d y . E v e n i f
e i g h t - b a r u n i t s a n d e a c h o f these, i n p o r a r y pianist even attempts. he h a d n o o t h e r v i r t u e s , D a v i s ' s w o r k
turn, into two four-bar units. Then c o u l d p r o v i d e s o m e o f t h e best i n t r o -
IV
there is a n i n i t i a l fact of which d u c t i o n s to w h a t the h a r m o n i c v a r i a -
I don't t h i n k that the o r i g i n of the
M o r t o n was well a w a r e : the basic me- tion means i n m o d e r n jazz that can
h a r m o n i c v a r i a t i o n w h i c h has g r a d u -
l o d i c m a t e r i a l is a t w o - b a r phrase. be f o u n d .
a l l y d o m i n a t e d j a z z is difficult to t r a c e
M o r t o n t a k e s a d v a n t a g e , m a k e s these w i t h i n the m u s i c : l i k e the r h y t h m i c S o n n y R o l l i n s does not have such a
facts (which another m a n might changes w h i c h have t a k e n place i n the g e n t l e l y r i c q u a l i t y , n e i t h e r as D a v i s
see as a m e l o d i c l i m i t a t i o n ) p r i n c i p l e s last t h i r t y years, it comes f r o m the d o e s n o r as P a r k e r d i d . N o r d o e s he
of his architectonics a n d chief virtues b l u e s . L o n g e r a g o t h a n we k n o w ( a n d h a v e t h e h a r m o n i c sense o f D a v i s o r
of h i s p l a y i n g . T h e final c h o r u s c o n - p r o b a b l y ever s h a l l k n o w ) , p l a y i n g P a r k e r . B u t he d o e s h a v e s o m e t h i n g
sists o f a c o n t i n u o u s e i g h t - b a r l i n e the blues c o u l d m e a n freely i m p r o v i s - that P a r k e r h a d a n d that D a v i s has
followed by two four-bar units w h i c h i n g i n an h a r m o n i c frame. A n d this l e a r n e d t h a t he d o e s n o t : he h a s a
contrast melodically. T h e t h i r d v a r i a - is t r u e w h e t h e r t h e s o l o i s t i s a w a r e o f t e c h n i c a l v i r t u o s i t y a n d he i s l e a r n -
t i o n (the most m e l o d i c a l l y c o m p l e x ) an i m p l i c i t h a r m o n i c frame or not, i n g to use it w i t h d i s c i p l i n e .
is based o n a p a r a l l e l r e p e t i t i o n of w h e t h e r he uses o n e c h o r d p e r c h o r u s R o l l i n s ' i m a g i n a t i o n a l t h o u g h it is
t w o - b a r u n i t s , w h i l e its " s i s t e r " v a r i a - (or just one t h u m p ) t w o , three, o r c o n s t a n t i s n o t so d a r i n g i n l i n e a n d
t i o n (the f o u r t h ) begins w i t h c o n - w h a t e v e r , a n d w h e t h e r he l i m i t s h i m - h a r m o n y as P a r k e r ' s . A l s o , u n l i k e
trasting two bar units. Etc. self t o " r e g u l a r " e i g h t , t w e l v e , o r D a v i s , R o l l i n s has, I t h i n k , p r o d u c e d
The performance may sound rigid s i x t e e n b a r c h o r u s e s o r lets i n s p i r a - hardly any balanced single or double
u n d e r s u c h s c r u t i n y , but it is not. t i o n d i c t a t e c h o r u s l e n g t h . It w a s choruses of r e a l l y m e m o r a b l e q u a l i t y .
T h e s c r u t i n y serves to b r i n g out evident that a m a n c o u l d take this W h a t R o l l i n s c a n d o at h i s best i s
p r i n c i p l e s of s t r u c t u r e i n a d e v e l o p i n g c o n c e p t i o n a n d a p p l y i t to a n y c h o r d f a c e d i r e c t l y t h e p r o b l e m of l o n g
i m p r o v i s a t i o n , a n d the p r i n c i p l e s are and chorus structurewhether it s o l o s w i t h a n o r d e r e d use o f t h e
t h e r e , h o w e v e r t h e y m a y be a p p l i e d came f r o m his grandfather or the e q u i p m e n t he d o e s h a v e . A n d i n a
spontaneously. radio. milieu w h e r e so m a n y m e n g u s h o u t
A n o t h e r post-ragtime s c h o o l of m u - T h e question is, once this concep- a l l t h e i r r e s o u r c e s a n d t r i c k s i n sec-
sicians, the E a s t e r n " s t r i d e " pianists, t i o n h a s d o m i n a t e d the m u s i c , w h e t h e r o n d a n d t h i r d choruses i n the belief
a l s o u s e d t h e p r i n c i p l e o f sets of a soloist can structure a l o n g i m p r o v i - that they are f o l l o w i n g i n P a r k e r ' s
m e l o d i c v a r i a t i o n s . It s e e m s t o m e sation a n d , i f so, h o w . steps, h i s a p p r o a c h i s e x e m p l a r y .
t h a t t h e w o r k o f s e v e r a l o f these m e n If one understands L o u i s A r m - I have heard R o l l i n s plav long
is i n c l i n e d to be almost d e c o r a t i v e strong's way of stating a melody with solos w h i c h are better t h a n a n y t h i n g
at t i m e s a m a t t e r o n l y o f r e p e a t i n g the s l i g h t shifts of accent a n d altera- he h a s r e c o r d e d ( I h a v e a l s o h e a r d
melody with various embellishments t i o n s of l i n e w h i c h d i s c o v e r b e a u t y h i m e x p l o i t h i s talents, but that is
imposed on it. A n d a performance a n d p a s s i o n i n t r i t e n e s s , he s h o u l d another q u e s t i o n ) , but w i t h the basis
l i k e W i l l i e " T h e L i o n " S i m t h ' s The have no t r o u b l e , despite the differ- o n w h i c h he o p e r a t e s i n m i n d , we
Boy in the Boat (Squeeze Me) c l e a r l y ences o f t o n e , r h y t h m i c a n d h a r m o n i c c a n h e a r at least a g o o d s k e t c h o f h i s
depends on rather m e c h a n i c a l changes c o n c e p t i o n , a n d q u a l i t y of e m o t i o n a l a p p r o a c h o n s u c h L P ' s as Saxophone
of tempo to compensate. "Fats" projection, with M i l e s Davis's open- Colossus a n d Way Out West. H e b e -
W a l l e r c a r r i e d the " s t r i d e " concep- i n g statements of f a m i l i a r melodies. gins, like D a v i s , with melody, gradu-
tion further. I n an early blues like F r o m such statements D a v i s g r a d u a l l y ally departs f r o m it i n t o a relaxed
Numb Fumbling we c a n h e a r W a l l e r ' s departs f r o m m e l o d i c line, often b y h a r m o n i c v a r i a t i o n w i t h simple short
excellent melodic inventiveness com- a k i n d of i n g e n i o u s d i s i n t e g r a t i o n , lines and s i m p l e note values. G r a d u -
p l i m e n t e d b y a fine sense o f i n t e r n a l i n t o d i r e c t use of h a r m o n i c m a t e r i a l , a l l y he b u i l d s i n t o l o n g e r l i n e s , s h o r t e r
contrast and echopowers which c r e a t i n g a n e n t i r e l y n e w melody out note values, double-time r u n s a l l the
c o u l d i n f o r m even his loosest i m p r o - o f c h o r d s t r u c t u r e . S i n c e he i s a P a r k e r - d e r i v e d resources of the m o d -
visations. In Waller and in E a r l Hines l e a d e r t o d a y , it f a l l s t o h i m t o b o t h ernistic virtuositythen gradually
w e see, o f c o u r s e , t h e b e g i n n i n g s o f open and close a performance, and reverses the process f r o m this peak,
the t r a n s i t i o n a w a y f r o m m e l o d i c v a r - his closing chorus o r choruses fre- r e t u r n s to s i m p l e r h a r m o n i c v a r i a -
i a t i o n s p l a y e d o n theme to v a r i a t i o n s quently take the same a p p r o a c h , con- tions a n d then to the m e l o d y itself.
w h i c h create entirely new melodies d e n s i n g the process i n t o b r i e f e r f o r m . T h e basic a p p r o a c h m a y seem rather
out of c h o r d structures. I do not say that t h i s w a y is an o b v i o u s i f it i s e x p o s e d t h i s w a y , b u t
The melodic approach continues entirely new one, but I do t h i n k that, it seems to m e that t h i s g r a d u a l
i f it no l o n g e r d o m i n a t e s . W e h e a r it at h i s best, D a v i s m a k e s s o m e t h i n g revelation of the soloist e q u i p m e n t
today i n E r r o l l G a r n e r w h o , despite u n i q u e o u t of i t . T h e first t h i n g t o t a k e s a d v a n t a g e of t h e l o n g s o l o p a s -
his limitations, his sentimentalities notice is that one does not often feel s a g e i n a w a y t h a t c a n m a k e t h e less
and his mannerisms, can show a that u s u a l a b r u p t a b a n d o n m e n t of o r d e r e d efforts o f m a n y y o u n g m o d -
genuine (often reductive) feel f o r m e l o d y a f t e r the first s t a t e m e n t . M i l e s ernists sound like an a n g l y reaction
the n a t u r e of a m e l o d y . A n d i n c a n m a k e the t r a n s i t i o n g r a d u a l l y a n d to t h e i r h a v i n g been i n t i m i d a t e d b y
T h e l o n i o u s M o n k ' s a p p r o a c h to a his u n i q u e presence a n d l y r i c gifts the task.
" s t a n d a r d " we hear a c o n t i n u a t i o n of o b v i o u s l y are i n v a l u a b l e i n m a i n - T h e w a y to h e a r a g o o d s o l o b v
the s t r i d e a p p r o a c h : there is the same t a i n i n g a s u s t a i n e d flow o f l i n e . W h i l e R o l l i n s is to t r y to h e a r it w h o l e , not
interest i n u n u s u a l sequence of h a r - i t m a y n o t be h i s best p e r f o r m a n c e c h o r u s b y c h o r u s . T h e e x p o s i t i o n is
monies that we can hear i n " T h e i n o t h e r r e s p e c t s , When Lights Are n e v e r so pat as m y a c c o u n t i s b o u n d
L i o n " , the same emphasis on m e l o d y . Low i s a n e x c e l l e n t e x a m p l e o f h i s to m a k e it seem. I n the m i d s t of the
Indeed since M o n k ' s p r i m a r y em- conception. B y the e n d of his l o n g second or t h i r d comparatively simple
phasis is t h r o u g h r h y t h m , metre, a n d o p e n i n g solo, M i l e s has t u r n e d a chorus, a rapid run may appear; in
accent, he has p r o d u c e d choruses chord structure and a sustained lyric the m i d d l e of a v i r t u o s o c h o r u s , s i m -
w h i c h are little m o r e than direct m o o d over to h i s s i d e m e n a n d , w h e n (Continued on Page 49)

DECEMBER 15
A L L T O O SOON by Stanley Dance
T o saw a w o m a n i n half is, pro- stream Jazz w h i c h was not b e i n g met t h a n e x p a n s i o n . E v e n at t h e S a v o y ,
fessionals insist, a t r i c k d e m a n d i n g f r o m A m e r i c a . Instead, they were jazz was i n f u l l retreat.
finesse. T h o u g h j a z z was s a w n i n h a l f being surfeited with jazz described M a n y of the greatest j a z z m u s i c i a n s
after W o r l d W a r II w i t h a notable as M o d e r n , C o o l o r Progressive, were existing on week-end gigs a n d
l a c k of finesse, a f a r m o r e m a g i c a l m u c h of w h i c h t u r n e d out to be, i n r e c o r d i n g , but the r e c o r d i n g often
result was achieved. T h e arms a n d fact, I m m a t u r e , P u r i t a n i c a l or P r e - consisted of r o c k V r o l l a n d back-
legs r e m a i n e d , b u t the t o r s o d i s a p - t e n t i o u s . I n these c i r c u m s t a n c e s , a n d g r o u n d s to v o c a l s , a l l c a l c u l a t e d to
peared. o n the p e r s o n a l i n i t i a t i v e of the h e a d stultify rather than ennoble their tal-
S u d d e n l y , there seemed to be noth- of B r i t i s h D e c c a , M r . E . R . L e w i s , ents. M u s i c i a n s of the c a l i b r e of C o l e -
i n g but D i x i e l a n d and B o p , or I w a s sent t o N e w Y o r k e a r l i e r t h i s man Hawkins, Roy Eldridge, Vic
depending where you l i v e d T r a d i - y e a r to attempt a r e c o r d e d cross-sec- D i c k e n s o n a n d Buster B a i l e y were
tional a n d M o d e r n . H o w to account t i o n of the " m a i n s t r e a m " scene. p l a y i n g at t h e m u c h - m a l i g n e d M e t r o -
for this spectacular dismemberment? I w a s u n d e r n o i l l u s i o n s as t o w h a t p o l e , a f i s h b o w l t h a t at l e a s t p r o v i d e s
W h a t h a d h a p p e n e d t o a l l t h e fine I w o u l d find. T h i s w a s m y f o u r t h r e g u l a r w o r k . T h e S t y g i a n g l o o m of
music that lay between? The m u - v i s i t to N e w Y o r k since 1937, a n d B i r d l a n d w a s as d e p r e s s i n g as i t s
sicians that made it were alive and each time a deterioration i n the c o n - music and forlorn audience-
mostly i n their p h y s i c a l and tech- d i t i o n of jazz was u n d e n i a b l e . N o one T h e r e was just one r e g u l a r l y con-
n i c a l p r i m e , but w i t h the collapse of s h o u l d be d e c e i v e d t o d a y b y t h e f a c t stituted g r o u p that was consistently
the b i g bands a n d i n c r e a s i n g d i s i n - that m o r e jazz records are m a d e a n d a p l e a s u r e to h e a r , a n d that was
terest i n t h e i r i d i o m , w o r k f o r t h e m s o l d t h a n ever, n o r by that of the B u d d y T a t e ' s septet at t h e s p a c i o u s
b e c a m e h a r d t o find. D u k e a n d B a s i e , p u b l i c i t y obtained for s u m m e r festi- C e l e b r i t y C l u b o n 125th Street. T h i s
a l m o s t a l o n e , c o u l d c o n t i n u e to p r o v e vals that last o n l y a few days. T h e c o m b i n a t i o n has been p l a y i n g a r o u n d
that there was still an audience f o r h e a l t h o f j a z z c a n b e s t be d e t e r m i n e d N e w Y o r k for several years, and
jazz that emphasized swing and b y t h e n u m b e r a n d duration of oppor- B u d d y h a s b e e n r e c o r d e d as a s o l o i s t
warmth. t u n i t i e s o p e n t o j a z z m e n t o w o r k as o n C o l u m b i a a n d V a n g u a r d , yet r e -
I n E n g l a n d , w h e r e a neat b a l a n c e jazzmen. cently an item was p r i n t e d i n the
of power existed for a considerable In 1937, i n three weeks, I h e a r d a n e w s s e c t i o n o f Down Beat e n q u i r i n g
time between T r a d i t i o n a l a n d M o d - dozen b i g bands of q u a l i t y ( D u k e w h e t h e r B u d d y w a s e n g a g e d as a
e r n , it was possible to reassert the Ellington, J i m m i e Lunceford, Fletcher chauffeur in Hollywood. Prophets
values of w h a t is n o w k n o w n there Henderson, Chick Webb, Earl Hines, m i g h t seem to be w i t h o u t h o n o r i n
as M a i n s t r e a m J a z z . ( S i n c e a l l g o o d Count Basie, T o m m y Dorsey, Benny New York.
j a z z t h e o r e t i c a l l y s w i n g s , S w i n g be- Goodman, Artie Shaw, L u c k y M i l - T h e v i r t u a l demise of the old-style
came both inadequate and ridiculous linder, Willie Bryant and Luis Rus- j a m session d u r i n g recent years has
as a d i s t i n g u i s h i n g l a b e l . ) J o h n H a m - s e l l ) . I n 1958, i n six weeks, I h e a r d been a severe b l o w to j a z z . T h e
m o n d ' s series of V a n g u a r d Jazz S h o w - o n l y two, b o t h of w h i c h were assem- " s t a g e d " j a m s e s s i o n h a s as l i t t l e i n
cases c o i n c i d e d very conveniently bled solely for r e c o r d i n g purposes. c o m m o n w i t h i t as m o s t o f t h e " b l o w -
w i t h t h i s m o v e m e n t , a n d it has n o w A s for s m a l l groups, I need not list i n g s e s s i o n s " that take place i n re-
carved out f o r itself a comfortable what there was a l o n g 5 2 n d Street c o r d i n g s t u d i o s . I n e a c h case t h e r e i s ,
place between the other two. i n 1937. T h i s year there was just i n v a r y i n g d e g r e e s of d e s p e r a t i o n , a
The English record companies soon Wilbur DeParis. Uptown and down- n e e d t o a s t o u n d , w h i c h i s n o t at a l l
f o u n d they h a d a demand for M a i n - t o w n , too, there was s h r i n k a g e rather c o n d u c i v e to g e n u i n e l y a r t i s t i c cre-

T h e B u d d y Tate Band Photo by Olivier Keller

THE JAZZ REVIEW


Gene Ramey, V i c Dickenson, H i l t o n Jef- a t r o m b o n e q u a r t e t c o n s i s t i n g of h i m - and D i z z y G i l l e s p i e , i n 1958, are not
ferson. H e r m a n A u t r e y Phi by OHvi Keller self, V i c D i c k e n s o n , B e n n y M o r t o n g r e a t e r as artists t h a n E a r l H i n e s a n d
and George Matthews that sounded, L o u i s A r m s t r o n g i n 1928. T h e y have
as J o J o n e s p u t i t , " l i k e a m i l l i o n - n o t h i n g of greater value to c o m m u n i -
dollar trombone section". cate, no s u p e r i o r stories, o n l y differ-
It i s t h e n e g l e c t o f m e n l i k e D i c k i e ent w o r d s .
W e l l s t h a t c a u s e s so m a n y o f u s i n A y o u n g m u s i c i a n m i g h t w e l l be
E u r o p e t o l o o k a s k a n c e at t h e A m e r i - wary of entering jazz today. W h i l e
c a n j a z z scene. H e r e is one of the he i s s t i l l m a s t e r i n g h i s h o r n he w i l l
outstanding trombones i n jazz his- be a c c l a i m e d . I n h i s t w e n t i e s he w i l l
t o r y , one w h o has c o n t r i b u t e d m u c h be a p p r o v e d . I n h i s t h i r t i e s h e m u s t
b u t h a s n o n e e d t o rest o n past e x p e c t t h e s n e e r s o f t h e avant garde.
achievements. D i c k i e ' s c o n t r o l , tone I n h i s f o r t i e s , he w i l l b e c o m p e l l e d
and range are still i m p r e s s i v e ; his to repeat the successes of h i s twenties.
a t i o n . N o r , of course, are w a r n i n g style is completely i n d i v i d u a l ; h i s T h e r e a f t e r , h e s h o u l d be p r e p a r e d t o
lights, t i c k i n g clocks a n d the r i g o u r s conceptions are imaginative, d a r i n g quit m u s i c . I n r e f u t a t i o n of Mose
of stereophony. a n d h u m o r o u s a c c o r d i n g to m o o d . S o A l l i s o n ' s s o n g , the o l d m e n of jazz
Inspiration i n a recording studio w h e n w e r e a d yet a n o t h e r a r t i c l e i n don't have a l l the m o n e y . T h e y o u n g
can never be guaranteed, but I have Down Beat o r Metronome about m e n , o n t h e o t h e r h a n d , s e e m t o be
l o n g felt t h a t t h e m o s t r e w a r d i n g j a z z D a v e B r u b e c k or A n d r e P r e v i n , we e s c a p i n g the f o r m a t i v e p e r i o d i n the
experience is the s w i n g i n g solo above t h i n k first about c r i t e r i a a n d then garret.
a s w i n g i n g r h y t h m section plusmost about ethics. A k i n d of p u r i t a n i s m is i n vogue
important spontaneous-sounding W e believe that r e a l l y homogene- today. The inner beauty m a y be
riffs f r o m two or three other h o r n s . ous, s w i n g i n g groups, like that n o w t h e r e , b u t t h e o u t e r b e a u t y , t h e easiest
E v e n i f the solo itself is not p a r t i c u - p l a n n e d to t o u r E u r o p e u n d e r B u c k g i v e n , is s h u n n e d . T h e y o u n g m u s i -
u a r l y i n v e n t i v e , t h e t o t a l effect w i l l Clayton's leadership, should hold an cians mostly sound like tired, doomed
be i n v i g o r a t i n g a n d e x c i t i n g . i m p o r t a n t a n d regular place on the m e n . T h e o l d e r m e n s o u n d as t h o u g h
In the 1930s, w h e n the p u b l i c was j a z z s c e n e . T h i s o n e , as at p r e s e n t p r o - they still savoured the challenge a n d
i n t e l l i g e n t e n o u g h to d e m a n d that its jected, will comprise B u c k a n d E m - j o y s o f l i f e . A m u s i c i a n s h o u l d be
j a z z b e d a n c e a b l e as w e l l as l i s t e n a b l e , mett B e r r y ( t p ) , D i c k i e W e l l s ( t b ) , m a t u r e at f o r t y , n o t e x h a u s t e d . T h e
t h i s w a s a s u r e , i m m e d i a t e l y com Earl W a r r e n (as), B u d d y Tate (ts), premiere of V a u g h n W i l l i a m ' s N i n t h
m u n i c a b l e f o r m u l a . It s t i l l p r o v i d e s Sir Charles Thompson (p), Gene S y m p h o n y took place on A p r i l 2 n d
one of the m o r e v a l i d f o r m s o f j a z z Ramey (b), and Herbie Lovelle (d). this year. W i l l i a m s was i n his m i d -
expression, but it requires an affinity M u s i c a l l y , it cannot help but be eighties. Because the a u d i e n c e was
a m o n g the p a r t i c i p a t i n g m u s i c i a n s m o r e s a t i s f y i n g t h a n the c o n t e m p o - f a m i l i a r w i t h W i l l i a m s ' " s t y l e " , there
that extends to b o t h style a n d t e m p o . r a r y c o m b i n a t i o n s of m a i n s t r e a m m u - were no hoots of d e r i s i o n , no sugges-
( A feeling for tempo was an early s i c i a n s w h o are c o m p e l l e d to p l a y a t i o n s t h a t he s h o u l d i n c o r p o r a t e t h e
c a s u a l t y i n the b o p r e v o l u t i o n . ) A t b a s t a r d k i n d of D i x i e l a n d . t r i c k s of y o u n g e r m e n .
its best, it w a s h e a r d f r o m m u s i c i a n s T h e post-war generation has been T h o s e c r i t i c s a n d that part of the
w o r k i n g r e g u l a r l y t o g e t h e r , as o n , f o r f e d a lot of nonsense about the stag- jazz audience whose appetite f o r " n e w
example, the s m a l l - b a n d records m a d e n a t i o n o f jazz p r i o r to the l i f e - s a v i n g s t y l e s " is so i n s a t i a b l e , o b e y a c o m -
by Johnny Hodges when Cootie act o f M e s s r s . P a r k e r a n d G i l l e s p i e . m e r c i a l p r i n c i p l e as o b v i o u s as t h a t
W i l l i a m s was also a m e m b e r of the Jazz was not standing still before w h i c h determines the y e a r l y f a s h i o n
Ellington band. t h e m , n o r w o u l d i t h a v e d o n e so w i t h - c h a n g e s o f P a r i s . I n so d o i n g , i n f a i l -
I f o u n d there were plenty of jazz- o u t t h e m . It i s q u i t e p o s s i b l e t h a t i t i n g to realize that n o v e l t y a n d q u a l i t y
m e n i n N e w Y o r k still, who not only m i g h t have t a k e n a different, better are not s y n o n y m o u s , they do jazz a
c o u l d , but l o v e d to p l a y i n t h i s i d i o m . road. The absurd demands for jazz great disservice.
B u c k C l a y t o n has helped keep it alive to c h a n g e , change, to h u r r y , h u r r y ,
V i c Dickenson, Benny M o r t o n , D i c k i e W e l l s
on records under his name (on are merely i n d i c a t i v e of b a d nerves.
Columbia and V a n g u a r d ) , and Buddy T h e pace of m o d e r n life is sometimes
Tate's g r o u p plays it a l l the t i m e , r e f e r r e d t o as t h o u g h i t a c c o u n t e d f o r
but several other studio combinations the r a p i d changes i n j a z z . B u t e n n u i ,
proved, to my mind, successful. " a d i s e a s e o f m o d e r n l i f e , " as P . A .
Among these, I would mention, Sheehan wrote m a n y years ago, " i s
Buster Bailey with H e r m a n A u t r e y , s i m p l y the repletion of those who
V i c D i c k e n s o n , H i l t o n Jefferson, R e d have tasted too speedily, or too fully,
R i c h a r d s , Gene R a m e y and J i m m i e at t h e b a n q u e t o f l i f e . "
C r a w f o r d . A u t r e y has h a r d l y been T h i s d i s e a s e , w i t h its i n s a t i a b l e d e -
h e a r d o n records since the d a y s of m a n d f o r n o v e l t y at a l l c o s t s , c a n o n l y
Fats W a l l e r a n d it was a great sur- l e a d to the e a r l y decease of a n e n -
p r i s e t o find t h a t h e s o u n d e d b e t t e r trancing music. A s some character-
t h a n ever. B u d d J o h n s o n , w i t h C h a r l i e istics are torn a w a y a n d discarded,
Shavers, V i c Dickenson, A l Sears, others twisted a n d t o r t u r e d , a p o i n t '
Bert Keyes, Joe B e n j a m i n and Jo m u s t s u r e l y be r e a c h e d w h e n j a z z w i l l
Jones, also p r o d u c e d the k i n d of n o l o n g e r be r e c o g n i z a b l e as a n e n -
s w i n g i n g ensemble I wanted. G r o u p s t i t y . E v e n n o w , the outsider c o u l d not
including ex-Basieites like Dicky h o l d an art of m u c h account whose
Wells, B u d d y Tate, Buck Clayton, E a r l most-acclaimed products are denied
W a r r e n a n d R u d y R u t h e r f o r d , nat- as d a t e d a n d o u t c l a s s e d w i t h i n a
u r a l l y fell w i t h i n the scope of m y decade. Geniuses a n d real artists
p r o g r a m m e , but D i c k i e W e l l s also led emerge but seldom. T h e l o n i o u s M o n k

DECEMBER 17
MY STORY
by Buddy Tate as told to Frank Driggs

. . . M y b r o t h e r was a saxophonist, . . . T h e St. L o u i s M e r r y m a k e r s Frenchy? D o I remember h i m ? H e


y o u k n o w , a n d 1 used to l i s t e n to h i m w a s n ' t a n y h e l l as a b a n d so I s t a y e d was a wonderful person, f r o m N e w
because I a l w a y s w a n t e d to p l a y the a r o u n d t h e r e f o r s i x m o n t h s o r so Orleans . . . a real Frenchman. H i s
sax myself. H e was w i t h T r o y F l o y d then j o i n e d T r o y F l o y d . T h i s was name was P o l i t e C h r i s t i a n , a n d talk
i n the e a r l y years b e f o r e T r o y r e a l l y after they made the records of about a b i g , pretty tone on t r u m p e t !
got s t a r t e d . H e u s e d t o s i t i n w i t h " S h a d o w l a n d B l u e s " a n d the " D r e a m - H e used to c o m e to m y h o m e t o w n
A l p h o n s o Trent's b a n d for rehearsals l a n d B l u e s " . D o n A l b e r t h a d left t h e every week w i t h a different b a n d , a n d
and things like that. M y aunt h a d a b a n d t h e n , b u t i t w a s s t i l l t h e best I t h i n k just about every m u s i c i a n i n
r o o m i n g house a n d most of the g u y s b a n d a r o u n d there after T r e n t . H e r - D a l l a s p l a y e d w i t h h i m at o n e t i m e
f r o m T r e n t ' s b a n d used to stay there. s c h e l u s e d t o t e l l T r o y t o let h i m off or another. H e h a d a nice reputation
M y b r o t h e r bought me a n alto a n d w h e n e v e r T r e n t w a s i n t o w n , so he and always h a d a nice band with h i m .
I stayed a r o u n d the house for about c o u l d go hear H a y e s P i l l a r s p l a y . H e H e could play louder and longer than
a year before I started t a k i n g lessons w a s s o m e t h i n g i n t h o s e d a y s . . . so a n y trumpet p l a y e r y o u ever h e a r d i n
on i t . There weren't m a n y people i n was the b a n d . . . y o u r l i f e . H e c o u l d be h e a r d a l l t h e
m y h o m e w h o c o u l d give m e lessons . . . They would come up and play w a y f r o m here to the A p o l l o [ f r o m
a n d m y b r o t h e r w a s i n D a l l a s at t h e f r o m 9 to 12 every S u n d a y after they 1 4 5 t h & A m s t e r d a m to 125th &
time . . . g o t finished t h e i r d a t e at t h e A d o l p h u s B ' d ' w a y ] . I stayed with T r o y about six
H o t e l , a n d , m a n , y o u c o u l d n ' t get m o n t h s o r so a n d t h e n j o i n e d T .
A f t e r I'd been r e h e a r s i n g , I j o i n e d
in when they played. T h e y used H o l d e r . H e was just r e f o r m i n g his
a b i g brass b a n d a r o u n d S h e r m a n
to make as m u c h as $ 7 5 . 0 0 a second b a n d , after A n d y K i r k h a d
and played with them for a while. M y
n i g h t a m a n , t h e y w e r e so p o p u l a r . t a k e n o v e r h i s first b a n d i n T u l s a .
cousin, R o y M c C l o u d , was a t r u m -
T h e y h a d a l l that a i r t i m e over W F A A Jesse S t o n e t o o k t h e rest o f t h e m a n d
peter, a n d just about a l l m y relatives
i n D a l l a s , a n d they were h e a r d a l l the w e n t to K a n s a s C i t y a n d T r e f o r m e d
c o u l d p l a y s o m e t h i n g , so w e f o r m e d
w a y t o C a n a d a . I h a t e d t o see t h a t again.
a f a m i l y b a n d a n d put it i n his
b a n d b r e a k u p , t h e y h a d so m u c h , a n d W e just h a d about eight pieces w i t h
name . . . McCloud's Night Owls.
t h e y w e r e so f a r a h e a d o f t h e i r t i m e . S a m m y P r i c e on p i a n o . W e were play-
W e ' d go a n d listen whenever T r e n t or
Trent wasn't m u c h of a business m a n i n g at t h e F a n n i n C o u n t y S t a t e F a i r
T r o y F l o y d c a m e to t o w n , a n d after
a n d he l e f t t h a t e n d t o G e n e C r o o k . I n in B o n h a m , Texas when this band
w e r e h e a r s e d f o r a w h i l e we got t o be
those days, they were outplaying f r o m Austin, Texas came through.
quite a g o o d little b a n d . W e started
D u k e . . . I r e a l l y t h i n k so. H e q u i t T h e y were called the D e L u x e M e l o d y
g e t t i n g c l u b dates a n d got good
the b a n d i n 1932 a n d went b a c k to B o y s . W h e n w e finished o u r d a n c e ,
e n o u g h t o be b o o k e d o u t a r o u n d t h e
F o r t S m i t h . If they h a d kept g o i n g we went over a n d listened to t h e m .
different territories. W e stayed to-
w i t h h i m t h e y w o u l d h a v e b e e n as b i g T h e y were a nice outfit a n d T l i k e d
g e t h e r a b o u t t h r e e y e a r s [see p e r -
as D u k e o r a n y o f t h e m . . . t h e w a y t h e y s o u n d e d , so he s a i d ,
sonnel]. R o y M c C l o u d and myself
w e r e t h e c a u s e of t h e b a n d b r e a k i n g T h e r e were a lot of great m u s i c i a n s " I ' m g o i n g to take over t h i s b a n d " .
u p because we went to W i c h i t a F a l l s a r o u n d T e x a s i n those years. C l a u d e H e h a d a b i g reputation i n that part
a n d j o i n e d a n o t h e r b a n d c a l l e d the S t . K e n n e d y , they called h i m " B e h n o " , of t h e c o u n t r y , so he m a n e u v e r e d
Louis Merrymakers. They weren't was a terrific trumpet player. H e was h i m s e l f i n t o the l e a d e r s h i p of that
f r o m St. L o u i s , they were an o r i g i n a l v e r y f a r a d v a n c e d o v e r e v e r y o n e else b a n d . J u s t he a n d I w e n t i n w i t h
T e x a s b a n d . I first m e t H e r s c h e l t h e n , a n d he left e a r l y t o g o to C a l i - t h e m , b e c a u s e T d r o p p e d t h e rest o f
E v a n s w h e n he w a s w i t h t h e b a n d a fornia. H e took a Texas band called t h e c o m b o [see p e r s o n n e l ] .
l i t t l e e a r l i e r . W h e n I g o t t h e r e he h a d the Oleanders and went to Los W h e n w e got b a c k t o D a l l a s , w e
g o n e to S a n A n t o n i o a n d j o i n e d T r o y Angeles. I believe they m a d e some went out to M i d l a n d a n d rehearsed
F l o y d . I met h i m i n 1926 when I pictures out there. B u c k [ C l a y t o n ] re- f o r a m o n t h a n d c a m e to S a n A n g e l o
m a d e m y first p r o f e s s i o n a l e n g a g e - m e m b e r e d h i m a n d s a i d he w a s a a n d went o n l o c a t i o n a n d i n three or
ment away f r o m m y home town. wonderful trumpet player. H e died f o u r m o n t h s t h i s b a n d w a s t h e best
H e r s c h e l h a d also been w i t h " T . N . T . " . some years ago. he e v e r h a d . H e c o u l d b u i l d a b a n d
T r e n t N u m b e r T w o , w h i c h was also I used to l i s t e n to B u d d J o h n s o n better a n d faster t h a n a n y o n e I ever
a T e x a s b a n d . T h e y h a d g o n e to N e w a lot w h e n h e w a s a r o u n d . H e l e f t saw. H e was a w o n d e r f u l person a n d
O r l e a n s to b r i n g D o n A l b e r t b a c k . e a r l y w i t h Jesse S t o n e a n d w e n t t o i f y o u d i d w h a t he s a i d , e v e r y t h i n g
T h e y patterned themselves after T r e n t K a n s a s C i t y to j o i n G e o r g e L e e . H e w o r k e d out r i g h t . H e c o u l d b u i l d a
a n d t h e y h a d a g o o d b a n d , a b o u t 12 was v e r y a d v a n c e d , even then, a n d b a n d i n three weeks w i t h k n o w l e d g e
pieces. he's s t i l l g r e a t t o d a y . of m u s i c , a n d he s h o u l d have been

18 THE JAZZ REVIEW


S m i t h f o r m e d an eight-piece b a n d to
p l a y f o r a n o p e n - a i r t h e a t r e . It w a s
a w a i l i n g little b a n d , a n d we stayed
t o g e t h e r a b o u t s i x m o n t h s o r so be-
f o r e t h i n g s got t o u g h . T h e n A l J o h n -
s o n , one of the t r u m p e t p l a y e r s , N a t
Towles a n d myself went to Little R o c k
and w o r k e d a r o u n d there f o r about
a year for a lady named Ethel M a y s .
W h i l e I was i n Little R o c k , this
b a n d a n d Chester L a n e ' s were the top
outfits. H e h a d a w o n d e r f u l band
with guys like A u b r e y Yancey and
Forrest Powell i n it. I remember h i m
as f a r b a c k as 1 9 3 1 . H e ' s o u t o n t h e
coast n o w .
C o l e m a n H a w k i n s left F l e t c h e r to
join Jack Hylton in England, and
F l e t c h e r sent f o r L e s t e r Y o u n g to
j o i n h i m . B a s i e c a m e t h r o u g h t o fill
a j o b , because he h a d just taken over
Bennie Moten's band, a l l except
Herschel and Jack Washington. I
j o i n e d h i m there i n Little R o c k a n d
stayed u n t i l the g u y s left one b y one
to g o b a c k t o K a n s a s C i t y t o J o i n
Bennie. Lester joined Basie i n Little
R o c k , because H e r s c h e l w o u l d n ' t leave
Bennie. T h e r e wasn't any f a l l i n g out,
b e c a u s e B e n n i e t o l d B a s i e to t a k e t h e
j o b a n d see w h a t he c o u l d d o w i t h i t .
Courtesy Frank Driggs It d i d n ' t l a s t t o o l o n g b e c a u s e B a s i e
d i d n ' t h a v e a n a m e t h e n a n d he d i d n ' t
a big-time leader. He's over 60 n o w t o n i o a n d got a b u n c h of us together. h a v e a n y r e c o r d s . B a s i e w a s t h e last
a n d still p l a y i n g wonderful horn. He's T h i s w a s i n 1 9 3 1 . T h e n w e w e n t to m a n to go b a c k , even t h o u g h B e n n i e
been w i t h N a t Towles a long time California with T and played i n Los wanted h i m to c o m e back.
now, i n O m a h a and on location i n Angeles for a week a n d then o n l o c a - N a t T o w l e s got a g u y i n D a l l a s
B i l l i n g s , M o n t a n a . T h a t T h a d every- tion i n Bakersfield for about six w h o o w n e d a s t r i n g of n i g h t c l u b s ,
thing . . . m o n t h s a n d t h e n c a m e b a c k to S a n and Buster S m i t h , Joe K e y s and my-
W e s t a y e d t o g e t h e r f o r n e a r l y five A n t o n i o . C a r l " T a t t i " S m i t h j o i n e d us self w e n t to D a l l a s w i t h h i m . B u s t e r
y e a r s a n d m a d e i t . It w a s a h e l l o f a then. q u i t a n d w e n t b a c k to B a s i e , s t i l l
b a n d . T c o u l d p l a y first, get-off, p a r t s , T a t t i h a d a fine t o n e a n d c o u l d t r y i n g to m a k e i t . M e a n w h i l e J o J o n e s
a n y t h i n g . E a r l Bostic was i n the b a n d always read. H i s father was p r i n c i p a l sent f o r J o e K e y s to c o m e t o M i n -
then, a n d really w a i l i n g . W e h a d three o f W i l e y C o l l e g e a n d I first h e a r d h i m n e a p o l i s to j o i n R o o k G a n z ' b a n d , a n d
l i t t l e v i o l i n s t h a t p l a y e d t r i c k y stuff i n 1 9 2 5 w h e n he r a n a w a y w i t h a L e s t e r left F l e t c h e r a n d went i n that
just l i k e the sax section w o u l d , a n d a r o a d show. H e was hot tempered but b a n d too. I got a t e l e g r a m to j o i n
tuba player, Leslie Sherrifield, who I r e m e m b e r once w h e n we were i n A n d y K i r k and I walked around with
c o u l d p l a y get-off t u b a l i k e E p p i D e l R i o , M e x i c o on a j o b , w h e n he a n d it f o r a l o n g w h i l e , b e c a u s e I d i d n ' t
J a c k s o n i n Trent's b a n d . W e used to J a c k R a n s o m , a n o t h e r b a n d l e a d e r got w a n t to l e a v e D a l l a s t h e n . I d i d j o i n
b o o k ourselves then, a l l over the h i g h on tequila a n d started fighting h i m after a w h i l e , a n d h e ' d been after
S o u t h , before the b o o k i n g agents over g a m b l i n g . Tatti pulled a pistol m e e a r l i e r to j o i n h i s b a n d . I r e p l a c e d
c a m e i n . W e were called T . H o l d e r ' s o n J a c k a n d he h a d a k n i f e . T a t t i Ben Webster i n A n d y ' s band. Basie
12 C l o u d s of J o y . W e a l w a y s w a n t e d p u l l e d three times a n d the g u n d i d n ' t h a d g o n e b a c k to B e n n i e t h e n a n d
to b a t t l e T r e n t ' s b a n d , b u t i t n e v e r g o off, so he w e n t o u t s i d e a n d t h r e w they h a d a b i t c h of a b a n d . T h e y were
c a m e off. W e d i d b a t t l e T r o y F l o y d it d o w n o n t h e street, a n d I s w e a r i t s u p p o s e d to g o i n t o t h e G r a n d T e r -
a n d t h a t u s e d to b e s o m e t h i n g . m a d e a h o l e i n the p a v e m e n t . I ' d l i k e race b e h i n d E a r l H i n e s , but the deal
A f t e r we closed the W i n t e r G a r d e n to see h i m a g a i n , b e c a u s e I u n d e r - fell t h r o u g h .
i n O k l a h o m a C i t y i n the s u m m e r , T s t a n d he's i n S o u t h A m e r i c a s o m e - A n d y got t h i s little break before
w o u l d j u m p i n a c a r a n d g o off to where. that a n d went East w i t h M a m i e S m i t h
C a l i f o r n i a . T h i s w o u l d b r e a k u p the W e also h a d a g u y c a l l e d H u g h w h o h a d c o m e t h r o u g h . W e w e r e at
b a n d , m o r e like a vacation, because Jones who was a hell of a solo m a n , the V e n d o m e i n B u f f a l o the n i g h t
we a l l saved up some m o n e y a n d some but c o u l d n ' t r e a d , a n d w h e n it c a m e B e n n i e d i e d on the o p e r a t i n g table.
o f u s h a d n ' t seen o u r f a m i l i e s f o r to p l a y i n g p a r t s , h e ' d m i s s a l l o v e r t h e Someone called from Kansas City and
quite a while. Gene C o y came into place. H e h a d some chops then, he told P h a T e r r e l l . A f t e r that B i g ' U n
Seminole, Oklahoma with Clyde Hart, c o u l d p l a y so h i g h , b u t he n e v e r m a d e [ W a l t e r P a g e ] t r i e d to t a k e t h e b a n d ,
Ben Webster, S l i m M o o r e , Joe K e y s i t . H e u s e d to s l i p off o n t h e j o b a l l a n d B u s M o t e n t r i e d to m a k e i t , b u t
a n d those guys. S o m e of his m e n h a d the t i m e . Y o u ' d l o o k a r o u n d f o r h i m B a s i e w a s r e a l l y t h e o n l y o n e to
left a n d j o i n e d J a p A l l e n a n d he a n d h e ' d be g o n e . H e ' d g o b a c k t o survive.
needed some replacements. Wesley Kansas City. W e played some dues w i t h A n d y ,
a n d I j o i n e d h i m for three months T's b a n d broke up a r o u n d 1933, m a n , things really were b a d , y o u have
o r so u n t i l T c a l l e d u s f r o m S a n A n - a n d a s m a l l g r o u p of us l e d b y W e s l e y no i d e a . I q u i t a n d went back to

DECEMBER 19

i
N a t Towles. Orihestm

191A Spr.n* Ss Olml Nfc.

Courtesy Frank Driggs

Dallas. A n d y hadn't gotten his break eral different arrangements o n one Clarence Love came from Kansas
yet. I w e n t b a c k t o W i l e y C o l l e g e a n d t u n e , l i k e Marie. W e rehearsed every C i t y a n d I met h i m i n M u s h o g e e i n
played w i t h their b a n d for a while. d a y w h e n we weren't p l a y i n g . B a s i e 1 9 2 9 . H e d i d n ' t h a v e as g o o d a b a n d
T h a t s u m m e r N a t T o w l e s h a d gotten couldn't have touched our b a n d . W e as T . H o l d e r o r N a t T o w l e s , b u t he
some good territorial work around c a u g h t h i s b r o a d c a s t w h e n he o p e n e d was established.
O m a h a a n d he t o o k o v e r t h e W i l e y at t h e G r a n d T e r r a c e , a n d w e w o u l d F o r m y m o n e y t h e best t r u m p e t
Collegians. I worked with h i m until have torn his band apart. O u r b a n d player a r o u n d was E d d i e T o m p k i n s .
I j o i n e d Basie i n 1939. W e h a d a hell was s w i n g i n g a l l the t i m e , c o u l d en- I n fact he was the o n l y t r u m p e t
of a good b a n d , a n d when we came tertain, and play pretty. W e played player L u n c e f o r d ever h a d . H e d i d n ' t
to t o w n , we j u s t t o o k over, i n the face a l l t h e best t e r r i t o r y w o r k a n d a l l t h e stay a r o u n d K a n s a s C i t y m u c h , a n d
of established c o m p e t i t i o n , because college proms. J o h n H a m m o n d picked w a s w i t h T . H o l d e r g r o u p t h a t Jesse
w e w e r e so m u c h b e t t e r m u s i c - w i s e . u p E r n i e F i e l d s b a n d out of T u l s a a Stone took back w i t h h i m to K a n s a s
T h e y h a d as m a n y as five b i g n a m e s couple of years later, a n d I'm telling C i t y . I t h i n k he w e n t w i t h e i t h e r
g o i n g at t h a t t i m e , R e d P e r k i n s , L l o y d y o u , there was no comparison. S i r G r a n t M o o r e or E l i R i c e i n the e a r l y
Hunter, The N i g h t Owls and a couple Charles T h o m p s o n was i n that b a n d , 30's, before L u n c e f o r d grabbed h i m .
of others. T h e D r e a m l a n d b a l l r o o m , F r e d Beckett, H e n r y C o k e r (with H e went to a l l the colleges a r o u n d
where a l l the names still p l a y today, Basie n o w ) , Archie Brown, who t h a t p a r t of t h e c o u n t r y a n d w a s j u s t
was the spot a r o u n d there a n d we h a d played like T r i c k y S a m ; C. Q. Price short of b e i n g a doctor. H e was
it sewed u p . B e f o r e we c a m e to who was t e r r i f i c alto m a n a n d c o u l d t e r r i f i c , he c o u l d p l a y first, get-off,
O m a h a we were w o r k i n g out of write some wonderful things. N . R . h a d a h e l l o f a r a n g e , a n d h e h a d to
D a l l a s , a n d u s e d to B a t t l e M i l t L a r - Bates was really s o m e t h i n g on t r u m - p l a y some h a r d m u s i c i n those days.
k i n s b a n d i n H o u s t o n a l l the t i m e . pet, he c o u l d p l a y first t o o , a n d w a s H e d i e d i n the A r m y .
Arnett C o b b a n d Illinois Jacquet were c o m p a r e d to B u c k i n style. H e q u i t
I remember Boots and H i s Buddies.
i n that b a n d , a n d they used to battle over some w o m a n , and P a u l K i n g
T h e y didn't have m u c h of a band,
u s e v e r y S u n d a y at t h e H a r l e m S q u a r e r e p l a c e d h i m , a f t e r he q u i t A n d y K i r k
a n d d i d n ' t get s t a r t e d u n t i l 1 9 3 5 o r s o ,
in Houston. i n early 1937. T h a t was a b a n d that
b e c a u s e w h e n I f i r s t s a w h i m , he w a s
Basie didn't have any organized really s h o u l d have made it. I replaced
playing with Johnson's Joymakers.
b a n d like ours then, and ours was H e r s c h e l when he d i e d a n d stayed
T h e r e were the M c D a v i d B r o t h e r s
definitely the better b a n d . A n d y K i r k w i t h B a s i e u n t i l 1949, a n d then went
w h o h a d a b a n d a r o u n d there i n the
called m e w h e n H a m m o n d was c o m - w i t h R u s h ' s g r o u p , then into the
e a r l y y e a r s , a n d t h e y w e n t to C a l i -
i n g to K a n s a s C i t y , because we were S a v a n n a h C l u b , a n d i n t o the C e l e b r i t y
fornia.
p l a y i n g a dance i n T r e n t o n , M i s s o u r i . C l u b w i t h m y o w n b a n d w h i c h I've
h a d a b o u t five y e a r s n o w . . . I ' l l tell y o u one t h i n g about the
N a t a n d I d r o v e to K a n s a s C i t y a n d
A . G . G o d l e y was the top d r u m m e r S o u t h , they'll recognize y o u r talent,
contacted J o h n , a n d the o n l y reason
all a r o u n d i n those e a r l y years, a n d b e c a u s e w e p l a y e d a l l t h e best w h i t e
he c o u l d n ' t c o m e u p to O m a h a a n d
A l v i n B u r r o u g h s was great then too. dances a n d the best l o c a t i o n s a n d
h e a r o u r b a n d w a s t h a t he w a s j u s t
T h a t ' s one t h i n g about B a s i e , he broadcast a l l the t i m e , but up N o r t h
s t o p p i n g over before g o i n g out to
k n o w s h o w to p i c k d r u m m e r s . t h e y ' l l tell y o u " w e ' d l i k e to put y o u
California for Benny Goodman's
W e u s e d to h e a r S u g a r L o u a n d o n a c o m m e r c i a l p r o g r a m , but the
o p e n i n g at t h e P a l o m a r . H a m m o n d
E d d i e out o f T y l e r w h e n w e h a d the S o u t h w o n ' t accept y o u " . T h a t ' s t h e i r
w a n t e d to h e a r s o m e g o o d j a z z that
f a m i l y band, but they never d i d any- w a y of t e l l i n g y o u they won't h i r e y o u .
n i g h t a n d he w e n t t o t h e R e n o C l u b
thing. They had a wealthy guy who T h e y d o n ' t w a n t y o u t o get w h e r e
a n d s i g n e d B a s i e o n the spot, a n d that
owned a r a d i o station a n d he used the r e a l m o n e y i s . I k n o w it isn't t r u e
was that. T a t t i S m i t h was p l a y i n g
to g i v e t h e m a l l the a i r t i m e , a n d that because T r e n t p l a y e d the A d o l p h u s
t r u m p e t w i t h Basie then, because
built their reputation up. KWKH Hotel every day for a year and h a d
Lips had signed with M C A . Nat had
Blues a n d n u m b e r s l i k e t h a t d i d i t . a r a d i o w i r e , a n d B a s i e just got i n t o
a l o t m o r e t o o f f e r , b e c a u s e he h a d
L i p s u s e d t o w o r k w i t h t h e m at o n e the W a l d o r f last y e a r .
five a r r a n g e r s , a n d a l l o f u s w e r e
w r i t i n g , a n d m a n y t i m e s w e h a d sev- time. (Continued on Page 27)

20 THE JAZZ REVIEW


The Negro Church:

Its Influence on Modern Jazz


by Mimi Clar

Rhythm Part 2
O n e of the most f a m o u s breaks i n tempo. Oscar Peterson's Tenderly striking resemblance to each other
jazz is executed by Charlie Parker w i t h its florid, rhapsodic first chorus when actually heard performed. This
during a performance of Night in proceeding to a succession of cho- k i n s h i p is fostered b y the e m o t i o n a l
Tunisia. T h i s break contains around ruses " i n the g r o o v e " is a g o o d ex- d r i v e a n d i n s p i r a t i o n r e f e r r e d to i n
s i x t y - f o u r notes i n just t w o b a r s . A a m p l e . A d u p l i c a t i o n of t h i s i d e a i n the paragraphs dealing with swing
more concise drum break is taken Negro gospel music is the Radio land t o be d i s c u s s e d i n m o r e d e t a i l
by A r t B l a k e y on H o r a c e Silver's re- Four's An Earnest Prayer, which in a future section).
c o r d i n g of Quicksilver: opens with a beseeching, melismatic Similar patterns may be found
supplication and closes with a toe- most abundantly in the repetitive
( M u s i c a l E x a m p l e 7: d r u m break)
tapping call-to-prayer sung and swung ostinato figures p l a y e d i n the accom-
B r e a k s are part of N e g r o c h u r c h m u -
mightily. p a n i m e n t of a r e n d i t i o n to e s t a b l i s h
s i c , t o o . O n Heaven by Mahalia Jack-
son, the guitar has the following Moving from the general to the a s w i n g i n g beat. T h e s e p a t t e r n s a r e
break: m o r e specific, we find a strong simi- most effectively presented by p l a c i n g
l a r i t y a n d close r e l a t i o n s h i p between them in parallel columns and pro-
(Musical Example 8: guitar break)
m a n y of the i n d i v i d u a l r h y t h m i c m o - c e e d i n g to c o m p a r e t h e m .
Negro church music and modern
tifs a n d figures i n modern jazz and (Musical Example 9: Jazz
j a z z share the concept of d e l a y e d ac-
Negro church music. While differing Negro Church)
t i o n . I n j a z z t h i s is f o u n d c l e a r l y i n
in notation, these patterns bear a S i m i l a r patterns are also apparent
the m u s i c of E r r o l l G a r n e r . H e often
p l a y s l o c k e d - h a n d s s t y l e at a steady
tempo w i t h o u t e x p l i c i t l y stating the
b e a t . H e d o e s so b y w a y o f i n t r o d u c -
t i o n to a n u m b e r or t h r o u g h o u t the
entire first chorus, thus creating a
tension i n t h e l i s t e n e r as he waits
for t h e beat to c o m m e n c e . A guest r J $ tyrftf i t \
s p e a k e r at t h e S o u t h e r n M i s s i o n a r y
Baptist C h u r c h of Los Angeles did
the same t h i n e i n a Draver recently 8

A s h e i n t o n e d h i s s u p p l i c a t i o n , h e re
Jazz: Church Music:
peated the i n his sentences:
1. Thelonius M o n k B y e - Y a 1. Sammy L e w i s I ' m Heaven B o u n d
Art Blakey; drums: piano and organ accompaniment:
"Lawd, youyouyouyou
y o u t o l d me . . . " 2. St. Paul's C h u r c h , KFWB, Sunday,
and 2. Horace S i l v e r S a f a r i
Oct. 14, 1956, 10:30 P.M.
tambourine: $ J | &JJ J J
"Weweweweknow A r t B l a k e y ; stick on cymbal:
that y o u . . . " 3. Alex B r a d f o r d L o r d , Lord, Lord
organ (left hand) :
This r e p e t i t i o n has the same effect 3. Bill DavisOoh Ah!
u p o n t h e l i s t e n e r as G a r n e r ' s d e l a y e d organ: rj J
C r j j | ^ 4. Pres DixonI Made a Step in the '

m a n i f e s t a t i o n of the r h y t h m i c pulse. Right Direction


piano: 1 JJlrjlJ* j /] J] - |
W e complete the s u r v e y of rhyth-
4. Curtis Counce Quintet at The Haig 5. White Rose C h u r c h of G o d in Christ,
mic frameworks and forms common
August 31, 1956 K F O X , Sunday, J u l y 29, 1956, 9:30
to modern jazz and Negro church Frank Butlerdrum
P.M. <2 JJ J J J
music by n o t i n g the concept of an figure behind sustained notes:
c J.J>J J \Jt*_.
ad-libbed section i n a piece b e i n g fol-
lowed by a section with a steady J 7 3 J 7 3 - T O J73

DECEMBER 21
in the rhythmic interplay between M a r i e K n i g h t ' s / ' / / Tell It Wherever For Me a n d i n t h e w o r k o f d r u m m e r s
instruments i n j a z z a n d between hand I Go, a n d o n T h e D a v i s S i s t e r s ' Jesus s u c h as A r t B l a k e y a n d F r a n k B u t l e r .
claps a n d foot-stomps i n the c h u r c h . Steps Right In When I Need Him Triplets are also used i n breaks a n d
In Alex Bradford's / Don't Care Most as o s t i n a t o p i a n o r h y t h m s . I n fill-ins. The guitar on M a h a l i a Jack-
What the World May Do, I'm Gonna the jazz field, triplets occur on the s o n ' s Heaven has this b r e a k :
Praise His Name, the drum plays M o d e r n J a z z Q u a r t e t ' s Willow Weep (Musical Example 18: Heaven)
four q u a r t e r notes per m e a s u r e , ac-
centing beats two and four; over I
this, hand-claps enter o n the second x
10
and fourth beats:
(Musical Example 10: hands, drum) t t f r :

The Comeback by C o u n t Basie fea-


> 1
y

if n n
tures the pattern just illustrated in
d i m i n u t i o n . H e r e , the g u i t a r
function in parallel fashion
chords
to the
n
n
i i r
church drum; the brushed snare
drum now
church
occupies
hand-claps:
the place of the
t
(Musical Example 1 1 : drums, guitar)
Repeated notes are often
the e n d of phrases f o r fill-ins i n b o t h
used at 12
sI n mi |
jazz and N e g r o c h u r c h music. These
repeated notes frequently fall into
similar patterns when they are placed n r r p p n
side b y side. F o r example, the fill-in
b e l o w , used b y the p i a n i s t i n a S o u t h - 13 4 4 It 44 44-
e r n M i s s i o n a r y Baptist C h u r c h serv-

u
-4-4 4-f-
' U I u u
ice, 9
and extremely popular among
gospel i n s t r u m e n t a l i s t s
(Musical Example 12: fill-in)
i s q u i t e r e m i n i s c e n t of the fill-ins
employed by K e n n y D r e w on Talkin' m m u i p 7 p n - f f i \

f
and Walkin' and by G e r r y Wiggins on
Night and Day (Zoot Sims Quartet) : L x. x < y ->r v: * v- >

j J.
(Musical Example 13:

On the
Drew, Wiggins)
recording of Count Your
14 c
Many Blessings by T h e F o u r Interns,
the p i a n o enters w i t h a repeated note
motif: 15
(Musical Example 14: motif)
which is d u p l i c a t e d i n most of the
recordings by Oscar Peterson, who
applies it w i t h i n the f r a m e w o r k of an r> J w 3 1 r 3 i
octave:
(Musical Example 15: Peterson)
16
m T * * * 4 * I . ; i

A final figure of s i m i l a r i t y exists S a l - va-+.n is Jfrte Lw<JI Sa\


i n E r r o l l G a r n e r ' s There Is No Greater
Love a n d M a h a l i a J a c k s o n ' s I'm So
Glad Salvation Is Free. I n the latter,
4 4^44
Miss Jackson holds a syllable on a 17
repeated note a n d f o l l o w s it w i t h a n
accented descending triplet which
ends before the downbeat:
(Musical Example 16: Jackson) 1r
In the Garner record, the note is
tremoloed instead of repeated, then t
18
proceeds to the accented descending
figure:
(Musical Example 17: Garner)
M a n y motifs in Negro church m u - 2v> _
sic a n d m o d e r n jazz are i d e n t i c a l . I n
both i d i o m s , triplets are sometimes 19
utilized for accompaniment purposes.
In the gospel field, they occur on

22 THE JAZZ REVIEW


w h i l e the p i a n o o n the S o u l S t i r r e r s '
r I
Nearer My God To Thee fills a gap
with: 20
( M u s i c a l E x a m p l e 19: triplets)
v-v-v- - y - ^ -h-f-t- -+
The piano on West Coast Blues by
Sonny C r i s s r e p l i e s to a h o r n
ment i n this m a n n e r :
state-
a
(Musical Example 20: piano) 21
Further rhythmically identical fill-
i n s m a y be o b s e r v e d i n a comparison
of a Sister Rosetta T h a r p e perform-
ance (title u n k n o w n )
Hampton Hawes and
with records by
Kenny Drew.
22
1 $1
The Tharpe pianist plays:
(Musical Example 2 1 : Tharpe)
p i a n i s t H a w e s p l a y s (Hump's Blues) :
(Musical Example 22: Hawes)
and pianist Drew plays (Drew's
Blues) :
(Musical Example 23: Drew)
Notice how a l l these patterns begin
and end on upbeats. 23
Gospel a n d jazz percussionists oft-
times k e e p the beat g o i n g i n exactly
the same w a y . T h e h a n d - c l a p p i n g pat-
tern ( f j t<m
the m o s t c o m m o n i n \
Negro ^ u r c l T e s today, is an exact
replica of the cymbal accents used 24
by A r t B l a k e y and other f u n k y d r u m -
mers. A hand-clapping pattern heard
i n the W h i t e R o s e C h u r c h of G o d i n
Christ is d u p l i c a t e d b y the muted

s $
1 0

brass section repeating a note b e h i n d


the melody on the Duke Ellington
r e c o r d , Boo-Dah: C J > J V > / / etc.
A later W h i t e Rose C h u r c h service 1 1

y i e l d e d a d r u m pattern w h i c h is i d e n -
tical to the drum patter on Gene
QnorW. 4 t W man-/ + i m
1^
A m n i o n s ' Great Lie: jtfJJJJ / etc. .^f-< . f -
25

1
P e r h a p s the most prevalent of the
drum figures i n the gospel field (ex-
e m p l i f i e d o n Life Is a Ball Game by
W y o n a C a r r a n d In That Day by Joe
May) is a perfect d u p l i c a t i o n of E r -
roll Garner's left-hand chord pattern:
26
C A l l l / J J SI J / - Erroll Gar-
ner provides instance of s i m i -
larity w i t h the Negro church when v ^
he i n t r o d u c e s the u n e x p e c t e d rest at
the b e g i n n i n g of a measure preceding
an accent on beat t w o i n Will You
Still Be Mine ?
(Musical Example 24: Garner)
8
Southern M i s s i o n a r y Baptist C h u r c h , K P O P , Sunday, Dec. 30, 1956,
10:15 P . M .
The same rest and accent situation
prevails i n the Ward Singers' How
Many Times?: D
KPOP, 10:30 P . M . , S u n d a y , Oct. 14, 1956
(Musical Example 2 5 : W a r d Singers)
and i n Jesus Gettin Us Ready For
That Great Day f r o m a s e r v i c e at L o s 1 0
K F O X , S u n d a y , A p r i l 29, 1956, 9:30 P . M .
Angeles' Temple of the H o l y Ghost
and School of Instruction: 1 2

(Musical Example 26: H o l y Ghost) 1 1


KFOX, S u n d a y , A u g u s t 5, 1 9 5 6 , 9 : 3 0 P . M .
This is the second in a series.
Future installments will deal with
Harmony and Emotion. 1 2
K G E R , S u n d a y , O c t o b e r 14, 1956, 1 1 : 3 0 P . M .

DECEMBER
THE CUBAN S E X T E T O
by Roger Pryor Dodge
It w a s b a c k i n t h e m i d d l e t w e n t i e s H e r e let m e i n s i s t a g a i n o n a p o i n t m u s i c a l leaders of p o p u l a r bands i n
t h a t I h e a r d m y f i r s t C u b a n sexteto I have often m a d e b e f o r e : it is m y f a s h i o n a b l e m u s i c a l spots o f H a v a n a
record. T h e n , like most novices, I theory that m u c h of o u r great clas- established the m a m b o . T h e i r proto-
was s t r u c k m a i n l y b y the a s t o u n d i n g sical m u s i c has its roots i n c e r t a i n t y p e w a s t h e montuno of t h e danzon.
d r u m m i n g , b u t as t h e y e a r s w e n t b y r a r e fertile periods of h i g h l y - d e v e l - T h e p e c u l i a r character possessed b y
I c a m e t o a p p r e c i a t e t h e s i n g i n g as oped f o l k - m u s i c . I n line w i t h this, the t h e s t y l e a n d f o r m o f a danzon gave
something e x t r a o r d i n a r y i n itself and C u b a n sextetos, I h o l d , h a v e r e a c h e d w a y to a m o r e p o p u l a r a n d m o d e r n
c o n t a i n i n g the most g l o r i o u s music. t h i s stage o f d e v e l o p m e n t a n d l i e approach, utilizing amongst other
N o w R i v e r s i d e has issued the only r e a d y f o r the n o t a t i o n - c o m p o s e r ' s use. o l d e r types, the m u s i c of the sextetos.
r e c o r d I k n o w of that gives a n y i n - M y interest i n b o t h j a z z a n d the H o w e v e r , it w o u l d have taken the
t i m a t i o n o f t h e c h a r a c t e r of t h i s m u s i c sextetos g o e s b e y o n d t h e d e e p p l e a s - integrity of a revivalist's fervor to
to present-day A m e r i c a n listeners. u r e I take i n l i s t e n i n g to t h e m ; I a m establish a n y t h i n g of s o l i d m e r i t .
Festival in Havana is a r e c o r d i n g of concerned with discovering and T h e m a m b o as p l a y e d i n N e w Y o r k
a m u s i c that preceded a n d gave b i r t h b r i n g i n g to notice t h e i r m a n y i n - consists of n o t h i n g m o r e than a
to the C u b a n sextetos. herent qualities characteristic of a n C u b a n r h y t h m section together w i t h
In the notes o n the R i v e r s i d e a r t r i p e to be t a k e n o v e r b y c o m - large choirs of trumpets, trombones
r e c o r d O d i l i o U r f e speaks of the later posers i n the c l a s s i c a l t r a d i t i o n . a n d saxes p l a y i n g a n a r r a n g e m e n t
b a s t a r d i z a t i o n a n d d i s t o r t i o n of this F u r t h e r , I feel that s h o u l d t h e i r po- d e r i v e d f r o m m o d e r n j a z z . It i s c o m -
m u s i c b y p o p u l a r taste. H e r e I h a v e t e n t i a l t i e s be n e g l e c t e d w e w o u l d be p l e t e l y w r i t t e n o u t a n d as c h a r a c t e r -
to d i s a g r e e w i t h h i m u n l e s s h e e x - m u c h the p o o r e r f o r t h e i r loss. T h i s less as i s b i g b a n d s c o r i n g i n j a z z .
cludes f r o m this blanket dismissal t h e o r y of m i n e has slanted a l l m y T h e r e have been some indications
t h o s e e a r l y sexteto r e c o r d i n g s o f t h e criticism, causing many of my that C u b a n r h y t h m s are c r e e p i n g into
twenties. A l o n g w i t h the present w a v e readers, whose interest i n jazz stems A m e r i c a n jazz. T o do what Gillespie
o f e t h n i c r e c o r d i n g s we a r e t r e a t e d f r o m w i d e l y different reasons t h a n m y d i d w i t h C h a n o P o z o is m e r e novelty.
t o m u c h t a l k a b o u t t h e s u p e r i o r i t y of o w n , to m i s u n d e r s t a n d m y a p p r o a c h . A n y great d r u m m i n g E a s t I n d i a n or
p r i m i t i v e f o l k m u s i c over its u r b a n B u t i f t h e y w i l l c o n s i d e r t h a t I see A f r i c a n c o m b i n e d w i t h the m e l o d i c
development. W h i l e I ' m a l l for the j a z z as a p a r t o f t h e w h o l e b o d y o f virtuosity of jazz w o u l d always prove
a v a i l a b i l i t y of ethnic r e c o r d i n g s , I W e s t e r n m u s i c a n d find m y deepest exciting. W h e n two types of m u s i c
c a n n o t go a l o n g w i t h the f u r t h e r - pleasure i n the e a r l y w o r k s of the are near n e i g h b o r s i n the same c i t y
back-we-go-the-better conception of classical periods, I t h i n k that they w i l l m a r r i a g e is i n e v i t a b l e . B u t the g l o r y
folk m u s i c . M a y b e I feel this w a y c o m e closer to m y m e a n i n g . of C u b a n r h y t h m cannot be fused
because I b e l o n g to a d a y w h e n we w i t h A m e r i c a n jazz merely by seating
W h i l e m o d e r n jazz still retains the
played our jazz records until they a Cuban drummer i n a jazz band any
m e t h o d of i m p r o v i s a t i o n of e a r l y j a z z ,
were t r u l y " b e a t . " O u r enthusiasm m o r e t h a n j a z z c o u l d be i n j e c t e d i n t o
t h e C u b a n m a m b o i n its s y n t h e t i c
was c e r t a i n l y not f o r t h e i r f o l k i n - C u b a n m u s i c b y the reverse process.
development grows f r o m no such i n -
tegrity alone. T h e r e w o u l d be no real u n i o n . O n
digenous roots. T h e only musicians
M o r e o v e r , I s t i l l find i n t h e u r b a n the l o w e r level, i f C u b a n a n d jazz
with any improvisational freedom i n
g r o w t h of j a z z a n a d v a n c e m e n t c a r r y - p l a y e r s were to sit d o w n together
C u b a are the s m a l l e r g r o u p s s e x t e t o s
i n g b e n e f i t s n o t f o u n d i n its p r i m i t i v e year after y e a r i n s m a l l H a r l e m joints
and t r i o s w h o s e m u s i c a l practices
prototype. A n attitude of contempt t h e o u t c o m e w i l l c e r t a i n l y be m o -
were never emulated by performers
for its u r b a n development w o u l d dis- mentous for the Cuban-jazz amalga-
on more conventional instruments.
miss a l l the i n s t r u m e n t a l jazz we mation. But imagine a snare d r u m -
O n e e x c e p t i o n , however, is the t r u m -
k n o w : O l i v e r , D o d d s a n d L o u i s , a l l of bass d r u m type of d r u m m i n g i n
p e t ; its best e x a m p l e c a n b e h e a r d
boogie-woogie piano, together w i t h C u b a n m u s i c ! I n t h e U n i t e d States
on the R i v e r s i d e release. P e r f o r m -
Bunk's glorious band. A n d I will o n l y B a b y D o d d s h a s g i v e n us a s t y l e
ances on c o n v e n t i o n a l i n s t r u m e n t s
r e m a r k right here that m y listening that seems to b e l o n g b y r i g h t i n a jazz
taken over f r o m the m i l i t a r y b a n d s
pleasures h a v e g r a v i t a t e d to c e r t a i n b a n d . T h e fact that o u r snare d r u m -
a n d danzon orchestras always show
jazz records made d u r i n g a short bass d r u m outfit has never been r e a l l y
the h a n d of the a r r a n g e r , whether i n
p e r i o d i n the twenties, a n d extending, i n t e g r a t e d i n t o j a z z p l a y i n g leaves
a s s i g n i n g to the v a r i o u s pieces t h e i r
o f course, to those later d i s c o v e r i e s r o o m f o r a s t y l e o f d r u m m i n g t h a t fits
h a r m o n i c a n d r h y t h m i c roles or i n
i n the same v e i n , r a t h e r t h a n to a n y as n a t u r a l l y i n t o i t s c o n t e x t as d o t h e
creating more ambitious compositions
s i n g i n g , solo or ensemble, that pre- d r u m s of a C u b a n b a n d .
l i k e those by o u r o w n b i g b a n d a r -
ceded this m u s i c . In C u b a d u r i n g the B u t to c o m e b a c k to the t w o m u s i c s
r a n g e r s . A s the sextetos, u n l i k e the
twenties there was a short c o m p a r a b l e o f o u r s u b j e c t . M y a t t a c h m e n t to t h e m
N e w Orleans improvisers, never e m -
p e r i o d w h e n t h e sextetos w e r e o f t h e as w e l l as t o c l a s s i c m u s i c d e r i v e s
ployed conventional instruments they
most listenable character before they f r o m t h e p e r e n n i a l i n t e r e s t I find i n
c o u l d not develop a school of i n s t r u -
sank into banality. B y listenable I t h e m , a n i n t e r e s t I d o n o t find i n
m e n t a l i m p r o v i s a t i o n r e a d y to be
m e a n that the m u s i c is not o n l y other folk musics. A s an example, the
taken over b y the p o p u l a r b a n d s .
charged with good melody, brilliant dance music of Chambonnieres, w h i c h
i n t o n a t i o n a n d p l a y i n g style but that T h e most infectious part of C u b a n is c e r t a i n l y c l a s s i c a l , n o t f o l k m u s i c ,
the development of its m a t e r i a l is m u s i c i s t h e montuno. B y concentrat- is a genre m a d e possible b y the status
made i n t r i g u i n g and exciting. i n g on this infectious section certain of the e a r l i e r i m p r o v i s e d m u s i c of

24 THE JAZZ REVIEW


h i s t i m e . It s e e m s t o m e , m o r e o v e r , p e c u l i a r to its different sections a n d b e t w e e n t h e t u n e g e n r e s . T h e sextetos
that h a d this i m p r o v i s e d m u s i c been their specific sequence, are h i g h l y of the earliest r e c o r d i n g s called their
notated it w o u l d appear v e r y little intriguing. One or two ballad-type m u s i c " s o n e s . " W h e t h e r the difference
d i f f e r e n t , i f at a l l , f r o m C h a m b o n - s e r t i o n s f o l l o w e d b y a montuno, each is i n m e l o d y or treatment I do not
nieres! of w h i c h is i n i t i a t e d b y a n i n t r o d u c - k n o w . T h e w o r d " r u m b a " I never
t i o n a b a c a d a c i s the s t r u c t u r e o f heard used for this m u s i c . T h e groups
T h e sextetos are d e f i n i t e l y a m u s i c
t h e danzon. But it was not destined consisted of s i x m e n g u i t a r , tres
of professionals. T h e y were c o n c e r n e d
t o flower i n t o t h e g r e a t m u s i c f o u n d (three stringed g u i t a r ) , claves, bongo,
w i t h c r e a t i n g a f o r m o f m u s i c to be
i n t h e son o f t h e sextetos. a n d bass. T h r e e o r f o u r of the players
listened a n d danced to, a n d w i t h
The Cuban rumbas and congos on sang. T h e s i n g i n g on the sexteto
the necessity of s t a y i n g w i t h i n the
Riverside have a l u x u r i a n t sound due records is a m i x t u r e of solo a n d en-
confines of a m o r e compact ensemble,
t o t h e m a n y v o i c e s w h i c h , p l a y e d at s e m b l e . It i s l o o s e l y k n i t , s o m e w h a t
than d i d their predecessors. O f a l l the
fast tempos w i t h f e r v i d d r u m m i n g ac- a n a l o g o u s to t h e f r e e d o m o f t h e m e l -
pre-sexteto records that I have h e a r d
companiment, g r i p our attention. T h i s ody instruments (trumpet, clarinet
I find t h a t n o n e o f t h e m g i v e s t h e
is m u s i c f o r a festive g a t h e r i n g - a n d t r o m b o n e ) of a j a z z b a n d . T h e
completely relaxed and pleasurable
musicians and spectatorseither i n a tunes l e n d themselves to f u l l t h r o a t e d
effect o f t h e s e x t e t o s , n o r d o e s t h i s
p a c k e d r o o m o r i n t h e o p e n a n d its and r i c h s i n g i n g either i n complete
relaxation ever lead to a n y let-down
w h o l e spirit grows out of t h e i r back- solos or injected breaks, giving,
of interest a n d v i r i l i t y . In consistency
c o u n t r y cult rites. B u t w h e n we are t h e r e b y , a r h y t h m i c o u t l i n e to the
of f o l k tune i n t e g r i t y , the R i v e r s i d e
n o t o n t h e scene a n d a r e n o t b r o u g h t m e l o d y . T h e b o n g o acts as a free
release is p r e e m i n e n t . B u t t h i s u n -
out of ourselves b y the s p i r i t of the voice, p o i n t i n g u p the m u s i c where
s p o i l t state i s c h a r a c t e r i s t i c o f m o s t
occasion, a subtler and somewhat t h e p l a y e r feels it i s n e e d e d r h y t h m i -
p r i m i t i v e art a n d does not neces-
m o r e i n v o l v e d a p p r o a c h wears better cally.
sarily make for satisfactory d a i l y fare.
T h e g r e a t i m p o r t a n c e o f t h e sextetos f r o m d a y to d a y : s o m e t h i n g l i k e T h e different g r o u p s u s u a l l y have
lies i n what they h a v e d o n e w i t h t h i s what H a m l e t told the players, " . . . for their own particular introduction
folk m a t e r i a l , a n achievement that i n t h e v e r y t o r r e n t , t e m p e s t , a n d , as I a f t e r w h i c h t h e t h e m e m a y be s t a t e d
far outweighs any compromise they m a y say, the w h i r l w i n d of p a s s i o n , b y the tres. T h e voices enter easily
h a v e m a d e w i t h p o p u l a r taste. T h e y o u m u s t a c q u i r e a n d beget a t e m - w i t h the r h y t h m section c a r r y i n g i n -
e n s e m b l e b a l a n c e w i t h i n a sexteto a n d perance that m a y g i v e it s m o o t h n e s s . " c e s s a n t l y o n . A f t e r finishing t h e first
a N e w O r l e a n s jazz b a n d d i d not It i s t h e i n e v i t a b l e n e s s a n d r e l a x e d p h r a s e the v o i c e s e n t e r a g a i n at w h a t
e x i s t i n t h e i r p r o t o t y p e s . It i s t h e m o m e n t u m of the s o l i d r h y t h m section appears some seemingly a r b i t r a r y
specific n a t u r e o f the i n s t r u m e n t s a n d of m a r r a c a s , g u i t a r , tres a n d s t r i n g point. T h e incessant m a r c h of r h y t h m
their p a r t i c u l a r duties when w o r k i n g bass b e h i n d t h e s i n g i n g a n d b o n g o m a k e s these i n t e r v a l s b e t w e e n v o i c e
w i t h i n a t r a d i t i o n a l f o r m a n d ac- p l a y i n g t h a t g i v e s these sextetos a entrances interesting and a b s o r b i n g
cepted style, that transforms basic s t a b i l i t y not f o u n d i n the p r e v i o u s w i t h a n effect o f a r t i s t r y o n l y at-
m a t e r i a l i n t o a h i g h e r w o r k of art. m u s i c . T h o u g h the sextetos t o o w e r e tained i n a most advanced classical
p a r t o f t h e l i f e of t h e c a n t i n a s a n d m u s i c . A l t h o u g h the f o l k t u n e s t h e m -
F o r e x a m p l e , t h e C u b a n danzon is
dance-halls they achieved a style that selves a r e as s h o r t as m o s t E u r o p e a n
a f o r m with e x c i t i n g possibilities but
is s e l f - s u f f i c i e n t a p a r t f r o m t h i s c o n - folk tunes, the specific setting g i v e n
i t s e v o l u t i o n o u t of a sedate past
text. M o s t ethnic r e c o r d i n g s s t r i k e me b y a C u b a n r h y t h m s e c t i o n a v o i d s the
never g a v e b i r t h to a n y t r u l y great
m o r e as r e p o r t s o f h a p p e n i n g s I w a s usual t e r m i n a t i o n s of the E u r o p e a n
m u s i c . A great deal of m a t e r i a l out
not fortunate enough to " witness treatment w h i c h does no m o r e than
o f t h e sextetos c a n be seen i n i t b u t
r a t h e r t h a n a p r e s e n t a t i o n of a p i e c e e x h i b i t the little tune. M a n y of the
the w h o l e c h a r a c t e r of m e l o d y a n d
o f m u s i c i n its o w n r i g h t . tunes have phrase endings which
treatment is that o f a w r i t t e n c o m -
i n s p i r e a l o n g h e l d t o n e o f n o ap
p o s i t i o n i n a p o p u l a r v e i n . If we c a n I c a n n o t c l a i m t o be a n a u t h o r i t y
p a r e n t d e f i n i t e n e s s . A s s u n g w e get a
forget the p a u c i t y of its m e l o d i c o n the sextetos a n d d o n o t h a v e t h e
smooth impressive composition with-
c o n t e n t , w e w i l l find t h a t t h e s t y l e s k n o w l e d g e to p o i n t out the differences
out a t t e n t i o n b e i n g d r a w n to the
briefness of the theme. T h e tune i n
a f e w i n s t a n c e s a p p e a r s t o be c u t u p
and laid on a r h y t h m i c webbing. The
interdependence of the t w o forestall
a n y f e e l i n g o f b r e v i t y a n d t h e effect
e x c e e d s i n g r a n d e u r a n y t h i n g pos
s i b l e to t h e l i t t l e t u n e i t s e l f . T h e
p r o t r u d i n g r h y t h m between the me-
Iodic sections makes for a most ideal
f o r m o f e a r l y c o m p o s i t i o n . La Mujer
Podran Desir b y t h e S e x t e t o N a c i o n a l
is an e x q u i s i t e e x a m p l e of t h i s l a i d on
choral singing with protruding rhvthm
D o " o J
b e t w e e n s e c t i o n s a n d is b u t o n e o f
t h e m a n y w a y s of p r e s e n t i n g m a t e r i a l
o f c o m p o s i t i o n a l s t a t u s . It g o e s be-
y o n d the mere r e p e t i t i o n of the tune.
A f t e r the first t u n e h a s b e e n s u n g
a few times the o r i g i n a l c h o i r s go
into a repetitive c o d a that has b e c o m e
i n m a n y instances the g l o r y of the
C u b a n s e x t e t o s , t h e montuno, and a
c o n t r i b u t i o n o f g r e a t i m p o r t a n c e . It
gives the son a most balanced p r o p o r -
t i o n . W e a p p r e c i a t e the c o n t r i b u t i o n
o f t h e montuno, i f we c o m p a r e the
sextetos w i t h t h e s m a l l t r i o s t h a t
a b o u n d i n H a v a n a , p l a y i n g at t a b l e s
s i n g i n g p o p u l a r a n d folk tunes s i m i -
l a r to those used b y the sextetos. T h e
s o l i d i t y given the whole piece b y the
sexteto style is t e l l i n g l y different
f r o m the m e r e s i n g i n g of f o l k o r
p o p u l a r tunes. T h e t r a n s i t i o n f r o m
o p e n i n g s o n to the m o n t u n o is often
a most i n s p i r e d i n d i c a t i o n of great
delight to c o m e . T h e r e is a c o n t r o l l e d
l i f t of t e m p o , e s p e c i a l l y at t h e i n t r o -
d u c t i o n of the m o n t u n o that i m p e r -
ceptibly accelerates to the e n d w i t h o u t
g i v i n g the least i m p r e s s i o n of b e i n g
hurried.
T h e sextetos h a d a great v o g u e
t h r o u g h o u t the twenties. J u d g i n g by
t h e i r r e c o r d s t h e t w o greatest g r o u p s
were the Sexteto H a b a n e r o a n d the
Sexteto N a c i o n a l . T h e r e were some
e x c e l l e n t r e c o r d s b y s u c h g r o u p s as
the Septeto M a t a m o r o s , E s t u d i a n t i n a
O r i e n t a l de R i c a r d o " M a r t i n e z , a n d
the S o n o r a M a t a c e r a , but I c o u l d not
j u d g e t h e i r c o n t i n u e d w o r t h b y the
few discs a v a i l a b l e . J u s t as the
c o u n t r y dance m u s i c of the 16th
century became fashionable a n d was
subsequently used by composer-
i m p r o v i s o r s to be g l o r i f i e d a n d p r e - Guiterrez, Jimenez, Cabrera, Martinez, Castillo, Godinez
s e r v e d i n t h e d a n c e s u i t e s we k n o w ,
so t h e p r i m i t i v e m u s i c o f t h e p r e -
sexteto d a y s b e c a m e p o p u l a r . We
m a i n t a i n t h e i r i n t e g r i t y , find t h e m - able but a little goes a l o n g w a y o n
must remember that the popular
selves so o u t m o d e d t h a t t h e y r a r e l y r e c o r d s a n d i s best as a n i n g r e d i e n t
" t a k i n g u p " of a m u s i c is not the
w o r k . E x c e p t i n times of r e v i v a l of a c o m p o s i t i o n r a t h e r t h a n a t h i n g
s a m e as a p o p u l a r i n f l u e n c e b e i n g
these p l a y e r s b e c o m e t h e s a d cases i n i t s e l f . T h e m e l o d i e s the N e g r o e s
exerted on a music. F o l k musicians
we read o f K i n g O l i v e r , J o h n n y h a v e e v o l v e d out of W e s t e r n a n d
w h o find t h e m s e l v e s " t a k e n u p " a n d
D o d d s , J i m m y Y a n c e y a n d the Sex- African music are beautiful and
then become professionals, d e r i v i n g
teto H a b a n e r o . simple with a richness than can only
their l i v i n g f r o m their art, have no
be d e s c r i b e d as p u r e g o l d . I t h a s n o t
desire to p a r t i c i p a t e i n the c u r r e n t T h e m u s i c of C u b a differs e n t i r e l y b e c o m e o v e r l y f i x e d as h a s t h e f o l k
p o p u l a r m u s i c t h e y m a y be d i s p l a c - f r o m jazz. W h a t happened to i n s t r u - m u s i c of E u r o p e , but a l l o w s the s i n g e r
i n g . T h e c o n d i t i o n s o f t h e i r n e w set- mentation i n this country is unique t o s i n g o n a n d o n w i t h o u t e v e r be-
u p m a y p r o v e so b e n e f i c i a l t h a t t h e y a n d resembles n o other m u s i c deriv- coming monotonous.
a r e e n a b l e d to create a n a r t w h i c h ing from Africa. In African music
even out of context of its o r i g i n a l m e l o d y has been the p r o v i n c e of the A l t h o u g h there m a y be f o u n d b o t h
locale is s t i l l s e l f - c o n t a i n e d . singer a n d r h y t h m the p r o v i n c e of f o l k a n d n o n - f o l k t u n e s i n t h e sexteto
W h a t e v e r the p o p u l a r i t y of a folk strictly rhythmic instruments. The records, we c a n be assured that on
m u s i c , its w i d e a p p e a l is n o t b e c a u s e r h y t h m s i n the s u n g melodies never the R i v e r s i d e release we a r e l i s t e n i n g
of its d e p t h of m e a n i n g f u l n e s s . I m i t a - showed the freedom a n d inventiveness to t r u l y great folk music. F r o m the
tors w i t h o u t the a b i l i t y of its i n - so c h a r a c t e r i s t i c o f j a z z . T h e few scanty specimens of C u b a n cult m u s i c
novators will naturally appropriate melody instruments either played that I have h e a r d , o n l y i n the A b a k w a
m o r e a n d m o r e of the p o p u l a r element rhythms h a r d l y more extended than Song by male chorus and drums
u n t i l a new genre has been created. the voice or p l a y e d r h a p s o d i c a l l y ( r e c o r d e d b y C o u r t l a n d e r ) d i d I find
T h i s new genre will strike a c h o r d a r o u n d t h e v o i c e . T h i s A f r i c a n ele- a n y i n d i c a t i o n of what m a y have been
in a larger public who will respond ment remained basically unchanged the prototype of the m u s i c on R i v e r -
t o i t as a m u s i c a f t e r i t s o w n h e a r t . i n C u b a . O n the R i v e r s i d e release we side. M u c h o f the cult m u s i c appears
Then g r a d u a l l y the o r i g i n a l folk hear both solo a n d ensemble voices A f r i c a n i n c h a r a c t e r , but the A b a k w a
artists f i n d their p o p u l a r i t y w a n i n g s i n g i n g simple tunes w i t h a r h y t h m i c S o n g is c e r t a i n l y a n e a r l y e x a m p l e of
u n t i l they themselves start i n c o r p o r a t - lilt i n the tune itself. T h e soloists w h a t e v e n t u a l l y flavored t h e sexteto
i n g s o m e o f the m o r e saleable ele- participate i n a semi-declamatory sones w i t h t h e i r A f r o - C u b a n c h a r -
ments i n t o t h e i r m u s i c . A t first they m a n n e r t h a t h a s its o w n r h y t h m i c a n d acter. T h e f o r m of the m u s i c does not
so t r a n s f o r m t h e s e e l e m e n t s t h a t t h e y r h a p s o d i c style. W e also f i n d t h i s i n k e e p to a definite n u m b e r of b a r s -
lose n o n e of t h e i r d e l i g h t ; eventually Flamenco and Cuban Punto Guajiro twelve, t h i r t y - t w o a n d t h r o u g h v a r i -
they degenerate into something no a n d i n t h e S p a n i s h S a e t a s . It i s e i t h e r a t i o n g i v e us w h a t a p p e a r s to b e a
different f r o m the cheapness of t h e i r s t r i d e n t o r t e n d s t o m o n o t o n y . I n its continuous creation. Blues and gospel
competitors. O r , i f the performers p r o p e r s e t t i n g I find i t m o s t e n j o y - singers f o l l o w the tune, their inflec-

26 THE JAZZ REVIEW


tions are more subtle than bold, and others t r e a t i n g the same tune reveal
T A T E
it is o n l y f r o m the w o r d s alone that that besides t h e i r s u p r e m a c y i n q u a l -
w e get a n y r e a l c o m p o s i t i o n a l p r o g - ity they are superior i n their extraor- (Continued from Page 20)
ress. T h e s a m e c a n be s a i d o f the d i n a r y i m p r o v i s a t i o n s of solo i n c i -
McCloud's Night Owls (Sherman,
inflection of C u b a n s i n g i n g , except dentals.
Texas, 1927-29).
t h a t t h e b o l d n e s s of j a z z i n s t r u m e n - Because the beauties of s i n g i n g are
Roy M c C l o u d , t p ; B u d d y Tate, alto;
t a t i o n is here r e a l i s e d b y a f r e e d o m n o t e a s i l y h a n d e d o n , t h e sextetos o f
Hazel Jones, p f ; Bernice Douglas,
i n l a y i n g out the c o m p o s i t i o n . T h e s e c o n d a r y i m p o r t a n c e never h a d the
b j o ; R a l p h Atterbury, dms.
i n t e g r a t i o n of C u b a n r h y t h m i c i n s t r u - i n t e r e s t of t h e f e w g r e a t o n e s , s o m e -
St. Louis Merrymakers, 1928 (short
ments does m o r e t h a n m e r e l y p r o v i d e t h i n g not true of the e a r l y jazz
while o n l y W i c h i t a Falls, Texas).
a s o l i d web of c h o r d a l r h y t h m ( g u i t a r , groups. S i n g i n g depends m o r e on rare
Troy Floyd Shadowland Orchestra
tres a n d bass); it is i n t e g r a t e d v o c a l q u a l i t y t h a n b a n d p l a y i n g does
(1929 San Antonio, Texassix
throughout. This contribution, which on rare instrumental ability. Thus,
months only).
I feel to be s i g n i f i c a n t , n o d o u b t w a s the f o l l o w e r s o f M a R a i n e y a n d Bessie
made b y the sextetos. T h e e a r l y S m i t h are extremely l i m i t e d , a n d u n - Willie Wagner, A l Johnson, tps; Bert
sextetos w e r e n o t m u c h m o r e t h a n less w e g o t o t h e m o r e s t a r k s c h o o l Johnson, tb; Hershel Evans, Buddy
copies of the c h o i r s we hear on of s i n g i n g s t e m m i n g f r o m a L e a d - Tate, t n r ; Siki Collins, alto; Allen
R i v e r s i d e , but w i t h fewer m e n . In the belly or a B l i n d L e m o n Jefferson, the V a n , pf; John H . Braggs, bjo; John
earliest r e c o r d I k n o w , the g u i t a r c o n t e m p o r a r i e s a n d f o l l o w e r s of the Humphries, dms; Charlie Dixon,
f a m i l y was present w h i l e the o l d R a i n e y - S m i t h h i g h point are n o b o d y sousaphone a n d tb.
m a r i l b o l a h a d already been displaced to a d u l a t e t r u l y . T h e f u l l - t h r o a t e d T. Holder's 12 Clouds of Joy (1930
b y the s t r i n g bass. I f i n d the montuno s i n g i n g q u a l i t y of the C u b a n N e g r o e s 33, D a l l a s , T e x a s ) .
o n t h e sexteto r e c o r d s m o r e r e l a x e d both i n ensemble a n d i n m a n y of the T. Holder, Wesley Smith, Reginald
a n d a m o r e i n t e g r a t e d part of the solos usually do not have the p e c u l i a r Corley, tps; George Corley, t b ; W a l -
w h o l e r a t h e r t h a n the f r e q u e n t l y used f o l k q u a l i t y of a blues singer, t h o u g h lace M e r c e r , B u d d y T a t e , E a r l B o s t i c ,
h u r r i e d e n d i n g c o n s i s t i n g of a repeti- m a n y of t h e i r voices do possess a reeds; L l o y d Glenn, p f - a r r ; Leslie
tious phrase. nasal folk i n t o n a t i o n . G e n e r a l l y speak- Sherrifield, t u b a ; Joe L e w i s , dms.
T h e p e r s o n n e l of the Sexteto H a b a - i n g , however, their songs sound more A d d C a r l S m i t h , t p ; H u g h Jones, t p ;
n e r o c h a n g e d at t i m e s b u t I b e l i e v e like lusty Western s i n g i n g but without J . K . M i l l e r , t p i n 1 9 3 1 , 3 2 , 3 0 re-
t h e l i n e - u p as seen i n t h e a c c o m p a n y - t h e b a d effects o f a c a d e m i c a l l y t r a i n e d spectively.
i n g p i c t u r e r e p r e s e n t s i t at i t s best. voices. Ethel Mays Band ( 1 9 3 4 , L i t t l e R o c k ,
The director Geraldo Martinez (3rd C u b a n t r u m p e t p l a y i n g is a m o s t Ark.)
voice) p l a y e d the bass, Jose J i m e n e z beautiful off-straight style that either A l Johnson, t p ; B u d d y Tate, t n r ; Nat
(1st v o i c e ) p l a y e d the claves, F e l i p e plays the tune i n s i m p l e f a s h i o n i n T o w l e s , bass.
N e r i C a b r e r a ( 2 n d v o i c e ) p l a y e d the a n s w e r to the s i n g e r s o r i n d u l g e s i n
Count Basie Orchestra (1934, Little
m a r a c a s , C a r l o s G o d i n e z p l a y e d the w h a t m a y best b e c a l l e d c a s c a d i n g
R o c k ) several months i n later 1934.
tres, G u i l l e r m o C a s t i l l o p l a y e d the c a d e n z a s . W h e n these c a d e n z a s a r e
Joe K e y s , Dee Stewart, L i p s Page,
g u i t a r a n d A u g u s t i n e G u i t e r r e z the s i m p l e a n d n o t o v e r - d o n e , as w i t h so
tps; D a n M i n o r , t b ; Buster Smith,
b o n g o s . W h e n we h e a r a t r u m p e t it m a n y players, they are a most useful
Jesse W a s h i n g t o n , a l t o s ; B u d d y T a t e ,
is n o d o u b t Jose I n t e r i a n . E x c e p t for a d j u n c t to the m u s i c . I n the c h o i r s
t n r ; Basie, pf; Cliff M c T i e r , gtr;
M a r t i n e z , Guiterrez and Interian they the trumpets are most v i r i l e . T h e
Walter Page, bs; Jo Jones, dms.
are a l l dead. M a r t i n e z a n d Castillo sextetos, w h e n they a d d a t r u m p e t
Nat Towles Orchestra (1935-early
d i v i d e d most of the solos between p l a y e r , a c t u a l l y have seven m e n , but
1939, Dallas, Texas and Omaha,
t h e m . M a r t i n e z is still c a r r y i n g o n as a rule they keep the name
Nebraska).
with his Conjunto T i p i c a H a b a n e r o "sexteto."
N . R . Bates, H a r o l d " M o n e y " J o h n -
de G e r a d o M a r t i n e z . C a s t i l l o ' s v o i c e A l t h o u g h the n u m b e r of sexteto
son, W e l d o n Sneed, tps; F r e d Beckett,
is one of the most w o n d e r f u l o f its records m a d e d u r i n g the twenties is
Henry Coker, A r c h i e B r o w n , tbs; C.
k i n d . It i s d e e p b u t w h e n he s i n g s s m a l l , these f e w p r e s e r v e f o r u s a r i c h
Q. P r i c e , S i k i Collins, altos; Lemuel
s o l o s he r a i s e s i t a l i t t l e , g i v i n g t h e store of m u s i c . W h e r e a s the R i v e r s i d e
Talley, B u d d y Tate, tars; Charles
i m p r e s s i o n of r e a c h i n g f o r t h e t o n e s . r e c o r d stands u p amongst the w o r l d ' s
T h o m p s o n , pf; Casey S m i t h g t r ; T o m
Jose J i m e n e z , a l t h o u g h he s a n g no ethnic records i n q u a l i t y a n d esteem,
Pratt, bs; Little Nat Williams, d m s ;
solos, h a d the most celestial voice. I a m i n c l i n e d to b e l i e v e t h a t b e c a u s e
D u k e Groner, vocals, and director.
In the ensembles his voice always these s e x t e t o s superficially appear
N a t T o w l e s , director. P a u l K i n g re-
t r a i l e d a n d l i n g e r e d o n at t h e e n d of s i m i l a r t o t h e c h e a p m u s i c of t h e
placed N . B. Bates i n 1937.
a phrase. T h a t w o n d e r f u l a b i l i t y to thirties, they are not appreciated by
Count Basie Orchestra (New York,
ease i n t o an ensemble a n d f a d e out the casual listener l i k e the older
1939-49) personnel i n discographies.'
at t h e e n d t h e y h a d t o p e r f e c t i o n . music. T h e same situation holds with
Jimmy Rushinei Kansas City Spvpn
T h e i r s i n g i n g has the b e a u t i f u l j a z z . O n e w h o likes the c h u r c h re-
( N . Y . , 1950-52).
relaxed drag found i n Bunk's band. v i v a l m u s i c of the 1900s m i g h t c o n -
C o m b i n e d w i t h the r h y t h m i c sections sider the m u s i c of O l i v e r ' s b a n d Buck Clayton, tp; Dickie Wells, tb;
it gives a f e e l i n g of s o l i d i t y that i n f e r i o r , especially i n the pop tunes. R u d y P o w e l l , alto, B u d d y Tate t n r -
makes all other types seem t h i n . T h e i r A l t h o u g h s o m e C u b a n s c o n s i d e r these Sir Charles Thompson, pf; Walter
d e l i v e r y of the p o p u l a r tune Mama e a r l y r e c o r d s to be c o l l e c t o r s ' i t e m s , Page, bs; Jo Jones, dms.
Inez i s a r e v e l a t i o n . C o m p a r i s o n o f on the whole they have no great Buddy Tate Orchestra (1953 until
t h e i r v e r s i o n o f Mama Inez w i t h t h a t s t a n d i n g . L e t us h o p e t h e R i v e r s i d e present) C e l e b r i t y C l u b , S a v o y P a l m
of another i n s p i r e d g r o u p , Ignacio r e l e a s e s t a r t s a r e v i v a l o f C u b a n sex- G a r d e n s , etc., etc.
P i n e i r o ' s Sexteto N a c i o n a l , o n l y em- teto i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s , n o w t h a t Pat Jenkins, t p ; E l i Robinson, tbs;
phasizes their supremacy and makes we have such a large audience for Ben Richardson, alto-clt-bari; B u d d y
us realize the heights s i n g i n g c a n rise Latin-American music. Enthusiasm Tate, tnr-clt; Sadi H a k i m (Argonne
to: while further comparisons be- f o r t h e m c o u l d l e a d to a n l p re-issue T h o r n t o n ) , pf; electric brass; C l a r -
tween the Sexteto Habanero and f r o m V i c t o r ' s vast store. ence " F a t s " D o n a l d s o n , dms.

DECEMBER 27
On Big Bill Broonzy
and the Blues
by Studs Terkel

Courtesy Studs Terkel

If the blues is a poetic remem- Big B i l l , porter. A s i d e f r o m w o r k i n choosing. H e has b o r n e his dignity
b r a n c e o f t h i n g s p a s t o r of today's railroad gangs, led by Sleepy John as g r a c e f u l l y as h i s g u i t a r .
trauma s m a l l wonder Big Bill Estes a n d L e a d b e l l y a m o n g others; / love you, baby
B r o o n z y is a m o s t n a t u r a l b a r d . H e plow h a n d ; cook; molder; preacher; But I sure ain't gonna be your dog.
has no forgettery. piano mover. M o v e r and Shaker.
Not j u s t a w o m a n he's s i n g i n g a b o u t .
/ was in a place one night
/ was born in Mississippi L i f e itself. A s f o r his feelings t o w a r d
They was all havin' fun
Arkansas is where I'm from members of the f a i r sex, L e p o r e l l o ' s
They was all buyin' beer and wine
"Madomina" could easily have ap-
But they would not sell me none. "Man I worked for in Arkansas,
p l i e d to the r o v i n g B i l l . O n e differ-
It w a s 1 9 4 7 . O r w a s i t ' 4 8 ? F o u r of all his k i d s went to college. Come
e n c e : the blues s i n g e r was f a r more
us i n a j a l o p y were p a s s i n g t h r o u g h home doctors, lawyers, g i r l a school
gentle than the Spanish Don. He
a pleasant I n d i a n a t o w n on our w a y teacher. I w i s h e d I c o u l d go to c o l -
evinces a genuine affection for wo
to Purdue. Lafayette, it was. We lege s o m e d a y . W e l l I d i d . I went to
men.
were thirsty. We saw a tavern, a college i n A m e s . " H e wasn't k i d d i n g .
w o r k i n g m e n ' s hangout. B i l l tossed a At I o w a S t a t e , h e l a n d e d a j o b as a My suitcase packed, my trunk's al-
casual glance, almost imperceptibly. campus janitor. ready gone
He smiled. "Uh-uh. They won't It's Big Bill's razor-whet, lovely Now you know about that, baby
serve me. Y o u guys go on i n . " He sense of i r o n y t h a t ' s e n a b l e d h i m t o Big Bill won't be here long . . .
outvoted. After all these were overcome. Cheated, euchred, gypped, No scenes, no recriminations. N e v e r
hard w o r k i n g guys decent m e n Bill triple-crossed most of his live-long has B i g Bill sung of bad women.
had n o r i g h t to j u m p to c o n c l u s i o n s . d a y s b y men and by fate-^he's i n - T h e y ' v e a l l been g o o d , w a r m - h e a r t e d .
As we entered all conversation v a r i a b l y c o m e u p w i t h a n ace. S o m e less t h a n o t h e r s . S o m e m o r e s o .
ceased Shot a n d a beer was the order On a v i s i t to h i s m o t h e r (born i n Willie Mae, don't you hear me
for four T h e n u d e v pent b e h i n d t h e slavery, died i n 1957 at t h e a g e of callin' you
bar was' eenial enoueh Politelv he 102), he d r o v e h i s b i g second-hand If I don't get my Willie Mae
murmured: "I can serve three of car into a filling station. Just out- I declare there ain't no other wo-
side Little R o c k . T h e red neck was man will do.
y
They said if you white, you all a b o u t t o get n a s t y . A black m a n i n
F o n d m e m o r i e s . S l y ones, t o o . Con-
right w h a t a p p e a r e d t o be a l u x u r y a u t o . . .
sider his w a y of k i d d i n g phonies a n d
If you brown, stick aroun " W h o s e c a r is t h i s , b o y ? " C a m e the
pretenders. O f t e n , he's tossed darts
But as you black deadpan retort: "Man I work for.
at c a s t e e v e n a m o n g h i s o w n p e o p l e .
Mmm, mmm, brother, get back, get My boss." T h e answer satisfied the
back, get back. white American. But if this black She said her mother was a Creole
The profane gibberish three of us man o w n e d that c a r boy! And an Indian was her dad.
m u m b l e d is of s m a l l matter. W e were Double-talk? Sure. Y o u must un- The dark-skinned singer remembers
l i c k e d as w e s l u n k o u t , x - r a y e d as w e derstand one thing, though. Bill b e i n g d e n i e d a d m i s s i o n to the c h u r c h
were by the hostile eyes of good, spoke t h e t r u t h , his truth. Always, to which his light-skinned grand-
solid workingmen. One man laughed Big B i l l h a s b e e n his own boss. No mother belonged. A n d so h e speaks
softly. It w a s Bill. We were losers, matter how h u m i l i a t i n g the c i r c u m - a universally ethnic truth. (How
the three of us without and the s t a n c e , h e n e v e r a l l o w e d h i m s e l f t o be often the nose of the German Jew
wretched clods within. O n l y B i l l was humiliated. A servant, often; servile, was out of j o i n t w h e n he e n c o u n t e r e d
the w i n n e r , a l a u g h i n g w i n n e r . never. N e i t h e r has he been belliger- the Polish Jew! Till M r . Shickle-
You know I can't lose ent. Just Bill T h e M a n , rich i n his g r u b e r refused to be selective i n this
Baby, I can't lose own secret h u m o r . S u r e , he's made matter. How the blonde Florentine
Not with this moppin' broom I use. adjustments, but they've been of his passed by the swarthy Calabrian!

28 THE JAZZ REVIEW


The Blues
And i n what tone of voice did the
"lace curtain" Irish refer to the
"turkeys?")
U n f o r t u n a t e l y , i n his latter years,
Big Bill's poetry and mother-wit have
been less t h a n a p p r e c i a t e d in some
q u a r t e r s . T r v i n g t o h i d e h i s h u r t , he
has recounted the numerous times
Anatole B r o y a r d ' s hipsters have hoot-
ed h i m , w a l k e d out o n his blues. A n d
young jazz fans who should know THE MURDER BALLAD
better. C o o l c h i l d r e n of a cool eve-
ning c a n be awfully cold. "Place I S h e got i n t h e j a i l h o u s e , t h e y a s k e d h e r w h a t she's t h e r e f o r .
work for i n Buffalo, m a n pays me off H e r inmates i n the j a i l house, " W h a t are y o u here f o r ? "
first night. First set. He says they She s a i d . " I k i l l e d that b i t c h t h a t ' s what I ' m here f o r . "
don't like what you singin'. Who " Y o u ' r e a m u r d e r e r , that's why you're i n j a i l .
wants to hear that o l d time stuff? " Y o u ' r e a m u r d e r e r , that's why you're i n j a i l .
Nobody's gonna pay to hear that T h e y w o u l d have h a d y o u pretty s o o n ; they were on y o u r t r a i l . "
these days." H e r t r i a l c a m e u p , she w a s i n f r o n t o f t h e j u d g e ,
D u k e never w a l k e d out on B i g B i l l . H e r t r i a l c a m e u p , she w e n t i n f r o n t of t h e j u d g e ,
Nor did Count. They know. That's H e r a t t o r n e y t r i e d to g i v e the j u d g e a n u d g e .
w h y they're the artists they are. T h e j u r y said, " T h a t g i r l is here."
H e ' s lost t r a c k of t h e e x a c t n u m b e r T h e j u r y s a i d , " T h a t g i r l is here."
o f b l u e s he's w r i t t e n ; s o m e 3 6 0 , g i v e T h e j u r y s a i d , " T h a t m u r d e r i n g g i r l is h e r e . "
T h e prosecutor s a i d , " T o d a y we're d i s h i n g out y e a r s . "
or take h a l f a dozen. So m a n y he has
T h e prosecutor s a i d , " T o d a y , g a l , we're d i s h i n g out y e a r s . "
handed to others. "Why not? If it
S o be c a r e f u l , d o n ' t h a v e y o u r f e a r s . "
suits 'em better'n me, w h y shouldn't
they have it?" S h e s a i d , " I k i l l e d h e r b e c a u s e she h a d m y m a n . "
S h e s a i d , " I k i l l e d h e r b e c a u s e she h a d m y m a n . "
And he insists on keeping green
I k i l l e d t h a t b i t c h ' c a u s e she h a d m y m a n . "
the m e m o r y a n d s o n g of his f r i e n d s
I r a t h e r be d e a d i n m y g r a v e t h a n h e r e ( t h a t b i t c h h a d m y s w e e t m a n ! ) ,
no longer here. "Leroy Carr, he's
I r a t h e r b e d e a d a n d g r a v e d ' s t e a d o f h e r h a v i n g m y sweet m a n .
gone. Big Maceo, he's gone. Jim I ' d b e d e a d a n d g r a v e d ! L e t h e r h a v e m y sweet m a n !
Jackson, R i c h a r d M . Jones, o l ' L e a d ,
J u r y f o u n d h e r g u i l t y : she m u s t g o t o j a i l .
they're gone. If I don't sing their
J u r y f o u n d h e r g u i l t y : she m u s t g o t o j a i l .
blues, who w i l l ? M a y b e the b l u e s ' l l U p the r i v e r to B a t o n R o u g e is her t r a i l .
die someday. But I ' l l have to die J u d g e s a i d , " F i f t y years f o r the w o m a n that y o u k i l l e d l o v i n g y o u r m a n . "
first." J u d g e s a i d , " F i f t y years for the w o m a n that y o u k i l l e d l o v i n g y o u r m a n . "
And what of Tampa Red talking I w i s h I c o u l d help y o u , but I ' m not sure that I c a n . "
to himself? And Memphis Minnie
(Traditional, P e r f o r m e d by Jelly R o l l M o r t o n , Riverside R L P 9 0 0 8 .
s h o u t i n g somewhere i n the d a r k n e s s ?
Transcribed by M . W.)
D o e s a n y b o d y r e a l l y give a hoot out
there? W h o cares? I n the A g e of I n -
difference, of bland Ivy and Jivy
L e a g u e r s on the m a k e , jazz fans a l l ,
a c c o r d i n g to the G o s p e l of Playboy,
to c a r e deeply is a r c h a i c . M o l d y . T o
these c a r e f u l y o u n g m e n w h o c o u l d n ' t
LOSING HAND
care less, B i g B i l l s a y s : " I care."
He missed out on a critical ap-
I gambled on y o u r love, baby, I thought I ' d be y o u r k i n g , b a b y ,
pointment w i t h the doctor not long
A n d got a l o s i n g h a n d . Y e s . a n d y o u c o u l d be m y q u e e n .
ago. I gambled on your love, baby, I t h o u g h t I ' d be y o u r k i n g , b a b y ,
"What happened, Bill?" A n d got a losing hand. A n d y o u c o u l d be m y q u e e n .
"There's a k i d just come up from Y o u r ways keep c h a n g i n g But y o u used me for y o u r j o k e r
Mississippi. Gotta a lot of blues. L i k e the s h i f t i n g d e s e r t s a n d . 'Cause I thought y o u r deal was clean.
Went over to talk with 'im about
copyright so's he don't get gypped W h i l e I was p l a y i n g fair, baby, W a y y o u d i d me, pretty baby,
like I done." Y o u played a cheating game. I declare I ' l l never understand
To keep the blues alive . . . Big W h i l e I was p l a y i n g fair, baby, W a y y o u d i d me, pretty baby,
Bill Broonzy is dedicated. For they Y o u played a cheating game. I declare I ' l l never understand.
I k n o w y o u didn't care, I gambled o n y o u r love, baby,
are a piece of a m a n a n d he is some-
B u t I l o v e d y o u just the same. H e y , a n d got a l o s i n g h a n d .
t h i n g of a m a n . I n this P e r i o d of the
P i p s q u e a k , that's really something. ( B y " C h a r l e s C a l h o u n " (Jess S t o n e ) . C o p y r i g h t by Progressive M u s i c , Per-
(Published by permission of Studs formed by R a y Charles on A t l a n t i c 8006. T r a n s c r i b e d by M . W.)
Terkle, and Jack Tracy of Emarcy
Records.) ( C o n t r i b u t i o n s to t h i s d e p a r t m e n t are i n v i t e d . )

DECEMBER 29
Reviews: Recordings

Red Allen: Ride Red Ride, RCA k n e w his heyday some thirty years L o u i s A r m s t r o n g , Collector's Items.
Victor L P M 1509 ago. N o w he relies on a potpourri Decca D18329.
of G o o d m a n l i c k s , freak noises, a n d Louis Armstrong, M y Musical A u -
A c c o r d i n g t o t h e n o t e s , t h r e e ses- a t r u l y f a c i l e finger t e c h n i q u e , r a t h e r tobiography. Decca D X M - 1 5 5 .
sions were r e q u i r e d to produce this than on cogent m u s i c a l ideas. H i g g y
lp; I really can't imagine why. surprises, however on a Bb blues,
A p p a r e n t l y t h e m e t h o d of s e l e c t i o n
There are no arrangements or en- Algiers Bounce, a n d o n St. James
f o r t h e Collector's Items set w a s t o
s e m b l e s t o s p e a k of, e v e r y t u n e b e - Infirmary. O n the f o r m e r , he is
pick "best s e l l e r s " w i t h no thought
gins w i t h the c o n v e n t i o n a l f o u r - b a r eloquent, i n tune, and begins to
a b o u t w h o m t h e r e c o r d s s o l d to o r
p i a n o i n t r o , every tune has the same s w i n g i n the f o u r t h c h o r u s . T h e suc-
w h y . T h u s t h e v o c a l p e r f o r m a n c e of
show-band, grandstand ending, and c e e d i n g c h o r u s sees h i m at t h e e n d
the p s e u d o - s p i r i t u a l Shadrack (com-
m o s t o f t h e t i m e is t a k e n u p w i t h s o l o of h i s rope, a n d the riffs b e g i n to
plete w i t h " m i x e d c h o r u s " ) is p l a c e d
c h o r u s a f t e r c h o r u s , s o m e o.k., s o m e fly. B u s t e r d o e s d o o n e k i n d of t h i n g
n e x t to t h a t s p l e n d i d s e r i e s of d i s -
completely dull or worse, i n rotation. better t h a n a n y c l a r i n e t i s t I c a n
p l a c e d accents i n the t r u m p e t c h o r u s
t h i n k o f ; t h e c o c k - e y e d , r e a l l y witty
H e a r i n g R e d A l l e n p l a y i s , to m e , o n Jeepers Creepers, and it isn't long
phrase is h i s forte, a n d the b a c k i n g
always a frustrating experience. H e a f t e r we h a v e m e t Brother Bill t h a t
he g i v e s A l l e n ' s v o c a l o n Ain't She
a m a z e s m e w i t h h i s sense o f p a t t e r n , we hear s u c h a m a g n i f i c e n t h a r m o n i c
Sweet s h o u l d c o n v u l s e a n y o n e .
h i s a b i l i t y to v a r y a s i m p l e , i n i t i a l v a r i a t i o n as t h a t o n t h e D e c c a v e r s i o n
phrase (frequently by an ingenious o f / Can't Give You Anything But
r h y t h m i c d i s l o c a t i o n ) , a n d to c o n - Love, a n d not l o n g after we have
s t r u c t a fine h a l f - c h o r u s f r o m i t . B u t h e a r d a l l a b o u t Old Man Mose t h a t we
then he gives u p , a n d is p r o n e to p l a y h e a r t h a t Confessin on w h i c h grand-
a n y one of a n u m b e r of stock figures, standing a n d art go h a n d i n h a n d i n
o f t e n senseless a n d q u i t e o u t o f c o n - the w a y that o n l y A r m s t r o n g c a n
t e x t . H e is w o n t t o t o s s i n a c h a r a c - b r i n g o f f a n d A r m s t r o n g not often.
teristic short descending chromatic
T h e A r m s t r o n g o n t h a t set i s t h e
r u n i n s u c h a w a y t h a t i t seems h e
A r m s t r o n g h e a r d i n the "Autobiog-
j u s t c a n ' t b e a r t o l e a v e a f e w beats
raphy" s e t a n d t h a t f a c t f o r c e s m e t o
or a measure of silence. Sometimes,
repeat the t r u i s m that A r m s t r o n g the
he ends a phrase early, a n d sustains
s o l o i s t i s n o t t h e A r m s t r o n g o f Canal
t h e final t o n e o v e r a c o u p l e o f m e a s -
Street Blues, Mandy Make Up Your
u r e s ( f i r s t c h o r u s o f / Cover the
Mind, o r e v e n o f Muskrat Ramble.
Waterfront). Other times, a bop lick,
T h a t is, L o u i s the s u b l i m e soloist ne-
o r a M i l e s i s h figure, m a k e s i t s a p -
c e s s a r i l y soon a b a n d o n e d L o u i s the
pearance out of nowhere (third
integrated lead ensemble voice and,
c h o r u s o f Sweet Lorraine). W i t h less
despite his h a v i n g p l a y e d a g a i n w i t h
finger twitching and more staying
s m a l l g r o u p s for over ten years now,
power, R e d c o u l d lead the p a c k ; he
n e v e r r e - l e a r n e d t h a t r o l e . T h e loss
has a r i c h , p l u m p sound a n d g o o d Frank Stout
w a s a g a i n , t h e g a i n a l o s s , a n d a l l of
technical e q u i p m e n t . A s it is, t r u m -
it necessary to A r m s t r o n g ' s g r o w t h .
peters l i k e H e r m a n A u t r e y a n d E m - N o accusation of sluggishness c a n
mett B e r r y outclass h i m . be leveled against the r h y t h m . T h e y T h e o m n i b u s has f o u r lps, has
H a w k is, of course, l a r g e l y re- do not always have the same end i n f o r t y - e i g h t s e l e c t i o n s , a l l b u t s i x of
sponsible f o r the recent a n d belated view, apparently, j u d g i n g from fairly w h i c h (New Orleans Function, Musk-
respect s h o w n t o w a r d s o l d e r j a z z m e n , frequent conflicts between, p a r t i c u l a r - rat Ramble, Struttin' With Some
a n d r i g h t l y so. H i s dense, h a r m o n i - ly, piano and drums. Nevertheless, Barbecue, My Monday Date, Basin
c a l l y s o p h i s t i c a t e d s t y l e c a n o n oc their separate contributions are con- Street Blues, Sleepy Time Down
casion become m o n o t o n o u s , because s i d e r a b l e . C o z y C o l e seems gifted South) were redone especially for it,
it is b a s i c a l l y u n m e l o d i c , or unthe- with startling prescience when play- a n d n o n e o f w h i c h dates e a r l i e r t h a n
m a t i c i f v o u w i l l a n d a great deal i n g b e h i n d solos, a n d his brushes on 1947. F u l l y t w e n t y - f o u r of those f o r t y -
of the t i m e emplo'ys the same wave- Ain't She Sweet swing elegantly. eight selections were o r i g i n a l l y done
l i k e r h y t h m i c m o t i o n as a t r e l l i s f o r M a r t y N a p o l e o n plays lightly, not on records before 1929 ( A r m s t r o n g
the changes. T h i s r e c o r d shows h i m too politely, a n d his synthetic style f o r t h e t i m e b e i n g i s a p p a r e n t l y as
in a vaeuelv bilious mood although fits i n t h i s b a n d . w i l l i n g as a r e c o r d c o l l e c t o r to p r e -
h i s SDOlTin Love Is lust Around the sent h i s a u t o b i o g r a p h y largely i n
I listened to the title tune once.
Corner i s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o f h i s best terms of what happened i n r e c o r d i n g
F o r t u n a t e l y , the m i n d has r e m a r k a b l e
playing. studios before that d a t e ) .
powers of recovery. E v e r y o n e , i n -
I s h o u l d h a v e l i k e d to h a v e a v o i d - cluding onlookers i n the studio, T h e r e are further troubles. O n all
ed comment on H i g g y and Buster s o u n d s as i f h e w e r e h a v i n g a j i m - b u t s i x t i t l e s , w e a r e t r e a t e d to t h e
B a i l e y . W h a t e v e r the reason, H i g g y d a n d y time, but w h y m a k e a record bouncy, monotonous, un-responsive
h a s n ' t p l a y e d o n t h e l e v e l t h a t he out of i t ? d r u m m i n g of B a r r e t t D e e m s d r u m -
once d i d for some y e a r s ; a n d Bailey L a r r y Gushee m i n g to w h i c h the p r e s e n c e of K e n n y

30 THE JAZZ REV I E W


J o h n on two tracks and Cozy Cole on (S.O.L) Blues: t h e p o w e r f u l effects s o l o i s t h a s a b a n d o n e d a l l p r e t e n s e of
two others (even w h o p p i n g after (even i n the solos) of the o r i g i n a l b e i n g a n y t h i n g b u t t h a t . A g a i n , to
b e a t s ) , a n d , of course, S i d n e y Catlett records are i g n o r e d , misapprehended, d i s c u s s m o s t of these r e c o r d s i s t o
on one, is a n e n o r m o u s relief. gone, a n d a g o o d A r m s t r o n g solo on harp on detailsthe sublime way
A r m s t r o n g introduces the collection Wild Man Blues d o e s n o t s a v e a n A r m s t r o n g i n c o r p o r a t e s a fluff i n
with a pronouncement about "the otherwise t r i c k y , even superficial, per- Dear Old Southland; Billy Kyle's
m u s i c just the w a y it was p l a y e d i n f o r m a n c e . O f Strutin With Some Bar- e x c e l l e n t i n t r o d u c t i o n t o the v o c a l o n
those g o o d o l d d a y s . " H a r d l y . A n d , of becue w e s h a l l s p e a k i n a m o m e n t . Body and Soul; the fine v o c a l o n
course, impossible. / Surrender Dear; the b a n a l r i d i n g o n
O n Cornet Chop Suey, guitarist
J u d g e d against the o r i g i n a l r e c o r d s grandstand mannerisms on Exactly
G e o r g e B a r n e s , i n c o n g r u o u s l y present
the three O l i v e r C r e o l e Jazz B a n d Like You, Hobo You Cant Ride This
o n several of the s m a l l b a n d n u m b e r s
n u m b e r s are near travesties. Y a n k Train, a n d Sunny Side of the Street.
(imagine him taking Lonnie John-
L a w s o n m i g h t seem a g o o d choice (if O f Lazy River a n d Georgia on My
s o n ' s r o l e i n Hotter Than That; that's
o n e w e r e i n a h u r r y ) at first, b u t he Mind, l a t e r .
t h e w a y t h e y set i t u p ! ) , h a s a n i n -
p l a y s w i t h w h a t seems a m o n o t o n o u s nane g u i t a r solo that a l l but character- O u t of the research f o r the n a r r a -
affectation. Some effort, (by Bob izes t h e w h o l e p e r f o r m a n c e . (For tion, done by Milt Gabler and
H a g g a r t ) w a s m a d e to t a k e p a r t s off Heebie Jeebies, A r m s t r o n g , incident- L e o n a r d F e a t h e r , c o m e s the n e w s t h a t
of the 1920's r e c o r d i n g s but, i n every ally, scatted, this t i m e i n nonsense o n Gully Low Blues, Johnny Dodds
case, the o r i g i n a l c o n c e p t i o n is s o o n words "old fashioned" as those was too f r i g h t e n e d b y the r e c o r d i n g
a b a n d o n e d for a s t r i n g of solos M o r t o n u s e d . ) Muskrat is represented h o r n to speak the l i n e " O h , p l a y i t ,
f a i r l y c o n v e n t i o n a l ones r e a l l y a n d b y the " S y m p h o n y H a l l " v e r s i o n . O f P a p p a D i p " o f course, the story goes
t h e r e a r e s u c h d e t a i l s as t h e O l i v e r t h e a s t o n i s h i n g King of the Zulus, w i t h Gut Bucket Blues, h e a r d t w o L P
c h o r u s e s o n Dippermouth being re- a w o r d later. sides e a r l i e r . L o u i s A r m s t r o n g also
d u c e d to t w o , p l a y e d i n u n i s o n b y the i n f o r m s us w h a t " l e a d i n g t r u m p e t
t w o t r u m p e t s at t h e b e g i n n i n g a n d N e x t c o m e three f r o m the A r m -
m e n " Humphrey Lyttelton and Y a n k
then a b a n d o n e d for some of A r m - s t r o n g - H i n e s p e r i o d , o n e o f t h e m (A
L a w s o n are. H e is clear, however,
strong's f a m i l i a r current blues style. Monday Date) a r e a l l y fine 1 9 5 1 p e r -
a b o u t the f a c t t h a t t h e s i d e s for
E d m o n d Hall, a brick throughout f o r m a n c e b y p r o b a b l y t h e best p e r -
C l a r e n c e W i l l i a m s led groups were
a n d c e r t a i n l y t h e best c l a r i n e t L o u i s manent b a n d A r m s t r o n g has ever h a d
m a d e at s e p a r a t e s e s s i o n s w i t h d i f -
has h a d i n ten years, s h o u l d surely ( i n d i v i d u a l l y i f n o t c o l l e c t i v e l y ) wi'th
ferent personnels, but the l i n e r ( w h i c h
h a v e b e e n g i v e n a n o t h e r s h o t at High three m a j o r soloists i n T e a g a r d e n ,
l u m p s t h e m a l l as " t h e B l u e F i v e i n
Society. Canal Street i s t h e s i n c e r e s t H i n e s ( p l a y i n g especially w e l l ) , and
November and December, 1924") is
e f f o r t at r e - c r e a t i o n a n d i n i t the d e e p L o u i s . T h e Basin Street h e r e i s t h e
not. T h e l i n e r w i l l also tell y o u that
r o c k i n g s w i n g a n d i n t e g r a t i o n of one f r o m the " G l e n n M i l l e r " s o u n d -
o n Memories of You, E d H a l l i s r e -
p a r t s o f the O l i v e r b a n d i s t o t a l l y t r a c k : of it too, m o r e later.
p l a c e d b y H i l t o n Jefferson. Jeff m a y
absent. A t this p o i n t , we have entered the have been there, but i f that isn't E d ,
The Clarence W i l l i a m s R e d Onion p e r i o d w h e n A r m s t r o n g the g r e a t it's brother H e r b .
a n d B l u e F i v e dates a r e r e f e r r e d to
Courlesy Riverside Retords
o n l y b y u s i n g s o m e of the tunes m a d e
o n t h e m , a n d L o u i s ' s o l o a f t e r the
generally rejuvenated T r u m m i e Y o u n g
c h o r u s o n Everybody Loves My Baby
is very good current A r m s t r o n g .
N e x t c o m e f o u r blues n u m b e r s . A d -
mitedly V e l m a M i d d l e t o n is not a M a
R a i n e y o r a Bessie S m i t h o r even a
T r i x i e Smith or a Chippie H i l l . Actu-
a l l y she i s n o t a s i n g e r a n d i s a l m o s t
t o t a l l y i n s e n s i t i v e to the w o r k s done.
M o s t of L o u i s ' a c c o m p a n i m e n t s are
rather b l a n d a n d n e a r l y coast.
W e go b a c k to N e w O r l e a n s f o r
that 1950 n i g h t c l u b act " N e w O r l e a n s
F u n c t i o n " o n w h i c h L o u i s ' p l a y i n g of
Free As a Bird w a s f a i r l y s t r a i g h t a n d
f u l l of feeling. A n d what a relief this
Hines-Cole-Shaw r h y t h m section i s !
O n Gut Bucket, L o u i s ' r e c r e a t i o n of
that s u p e r b solo is a s h a d o w a n d the
performance ends on some light
rifling.
O n the t h i r d s i d e b e g i n s a s e r i e s
o f s e v e n m o r e n u m b e r s f r o m the H o t
F i v e - S e v e n p e r i o d , a n d one r i n g e r
a Snag It, s p o i l e d f r o m t h e s t a r t b y
the s u b s t i t u t i o n of a trite a n d silly
r i f f f o r t h e a n s w e r i n g b a s s figure i n
the o n c e p l a i n t i v e i n t r o d u c t i o n . S u f -
fice it t o s a y t h a t D e e m s p l a y s a l l
the w a y t h r o u g h t h e s t o p t i m e s e c t i o n s
o n b o t h Potato Head a n d Gully Low

DECEMBER
T h e h a n d s o m e , not to say g a r i s h , D a v e B r u b e c k : The Dave Brubeck

feature/ p r o d u c t i o n begins with a b i o g r a p h i c a l


essay b y , o f a l l p e o p l e , t h a t c o l l e c t o r
Quartet in Europe, C o l u m b i a C L 1168
I u s e d to be o n e of the c r o w d t h a t
V V V o f p o e t r y a n d v e r s e f o r the A m e r i c a n just dismissed Brubeck. W h e n I
middle-brow, Louis Untermeyer. He started p l a y i n g with M i l e s , I found
HARDEN, quotes everyone f r o m c r i t i c W i l l i a m o u t M i l e s h a d a l o t of r e s p e c t f o r
JOHN
COLTRANE, R u s s e l l to d i s c j o c k e y G e n e N o r m a n h i m . M i l e s t o l d m e to l i s t e n t o h i s

MAN
I STREAM
MG 12127 to give L o u i s his c r e d e n t i a l s , a n d i n
Fleugelhorn stylist h a r m o n i e s a n d to w h a t he does w i t h
Harden Exciting a b u r s t o f p h r a s e - c o i n a g e , w i s h e s to a b a l l a d , a n d I ' v e c o m e to a p p r e c i a t e
tenor saxist Col-
trane blend with a d d " a l o u d a n d fervent A m e n . " T h e some of B r u b e c k .
Tommy Flanagan's
niano Done Wat-
essay i s a t e p i d , f a c i l e r e - h a s h o f s o m e
kns' bass and Louis o f the u s u a l b i o g r a p h i c a l sources. I ' m especially f o n d of his c o m p o s i -
Haves' drums in a
T h e r e f o l l o w s w h a t i s b i l l e d as " a n tions i n general. H e has a r e m a r k -
tncki a p p r e c i a t i o n " b y G i l b e r t M i l l s t e i n . It able w a y of c r e a t i n g m o o d s i n h i s
is s k i l l f u l l y s l i c k a n e c d o t a l prose, c o m p o s i t i o n s . O d d l y , these a r e m o o d s
i n i t i a l l y b u i l t on a s i m i l e between he can't e s t a b l i s h often i n his p l a y -
Armstrong and Charles G. Finney's i n g of h i s o w n w o r k s ; but give the
WHY-FI on SAVOY? Circus ( n . b . ) of Dr. Lao p l u s the w o r k s to s o m e b o d y else, a n d i t c a n
w o r k . I don't t h i n k , i n short, that h i s
A combination of the superb recording skills p r o p o s i t i o n that L o u i s is "beyond
of engineer Kudy V a n fielder, top mastering praise", and is, I think, quite imper- o w n fifrourj i n t e r D r e i s h i s m a t e r i a l
techniques, full 100% V i n y l Disc l'ressings
c e p t i v e a n d u n e n l i g h t e n i n g a b o u t the properly.
with noise-free, Oruye-fiard processing make
for the most superior Ja/.z record processing
m u s i c o r the m a n . N o w , when Brubeck plays his own
currently available on the market at the
price' ' A m I c a l l i n g t h i s a n u n - e v e n set, m a t e r i a l b y h i m s e l f , I get a d i f f e r e n t
a m i s t a k e , a b a d set w i t h a f e w g o o d and better i m p r e s s i o n . I wonder
Every Album features Full
Color Jacket and d e t a i l e d ' D e -
s c r i p t i v e L i n e r Notes.
m o m e n t s , a n effort to r e - c a p t u r e w h a t w h e t h e r P a u l D e s m o n d a n d the o t h e r
c a n n o t be r e - c a p t u r e d ? I d o n ' t k n o w , m e m b e r s o f t h e g r o u p feel w h a t D a v e
seal fa P o l y e t h y l e n e Dustproof
factory bag. quite honestly, w h a t it is o n the i s d o i n g . A n d I h e a r M i l e s p l a y In
NEW!
log and
Current complete cata-
discography ready!
w h o l e , except that o n the face of it, Your Own Sweet Way w i t h t h e f e e l -
W r i t e Dept. JR.
it i s a b i t i m b a l a n c e d i n f a v o r o f a n ing I think Brubeck intended.
A r m s t r o n g w h o now exists o n l y o n
A A A I n fact, B r u b e c k once t o l d m c he
important re-issue albums from
h a d a l o t o f o r i g i n a l s t h a t the g r o u p

LY
Brunswick, Columbia, and Riverside.
doesn't p l a y because he has a p o l i c y
B u t a b o u t Struttin' With Some Barbe-
of not p l a y i n g a n y t h i n g the g u y s don't
NEWARK cue, Basin Street Blues, Lazy River,
w a n t to p l a y .
a n d Georgia On My Mind a n d p a r t i c -
u l r a l y King of the Zulus I d o k n o w A s for D e s m o n d , I've h e a r d some
J A Z Z PHOTOGRAPHS s o m e t h i n g o f w h i c h I w o u l d l i k e to people say P a u l is entirely o r i g i n a l .
t r y to speak. I t s e e m s to m e t h o u g h t h a t h e ' s n o t
From a n extensive a n d unique I t i s v e r y w e l l to t a l k a b o u t A r m - completely so. I hear a lot of A r t
strong's r h y t h m i c conception, about P e p p e r ( i n the p e r i o d w h e n A r t was
private collection, featuring pix his t r a n s f o r m a t i o n s of b a n a l melodies, with K e n t o n , although maybe Des-
a b o u t the s u p e r b i m a g i n a t i o n o n a n mond influenced Pepper), some
of the famous and obscure in h a r m o n i c v a r i a t i o n l i k e t h a t i n the K o n i t z and some Benny Carter. Des-
1 9 3 8 / Can't Give You Anything But m o n d ' s s o u n d is p r e t t y close to b e i n g
jazz history. An interesting a d d i - Love, a b o u t " t h e first g r e a t j a z z s o l o - o r i g i n a l ; i t ' s n o t t h e k i n d of s o u n d
i s t . " It i s a l s o a l l v e r y w e l l t o s a y I l i k e . H e uses t h e e n d o f the h o r n
tion to any record collection, t h a t t h i s King of the Zulus i s n o t l i k e I don't l i k e a n d that coupled w i t h
t h e first. It h a p p e n s t o be b e t t e r . O n t h e sweetness m i s s e s m e . I h e a r d h i m ,
trad, or modern. Sweet band it, a n d o n the other titles f o r w h i c h f o r e x a m p l e , p l a y a figure a l o t of
I have reserved comment, A r m s t r o n g the blues p l a y e r s use, but it sounded
pix too. is a s t o n i s h i n g a n d a s t o n i s h i n g because so sweet
he p l a y s what he p l a y s w i t h s u c h great
N o w Johnny Hodges or Scoops
Examples: Dink Johnson, Chas. power, a u t h o r i t y , sureness, firmness
C a r e y c o m e c l o s e r t h e g e t t i n g the
c o m m a n d i n g p r e s e n c e as to be b e y o n d
s o u n d I like. W i t h Hodges, that sound
Creath, BG 1938, Waller, Bunny style, b e y o n d category, almost (as
h a s n o t h i n g to d o w i t h h i s sweetness
they say of Beethoven's last quartets)
b u t w i t h the basic s o u n d of his i n -
with TD, several Oliver bands, b e y o n d m u s i c . W h e n he p l a y s the
strument. I m e a n a strong sound that
trumpet this way, all considerations
is the same i n strength regardless
C. Christian, early Basie and of " s c h o o l s " , most other j a z z m e n ,
of the v o l u m e . W i t h P a u l , his s o u n d
most other musicians s i m p l y drop
c h a n g e s as t h e v o l u m e d o e s . I t gets
Moten, Oliver Cobb (100s more). a w a y as w e l i s t e n . T h e s h o w b i z p e r -
t h i n n e r as h e gets l o u d e r . I h a v e a
s o n a l i t y a c t , t h e c o a s t i n g , the f o r c e d
Old customers: greatly enlarged feeline b v the w a v it was S c o o p s '
jokes and sometimes forced geniality,
s o u n d w i t h H i n e s that got to B i r d .
the p e r p e t u a l e m o t i o n a l content of
list now available. Send stamp I n fact, B i r d d i d n ' t have that s o u n d
m u c h of A r m s t r o n g ' s m u s i c past a n d
w h e n he W 3 S w i t h J a y M c S h a n n .
present (that of a m a r v e l o u s l y e x u -
for free list to b e r a n t b u t c o m p l e x c h i l d ) a l l these P a u l ' s time is very good. Dave's
d r o p away, a n d we are h e a r i n g a sur- depends o n the tempo. H e ' s O . K . o n
Duncan P. Schiedt
p a s s i n g a r t i s t c r e a t e f o r u s e a c h of m e d i u m t e m p o s , b u t w h e n he's p l a y -
2534 E. 68th St.
u s a surpassing art. i n g his rhythmic things locked
Indianapolis, Indiana
M . W. hands o n faster tempos h i s t i m e

THE JAZZ REVIEW


varies a little. T h a t v a r i a b i l i t y causes until he became the c a r i c a t u r e of h i m -
t h e s w i n g to f a l l off. self t h a t h e i s t o d a y . modern jazz begins on

PRESTIGE
T h e degeneration of the E c k s t i n e
Joe M o r e l l o added a sudden spark
s t y l e i s e a s i l y h e a r d o n Blues For
to t h e g r o u p . W h e n I h e a r d B r u b e c k .
Sale, w h i c h c o u p l e s s o m e o f B i l l y ' s
I think i n 1952, with Herb B a r m a n
fine N a t i o n a l r e c o r d i n g s w i t h s o m e
and W y a t t Ruther, I thought it was
v e r y p o o r sides made a r o u n d the
a swinging thing. But with Joe Dodge
time of h i s entrance into the p o p u l a r
a n d Bates, nothing was happening. VERY BEST WISHES TO THE
field ( n o t e s f a i l t o d e s i g n a t e o r i g i n a l
N o w Gene W r i g h t and Joe M o r e l l o EDITORS AND PUBLISHERS
r e c o r d i n g dates o r l a b e l s ) . A t i t s best.
make it sound more like anybody THE JAZZ REVIEW
B i l l y ' s was a potent, i n s p i r e d voice
else's r h y t h m s e c t i o n . Prestige Records, Inc.
that WHS g o i n g somewhere, that h a d
H a v i n g begun to p a y m o r e atten- s o m e t h i n g i m p o r t a n t to say a n d k n e w
t i o n to B r u b e c k , i t seemed to m e that e x a c t l y h o w to say i t . A n d the b a n d , The Top Modem Jazz Artists
there is a T a t u m influence o n h i s h a v i n g exactly the same message i n Are Available On Prestige LPs
h a r m o n i e s that I h a d n ' t n o t i c e d be- m i n d , helped h i m deliver it. In both
fore. I ' d a l w a y s been aware of h i s
MILES DAVIS
s i n g e r a n d i n s t r u m e n t a l i s t s w a s that
studies w i t h M i l h a u d , b u t n o w I ' m
SONNY ROLLINS
q u a l i t y o f tension that is like watch-
also aware of the t r a d i t i o n a l jazz
THE MJQ
i n g t h e flame s l o w l v c o n s u m e t h e l o n g
p i a n o influences i n h i s p i a n o con- fuse o n a l i g h t e d s t i c k o f d y n a m i t e
THELONIOUS MONK
ception.
RED GARLAND
and w
ouiu on
nu ud
u ec ri ii ini gg w
whi let n i t w i l l 5
g o o f f' il/
JOHN COLTRANE
it w i l l rm off and what will hannen
I s u p p o s e w h a t I l i k e best a b o u t GENE AMMONS
B r u b e c k i s the h a r m o n i c c r a f t s m a n - after the e v n l o s i o n T h e l u m o v lagged MOSE ALLISON
s h i p o f h i s c o m p o s i t i o n s . I ' m less r o u g h n e s s t h e free e x c i t e d n e w n e s s HERBIE MANN
impressed b y the g r o u p . I w o u l d go nf u
oi R im
l l vj cliiu
a n d ins
b i s biidiiu
and w e r e a fm
wcic a ir trir) v
to h e a r h i s g r o u p n o w , t o h e a r w h a t f T L _ r e s t r a i n e d n n i n s n i r p d inn plus many others
he's t h i n k i n g about. P a u l D e s m o n d lasses d r o o l e d o u t b y t h e s i n g e r l a t e r
is a v e r y n i c e g u y , a n d i t ' s h a r d on. Send For Free Catalog
to separate h i s m u s i c f r o m h i s per- T h e best t r a c k s i n t h i s p a c k a g e
sonality, but I have to because he is (It Ain't Like That No More, Long
not one of m y f a v o r i t e players. H i s Long Journey, Lonesome Lover Blues,
p l a y i n g is too prettv J o e M o r e l l o is All I Sing Is Blues) c o n t a i n that
a g o o d d r u m m e r , although he too is terseness o f p r o n u n c i a t i o n a n d p h r a s - PRESTIGE RECORDS INC.
not one o f m y favorites (I prefer i n g coupled with an intensely con- 203 S. Washington A v e , Bergcnficld, N . J.
let's s a y t h e A r t B l a k e y t r a d i t i o n ) ' trolled w a i l i n g deliberateness that
but M o r e l l o is a steady d r u m m e r w h o m a r k e d B i l l y ' s best efforts. T h e s i n g -
this
swings. i n g o n these s i d e s i s p r o u d , a l m o s t
defiantly so.
advertisement
B a c k to P a u l w h a t he p l a y s is
In the unsuccessful tracks (Blues
directed
k i n d of superficial. H e skims over the to the
For Sale, Blues, Jelly, I Do, Do You I,
s u r f a c e ; h e d o e s n ' t get i n t o t h e t h i n g
i t ' s as t h o u g h E c k s t i n e let h i s b e l t o u t Discographer-Hisrorian-
t h e w a y A r t P e p p e r d o e s . A n d as f o r
a few notches: the p h r a s i n g a n d i n - Collector
D a v e ' s p l a y i n g , I ' d l i k e it better i f
t o n a t i o n are r e l a x e d to the p o i n t o f Subscribe
h e ' d take the cute t h i n g s out of h i s
l e t h a r g y a n d m e r g e i n t o a n e v e n flow to . . .
p l a y i n g . L i k e H o r a c e S i l v e r is noted
of s y r u p y g o o ; the b e a u t i f u l voice i s
for funk, Dave has established h i m -
lost i n a m a z e o f s u g a r y v i b r a t o ; a l l R E C O R D
self b y cuteness. I t ' s h a r d to v e r b a l i z e .
the j a z z f e e l i n g h a s e v a p o r a t e d ; a n d RESEARCH
A n y w a y , this a l b u m i s one of the t h e s t y l i s t i c d e v i c e s e m e r g e as m e r e A bi-monthly journalistic endeavor,
best I ' v e h e a r d b y t h e m , m o s t l y b e - e n d s i n t h e m s e l v e s . Jelly, b y t h e w a y , now in its 4th year, devoted to sound,
cause of the r h y t h m section. is sacrilege. T o recut what w a s once accurate and interesting research into
all phases of Musical Americana (Jazz,
J u l i a n Addlerley perfect g e m w i t h the H i n e s b a n d
Vaudevillian, Personality, Folk, Popu-
w a s u n w i s e o f B i l l y , as h e i s f o r c e d lar . . . and the largest record auction
to c o m p e t e w i t h h i m s e l f a n d f a i l s in the world, in every issue.)
badly.
B i l l y E c k s t i n e : Blues For Sole, Em-
Blues, My Deep Blue Dream, and Record Research
A r c y M G 36029
/ Do, Do You a r e n o t e v e n b l u e s ; 131 Hart Street
the first t w o w e r e p r o b a b l y i n c l u d e d Brooklyn 6, N . Y .
Blues For Sale i s a s i g n i f i c a n t a l -
i n t h e set b e c a u s e t h e y h a v e m i n o r
b u m . It i s a v i v i d i l l u s t r a t i o n o f t h e Please start my subscription at once.
m e l o d i e s (Dream, otherwise, is good Here is $3.00 for your introductory offer
difference between jazz s i n g i n g a n d
Eckstine). A n d Blues is i n the of 12 issues.
pop singing.
twelve-bar f o r m b u t has that feigned
I n the eyes of this r e v i e w e r , B i l l y m e l a n c h o l y a n d lack of e m o t i o n a l Name
E c k s t i n e w a s at h i s p e a k w i t h E a r l c o n c e p t i o n w h i c h negates a n y t e c h -
H i n e s , never quite equaled his o w n nical frameworks. Address
efforts o n the N a t i o n a l sides o f h i s Blues For Sale i s a n a l b u m t h a t a
next p e r i o d w i t h h i s o w n band, a n d jazz listener w i l l n o t be able to take City State
b e g a n to b a c k s l i d e d u r i n g h i s tenure straight. H e w i l l have to s k i p the BONUS DIVIDEND!!!
w i t h M G M ( i n spite of f a i r l y accept- needle a r o u n d to the offerings w h i c h a periodic record bulletin to all sub-

4
a b l e b e g i n n i n g s w i t h t h i n g s l i k e Blue satisfy h i s standards of judgment. scribers, in addition to regular sub-
scription.
Moon, Caravan, What's My Name) Mimi Clar

DECEMBER 33
r-jj] W . C . H a n d y Blues. Sung by his tions for w h i c h James P . h a d a fond-
jazz on Daughter Katharine Handy Lewis. ness, a n d e n d e d b y a s h o r t c o d a . It
Accompanied by James P . John- is n o t t h e best b l u e s p l a y i n g t h a t o n e
F O L K W A Y son. Folkways FG3540 can hear. James P . ' s blues were not
too successful, except f o r Backwater
K a t h r y n H a n d y Lewis sings O n e of the most f a m o u s quotes of Blues a n d a f e w o t h e r s . H e c e r t a i n l y
W. C. H A N D Y BLUES
1957 was the r e m a r k made by was not a blues pianist i n the same
Thelonious M o n k while he was listen- w a y that someone l i k e J i m m y Y a n c e y
i n g to the p l a y b a c k of one of h i s was. H e plays blues m u c h i n the same
in T r i u U l i o n u l Stylr- solos: " T h a t sounds like James P . w a y that he plays a tune like Blue
Johnson". Strangely enough, M o n k Turning Gray Over You, a n d h i s
does s o u n d l i k e James P . f r o m time to blues suffer f o r i t .
t i m e , a n d so d o F a t s , B a s i e , T a t u m , In a d d i t i o n , he was not i n g o o d
a n d D u k e (as w e l l as W i l l i e G a n t a n d health w h e n he made this record a n d
Q. Roscoe S n o w d e n ) . Since James P . his p h y s i c a l l i m i t a t i o n s a r e evident.
Accompanied by
James P. Johnson has h a d s u c h a s t r o n g influence o n so T h e bass l i n e w a v e r s u n c e r t a i n l y b e -
and Piano Solos m a n y well-known pianists, it is amaz- tween a dotted r h y t h m a n d straight
i n g that most people have never h e a r d eights, a n d there is a rather tentative
H a n d y ' s blues at their best, with piano
of h i m . T h e average f a n confuses feeling to the w h o l e p e r f o r m a n c e . It
accompaniment and solos by James P . J o h n -
son. Includes M e m p h i s Blues, St. Louis h i m with Pete Johnson ( " D o y o u is a m y s t e r y w h y h e m a d e so m a n y
Blues, Joe T u r n e r Blues, Loveless Love, and r e a l l y like b o o g i e - w o o g i e ? " ) a n d t h e records of blues a n d b o o g i e - w o o g i e
Blue Moods others. Notes by Charles E . average m u s i c i a n t h i n k s o f h i m af- i n h i s last y e a r s , w h e n h e c o u l d h a v e
Smith. F6-3540
f e c t i o n a t e l y , i f d i m l y , as a n e a r l y r e c o r d e d so m a n y o f h i s o w n w o n d e r -
Samuel B . Charters teacher of Fats W a l l e r . f u l p i e c e s ( s u c h as After Tonight, a
MUSIC O F N E W ORLEANS James P . was not Pete Johnson, gem of a tune w h i c h he made for
nor a mere "teacher" of Fats W a l l e r . D e c c a i n the late t h i r t i e s ) .
MBM T H E M U S I C O F B M W
He was a m u c h more interesting m u s i - T h e second a n d t h i r d tracks present
c i a n t h a n W a l l e r . H i s bass l i n e s a r e a unique problem. They are entitled
better c o n s t r u c t e d , h i s r i g h t h a n d is Blue Moods 2 a n d Blue Moods Sex
'I f r e e r a n d less r e p e t i t i v e , h i s r h y t h m ( ! ) , respectively, a n d are absolutely
is m o r e a c c u r a t e , a n d h i s p l a y i n g i s i d e n t i c a l , except that t r a c k # 3 ends
n o t so r e l e n t l e s s l y t w o - b e a t as t h a t o f with an eight-bar coda which is ab-
Fats. A l t h o u g h he l a c k e d the smooth sent f r o m t r a c k # 2 . T h a t i s t o s a y ,
technique of T a t u m ( a n d of Fats) they are not t w o masters of the same
and the s t r i k i n g h a r m o n i c i m a g i n a - tune, but are congruent, interchange-
tion of E l l i n g t o n , he nonetheless able, a n d precisely the same i n every
V o l . 1 M u s i c o f t h e S t r e e t s , M u s i c of carved out a stvlp which was rich respect. S i n c e t r a c k # 3 is l o u d e r a n d
M a r d i Gras. Includes dawn to dusk sound enough i n general m u s i c a l resources clearer than track # 2 , m y guess is
record of " F a t s T u e s d a y , " M a r d i Gras day. to h a v e r e c r e a t e d at W fragments that track # 2 is m e r e l y a n i n c o m -
Notes F A 2641.
of itself I n d T i d n i n . of Mien .rnlike plete c o p y of i t . T h e a u t h o r of t h e
V o l . II M u s i c o f t h e E u r e k a B r a s s B a n d .
Titles include P a n a m a , T r o m b o n i u m , Just m u s i c i a n s as M o n k a n d J o h n L e w i s a l b u m notes e v i d e n t l y e x p e r i e n c e d a
a Little W h i l e to Stay Here, M a r y l a n d , M y f e e l i n g o f deja vu, f o r h e t r i e s t o
M a r y l a n d , etc. Illustrated notes. F A 2642. Unfortunately, James P.'s record-
e x p l a i n a w a y what must have been a
Vol. I l l M u s i c o f the D a n c e H a l l s . ing career was a bit too long. H e was
Includes B i g M a m o u , R o a d of Sunshine, mysterious inquietude indeed:
p l a y i n g h i s best i n t h e t h i r t i e s , b u t
Anytime, M a r r i e d M a n Blues, Careless
he i s c u r r e n t l y r e p r e s e n t e d o n r e c o r d " W h e t h e r h e i n t e n d e d these t o
Love, Shake it and Break it, Nellie Gray, be t h r e e s e c t i o n s o f o n e w o r k o r
Blues, others. Illustrated notes. F A 2643. either b y recordings of his o l d piano
rolls, w h i c h sound exactly like piano only t w o , w i l l have to r e m a i n a
Big B i l l Broonzy sings rolls, o r b y records f r o m the forties, m y s t e r y . T h e first t w o differ i n
COUNTRY BLUES w h i c h were m a d e after h i s health h a d m o o d but are close i n pattern.
b e g u n to f a i l . T h i s r e c o r d is f r o m t h e T h e t h i r d section, also close i n
forties. pattern, was clearly designated
b y J a m e s P . as s e p a r a t e . . .
T h e first s i d e i s a c o l l e c t i o n o f W .
W h a t w e h a v e , t h e r e f o r e , i s es-
C. H a n d y ' s b l u e s s u n g b y H a n d y ' s
sentially one theme, approached
daughter ("Accompanied b y James P .
i n t h r e e d i f f e r e n t m o o d s , t h e first
Johnson and Piano Solos"). Miss
two only slightly d i s s i m i l a r . T h e
H a n d y approaches the melodies more
parallel between parts i s , how-
as a r t s o n g s t h a n a s b l u e s , a n d j a z z i -
ever, the o n l y i n d i c a t i o n of a n
cal art songs are not m y c u p o f tea,
un-resolved concept . . . T h e
b u t s h e s i n g s t h e m w i t h o b v i o u s affec-
structure is w o n d e r f u l l y s o l i d ,
t i o n , a n d s u c h a gesture of filial
Big Bill's most memorable album, a monu- especially o n cuts one a n d three,
devotion s h o u l d not be c r i t i c i z e d .
mental work of the art of the real blues. w i t h every note i n place, every
" T h e balance between voice and guitar,
T h e r e a r e a f e w i n t e r m i t t e n t flashes
note m e a n i n g f u l . "
form and content, and emotion and re- o f fire f r o m J a m e s P . b u t f o r t h e
straint is perfect. The New Yorker. In-
It s h o u l d b e n o t e d t h a t t h e r e i s n o t
m o s t n a r t he is c h a i n e d d o w n heneath
cludes, T r o u b l e i n M i n d , In the Evening, the m e l o d y . the slightest s i m i l a r i t y between the
D i g g i n ' M y Potatoes, South Bound T r a i n , first t r a c k a n d t h e o t h e r " t w o " t r a c k s
others. Notes by Charles E . Smith. F S 2326. T h e reverse contains " t h r e e " i m - except that " t h e c o m p o s e r " was play-
AllF O L K W A Y S 1 2 " 33 1/3 l o n g - p r o v i s a t i o n s b y J a m e s P . T h e first i n g blues. M i s s H a n d y o n her half of
play record list p r i c e . $5.95 t r a c k , c a l l e d Blue Moods 1, c o n s i s t s t h e r e c o r d at least s e r v e s t h e u s e f u l
Folkways Records & Service Corp. of s i x choruses o f blues, prefaced b y f u n c t i o n of e n a b l i n g jazz critics to tell
117 W . 46th St.. N . Y . C . one o f the little operetta-like i n t r o d u c - f r o m the l y r i c s whether she is repeat-

34 THE JAZZ REVIEW


ing a previous number or singing a o u r t i m e . T h e actor's s t u d i o i d e a is with energy, and with a certain
different one. m i g h t be d r a w n between this k i n d of a m o u n t of i m a g i n a t i o n , b u t he d o e s n ' t
T h e p l a y i n g on track # 3 (or track s i n g i n g a n d what used to be c a l l e d sound like it's any f u n .
# 2 , i f y o u p r e f e r ) is f a r s u p e r i o r to the p l a s t i c a r t s . N o w a d a y s we c a n H e h a n d l e s h i m s e l f best o n t h e
that o n t r a c k # 1 . A g a i n there are recognize the celebrated artists of blues, but even there never expresses
six choruses of blues, w i t h h a r m o n i c this century not only i n their can- h i m s e l f f u l l y . H e m i n i m i z e s the v a l u e
substitutions of one sort o r another vases b u t i n t h e i r r u g s , t a p e s t r i e s , of his feelings, p l a c i n g m o r e i m p o r -
i n t h e first f o u r b a r s o f e a c h c h o r u s , w a l l p a p e r , t e x t i l e s ; i n a l l cases t h e i r tance on f o r m a n d style. M a t u r i t y
followed b y a 32-bar tune seemingly w o r k is the same because it i g n o r e s m a y b r i n g more trust of his o w n
patched together f r o m every hack- relief. viewpoint, but on this a l b u m his facil-
neyed c l o s i n g p e r i o d that James P . It i s e v i d e n t l y e a s y t o d e s c r i b e h o w i t y is f a r better developed t h a n h i s
ever used. L u c k i l y , James P.'s v a l i d i t y M a r y A n n M c C a l l w o r k s . It i s f a r a b i l i t y to m a k e a statement of h i s
consists m o r e i n h o w he plays t h a n i n f r o m e a s y t o assess t h e r e s u l t s , a n d own.
w h a t he p l a y s . H e h a s a n a l m o s t v i r t u a l l y impossible to i m a g i n e a rea-
a r c h i t e c t u r a l w a y of h a n d l i n g r h y t h m , son for this elaborately incorrect D o n a l d ' s p l a y i n g is b r i g h t , c l e a n ,
of p l a c i n g pulses like b u i l d i n g b l o c k s , w a y o f s i n g i n g , except that it seems y o u t h f u l , a n d often c h a r m i n g , but it
a n d a w o n d e r f u l l y subtle m a n n e r of to be w h a t great n u m b e r s of people m i g h t b e e a s i e r t o see d e e p e r i n t o i t
a l l o w i n g different r h y t h m i c concep- w i s h t o h e a r . O n e f a r less g i f t e d i f t h e s u r f a c e w e r e n o t so s h i n y . S o m e
tions to exist simultaneously i n both singer t h a n M i s s M c C a l l has c a r r i e d of the same prettiness that existed i n
h a n d s . A l t h o u g h he h a s p l a y e d m u c h the m e t h o d to a p o i n t w h e r e a n y the e a r l y p l a y i n g of Chet B a k e r a n d
b e t t e r t h a n he d o e s o n t h i s r e c o r d , l i s t e n e r m u s t w o n d e r i f she i s g r i p p e d J o n E a r d l e y is present here, w i t h
there is c e r t a i n l y e n o u g h here to i n - by nausea or a p h r o d i s i a ; Schwann h o p e for future development of a
terest a n i n t e l l i g e n t l i s t e n e r i f h e lists a dozen records b y her. E v i - s t r o n g e r sense o f t h e e a r t h .
doesn't m i n d b u y i n g two solos for d e n t l y , j u s t b e c a u s e i t i s so s t u d i e d , W a l d r o n ' s c o m p i n g throughout the
t h e p r i c e of t h r e e . T h i s is m u s i c f o r it's got to be art. a l b u m is listless, i n t e r f e r i n g w i t h the
the m a n w h o e n j o y s l i s t e n i n g to Beneath the overlay, M a r y A n n ' s flow o f t h e s o l o i s t r a t h e r t h a n a s s i s t -
James P . Johnson. v o i c e seems to h a v e a n i n d i v i d u a l i n g it. T h e s t r o l l i n g choruses where
Dick Wellstood and touching quality, rather wistful D o n a l d p l a y s w i t h j u s t bass a n d
a n d r e s e m b l i n g , i f a n y b o d y ' s , that drums are m u c h more unified. M a i ' s
of her onetime i d o l M i l d r e d B a i l e y , o w n c h o r u s e s a r e u n i n t e r e s t i n g be-
M a r y A n n M c C a l l : D e t o u r to the o r of that g o o d p o p u l a r s i n g e r Rose- c a u s e he seems u n i n t e r e s t e d h i m s e l f .
M o o n , Jubilee V J L P 1078. m a r y C l o o n e y . It i s t o be r e g r e t t e d
R o n T u c k e r s o u n d s fine i n g e n e r a l ,
t h a t she feels c o m p e l l e d t o a b u s e i t .
a l t h o u g h h e gets a l i t t l e p u s h y w h e n
M a r y A n n M c C a l l is one of several I find t h e a c c o m p a n i m e n t s m o s t l y
he feels m o r e s h o u l d be h a p p e n i n g .
s i n g e r s w h o c a n b e r e c o g n i z e d as b e - i n a p p r o p r i a t e , even grotesquely so,
H e gets a g o o d s o u n d f r o m his i n s t r u -
l o n g i n g to a school. T h e i r w o r k is t o these m o d e s t s o n g s , b u t t h e y a r e
ment a n d a g o o d feeling on each
e a s i l y t o l d f r o m t h a t of c l a s s i c j a z z notable f o r t w o reasons. O n e is the
tempo.
s i n g e r s i n t h e i r a p p r o a c h to t h e t e c h - interesting combination of solo
n i q u e of s i n g i n g a n d i n t h e i r treat- strings ( v i o l a , cello, bass) pizzicato, D o u g W a t k i n s i s t h e o n l y one o n
ment of grace notes, p a s s i n g tones, plus g u i t a r . T h e other is those same t h e a l b u m w h o s o u n d s l i k e he's get-
and embellishments generally. The strings bowed, entirely without v i - ting any real pleasure f r o m playing.
v o i c e is not p l a c e d f o r w a r d ; it seems b r a t o ; e v i d e n t l y this is one s o l u t i o n H e ' s not the facile soloist that J a c k i e
to issue f r o m the r e g i o n w h e r e l o w t o t h e p r o b l e m of u s i n g t h e s t r i n g s a n d D o n are, but his q u a l i t y t h r o u g h -
back vowels are p r o d u c e d (which i n a t r u e j a z z setting w i t h o u t the out b o t h h i s solos a n d h i s l i n e is
may explain how opaque their dic- pulse of j a z z b e i n g frustrated by the warm, thoughtful, and satisfying.
t i o n c a n b e ) , a n d f r o m there to be classical vibrato. T h e choice of tunes is good. T h e
r o l l e d a r o u n d o n the tongue l i k e a G l e n n Coulter s t a n d a r d s It's You Or No One, The
t h i r s t y m a n ' s first s i p o f w a t e r . P r e -
Way You Look Tonight, and Lover
s u m a b l y the tone that results f r o m
Man a r e r i c h s t i m u l i f o r i n v e n t i o n ,
t h i s p r o c e d u r e i s m e a n t as a v o c a l Jackie M c L e a n Quintet. Jubilee a n d the o r i g i n a l s (two b y J a c k i e a n d
a p p r o x i m a t i o n of the s o n o r i t y a cool V J L P 1064. one by M a i ) are a l l interesting. T h e
instrumentalist strives for, t h o u g h i n
a l b u m c o v e r is attractive, a n d the
fact i t i s a c a v e r n o u s s o u n d as u n - Jackie McLean's admiration for notes by C h a r l i e M a c k give the per-
l i k e the a e r a t e d t o n e of. s a y , L e s t e r C h a r l i e P a r k e r is o b v i o u s o n this tinent i n f o r m a t i o n about the date a n d
Y o u n g as a n y t h i n g c o u l d b e . reissue a l b u m . H i s tone, conception, the m u s i c i a n s , a f t e r a q u e s t i o n a b l e
T h i s u n u s u a l a p p r o a c h results i n a a n d c h o i c e of m a t e r i a l are based o n essay a t t e m p t i n g to j u s t i f y J a c k i e ' s
m a r k e d loss of v o c a l a g i l i t y , there- h e a r i n g t h i n g s the w a y B i r d m i g h t d e v o t i o n to B i r d ' s c o n c e p t i o n .
fore the second hallmark. Where have p l a y e d them. I n places, J a c k i e Bill Crow
grace notes receive an accent, i n manages to d i s c o v e r expressions that
b a r o q u e m u s i c , o r c o n v e r s e l y a r e let c a n ' t be i d e n t i f i e d as d i r e c t q u o t e s f r o m
u p o n , i n c l a s s i c a l j a z z , these v o c a l - B i r d , b u t i n the m a i n he s o u n d s s a t i s -
ists a c c o r d t h e m t h e s a m e stress as fied w i t h b e i n g a b l e t o r e c r e a t e f o r J e l l y R o l l M o r t o n : New Orleans
the notes of the m e l o d i c l i n e , no himself some of B i r d ' s beauty. Some- Memories, Commodore F L 30000
m o r e , n o less. T h e i n e v i t a b l e a b s e n c e where there is a conflict, t h o u g h , f o r S i d e 1 h e r e c o n s i s t s o f the five
of a n y m a r k e d p r o f i l e , w h i c h i s t o I don't hear the j o y of p l a y i n g some- classic blues. F o r t r a d i t i o n a l jazz it
s a y t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of t h e i d e a o f t h i n g w o n d e r f u l . If he really c o u l d w o u l d h a v e b e e n d i f f i c u l t to select a
e q u a l i z e d s u r f a c e t e n s i o n i n p l a c e of t h i n k of n o t h i n g m o r e b e a u t i f u l t h a n m o r e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e yet m o v i n g five:
the o l d p r i n c i p l e of a l t e r n a t i n g waves to p l a y the w a y B i r d p l a y e d , w h y , the t w o t w e l v e - b a r n u m b e r s , Mamie's
of excitement and repose this w h e n he m a n a g e s t o c r e a t e s u c h a f a i r Blues a n d T o n y J a c k s o n ' s Michigan
m e t h o d s e e m s t o be t h e d e l i g h t o f copy of the style, does his p l a y i n g Water Blues a r e c o m b i n e d w i t h Don't
a u s e f u l a n a l o g y , b u t a better p a r a l l e l s o u n d so g r i m ? H e p l a y s c l e a n l y , You Leave Me Here, Buddy Bolden's

DECEMBER 35
Blues, a n d the i n c o m p a r a b l e Winiri c a t e the n a t u r e o f J e l l y ' s t r a n s f o r m a -
Boy. P e r h a p s it is wise to r e f r a i n tion than bars four a n d twelve of the
f r o m c o m m e n t o n these b l u e s n u m - C s t r a i n . R e c a l l that i n J o p l i n ' s o r i g i -
bers o n the g r o u n d s that so m u c h of nal this is a full typical ragtime
the q u a l i t i e s w h i c h so u r g e n t l y a p p e a l s t r a i n . I n b a r s 4 a n d 5, t h e p h r a s e
to t h e l i s t e n e r a r e d i r e c t i n n a t u r e could scarcely be more characteristic
and almost personal. (the r i g h t h a n d o n l v i s s i g n i f i c a n t f o r
S i d e 2 is susceptible to the m o r e the contrast here) E x a m p l e 2
usual a p p r o a c h . F o r example, take the B a r 1 2 reflects t h e c r u d e n e s s o f
fascinating lead number, the trans- early ragtime's harmonic changes.
f o r m a t i o n of Scott J o p l i n ' s Original T h e progression i s f r o m tonic to sub-
Rags f r o m r a g t i m e i n t o J e l l y ' s j a z z . m e d i a n , the change w h i c h a l l of jazz
( I n c i d e n t a l l y , the L P L a b e l errone- m a d e so r i c h a n d so v a r i e d . I t i s t h e
o u s l y i d e n t i f i e s Original Rags a s a c h a n g e w h i c h " m a k e s " s u c h tunes as
c o l l a b o r a t i o n between Scott a n d J o p - Salty Dog, A Good Man Is Hard To
l i n - either that o r the h y p h e n is a Find, Ballin The Jack, Jada, a n d
misprint.) countless others. B u t the change w a s
T h e most obvious indications of not e x p l o i t e d i n r a g t i m e L a t e r rags
Jelly's jazz a p p r o a c h stem, i n the d i d somewhat better, thanks largely
right h a n d , f r o m the i m p r o v i s a t i o n to the m u s i c i a n s h i p o f l a m e s Scott
a n d , i n t h e left h a n d , f r o m t h e a n t i c i - a n d J o p l i n ' s o w n late-developing in
pated downbeats a n d the octave r u n s terest i n h a r m o n y a n d e v e n t o n a l i t y .
of four sixteenth-notes, Jelly's trade- But this is an 1899 r a g , a n d J o p l i n
m a r k . A c t u a l l y , h o w e v e r , these d e - r a n r o m e n n w i t h n o t h i n g better t h a n
vices do not e x p l a i n the f u l l trans- t h e figure s h o w n i n E x a m p l e , 3.
f o r m a t i o n w h i c h Jelly brings about. In J o p l i n , of course, this strain is
T h e g u l f w h i c h separates r a g t i m e , as r e p e a t e d v e r b a t i m ( a t least i n these
the e a r l y r a g c o m p o s e r s u n d e r s t o o d two b a r s ) .
it, f r o m j a z z as J e l l y e p i t o m i z e d i t N o w note J e l l y ' s r i g h t h a n d i n b a r
this gulf has to do more w i t h the type 4. T h e p h r a s e d e p a r t s f r o m t h e J o p l i n
o f beat w h i c h t h e t w o d e v e l o p a n d o r i g i n a l i n the slightest a n d yet most
the n a t u r e o f t h e m o m e n t u m w h i c h i m p o r t a n t r e s p e c t . S e e E x a m p l e 4 , as
b u i l d s u p . T h e difference is reflected c o m p a r e d with E x a m p l e 2.
9 8 on F . M L
i n the entire o r g a n i z a t i o n of the tune. N o w note b a r 12. T h e first t i m e
in L O S A N G E L E S T h e whole a p p r o a c h to Original t h r o u g h , the right h a n d merely "jazzes
Rags reflects J e l l y ' s b r e a k f r o m r a g - u p " what is really the same phrase
time. J o p l i n , i n the o r i g i n a l w r i t i n g as i n t h e o r i g i n a l J o p l i n v e r s i o n . B u t
o f t h e t u n e , p l a i n l y states t h e s t a n d - the left h a n d d e p a r t s c o n s i d e r a b l y ,
a r d , vigorous opening theme. H e then w i t h one of those m a r v e l o u s progres-
g i v e s t h e s e c o n d s t r a i n a l i g h t e r , float- sions f r o m tonic to sub-median w h i c h
i n g q u a l i t y , a n effect h e i g h t e n e d b y a b o u n d i n jazz. Incidentally, the par-
a l t o g e t h e r o m i t t i n g t h e left h a n d i n t i c u l a r series o f s i x t h s , u s e d i n t h e
JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS b a r one. T h e n i n the t h i r d theme, left h a n d , i s s e l e c t e d so' a s t o fit w e l l
J o p l i n c o m e s d o w n to c l a s s i c r a g t i m e harmonicallv both with Joplin's right
1941CHARLEY C H R I S T I A N and DIZZY
G I L L E S P I E in Hiitoric Session, at with the tvDical right h a n d phrases h a n d ( E x a m p l e 3) a n d even more
Minions. C P T S48 of the i d i o m , M u s i c a l E x a m p l e 1. w i t h Tellv's s l i g h t m o d i f i c a t i o n o f it
1946- SONNY B E R M A N with the FIRST A l l three See E x a m p l e 5 :
HERD. C P T 532 themes are repeated. T h e n , after a re- N o w the second time through, the
1947- W N E W S A T U R D A Y N 1 T E SWING t u r n t o t h e first s t r a i n , J o p l i n m o v e s left h a n d c o n t a i n s b a s i c a l l y t h e s a m e
SESSION, with Roy, Ventura, Allan q u i c k l y t o t w o u n r e p e a l e d final s t r a i n s . thoughts, simplified somewhat in
Eager, Fats Navarro, etc. C P T 549
T h e h a n d l i n g of Jelly, the jazz o r d e r to a v o i d dissonance w i t h the
1950-AL HAIG Jazz Will-O-The-Wisp
pianist, is quite different. D i s p e n s i n g new right h a n d phrase. T h e right
C P T 551
w i t h h a l f the i n t r o d u c t i o n , h e estab- h a n d phrase is w h o l l y different n o w
1 9 5 8 - S A L U T E T O BUNNYRusty D e d - lishes h i s m o m e n t u m very q u i c k l y a n d clearly pursues the ideas con-
rick Ork. C P T 551
and moves f o r w a r d . H e rides over t a i n e d i n t h e first 11 b a r s a p o s s i -
J o p l i n ' s c r u d e a t t e m p t s t o set u p s o m e bility w h i c h h a d evidently escaped
STEREO AND MONAURAL DISCS
k i n d of variety of a p p r o a c h to the J o p l i n . N o t e f o r e x a m p l e t h a t t h e last
P O R T R A I T O F P E E W E E , with Pee Wee, three different strains. Jelly forces five n o t e s a r e n o w i d e n t i c a l ( o r a l -
Ruby, Bud, Vic, and Nat Pierce Ork. a l l o f t h e first t h r e e t h e m e s t o b e m o s t I ' m n o t at a l l s u r e I ' v e n o t a t e d
CPST 5561, C P T 565. i d e n t i c a l i n s p i r i t , fused together to t h i s e x a c t l y as i t i s p l a y e d , s i n c e t h e
JU A N I T A H A L L SINGS T H E B L U E S , b u i l d u p h i s n e w j azz-type rnorncn- last note of the nhrase m a v be G
with Hawk, Buster Bailey, Doc Cheatham t u r n H e gets t h e beat s w i n g i n g l i g h t - r a t h e r t h a t C ) t o t h e e q u i v a l e n t five
and Claude Hopkins Ork.
ly experimenting w i t h sixths i n the notes i n b a r f o u r . T h e p r o g r e s s i o n to
CPST 5556, C P T 564
left h a n d a r e s o u r c e w h i c h r a g t i m e s u b - m e d i a n (instead o f the d o m i n a n t
never tolerated but w h i c h become f o u n d i n b a r five) i s m a d e q u i t e c l e a r
For catalog write: m o r e a n d m ore frequently used i n i n t h e l e f t h a n d i n t h e first b e a t o f
ESOTERIC & COUNTERPOINT RECORDS j a z z a s ; n H i n e s esneciallv o r the bar 13. Musical Example 6 .
3 3 3 Sixth A v e n u e , N e w Y o r k 14 L i o n (see, f o r e x a m p l e , Willie's Blues T h i s i s the k i n d of t h i n g w h i c h
the D o t L P ) o r A r t T a t u m J o p l i n delighted i n d u r i n g later years
Nothing could more clearly indi- ( w i t h i n the ragtime framework, of

THE JAZZ REVIEW


c o u r s e ) . H i s m i s s i n g i t i s the k i n d of i n g , f o r e x a m p l e , that this is the basic sible because of v a r i o u s p e r m i s s i b l e
missed o p p o r t u n i t y w h i c h is natural resource of C h a r l i e P a r k e r ' s m u s i c a l w a y s o f c l o s i n g t h e w h o l e t h i n g off
e n o u g h to find i n t h i s m a i d e n flight g e n i u s . I k n o w i t i s w h a t elevates ( o r g o i n g to t h e n e x t s t r a i n ) i n t h e
in r a g t i m e c o m p o s i n g . J . S . B a c h to h i s h i g h p l a c e . I n f a c t , short space of two beats. J e l l y a n d
J u s t one f u r t h e r t h i n g o n J e l l y ' s it is f o u n d w h e r e v e r great not s i m p l y j a z z g e n e r a l l y w e r e n o t u s e d to these
h a n d l i n g o f b a r 12, a g a i n i n c o n t r a s t g o o d m u s i c i a n s are found. 1
confinements. I n the blues, f o r ex-
to J o p l i n ' s : n o t e h o w i n both c h o r u s e s M o v i n g o n past the first t h r e e a m p l e , the p e r f o r m e r has t w o f u l l
t h e p h r a s e e s t a b l i s h e d i n b a r 12 i s strainswithout r e c a p i t u l a t i n g s t r a i n m e a s u r e s to finish s o m e t h i n g off. A t
used f o r the w h o l e last f o u r b a r s . A J e l l y r e v i s e s the D s t r a i n w h o l e - t h e e n d o f a j a z z t u n e , he f r e q u e n t l y
A n d , since the second t i m e t h r o u g h sale, m a k i n g it a k i n d of b r i d g e c a n d o w i t h o u t the final f o u r t h b e a t
t h e p h r a s e o f b a r 12 i s t i e d to t h e rather t h a n a separate theme of its e n t i r e l y h e n o r m a l l y does i n the
first 11 b a r s as w e l l , t h i s m e a n s t h a t o w n . H e even ends it w i t h a s e m i - b l u e s a n d m u c h o t h e r j a z z . It i s a l -
J e l l y has succeeded i n t y i n g the w h o l e cadence p r o p e l l i n g the m o t i o n i n t o E . m o s t c o r r e c t to s a y t h a t j a z z c h o r u s e s
chorus together. T h e n by his h a n d l i n g T h i s i s d e f i n i t e l y not i n J o p l i n ' s o r i g i - are not tvDicallv sixteen whole bars
o f the D s t r a i n ( d i s c u s s e d b e l o w ) , h e n a l ; i n fact, note the decided stop i n b u t r a t h e r a n u p b e a t p l u s 15 w h o l e
further p r o l o n g s the m o m e n t u m w h i c h b a r ' 16 o f J o p l i n ' s s t r a i n D . bars p l u s 3 beats of the sixteenth.
is w h a t h e i s s t r i v i n g f o r , as d i s - T h e E strain, w h i c h is played only T h e h o m e t o n i c is u s u a l l y r e a c h e d
t i n g u i s h e d f r o m the stop-and-go tech- once i n the J o p l i n o r i g i n a l is repeated b v b a r 15 thp first bpat o f b a r 16
nicrues o f r a g t i m e J e l l y ' s m o m e n t u m i n Jelly's version, suggesting (but it at t h e v e r y latest
b u i l t u p as i t i s w i t h o u t a d e e p b r e a t h is o n l y a s u g g e s t i o n ) t h e " j a m m i n g J a z z i s n o t u s e d to f a c i n g t h i s
a l l the w a v f r o m the b e g i n n i n g o f C o u t " of a jazz tune. p r o b l e m of not r e a c h i n g the h o m e
f i v e choruses all t o l d m a k e s his B u t note h o w i n one respect J e l l y t o n i c u n t i l t h e t h i r d beat o f the last
a b r u D t final e n d i n g ( a l s o d i s c u s s e d does follow J o p l i n ' s pattern. Despite b a r a n d h a v i n g to s h u t u p s h o p i n
b e l o w ) a l l t h e m o r e effective. the f a c t t h a t b o t h r i g h t h a n d a n d t w o b e a t s . N o w h e r e else i n t h e 10
T h i s c r e a t i o n o f b a r s 13 t h r o u g h left h a n d h a v e d e p a r t e d f a r f r o m t h e tunes on this l p does J e l l y encounter
16 o n the b a s i s o f t h e s i n g l e p h r a s e o r i g i n a l i n the details, the p a t t e r n the p r o b l e m . A n y j a z z m u s i c i a n w h o
o f b a r 12 i s n o t to be g l o s s e d o v e r r e m a i n s o f h o l d i n g off t h e final r e - h a s t r i e d to e n d Save It Pretty Mama
l i g h t l y . T h i s w a y of t y i n g together a t u r n to h o m e t o n i c u n t i l t h e t h i r d b e a t o r You Can Be Kissed i n any but an
piece, b y h a v i n g the p h r a s i n g o v e r l a p o f t h e last m e a s u r e , r a t h e r t h a n the u n o r t h o d o x m a n n e r k n o w s w h a t the
the b o u n d s o f t h e f o u r - s q u a r e s t r u c - first b e a t as w a s J e l l y ' s u s u a l p r a c t i c e . p r o b l e m i s . S o i t i s i n t e r e s t i n g to
ture is a splendid artistic achieve- I n r a g t i m e , e n d i n g as l a t e as t h e n o t e h o w l e l l v d o e s m a n a g e to p u l l
ment. I believe I a m correct i n say- t h i r d beat of the last measure is fea- o u t . H e s o l v e s the i d e n t i c a l p r o b l e m

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A c t u a l l y i t w o u l d b e m o r e a c c u r a t e to s a y t h a t i t i s f o u n d w h e r e v e r g r e a t m u s i c a l m o m e n t s a r e f o u n d s i n c e s o m e
r a t h e r m e d i o c r e m u s i c i a n s s e e m to s t u m b l e o n t h e t h i n g s v e r y o c c a s i o n a l l y .

DECEMBER 37
r in identical fashion on The R e d Hot
P e p p e r s ' n u m b e r , CannonbaU Blues
there, of course, the p r o b l e m was
s e l f - i m p o s e d ) . T h e d e v i c e h e uses i s
so s i m p l e y e t gets t h e j o b d o n e w i t h
s t r i k i n g effectiveness. It is w o r t h not-
ing.
N o n e o f t h i s is t o s a y t h a t the
" t r a n s f o r m a t i o n " o f Original Rags i s
a l l net g a i n . W h i l e J e l l y ' s w a n d e r i n g
left h a n d s i x t h s a r e m o s t i n t e r e s t i n g ,
they must substitute for some very
p r e t t y l i t t l e left h a n d l i n e s i n the Fats N a v a r r o : Savoy M G 12119, f o r e x a m p l e . B u t the other m u s i c i a n s ,
J o p l i n o r i g i n a l , e s p e c i a l l y the e n d i n g s M G 12119, Blue Note 1531, 1532. s u c h as S o n n y R o l l i n s , C h a r l i e R o u s e ,
o f t h e f i r s t a n d last s t r a i n s . T h e s e Kenny Clarke, Ernie Henry, Milt
A n excellent g r o u p of a l b u m s has
a r e s h o w n i n E x a m p l e s 7 a n d 8, r e - Jackson, have since absorbed the
been released c o v e r i n g most of the
s n e c t i v e l v ( o m i t t i n g the c h o r d s w h i c h fundamental revolutionary princi-
r e c o r d e d w o r k of F a t s N a v a r r o . O n
go w i t h t h e m , of c o u r s e ) . ples of the b o p p e r i o d to develop ex-
B l u e N o t e The Fabulous Fats Na-
T h e rest o f s i d e 2 i n c l u d e s The varro Volumes 1 and 2 contain his pressions of t h e i r o w n d u r i n g the
Crave, a S p a n i s h - t i n g e n u m b e r ; The r e c o r d i n g s w i t h the T a d d D a m e r o n past t e n y e a r s . B i r d , D i z z y , M a x , a n d
Naked Dance; a n d Mister Joe a n d Sextet a n d Septet, the B u d P o w e l l B u d were then the p r i n c i p l e voices
King Porter, the t w o t o u r s de f o r c e . Quintet, a n d the M c G h e e - N a v a r r o of that i d i o m a n d were the most
The Naked Dance i s h a r d l y a f i r s t B o p t e t . O n S a v o y " O p u s de B o p " c o n - i m i t a t e d ; n o n e of their i m i t a t o r s
class J e l l y n u m b e r but one o r m o r e tains f o u r sides he r e c o r d e d w i t h a c h i e v e d t h e i r ease a n d s i m p l i c i t y i n
p o i n t s a r e w o r t h d i g g i n g . F o r ex- D a m e r o n a n d L e o P a r k e r , a n d In d e a l i n g w i t h the complexities of the
a m p l e , the poetic p h r a s i n g i n the The Beginning . . . Bebop! has f o u r n e w f o r m . I feel sure that, h a d Fats
t h i r d c h o r u s (the f i r s t i n E F l a t ) i s t h a t he r e c o r d e d w i t h E d d i e D a v i s . c o n t i n u e d to p l a y , he w o u l d have
just delightful musical logic. gradually discarded certain imitative
E a c h of the g r o u p s was assembled facets o f t h e p l a y i n g w e h e a r o n
I n the s i x t h c h o r u s , w h i c h is the f o r the p a r t i c u l a r r e c o r d date, a n d these r e c o r d s a n d w o u l d h a v e d e -
s e c o n d B s t r a i n , l i s t e n f o r the left t h o u g h the m u s i c i a n s are agreed on veloped more fully his own creative
hand. In J . Lawrence Cook's tran- their i d i o m a n d k n o w each other's i n d i v i d u a l i t y . P o s s i b l y w o r k i n g to-
s c r i p t i o n he i n d i c a t e s m e r e l y a r e - w o r k , the m u s i c lacks the u n i t y that gether over a l o n g p e r i o d w i t h a
p e a t of the fifth c h o r u s . N o t h i n g c o u l d comes with longer association. M a n y g r o u p o f h i s o w n a n d finding s t i m u -
be f u r t h e r f r o m t h e t r u t h . T h e left a g o o d t a k e w o u l d o b v i o u s l y h a v e be- l a t i n g m u s i c i a n s to play w i t h steadily,
h a n d a c t u a l l y t a k e s off i n a fine c o m e a n e x c e l l e n t one i f e v e r y o n e h a d would have provided the proper
m e l o d y o f i t s o w n , as s h o w n i n E x - been m o r e comfortable w i t h the tune. c o n d i t i o n s f o r the s m e l t i n g out of
a m p l e 9. T h i s i s n o t a m e l o d y s u i t a b l e Fats plays well throughout, executing this r i c h talent. S u c h an evolution
f o r r i g h t h a n d h a n d l i n g but it is the written parts b e a u t i f u l l y , w i t h took place i n the w o r k of C l i f f o r d
d e c i d e d l y the l i n e w h i c h J e l l y has h i s g o o d t o n e a n d a n easy a p p r o a c h t o B r o w n , w h o also began b y u s i n g
attention o n . T h e r i g h t h a n d is m e r e l y p h r a s i n g . H o w e v e r , he s e l d o m r e a c h - D i z z y ' s t o o l s , u n t i l he d e v e l o p e d a
a c c o m D a n i m e n t at t h i s r j o i n t I n l e l l v es a n y r e a l d e p t h o f e x p r e s s i o n o n t h e set o f h i s o w n t h a t w e r e m o r e s a t i s -
o n e m u s t a l w a y s be c a r e f u l ' t o k n o w more unfamiliar numbers. H i s impro- factory for h i m . A n d Miles D a v i s '
where the lead is. In t r i o recordings, v i s i n g ranges f r o m competent run- m u s i c a l g r o w t h is an excellent i l l u s -
f o r e x a m n l e he f r e o u e n t l v t o o k D i a n o n i n g of t h e c h a n g e s a n d t h e i r scales t o t r a t i o n of the results of steady p l a y -
choruses w h i l e the c l a r i n e t was g o i n g b r i l l i a n t m e l o d i c d i s c o v e r y . M u c h of i n g with stimulating groups.
f u l l b l o w n . A n d i n m u c h of the R e d his concept is f r a n k l y taken f r o m A n interesting sidelight on the
H o t P p n n p r m a t e r i a l trip l e a d i s i n D i z z y Gillespie's w o r k of the same events of the same p e r i o d is g i v e n
some nhsnirp nlarp I for pxamnlp p e r i o d , but occasionally a l y r i c a l o n the r e m a i n i n g tracks of the two
P n n F o t p r ' h a s * i n trip h a n i o c h o r u s q u a l i t y of h i s o w n enters h i s p l a y i n g S a v o y a l b u m s . T h e r e are f o u r b y a
i n Black Bottom Stomp) s t r o n g l y , g i v i n g a g l i m p s e of the r i c h - Kai W i n d i n g - A l l e n Eager quintet,
A l s o n o t e t h a t c o n s i s t e n t l y i n the ness t h a t s u r e l y w o u l d h a v e d e v e l o p e d four by B r e w Moore's quartet, four
A flat c h o r u s e s i n The Naked Dance, h a d he l i v e d . by a Stan Getz quartet, a n d four by
Jelly hits the seventh (a t h i r d inver- T h e solo work by everyone on a Bud Powell-Kenny Dorham-Sonny
s i o n , i f y o u w i l l ) of the d o m i n a n t , these records to v a r y i n g d e g r e e s Stitt quintet. A c t u a l l y , the P o w e l l
w h e n the ear w o u l d expect ( a n d J . shows only moments of genuine sides are the o n l y ones where the
L a w r e n c e C o o k notates) the root of c o m p o s i t i o n w i t h i n the f r a m e w o r k of musicians are p l a y i n g true bebop.
the c h o r d . I n E x a m p l e 9, the first n e w devices. T h e r e m a i n d e r of the B u d p l a y s v e r y w e l l o n Rays Idea,
appearance of this unexpected D F l a t p l a y i n g lacks this depth, and, how- a n d adequately o n the other sides,
i s s h o w n i n b a r s 13 a n d 1 4 . I n the e v e r f a s c i n a t i n g , seems t o s h o w o n l y but has r e c o r d e d better choruses t h a n
five c h o r u s e s w h i c h f o l l o w t h i s , a l l i n infatuation with new devices these. S o n n y p l a y s w i t h commend-
a F l a t , the note c o n s t a n t l y substitutes se. O f a l l t h e m u s i c i a n s o n these a b l e i n t e n s i t y , flow, a n d c o n t i n u i t y ,
f o r E F l a t . I k n o w of no e x p l a n a t i o n sides, B u d P o w e l l seems to h a v e h a d but never goes deeper into the
o f t h i s i n t e r m s o f t h e m u s i c a l effect t h e n t h e best i n n e r e r a s n of thp musical possibilities than using Bird's
it creates. M o r e l i k e l y it was just i d i o m : his solos sound connected conception to r u n c h o r d changes.
something Jelly had i n his fingers a n d c n m n l p t p w i t h i n thpm<!plvp Dnp K e n n y o f t e n lets a s t r o n g i m p u l s e
t h a t he h a p p e n e d to g o a n o t e t o o ' l o w to the u n f o r h m a ^ c a r r y h i m for a moment, but seldom
e v e r y t i m e , b u t , s i n c e t h e D F l a t is hi* r ^ r s o n a l l i f e LZ th h ^ r k i s a b l e to f o l l o w i t t o i t s c o n c l u s i o n ,
i n t h e c h o r d he felt n o g r e a t c o m - t o d a v T ^ n l v ^ mTld rPrn^nrlpr J t h P o r to be s t i m u l a t e d b y it i n t o a n o t h e r
p u l s i o n t o c o r r e c t the e r r o r A t least I ' J n L t n witV, J, X nVnilv connected o n e , a n d so he r a r e l y
this is m y guess. G u y Waterman seems t o be g o i n g a n y w h e r e . T h e
e d o n Wail ' a n d Bouncing Wth B d

38 THE JAZZ REVIEW


W i n d i n g sides are interesting, but Willie " T h e L i o n " Smith: The i n E x a m p l e 1, s u g g e s t i n g E m i n o r
not m u c h f u n . K a i was t r y i n g h a r d Lion Roars, Dot D L P 3094 but u l t i m a t e l y l e a d i n g to h o m e t o n i c
to p l a y the style, w i t h o u t m a k i n g a n y i n the relative m a j o r , pervades h a l f
T h e t h o u g h t that c o m e s to m i n d i n
discoveries about his own expression. the c h o r u s :
h e a r i n g this L P is "keep quiet a n d
T h e r h y t h m section ( M a r t y N a p o - r
p l a y . " W i l l i e "the L i o n " Smith is 1^. si
leon, Eddie Safranski, and Shelly a first-rate pianist. N e i t h e r he n o r
M a n n e ) n e v e r gets i n t o a g r o o v e L e o n a r d F e a t h e r a r e as i n t e r e s t i n g *
since they keep t r y i n g to m a k e some- talkers.
t h i n g o u t o f t h e m u s i c t h a t i s n ' t : five
T h i s r e c o r d consists of an extended T h i s a n d s i m i l a r figures, p l u s the
m e n just aren't a b i g band. A l l e n
i n t e r v i e w of the L i o n , w i t h L e o n a r d Lion's exquisite right-hand touch,
Eager plays well here, and I
F e a t h e r a s k i n g the questions a n d the combine i n a swinging relaxed n u m -
t h i n k he w o u l d h a v e d o n e b e t t e r t o
L i o n a n s w e r i n g a n d i n t e r s p e r s i n g the ber that alone m a k e s the w h o l e l p
stay w i t h the K a n s a s C i t y style
interview w i t h n u m e r o u s tunes, most worthwhile.
p l a y e r s , s i n c e he m a d e s u c h g o o d use
of t h e m d e s i g n e d to i l l u s t r a t e p a r t i c u - N u m b e r s l i k e Carolina Shout r e a l l y
of Lester Y o u n g ' s basic approach
l a r p i a n o s t y l e s , s u c h as t h e " v e r y r o c k f r o m the first n o t e . F o r m y taste,
without b e c o m i n g a sterile i m i t a t o r .
earliest blues," James P.'s style, D u k e F a t s ' v e r s i o n o f Carolina Shout i s f a r
B r e w M o o r e ' s sides are m u c h m o r e E l l i n g t o n ' s s t y l e , b o o g i e w o o g i e , etc. more powerful and swings more,
u n i f i e d , since there the b e b o p style
S o m e of the talk is d e l i g h t f u l w h e n w h i l e the a p p r o a c h used i n the L i o n ' s
is n o t t h e r e a l c o n s i d e r a t i o n . B r e w
t h e L i o n gets r o l l i n g a n d is n o t i n t e r - s e c o n d c h o r u s b u i l d s u p less t e n s i o n
also d i s p l a y s a n honest a d m i r a t i o n
rupted by leading questions f r o m M r . t h a n w h e n t h e left h a n d t e n t h s h i t o n
for Lester without losing his own
Feather. The long bit on D u k e Elling- the u p b e a t as t h e y d o i n H i n e s . B u t
i d e n t i t y . S t a n G e t z at t h i s stage s e e m s
ton's start, for example, is a gem. it is p e r h a p s u n f a i r to h o l d any
d r a w n i n several d i r e c t i o n s : a tone
B u t it is the L i o n ' s r o c k i n g H a r l e m p i a n i s t u p against F a t s a n d the F a t h e r .
that is a hangover f r o m his early
p i a n o p l a y i n g t h a t e l e v a t e s t h i s Ip. H i s boogie woogie is novel, with
a d m i r a t i o n of V i d o M u s s o , a n d a
T a k e Zig-Zag, p o s s i b l y the s w i n g - t h e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c H a r l e m left h a n d
conception that b o r r o w s f r o m D i z z y ,
ingest tune on a s w i n g i n g lp. T h e device of h i t t i n g the top note of the
B i r d , a n d Lester without m u c h re-
left-hand figure w h i c h gives it its octave before the b o t t o m note, re-
g a r d to content. H i s d e t e r m i n a t i o n
unique q u a l i t y is s i m p l i c i t y itself versing the u s u a l o r d e r for boogie
to s w i n g h a r d a n d p l a y w i t h a b i g
yet a m a s t e r s t r o k e ! T h e figure s h o w n w o o g i e . It is t h i s d e v i c e w h i c h c o n -
sound was more predetermined than
Burt Goldblatt t r i b u t e s ( w i t h o t h e r d e v i c e s ) t o the
o r g a n i c . T h o u g h a little m o r e depth
u n i q u e m o m e n t u m of the H a r l e m
a n d b r e a d t h w o u l d be w e l c o m e i n h i s
s t y l e as i n F a t s , J a m e s P . , a n d t h e
p r e s e n t s o u n d , i t at least i s h i s o w n .
L i o n . I n c i d e n t a l l y , it is W a l l y Rose's
T h e v a r i e t y of r h y t h m sections o n
use o f t h i s d e v i c e w h i c h so o b v i o u s l y
these f o u r a l b u m s g i v e s a n i n t e r e s t i n g
s t a m p s R o s e ' s r a g t i m e a p p r o a c h as
cross-section of the c o n c e p t i o n of the
e r r o n e o u s (see h i s r e c o r d i n g s o f Pine-
e m o t i o n a l q u a l i t y of j a z z w h i c h t h e
aoDle Rae The Cascades a n d most
musicians had i n this period. The
g l a r i n g , Euphonic Sound's). '
pianists, T a d d D a m e r o n , A l H a i g ,
B u d P o w e l l , H a n k Jones, M i l t Jack- T h e L i o n as h i s t o r i a n d o e s n ' t q u i t e
son, Gene D i N o v i , and M a r t y N a - m e a s u r e u p to t h e L i o n as m u s i c i a n .
p o l e o n , r e p r e s e n t a b o u t as w i d e a W i t h a l l d u e respect to a w o n d e r f u l
variety of attitudes t o w a r d accom- p i a n i s t , the " v e r y earliest b l u e s " has
p a n i m e n t as y o u c o u l d find, a n d y e t f a r t o o m o d e r n a l i l t t o t h e b e a t . It i s
they are all f u n c t i o n i n g w i t h i n a p o s s i b l e to h a v e a g r e a t r e s p e c t f o r
specific f o r m developed for p l a y i n g H a r l e m p i a n o , f o r the L i o n , a n d f o r
t h i s k i n d o f m u s i c . I find t h e c a l m the p a r t i c u l a r style i n w h i c h the L i o n
strength of A l H a i g a n d Gene D i - plays this blues a n d still have no
N o v i a n d t h e sense o f p r o p o r t i o n a n d d o u b t whatsoever that the L i o n is not
i m a g i n a t i o n of Bud Powell more recreating accuratelv anv earlv blues
s t i m u l a t i n g t h a n the nervous j a b b i n g s t v l e It m a v be p o i n t e d o u t t h a t t h i s
in Dameron, Napoleon, and Jack- g e n t l e m a n w a s n o t vet b o r n w h e n t h e
s o n ' s w o r k h e r e . A s a m e a s u r e of h i s first r a g w a s p u b l i s h e d ( a v e a r i n
t r e m e n d o u s g r o w t h , it is i n t e r e s t i n g w h i c h T o n y J a c k s o n was a l r e a d y of
to l o o k b a c k t o a t i m e w h e n M i l t h a d ftffC) * w a s t w o y e a r s o l d w h e n Jop~
a less b e a u t i f u l c o n c e p t i o n t h a n he
has n o w , a n d it is a r e m i n d e r that en veTsold when Rnddv Rnlden
e v e r y o n e b e g i n s w o r k i n g w i t h less went m a d a n d stopped p l a y i n g
t h a n a t o t a l e x p r e s s i o n a n d , at w h a t - B u t t h e L i o n s w i n g s as f e w d o w h e n
ever rate of g r o w t h , develops t o w a r d he t o u c h e s the p i a n o . T h e r e a r e r a r e
h i s o w n p o t e n t i a l . J u s t as I ' d l i k e t o m u s i c i a n s w h o seem c o n s t i t u t i o n a l l y
hear records b y Fats N a v a r r o ten u n a b l e to s o u n d a n o t e w i t h o u t i t
years later, I ' d also like to hear c o m i n g a l i v e . M i l t J a c k s o n , f o r ex-
records of L o u i s A r m s t r o n g i n the a m p l e , s e e m s d e l i g h t f u l l y u n a b l e not
Waif's H o m e B a n d , or Charlie Park- to s w i n g even o n the most e r u d i t e
e r a t h i s first K a n s a s C i t y jam M o d e r n Jazz Quartet creations of
sessions. F r o m that standpoint, I L e w i s . T h e L i o n also has this q u a l i t y .
v a l u e these f o u r a l b u m s f o r t h r o w i n g A s a result, his piano p l a y i n g sur-
a more objective light on an i m - v i v e s t h e t a l k m a k i n g t h e L P to r e -
portant p e r i o d i n the development of peat, t h o r o u g h l y w o r t h w h i l e . '
jazz. g;ii Crow
G u y Waterman

DECEMBER 39
Muggsy Spanier: t h e W o l v e r i n e s . It i s q u i t e t r u e t h a t Marmalade), the N O R K generally
K i d Muggsy's Jazz, any connection w i t h the later C h i c a - departed f r o m this pattern too (but
[Charles Pierce (1927), g o a n s is h a r d to i m a g i n e ; I r a t h e r the h a r m o n i e s are not n o v e l ) , a n d the
Jungle K i n g s (1927), suspect that the l i n e of subsequent b i - s e c t i o n a l t u n e s ( s u c h as Shim-me-
Bucktown Five (1924), i n f l u e n c e , i f a n y , m i g h t be t o t h e sha-wabble) a n d Da-da Strain, still
Stomp Six (1924)], N i c h o l s groups of the later '20s. I have two independent melodies.
R i v e r s i d e R L P 12-107 don't think this should require a A m o n g the B u c k t o w n F i v e records,
change of opinion regarding the Chicago, Mobile, Steady Roll, Why
A favorite truism among jazz C h i c a g o a n s , at least f o r t h e m o m e n t . Couldn't It Be, a r e a n e w e r t y p e s t i l l ,
writers w o u l d have it that M u g g s y T h e i r music was very m u c h sui w i t h a v e r s e o f lesser m e l o d i c i n -
e s p e c i a l l y t h e Kid M u g g s y o f t h i s generis, a n d d i s a p p e a r e d as a r e c o g - terest, a n d s e r v i n g m o r e obviously
a l b u m w a s the most successful white nizable entity w i t h i n a decade after as a p r e l u d e t o t h e c h o r u s . B u t t h e
assimilator of K i n g O l i v e r ' s cornet its i n c e p t i o n . verse is d o w n - g r a d e d i n i m p o r t a n c e
style, or, to those w i t h stronger M u g g s y ' s b a n d , first o f a l l , p l a y e d b y b e i n g p l a y e d as a n i n t e r l u d e ,
stomachs, the " b l a c k e s t " w h i t e cor- a great deal faster t h a n d i d the C r e o l e r a t h e r t h a n a p r e l u d e . It serves o n l y
netist. B y extension, the B u c k t o w n J a z z B a n d , w i t h less v a r i a t i o n i n t h e to b r e a k u p the u n r e l i e v e d succession
F i v e , the first band with which tempos chosen. Buddy's Habits, of choruses.
M u g g s y recorded, is i n direct line Chicago Blues, Mobile Blues, Hot T h e style of the B u c k t o w n F i v e is
of descent f r o m O l i v e r ' s C r e o l e Jazz Mittens, a n d the S t o m p S i x Every- d i s t i n g u i s h e d b y another feature, not
B a n d . I n his c o m m e n t a r y to this body Loves, a r e , f o r a l l p r a c t i c a l p u r - c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of the C r e o l e Jazz B a n d ,
a l b u m O r r i n Keepnews gives full poses, i n d i s t i n g u i s h a b l e i n tempo. but quite c o m m o n i n the w o r k of
credence to this n o t i o n , v i z : " T h u s O n e tune w h i c h gives an i m p r e s s i o n other c o n t e m p o r a r y white b a n d s : the
M u g g s y , m u c h m o r e than the others, of haste, belied by a c t u a l i t y is Why impression of discontinuity, both
was free to t u r n f o r h i s p r i m a r y i n - Couldn't It Be. T h i s , o n e s u s p e c t s , i s horizontal and vertical, in musical
s p i r a t i o n d i r e c t l y to the source m u s i c because the tune is f a i r l y c o m p l i - t i m e a n d space. A l t h o u g h t r u m p e t
of g r o u p s l i k e K i n g O l i v e r ' s C r e o l e cated, a n d i n the cornet solo w h i c h and clarinet are frequently i n tan-
J a z z B a n d . I n effect, t h a t w o u l d s e e m opens the side, M u g g s y plays m o r e dem, r h y t h m i c a l l y (sometimes t r u m -
to be the difference between the notes t h a n u s u a l (then, a n d n o w ) . pet a n d t r o m b o n e , as i n Buddy's
B u c k t o w n F i v e a n d S t o m p S i x selec- In this speeding up of average tempo Habits) t h e t o t a l effect i s less h o m o g -
tions a n d the 1927 w o r k of the m o r e the B u c k t o w n F i v e resembles the enous, f o r there is m o r e tendency
celebrated Chicagoans. Muggsy's W o l v e r i n e s , a n d is q u i t e different f o r two, o r even three, i n s t r u m e n t s
earlier group was directly influenced from Oliver's band and N O R K ; and to stop a n d go together, l e a v i n g a n
b y the t r a n s p l a n t e d giants of N e g r o the W o l v e r i n e s s h o w t h e s a m e i n - unfillable gap. O f course, bands cap-
N e w O r l e a n s j a z z . . . " O n e is c u r i - flexibility, t o a lesser d e g r e e . W h a t i t a l i z e o n t h i s , as e v i d e n c e d b y t h e
ous to k n o w , however, what c r i t e r i a , the r e a s o n m i g h t b e w o u l d b e h a r d f r e q u e n c y of c a r e f u l l y rehearsed i n -
apart f r o m M u g g s y ' s own sound and to e x p l a i n , a n d h a r d e r t o p r o v e . terludes a n d breaks, almost always
h i s s k i l l f u l use o f t h e p l u n g e r m u t e , T h e tunes represented here show w i t h a r t f u l l y p l a c e d rests. P e r h a p s ,
b a c k u p this p o i n t of v i e w . T h e r e that the b a n d was f a r f r o m f o l l o w i n g too, the c h a n g i n g character of c l a r -
seems to m e to be a g o o d d e a l of either O l i v e r , or the O D J B and inet p l a y i n g has s o m e t h i n g to do
e v i d e n c e t o t h e c o n t r a r y w h i c h , so NORK. The already stereotyped w i t h the d i s c o n t i n u i t y ; there are n o w
f a r as b a n d s o u n d i s c o n c e r n e d , t i e s d i x i e l a n d changes (circle of 5ths) f e w e r s i m p l e scales a n d arpeggios,
the B u c k t o w n F i v e r a t h e r closely to are avoided, along w i t h the trisec- a n d m o r e a n g u l a r flights i n t o t h e
the white " d i x i e l a n d " t r a d i t i o n , i n - t i o n a l m a r c h f o r m , a n d its c o n - h i g h e r range of the i n s t r u m e n t .
c l u d i n g the o r i g i n a l D i x i e l a n d Jazz comitant subdominant modulations. Really A Pain i s a g o o d e x a m p l e
Band, N e w Orleans R h y t h m Kings, A l t h o u g h they too recorded some of how this phenomenon, which
perhaps even the M e m p h i s F i v e , a n d O D J B t u n e s (Tiger Rag, Clarinet c o m e s o u t as i n a n i n d i v i d u a l ' s

^ COfZNET
k
n ri i in
if
11 >niii g
3 3

run i i - i ^ i j i i i i T j L i h w , , > | |
i " , ?

40 THE JAZZ REVIEW


p l a y i n g , operates o n the structure of
a tune. O n e c a n not help but think
there was a conscious "progressiv-
fie a f t e r a n i n i t i a l e n s e m b l e c h o r u s
goes o n t o successive cornet, c l a r i -
net, p i a n o , t e n o r s a x , v o c a l ( b y R e d
n t>lue note
THE FINEST IN J A Z Z
i s m " here. It is special m a t e r i a l , not McKenzie) and final ensemble
a p o p u l a r s o n g at a l l , a n d p a s t e d chorus. F o u r out of the s i x choruses
SINCE 1 9 3 9
together out of changes a n d m e l o d i c o n Darktown Strutters' Ball a r e s o l o ,
phrases f r o m a l l over. T h e i n t r o is a a n d Bull Frog Blues h a s t w o b l u e s
MILES DAVIS
Two beautiful LPs by the Master. Tempus
c o u s i n o f Eccentric, t h e first f o u r choruses each for clarinet a n d cornet. Fugii, Ray's Idea, Dear Old Stockholm, Weirdo,
b a r s r a t h e r c l o s e t o Fidgety Feet, Friars Point Shuffle is a n excellent Kelo, etc. With Jay Jay Johnson, Horace
a n d reminiscences of other tunes c o n - example of the undifferentiated, ab- Silver, Jackie McLean, Art Blakey, Kenny
Clarke, etc.
tinually pop up. stract i n s t r u m e n t a l blues, w i t h o u t a n y
T h e de-emphasis of the verse h a s particular melody or lyrics, a n d
BLUE NOTE 1501, 1502
been mentioned i n passing. T h i s , i n often w i t h o u t a n y t h i n g to m a r k it
fact, m a y be ultimately responsible off f r o m h u n d r e d s o f o t h e r b l u e s o f
for the sly transitions a n d unusual the same type. T h i s is not a n i n -
m o d u l a t i o n s i n w h i c h these t r a c k s novation, for some of the Creole
a b o u n d . Chicago Blues, f o r e x a m p l e , Jazz B a n d ' s blues approach the
goes f r o m E b t o n b t o E b . Q u i t e "blues i n B b , " but i n this 1927 re-
p o s s i b l y these w e r e d e v i c e s t o a l - cording the evolution from vocal
leviate m o n o t o n y that comes with b l u e s t o b l u e s as a s k e l e t o n f o r s o l o s
repetition of the same 32-bar chorus, is complete. T h a t this is a n instru-
since the B u c k t o w n F i v e c o u l d not mental f o r m is demonstrated b y the
o r w o u l d n o t find t h e w a y t o p l a y insignificance, i f not meaningless-
one ensemble c h o r u s after another ness, o f t h e l y r i c s : " F r i a r ' s P o i n t
(or w i t h a solo i n bas-relief) i n a n Shuffle, F r i a r ' s P o i n t Shuffle, that's
interesting w a y . S o , the solo be- the dance I l i k e " (repeated) " I ' m go- SOMETHIN' ELSE
comes m o r e a n d more frequent. T h e i n g to d o that dance, a n d I ' m g o i n g One for Daddy-O, Somefhin' Else, Autumn
to d o i t a l l n i g h t . " C u t l o o s e f r o m t h e Leaves, Love for Sale, Dancing in the Dark.
trombonist, G u y Carey, continues a n
(Miles Davis performs by courtesy of Columbia
old tradition, of course, w i t h h i s f o u n d a t i o n of a specific tune, the Records.)
s a c c h a r i n e s o l o s p l a i n statements of l e a d c a n d o l i t t l e else t h a n p l a y a s o l o "One of the best of the year."
a " t r i o " m e l o d y o n Buddy's Habits style, u s i n g the i m p r o v i s a t i o n a l pat- - R a l p h J. Gleason, S. f. Chronicle
terns that c o m e to h i m the easiest. Harold L. Keith, Pittsburgh Courier
a n d Mobile Blues; b u t the t w o tunes
Spotlight Winner, The Billboard
by the Stomp S i x actually open with F o r example, Muggsy's lead from
BLUE NOTE 1595
full cornet choruses, a n d Everybody Friar's Pointthe transcription is
has solos b y a l l three horns. n o t t o b e t a k e n as m o r e t h a n a r o u g h SOMETHIN'

ELSE
T h a t group is a n interesting o n e ; outline.
it is also a progressive one a n d de- These last f o u r sides a r e u n m i s -
serves o u r a t t e n t i o n f o r t h e n e w takeably i n the " C h i c a g o style"the
things that M u g g s y a n d V o l l y D e shuffle o n Darktown is especially well
CANNONBALL
F a u t , i n p a r t i c u l a r , were t r y i n g to d o n e b u t t h e y a r e n o t t h e best e x -
A D D E R L E Y
do. M u g g s y shows assurance that is a m p l e s . T h e China Boy r e c o r d e d a
uncanny, a n d a simple, but well-con- couple of months after this one ( i n MILES DAVIS

ceived m e l o d i c style. D e F a u t is one C o l u m b i a C L 6 3 2 ) is tighter, has HANK JONES


o f t h e first t o p l a y h i s p a r t i c u l a r k i n d better solos, a n d swings m o r e . M e z z - SAM JONES
of b o u n c y , a n g u l a r lines, w h i c h D o n r o w ' s s o u n d o n Friar's Point is
ART BLAKEY
M u r r a y was to carry on. B u t the s i m p l y hideous, although I suppose BLUE NOTE 1595
band lacks cohesion i n the long r u n that point is a dead horse, a n d S u l -
because the style o f t r o m b o n e G u y l i v a n ' s s o l o o n Darktown is awk- FATS NAVARRO
C a r e y p l a y e d w a s t o o close to E d d i e ward and harmonically primitive The fabulous Fats Navarro's greatest contri-
butions to jazz. Our Delight, The Squirrel, The
Edwards; besides his breaks are c o m p a r e d to some of h i s other w o r k
Chase, Souncin' with Bud, Lady Bird, Damer-
c o r n y , a n d t o o stiff. T h e r h y t h m i s of this p e r i o d . Teschmacher only be- onia, etc. With Tadd Dameron, Bud Powell,
g e n e r a l l y fine, e x c e p t w h e n a t u b a gan to show d i s c i p l i n e d m u s i c i a n s h i p Sonny Rollins, Ernie Henry, Wardell Gray,
is a d d e d , o n t h e S t o m p S i x d a t e ; h e i n the last r e c o r d s he m a d e , a l t h o u g h Kenny Clarke, Roy Haynes, Milt Jackson,
Howard McGhee, etc.
is not content to p l a y h i s t w o o r f o u r h e r e h e h a s as m u c h fire a n d f a n t a s y
per measure, b u t tries to outdo the as h e e v e r d i d h a v e .
BLUE NOTE 1531, 1532
trombone p l a y e r . T h e m u s i c gets T h i s is h a r d l y the place to discuss THE FABULOUS FATS NAVARRO
l o s t i n t h e scuffle. the " C h i c a g o s t y l e " b u t a c o m -
blur note I S ' M volume 1
T h e other records i n this a n - parison is inevitable, given the a r -
thology are quite another matter. rangement of the reissue. T h e t w o
F r o m the cornet's e a r l y entrance at g r o u p s of sides b e l o n g together as
t h e b e g i n n i n g o f China Boy ( n o t m u c h as G u i n e s s a n d s t r a w b e r r y
n e c e s s a r i l y M u g g s y ) , t h i n g s a r e less t a r t s : the C h i c a g o sides a r e interest-
expertly done than on the earlier i n g o n l y i n s o f a r as o n e i s i n t e r e s t e d
records. T h e sound a n d approach are i n t h e " c h i c a g o s o u n d " o r t h e sep-
n e w , h o w e v e r , a n d as i n t e r e s t i n g i n arate soloists; the B u c k t o w n F i v e ,
t h e i r o w n r i g h t as o n t h e B u c k t o w n on the other h a n d , is a n intrinsically
F i v e s . W h a t h a s h a p p e n e d c h i e f l y , as intriguing a n d vital band, completely
everyone h a s k n o w n a l l a l o n g , i s that apart f r o m the interest aroused b y
here the solo r e a l l y takes over. E a c h its s y n t h e t i c style a n d v e n e r a b l e p o s i - 12" LP, List $4.98
o f t h e s e s i d e s h a s at least t h r e e o r t i o n as j a z z a r t i f a c t . BLUE NOTE RECORDS
f o u r o f t h e m , a n d Friar's Point Shuf- L a r r y Gushee 47 West 63rd St., New York 23

D EC EM B E R 41
Art T a t u m : with Benny Carter, granted today. H e doesn't sound R a g t i m e : P i a n o R o l l Classics, River-
Louis Bellson, Verve M G V - 8 2 7 7 " n e w " because you've already heard side R e c o r d s , R L P 12-126
what h e does m a n y times as p l a y e d
by other people. R a g t i m e is extremely difficult m u -
B e n n y w a s m o r e o r less r e s p o n s i b l e sic t o p l a y w e l l . T h e difficulty stems
M y first i m p r e s s i o n w a s o n e o f for alto m e n p l a y i n g a l l over their not from technical requirements,
again becoming intrigued by Tatum's h o r n , f r o m t o p to b o t t o m . H e w a s w h i c h a r e n o t as d e m a n d i n g as s o m e
excursions with the changes. L i k e i n o n e o f t h e first o f t h e v i r t u o s i , o n e c r i t i c s seem to t h i n k they a r e . T h e
You're Mine You, h e w e n t i n t o s o m e of t h e first w i t h b l a z i n g speed w h e n d i f f i c u l t y i s r a t h e r t h a t t h e sound o f
thingswith his usual subtletythat he w a n t e d i t , a n d a l t h o u g h he c o u l d ragtime, the approach w h i c h must be
made me wonder how he was going p l a y so m u c h , i t a l w a y s a l l w o r k e d used, is f o r e i g n to the jazz pianist of
to w o r k h i s w a y b a c k t o r e a l i t y . I t out r i g h t o n time. I n fact, h e p l a y e d t o d a y , even t h e revivalists. L e e Staf-
was also g o o d to hear B e n n y p l a y i n w i t h i n the time w i t h a great deal of f o r d came the closest, b u t Stafford
s u r r o u n d i n g s like this. He's basically subtlety, b u t he w a s l i k e the J o e D i - took the "not-too-fast" warning too
a r e l a x e d m u s i c i a n a n d c a n b e best m a g g i o ' o f the alto i n that he c o u l d literally.
s h o w n off i n a r e l a x e d c o n t e x t r a t h e r a n d c a n p l a y as m a n y n o t e s as a n y - R a g t i m e is designed to have a
than with Oscar Peterson a n d one, b u t he m a k e s i t l o o k so easy. r h y t h m i c m o m e n t u m w h i c h c a n so
gljyg S o m e of the younger players are like easily be lost w h e n p l a y e d either t o o
l i k e that w h o a r e f r a n t i c . W i l l i e M a y s . T h e y m a k e it look so fast o r t o o s l o w . A t t h e e x c e s s i v e l y
T a t u m , o f c o u r s e , h a r m o n i c a l l y set h a r d a n d therefore spectacular fast s p e e d , i t i s i m p o s s i b l e t o s w i n g ,
the pace f o r m o d e r n p i a n i s t s . B u d H a r m o n i c a l l y , I don't think Benny's without improvising a n d dropping
Powell studied his harmonies. R e d been t o o m u c h o f a n i n n o v a t o r . H e the p h r a s i n g o f ragtime. A t the ex-
G a r l a n d c a n a n d does p l a y a lot of covers a l l the c h o r d , b u t he stays i n c e s s i v e l y s l o w s p e e d , t h e beat b e -
T a t u m t h i n g s i n c l u d i n g T a t u m ' s oc- the c h o r d . I never h e a r d h i m d o i n g c o m e s t o o stiff. I t i s p e r f e c t l y p o s s i b l e
casional use of stride, b u t w i t h m o d - a n y t h i n g t h a t w a s r e a l l y different i n t o s w i n g at e i t h e r f a s t e r o r s l o w e r
e r n v o i c i n g s . B y that I m e a n R e d w i l l terms of changes whereas C o l e m a n t e m p o s , b u t o n l y w i t h a j a z z beat
use c l o s e v o i c i n g s w i t h o c c a s i o n a l a d - H a w k i n s even i n the m i d - 3 0 s w a s which is inappropriate f o r ragtime.
d i t i o n a l tones that a r e even outside using substitute a n d passing chords. T h e n , too, m a n y pianists w h o have
the c h o r d f o r c o l o r . T a t u m , h o w - recently recorded rags play too light
C a r t e r also h a d a l o t to d o w i t h
ever, m a y go out of the k e y but not f o r t h e i d i o m , a n d get a p a t h e t i c
d e v e l o p i n g the so-called " s w e e t " style
out o f the c h o r d . W i t h a l l of h i s r i c k y - t i c k y s o u n d . O t h e r s get a h u -
of alto p l a y i n g , a n d was p a r t i c u l a r l y
s u b t l e t y , T a t u m t r i e d t o s o u n d as morless, p l o d d i n g k i n d of sound.
s k i l l e d i n t h e uses h e m a d e o f v i b r a t o
consonant as possible. A n o t h e r differ- These recorded piano rolls come
H e d i d n ' t have a stock v i b r a t o ; he
ence between T a t u m a n d some m o d - m u c h closer to the p r o p e r s o u n d than
m a d e i t s l o w o r fast i n o r d e r t o set
ern Dianists i s that he d i d n ' t i m n l v a n y recorded revivalist w h o has at-
particular moods. M o s t of the times
anvthine H e olaved evervthingand tempted ragtime p l a y i n g .
o n b a l l a d s , h e ' l l use a fast v i b r a t o f o r
of course he h a d the t e r h n i m i e t o ' Fortunately, the piano rolls avail-
example.
Today more pianists i m p l y able f o r m a k i n g this record included
L o u i s B e l l s o n w a s effective o n t h i s
I t h i n k C a r t e r w a s a great i n n o v a - s o m e o f the greatest rags. It c o u l d be
a l b u m as a t i m e - k e e p e r , b u t t h e y
tor i n m o d e r n alto p l a y i n g a n d he's a r g u e d , f o r e x a m p l e , t h a t Grace and
been e m u l a t e d b y so m a n y p l a y e r s d i d n ' t really need h i m . A r t plays
Beauty a n d Fig Leaf Rag r e p r e s e n t
w h o went i n so m a n y different d i r e c - everybody's part. the greatest s i n g l e finished achieve-
tions. B e n n y a c c o r d i n g l y is taken f o r J u l i a n Adderley ments o f Scott a n d J o p l i n , respec-
Featured In the 6th issue ore:
tively, a n d they were, of course, the
Now save $ 2 d . t. s u z u k i m o s t i m p o r t a n t c o m p o s e r s of r a g -
ASPECTS O F JAPANESE C U L T U R E . A n es- time. U n q u e s t i o n a b l y . Grace and
by subscribing say o n the role Z e n B u d d h i s m has p l a y e d
Beauty i s t h e m o s t m a g n i f i c e n t t h i n g
i n the c u l t u r e of J a p a n .
Scott ever d i d . O n e m u s t be a little
to America's garcia lorca more guarded i n discussing Joplin.
T H E A U D I E N C E . T h e first E n g l i s h t r a n s -
liveliest literary lation of t w o scenes f r o m the
S p a n i s h a u t h o r ' s surrealist p l a y .
great Fig Leaf m a y h a v e b e e n t h e greatest
s i n g l e finished a c h i e v e m e n t o f h i s . I t
magazine pieyre reaches t h e heights to w h i c h i t as-
de mandiargues p i r e s . It is a t h o r o u g h m u s i c a l suc-
CHILDISHNESS. A b r i l l i a n t , erotic story b y cess i n i t s i d i o m . A f t e r 1 9 0 8 , J o p l i n
the author of The Girl Beneath the Lion.
undertook more ambitious efforts
douglas wool! Euphonic Sounds, Magnetic Rag,
$0 THE F L Y M A N , a fine short story about
e v e n Reflections Rag, a n d Scott Jop-
life in the Southwest.

in addition, P O E M S , STORIES A N D ESSAYS


lin's New Ragwhich met with con-
of u n u s u a l interest. E d i t e d b y Barney s i d e r a b l y less s u c c e s s , i n t e r m s o f
Rosset a n d D o n a l d A l l e n . P u b l i s h e d f o u r
times a year; $1 per c o p y . achieving their musical objectives,
t h a n t h e c l a s s i c Fig Leaf.
EVERGREEN REVIEW, Dept. C61 795 Broodway, N.Y. 3 This record has good balance i n
Please enter my subscription beginning with
the current volume No. 6 {Send no money; you t h e J o p l i n s e l e c t i o n s t h e e a r l y Ori-
will be billed later.)
ginal Rags a n d The Entertainer, the
D E I G H T I S S U E S . $6 F O U R I S S U E S . $3.50
(You save $2) (You save 5 0 ) c l a s s i c 1 9 0 8 n u m b e r Fig Leaf a n d t h e
(Canadian and Foreign subscriptions: Eight
issues, $7; Four issues. $4) l a t e ( 1 9 1 2 ) Scott Joplin's New Rag.
T h e balance a m o n g c o m p o s e r s is also
Name good with Joseph L a m b , T o m T u r p i n ,
a n d J a m e s S c o t t r e p r e s e n t e d , as w e l l
Address
as s o m e lesser l i g h t s .
City Z o n e . . . . State..
G u y Waterman

THE JAZZ REVIEW


RECONSIDERATIONS 2

BODY AND SOUL, C o l e m a n Hawkins H a w k i n s o v e r c a m e a l l these ob- The second c h o r u s , h o w e v e r , is i n -


I'M CONFESSING THAT I LOVE YOU. stacles a n d a c h i e v e d a p e r m a n e n t l y f e r i o r t o t h e first. T h e a c c o m p a n i -
L e s t e r Y o u n g and his Quintet great s a x a p h o n e solo, one that con- ment, w h i l e f a i l i n g to p u l l H a w k i n s
t i n u e s to b e b o t h a c o m m e r c i a l a n d d o w n , n e v e r t h e l e s s seems t o affect h i s
Body and Soul w a s r e c o r d e d O c t o - an artistic success. p l a y i n g i n some w a y . H e is g u i l t y of
ber 11, 1939, after C o l e m a n H a w k i n s H e states t h e m e l o d y i n t h e first h o n k i n g i n several bars, a n d little
had r e t u r n e d f r o m an extended stay few b a r s , a n d t h e n proceeds to i m - r h y t h m i c g i m m i c k s creep into certain
i n E u r o p e . It w a s a n d i s a s u r p r i s - provise with such melodic and p a s s a g e s , i n t e r s p e r s e d w i t h t h e flashy
i n g l y successful performance. Surpris- r h y t h m i c inventiveness that he i s , i n arpeggios that H a w k i n s sometimes
ing, because there were several h a n d i - effect, w r i t i n g a n e w t u n e . T h e s h o w y a l l o w s to c o m e out i n the guise of
caps to o v e r c o m e . T o b e g i n w i t h , the arpeggios of the second chorus are improvisation.
tune is h a n d i c a p p e d b y a c h o r d struc- a b s e n t i n t h e first; t h e y a r e u n n e c - T h i s is not to say that there is n o
ture that is too closely allied w i t h the essary. g o o d b l o w i n g here. B u t , without the
m e l o d y . F u r t h e r , the l y r i c s a n d the The b r i d g e , it seems to m e , c o n - g r e a t first c h o r u s w h e r e t e c h n i q u e
m u s i c seem to have become p e r m a - t a i n s t h e finest a n d m o s t i m a g i n a t i v e and substance are fused into a b r i l -
nently i d e n t i f i e d i n the p o p u l a r A m e r - w o r k . It i s t h e w e a k e s t p a r t o f t h e liant w h o l e t h e r e c o r d w o u l d not
i c a n c o n s c i o u s n e s s as " c l a s s i c , " so tune, but H a w k i n s makes of it a soar- c o m m a n d t h e r e s p e c t t h a t i t so r i g h t l y
t h a t a n y a t t e m p t t o get o u t s i d e of t h e ing, gracefully m o v i n g passage. H i s does.
m e l o d y l i n e w o u l d seem to h a v e been intonation a n d p h r a s i n g are faultless;
I'm Confessing is a r e c o r d that
d o o m e d to c o m m e r c i a l f a i l u r e . F i - the i m p r o v i s a t i o n i s n o t i m p o s e d , b u t
deserves a f a r w i d e r r e p u t a t i o n t h a n
n a l l y , there is the u n i n s p i r e d person- flows n a t u r a l l y f r o m a n d i n t o the
t o m y k n o w l e d g e i t has. R e c o r d e d
nel w h o p r o v i d e d t h e a c c o m p a n i m e n t . s u r r o u n d i n g passages.
i n t h e fifties w i t h O s c a r P e t e r s o n ,
Ray B r o w n , J . C . H e a r d , it presents
the p o s t - B a s i e Y o u n g i n a t r u l y i n -
spired performance.
Where H a w k i n s briefly hints his
m e l o d y a n d t h e n proceeds to i m p r o -
v i s e , b e i n g p o s s e s s o r of h i m s e l f a n d
t h e t u n e , Y o u n g seems t o b e c o m e
h i m s e l f p o s s e s s e d by t h e c h o r d s a n d
t h e m e l o d y , so t h a t f r o m b e g i n n i n g
to e n d h e i s i n s i d e t h e m u s i c , a n d
n e v e r steps o u t as H a w k i n s d o e s o n
his s e c o n d c h o r u s . H e s t a y s f a i r l y
close to the m e l o d y i n the first
c h o r u s ; but even so, his p h r a s i n g a n d
s t r i k i n g i n t o n a t i o n convey the m o o d
he b u i l d s u p t o p r e p a r e u s f o r t h e
v e r y m o v i n g last c h o r u s .
T h e r e we are caught up i n jazz
m u s i c so i m b u e d w i t h b l u e s f e e l i n g
we c a n almost hear B i l l i e (or perhaps
she h e a r s L e s t e r w h e n she s i n g s )
and so d e e p l y f e l t . T h r o u g h s o m e
m a g i c of h i s h o r n , the listener is
b r o u g h t i n t o a n d m a d e a p a r t of the
music.
T h e r e is the difference between
these t w o r e c o r d s . H a w k i n s ' p e r f o r m -
ance we a d m i r e i m m e d i a t e l y ; Y o u n g ' s
we a d m i r e o n l y after we have e x p e r i -
enced it m o r e than once. F o r t u n a t e l y ,
it i s s t i l l t h e r e t o be e x p e r i e n c e d .
E d w y B. Lee

DECEMBER 43
Reviews: Books
C o u n t Basie a n d his O r c h e s t r a a n d its direct r a i l c o n n e c t i o n to fluence of Fletcher Henderson at
by R a y m o n d H o r r i c k s . Citadel Press, C h i c a g o a n d S t . L o u i s ! H e gets s e v e r a l stages o f t h e b a n d ' s d e v e l o p -
1957 t h r o u g h the c h a p t e r w i t h o u t ever ment. H e also ignores the second
m e n t i o n i n g the D e p r e s s i o n , P r o h i b i - crisis of Basie's career, w h e n he was
t i o n , or the Pendergast regime. f o r c e d f o r t h e s e c o n d t i m e to c u t
T h e n there is the passage: " H a r r y back to a s m a l l g r o u p b y e c o n o m i c
T h e r e is a g o o d b o o k i n C o u n t E d i s o n , t h e enfant terrible o f t h e sec- pressures, a n d m i g h t have started a
B a s i e , but don't be a l a r m e d ; this tion, a trumpeter whose extrovert, second evolution toward a new b i g
is n o t i t . explosive phrases were completely b a n d style, but instead s u r r e n d e r e d ,
without precedence i n jazz, yet w h o then a n d forever, the m u s i c a l content
" I t is the objective of t h i s b o o k , "
played with such tonal force and un- o f h i s b o o k to o u t s i d e a r r a n g e r s a n d
M r . H o r r i c k s writes i n his preface,
i n h i b i t e d s w i n g that his . . . phrases to repetition a n d b o r e d o m .
" t o p r o v i d e a s u r v e y of the C o u n t
Basie orchestra's twenty years or gave . . . the b a n d a f i l l i p . " One longs A s f o r B a s i e ' s i m a g e as a m a n ,
m o r e of existence, e x a m i n i n g not o n l y t o a d d i n t h e a r c h e s t New Yorker w e get n o t h i n g o f h i s f a m i l y b a c k -
the p e r s o n a l fortunes of the leader m a n n e r , " a n d e a r n e d h i m the endear- g r o u n d (except one technicolor wide-
but also s o m e t h i n g of the band's i n g n i c k n a m e , Sweets." I n a d d i t i o n to screen b a n d a n n a - h e a d e d g l i m p s e of
h i g h l y i n d i v i d u a l s t y l e of p l a y i n g a n d these a n d o t h e r m i s c o n c e p t i o n s , t h e r e Basie's father i n a v e r s i o n of the
of the i m p o r t a n t m u s i c i a n s w h o have are factual inaccuracies i n plenty, gala-concert-at-Carnegie-Hall-fadeout
a i d e d . . . i n m a k i n g s u c h a s t y l e of w h i c h M r . H o r r i c k s covers i n ad- that u n a c c o u n t a b l y also includes the
exnression nossihle " T h e emnhasis of vance by a b r o a d s i d e of cannister d e b u t o f P r o f e s s o r M . W . S t e a r n s as
this sentence betravs the s t r u c t u r e of against academicians i n a r e m a r k a b l y one of the great names of the enter-
tousled p a r a g r a p h of the preface. t a i n m e n t w o r l d ) , n o t h i n g of h i s r e a l
n e 7 o f the V a d e r i n d e e d ' T h e f i r s t T h e m a j o r part of the b o o k , b y psychology, not even the caught-in-
fift^n l*Z> r r t p l l , ^ P T H M "of second v o l u m e , i s t h e s e r i e s o f sketches o f m i d - s t r i d e of t h e N e w Y o r k e r p r o f i l e .
Basie sidemen, m a n y of w h i c h might W e get the k i n d o f p o r t r a i t t h a t i s
^R..W T , ! l r ! " tn.IZf well merit publication i n a bi-weekly f e a t u r e d i n Filmland, o r a Down Beat
, y
t'v.; w Tor. j o u r n a l , t h o u g h perhaps not i n a "Cross Section."
t w e n t y - t o u r p a g e s surve> t h e h i s t o r y m o n t h l y . T h e are neither perceptive A n d last o f a l l t h e w r i t i n g . T h e r e
ot t h e b a n d f r o m K a n s a s L i t y d a y s e n o u g h n o r d e f i n i t i v e e n o u g h to be is a t e n d e n c y i n s o m e A m e r i c a n
to t h e p r e s e n t , f i f t e e n p a g e s e u l o g i z e preserved i n b o o k f o r m , even i f there circles to r e g a r d E n g l i s h m e n of s o u n d
oasie s piano styie, a n a c r o w n i n g i n w
Basie s piano style, a n d c r o w n i n g this e d u c a t i o n as g u a r d i a n s o f t h e p r o s e
jerry-built monument, two h u n d r e d were real need for a p o r t r a i t of, say,
jerry-built monument two h u n d r e d t r a d i t i o n , but j u d g i n g f r o m M r H o r -
pages of Wendell Culley.
p a g e s of s k e t c h p o r t r a i t s ot B a s i e r i c k s ' b l a n d a n d g l u t i n o u s style he
sidemen. A l l this m i g h t have been f o r g i v a b l e
T h i s is not a very ambitious has chosen for m o d e l not A d d i s o n , o r
if M r . H o r r i c k s h a d attacked b o l d l y
scheme for a book about Basie and L a m b , o r H a z l i t t o r even B e e r b o h m ;
either the problems of the o r i g i n s a n d
his b a n d ; i f it were perfectly executed he has c h o s e n ne'rhans a c o l u m n i s t i n
d e v e l o p m e n t of B a s i e ' s b a n d s t y l e , o r
it m i g h t have the quiet c o m i c p o s s i b i l - Woman's Own o r even the leader
the p r o b l e m of a perceptive and
ities of a c o m p o s i t e d e s c r i p t i o n of an w r i t e r of W a u g h ' s h y p o t h e t i c a l Daily
r o u n d e d p o r t r a i t o f B a s i e as a p e r -
Beast.
elephant m a d e b y a team of b l i n d s o n a l i t y i n t h e p s y c h o l o g i c a l sense,
m e n . B u t w i t h i n h i s stated a i m s M r . both important and long-evaded prob- T h e r e is a n a p p e n d e d B a s i e d i s c o g -
Horricks shows some astonishing l e m s . B u t he h a r d l y t o u c h e s t h e r e a l raphy by M r . A l u n M o r g a n , which
gaps, a n d a s u r p r i s i n g n u m b e r of p r o b l e m s of the stylistic development seems competent a n d t h o u g h t f u l l y pre-
p u r e g o o f s . I n c h a p t e r t w o h e at- of the e a r l y b a n d : the o r i g i n s of the s e n t e d , t h o u g h i t m a y be e c c e n t r i c to
tempts a n e x p l a n a t i o n of the f e r t i l i t y jazz of the Southwest, a n d its rela- include in a Basie discography such
o f K a n s a s C i t y as a b r e e d i n g g r o u n d t i o n to N e w O r l e a n s ; t h e s t y l i s t i c n e o - B a s i e r e c o r d s as t h o s e b y t h e
f o r j a z z b y , a p p a r e n t l y , l o o k i n g at a r e l a t i o n between the B l u e D e v i l s , Charlie's Tavern Gang group The
m a p of the U . S. a n d " l i n k i n g u p its Benny Moten's band, and Basie's N a t u r a l Seven. T h e b o o k has no
p o s i t i o n w i t h its e c o n o m i c s t a t u s , " b a n d ; the influence of s m a l l b a n d i n d e x , w h i c h a d d s i n c o n v e n i e n c e to
i n v e n t i n g a city of great prosperity habits-of-thought o n the style of e a r l y its fault of u n r e l i a b i l i t y .
d u e to its i m p o r t a n t r i v e r b o a t traffic B a s i e b a n d s ; the perhaps c r u c i a l i n -
H s i o Wen Shih

THE JAZZ REVIEW


J a Z Z in Print by Nat Hentoff

It Was Ever Thus Dept.: From a Jazz Podium, a German monthly, T h e H o l l y w o o d Reporter? I n the
R a l p h G l e a s o n c o l u m n i n the N o v e m - is e d i t e d b y D i e t e r Z i m m e r l e , Stutt- A u g u s t 2 7 i s s u e of t h a t film t r a d e
b e r , 1 9 4 1 Jazz Information-"Now gart-W, Vogelsangstrasse, 32. A m e r i - journal, a brief interview with D a v i d
i t ' s p e r f e c t l y all r i g h t f o r a m a n t o c a n c o r r e s p o n d e n t is E r i c V o g e l . A t R o s e b e g i n s : " S o v i e t R u s s i a is t a k i n g
c o m p l a i n , b u t to g r o u s e n o . That N e w p o r t , he asked v a r i o u s observers ruthless measures to k e e p a l l j a z z ,
F r a z i e r , a l w a y s g r o u s i n g . I n the b i g w h a t t h e y t h o u g h t o f the I n t e r n a t i o n a l p a r t i c u l a r l y r o c k ' n ' r o l l o u t o f the
b l a c k m o r n i n g it's one t h i n g but r i g h t B a n d . T h e most characteristic answer c o u n t r y , " reports composer-conductor
i n the m i d d l e of the d a y it's e n o u g h came from Prof. M a r s h a l l Stearns: D a v i d Rose, who recently returned
to m a k e one stop r e a d i n g Made- " I c h b i n kein Kritiker, sondern ein f r o m a visit b e h i n d the I r o n C u r -
moiselle. A n d a l l those lovely girls J a z z h i s t o r i k e r . A u s di'esem G r u n d e t a i n . . . . " T h i s is nonsense. W h e n
too. mbchte i c h auch nicht kritisch beur- B e r t C o w l a n of W B A I - F M w e n t to
"And now for Muggsy. Him, teilen Ich w i l l auch keine einzelnen R u s s i a i n Tulv to w o r k o u t a u r o g r a m
F r a z i e r doesn't keep. H i m belong to Bandmitglieder hervorheben oder exchange agreement w i t h R a d i o M o s -
everybody. U g h ! M u g g s y big bands, Vergleiche mit amerikanischen Or- c o w he b r o u g h t at t h e R u s s i a n s ' r e -
yes. U g h ! T h e m he c a n keep. L e e r-tipstprn a n s t p l l p n W m n S i p a b p r l i n a u e s t a s i z a b l e n u m b e r o f i a z z sets
W i l e y he c a n k e e p also. B u t F r a z i e r . hedinirt meinen nersonlichen Fin- a n d p a r t o f t h e final a g r e e m e n t i s f o r
U ^ U U l g L 1I1C111G11 JJtl OVllll^lltill J_.ll!
I keep. H i m I keep where I want h i m h i m to c o n t i n u e s e n d i n g A m e r i c a n
druck kennenlernen wollen dann
r i g h t between the covers of Made- i a 7 7 as w e l l as c l a s s i c a l a l b u m s In
m o c h t p i c h satrpn F l l i n f f t o n h r a u r h t
moiselle." sich n k h t zu f U r c h t e n ! " fact when bp wa tbprp a snprific
S h e l d o n M e y e r , an assistant trade rem.esTfrnm Radio Moscow wVfor
e d i t o r at O x f o r d U n i v e r s i t y P r e s s , Reminds me of a headline in the
has a v a l u a b l e a r t i c l e i n the A u g u s t Boston. Globe several years ago: rtd^ani LT.ZL Otbpr l f r l !'
I I Publishers Weekly. T i t l e d Publish- "Senator Saltonstall Declares For
ing Jazz Books, the piece is l a r g e l y Indian Pudding." ? K i n i l ! 1 P r ' . ! T
b a s e d o n M e y e r ' s c o n t r i b u t i o n to the i n d i c a t e d over the past year a n d a
N e w address f o r the excellent dis-
N e w p o r t panel discussion this year h a l t h o w c o n s i d e r a b l y the K u s s . a n
cographical magazine, Jazz-Statistics:
o n The Editors' Point of View. He a t t i t u d e t o w a r d j a z z h a s beer, c h a n g -
0 . F . B i f a n g s t r a s s e 6, R e i n a c h , B a s e l -
outlines a survey of books on jazz i n g . M o r a l , of c o u r s e , i s d o n t b e l i e v e
land, Switzerland. . . .
published i n this country f r o m 1936 everything you readespecially in a
o n . M e y e r believes " t h e r e is no e a r t h - J a c k G o u l d i n the J u l y 2 8 New trade paper. . . .
ly excuse for anyone b r i n g i n g out York Times, r e v i e w i n g a Stars of Jazz A beautifully designed, and I'm
a h i s t o r y of jazz o r a jazz reference TV show that i n c l u d e d jazz-and- told by J o h n L e w i s , excellently writ-
b o o k i n the next few y e a r s . " S t r a n g e p o e t r y w i t h K e n n e t h P a t c h e n a n d the ten G e r m a n j a z z m a g a z i n e i s Der
c o m m e n t s i n c e t h e r e i s as vet n o C h a m b e r Jazz Sextet conducted by Drummer. For information, write
t h o r o u g h l y first-rate i a z z h i s t o r y a n d Allyn Ferguson: " . . . there was a Horst Lippmann, Hotel Continental,
c e r t a i n l y t h e Encyclopedia of Jazz, f r a m e d p i c t u r e of B a c h o n the r i g h t - Frankfurt am M a i n
d e s n i t e a l l t h e h e l n i t ' s b e e n is f a r h a n d side of the screen a n d a m a t c h -
f r o m o D t i m u m I ' d suggest M r ' M e v e r i n g f r a m e of M r . F e r g u s o n o n the I n Les Arts, P a r i s , the issue dated
m i g h t w a n t t o ' r e c o n s i d e r at least t h e left-hand side. M r . T r o u p later said June 25-July 1, Andre Hodeir has
l a s t p a r t o f h i s d i c t u m w h e n h e sees that i f B a c h were to t u r n o v e r i n h i s two articles. O n e deplores the decline
A l b e r t M c C a r t h y ' s Who's Who, due g r a v e , i t w o u l d be to h e a r the C h a m - of Duke Ellington; the other says
n o s s i h l v i n 1 9 5 9 M e v e r is rijyht h o w ber Jazz Sextet more clearly. O n e Miles Davis and G i l Evans can take
ever i n that " m a n v subjects w h i c h w o u l d have thought that television
have h a r d l y been touched c r y out for the place left by Ellington and his
had enough rating troubles without
musicians. We hope to run a trans-
a t t p n l i o n T b p r p nppd tn lip hiocrra u n d e r t a k i n g to p o l l t h e d e a d . "
nhiesofnrnZpJ 1 1 1 S lation of the Ellington article. In
work r ^ m a i n ^ r ' N e w address for B o b Koester's D e l - the A u g u s t 3 S a n F r a n c i s c o Chronicle,
^ J L a^d i t , I I H a L v t i ^ mar Records, Blue Note Record Shop Ralph Gleason reviewing Duke's new
Z,A P o f ! , , ,?r^ l n l d i t a n d Jazz Report Monthly is 4 2 E a s t Columbia version of Black, Brown
made " C h i c a g o Avenue, Chicago 11, Illinois. and Beige with M a h a l i a Jackson, dis-

DECEMBER 45
agrees and writes of Duke's "con-
tinued creativeness," calling Hodeir
myopic on the subject and this
w r i t e r p e t u l a n t b e c a u s e of a r e f e r e n c e
i n a Harper's a r t i c l e to D u k e ' s s h o w -
biz performance at a p r e v i o u s brace
o f c o n c e r t s at t h e S t r a t f o r d , O n t a r i o ,
Shakespearean Festival.

In between the two m a y lie a m o r e


accurate appraisal. Duke can still
createwhen he has the t i m e . Too
o f t e n these d a y s , t h e b a n d m e n play
new w o r k s i n p u b l i c w i t h one or two
or even no rehearsals, a n d the w o r k s
t h e m s e l v e s h a v e b e e n so h a s t i l y w r i t -
ten that they are often o n l y sketches.
And if Duke's really in a hurry, he
just lets Paul Gonsalves and Sam
Woodyard loose.

Another good j o u r n a l for disco-


grapherswhich also has pungent,
controversial record reviews is
Godchild's Jazz Bulletin, 172/4 Ark-
w r i g h t Street, N o t t i n g h a m , E n g l a n d .
Peter R u s s e l l is the editor. Russell
Gil Evans Don H u n s t e i n , c o u r t e s y of C o l u m b i a R e c o r d s
disagrees with Hodeir. " G i l Evans
. . . is not of E l l i n g t o n ' s stature
either as composer or arranger."
W i t h a l l respect to G i l a n d H o d e i r ,
Andre is building a case for Gil
that not even Gil's staunchest ad-
mirers w o u l d subscribe to.
No one has time to hear every
new disc as it appears. For There, are four E n g l i s h pop music
w e e k l i e s . T w o T h e New Musical Ex
the kind of reliable help you
press (143,259) a n d The Melody
need to make up your own Maker (over 114,000) have circula-
mind before buying, read... tions f a r i n advance of any s i m i l a r
A m e r i c a n p u b l i c a t i o n . T h e others are
Record Mirror (for which Benny
G r e e n writes r e c o r d reviews) a n d the
n e w e s t , Disc ( o f w h i c h T o n y H a l l i s
The American ^ t h e m o d e r n j a z z r e v i e w e r ) . T h e s e last
two are also d o i n g well b u t one

Record Guide w o n d e r s a b o u t Disc's editor-in-chief


w h e n h e passes m a t e r i a l l i k e t h i s ex
cerpt f r o m one M a u r i c e Neale's article
THE AMERICAN TAPE GUIDE o n Satchmo i n the A u g u s t 23 i s s u e :

" T h e is a s t o r y t o l d about B i x
truly encyclopedic i n its coverage of the month's releases B e i d e r b e c k e . . . t h e n at t h e h e i g h t
e for two dozen years the collector's most trusted counselor of his short, p y r o t e c h n i c career. B i x
the oldest independent journal of opinion i n the field was l e a d i n g the p a r a d e a n d r e a l l y go-
a n d more than just r e v i e w s - c o m p a r i s o n s ! i n g great g u n s i n the k n o w l e d g e that
not o n l y he but e v e r y o n e k n e w that
he was the greatest t r u m p e t p l a y e r
Spedml I n ^ i ^ r y Oger To )Ye Remder. i n t h e w o r l d . T h e p a r a d e h a d to m e e t
a n o t h e r p r o c e s s i o n at a r e n d e z v o u s
at t h e j u n c t i o n o f t h e m a i n street
Please enter my trial subscription for eight months. I enclose |2p Bill me
where they w o u l d j o i n forces and
m a r c h o n together. B i x was h i t t i n g
Name
the h i g h notes, s w i n g i n g f r o m strength
to s t r e n g t h , w h e n the first notes of
Address '.
t h e t r u m p e t p l a y e r c a m e to h i m f r o m
the distant p a r a d e f a i n t l v at first
City Zone State
but then quite clearly. T h e people
w h o tell this story say that when B i x
H P T 0. lox 319 . . . l e a l , city Stettet, He* Verfc V.
first h e a r d t h e n e w t r u m p e t , h e w e n t

46 THE JAZZ REVIEW


pale. H e stopped p l a y i n g . H e listened tators ( i n l i e u of p r i n t e d p r o g r a m s Roots and the Mainstream: The
to t h e m u s i c , a n d t h e y s a y t h a t B i x w h i c h w o u l d , of course, r e q u i r e a d - following itemcontributed by M a r -
j u s t p u t d o w n h i s h o r n a n d b e g a n to vance p l a n n i n g ) disk jockeys whose shall Stearnsis printed without
c r y . The new trumpeter who had de- a n n o t a t i o n u s u a l l y centers on their change f r o m the M a y 2 2 , 1958 e d i -
throned Bix, was a 19-year-old youth o w n r a d i o p r o g r a m s . T h e y are con- t i o n of the S o u t h H a v e n , M i c h i g a n ,
called Louis Armstrong." (Italics are stantly w i t n e s s i n g the p r e s e n t a t i o n of Tribune: "The South Haven Music
M r . Neale's). p l a q u e s to m u s i c i a n s w h o h a v e w o n S t u d y C l u b m e t at t h e h o m e o f M r s .
some magazine's popularity poll (this L y l e W e e d on M o n d a y evening. M a y
T h e r e is m o r e i n M r . N e a l e ' s a r t i c l e
was c a r r i e d to a h e i g h t of a s i n i n i t y 19, w i t h M r s . W e e d p r e s i d i n g over
to shatter the h i s t o r i c a l firmament,
at t h e N e w Y o r k J a z z F e s t i v a l o n the business session. . . . M r s . F r e d
but I w i l l quote only one m o r e i n -
R a n d a l l s I s l a n d last s u m m e r , w h e n S t u c k u m , p r o g r a m c h a i r m a n f o r the
s i g h t : " H e h a d the r a c i a l g e n i u s o f
each p e r f o r m i n g g r o u p was presented e v e n i n g , ' presented 'Our American
b e i n g a b l e t o detect quarter notes,
w i t h a t r o p h y g i v e n i n the n a m e of a Jazz a n d It's (sic) Influence,' assisted
something that evades the most
brewery or a w h i s k y bottler) bv several members Mrs' Nelson
talented of E u r o p e a n or, i n d e e d , any
B r e d i e n s t e i n gave a 'resume of the
white m u s i c i a n . "
I n t h e O c t o b e r 4, N e w Y o r k World- h i s t o r y o f J a z z , o f w h i c h t h e r e a re
Eskimos? Telegram and Sun m a g a z i n e s e c t i o n , three types, she s a i d . T h e s e i n c l u d e
W h i l e o n the subject of b y l i n e s to Albert M . Colegrave interviewd Pops 'sweet' 'svmohonic' and ' h o t ' of
trust, S a m G o o d y t h e S a m G o o d y Foster a n d L o u i s A r m s t r o n g . " Q : Was w h i c h ' boogie-woogie is a samnle
i s p u r p o r t e d l y the a u t h o r o f t h e there race segregation a m o n g the m u - P JpCo rUtlTg P Tjperi os V a
V C v i iiw
wi ilni w
Wode
S d n ii uo ini p
p c cpir ii lnl
c o l u m n , Waxing Mellow, in Dude s i c i a n s i n N e w O r l e a n s i n the o l d thp i a z z field she s a i d Mrs Richard
m a g a z i n e . I ' m i n d e b t e d to T u p p e r days? P O P S : I played around New R a r n e n nlave'd a n i a n o s o l o ' t o illus
S a u s s y o f T h e S c h o o l of J a z z f o r O r l e a n s i n m i x e d b a n d s , f o r y e a r s . It ;e sLgh\7de, by
' .e boogie m

p o i n t i n g out this h e l p f u l s e c t i o n : wasn't l i k e t o d a y , like it is i n N e w


Bernard Whkefiel'd.
" . . . Most amateurs t h i n k jazz comes Orleans now Q : W h a t do you
mean, 'like New Orleans now?' " M r s . B r e i d e r n s t e i n g a v e as a v o c a l
u n d e r j u s t one h e a d i n g , a n d that's
L O U I S : Since 1954, i n N e w Orleans, s o l o , Stardust, by Hoagy Carmichael,
e i t h e r the C h a r l i e P a r k e r o r D i x i e -
they don't want white a n d N e g r o m u - accompanied by M r s . Barden.
l a n d style. B u t they c a n t h i n k a g a i n .
Since jazz p r i m a r i l y means that y o u sicians p l a y i n g together. . . . I don't " M r s . K r u z e l p l a y e d Kitten on the
get t h e s a m e b a s i c m e l o d y , b u t i t r u n into m u c h trouble w i t h segrega- Keys, by Confreys and Bumble
c o m e s o u t d i f f e r e n t l y a c c o r d i n g to t i o n , 'cause I don't go where I ' m not Boogie, b y J a c k N i n a , as p i a n o s o l o s
who plays it, then you can understand wanted. A n d please don't take Mrs. Gertrude Cleveland sang: He's
w h y it's d i v i d e d into three different t h i s o u t , I ' m g o i n g to t e l l t h i s s t r a i g h t Got the Whole World in His Hands,
types. S w i n g i n g jazz, for instance. I d o n ' t g o to N e w O r l e a n s . . . n o adapted b y Geoff L o v e , a c c o m p a n i e d
T h a t ' s foxtrots a n d d a n c i n g beats, more." . by M r s . L e o n Burge.
but because it's a fast t e m p o , it's still
j a z z , a l t h o u g h i t ' s n o t to be c o n f u s e d
w i t h o t h e r fast t y p e s o f d a n c e m u s i c ,
l i k e s o u t h of the b o r d e r m a m b o s a n d
rhumbas and cha-cha's The
s e c o n u iviiiu 01 j a z z i s u i x i e i d i i u , d i m
t h i s is c l o s e r to t h e uoi ri ig gi ii indai l m
u 1 L meeaanniinnggss
o f ia77 t h a n a n v t h i n o - pise a c o m b i m
t i o n of o l d N e g r o s p i r i t u a l s a n d w o r k
- B Y - J E R R Y SSI L V E R M A N ^dk IHms
songs so to s p e a k
A superb collection of 110 American Folk Blues
To whom?
most appearing in print for the first time arranged
R a l p h G l e a s o n i n the S e p t e m b e r
for voice, piano and guitar. Musicological considera-
tions of the art form; biographical sketches of men
3 0 San Francisco Chronicle: "There like Blind Lemon Jefferson, Leadbelly and Josh White.
is, i n this country (and especially Bibliography and discography; and an invaluable guitar
a m o n g the j a z z m u s i c i o n s ) a t e n d - chord diagram chart. 308 pages 8Va"xl0 /4" 3

e n c y to b e u t t e r l y d i s a f f i l i a t e d f r o m Illustrated Probable Price $6.95


a n y political problem. M o s t jazz m u - See your local bookseller, or write direct:

[JUTES
s i c i a n s , whatever they m a y say o r do M ,{<c,<7/a>, ^ow/iawj 60 Fifth Ave., New York 11, N
i n p r i v a t e , act as t h o u g h t h e y b e l o n g
to a d i s f r a n c h i s e d class of citizens
with no responsibilities and no
duties." . . . . I.
First-rate, unusually angry piece by
J o h n S. W i l s o n o n the suffering jazz
concert a u d i e n c e i n the S u n d a y , Sep-
t e m b e r 2 8 New York Times. He
sung and ployed by J E R R Y SILVERMAN
covers a m o n g other outrages the w a y
A full-range recording of 12 Folk Blues including Dar-
record companies have taken over M, Trouble in Mind. Talking Dust Bowl and Alberta!
at j a z z " f e s t i v a l s . " " P r o g r a m m i n g i n The first in a series of records illustrating Jerry's NEW
g e n e r a l , " W i l s o n o b s e r v e s , " s e e m s to book. A-V 101 1 2 " LP $4.98
be b e y o n d the a b i l i t y o r c o m p r e h e n - See your local record dealer, or write direct:
s i o n of m a n y of those w h o p r o d u c e Audio-Vide. y 4 5 W. 49th St., New York 19, N.Y.
jazz concerts. . . Jazz audiences are Productions Inc.
r e q u i r e d to e n d u r e as p r o g r a m a n n o -

DECEMBER
T h e large, $1 silver anniversary D u k e E l l i n g t o n does not u s u a l l y
i s s u e o f Esquire h a d several jazz speak i n p u b l i c on n o n - m u s i c a l sub-
G BAWD S M K f i .
articles. A superficial (but possibly jects. F o r that m a t t e r , he h a r d l y says
h e l p f u l to the u n s o p h i s t i c a t e d ) Intro anything about anything i n public.
duction to the Classics for Hipsters Before leaving for E u r o p e i n early
b y G e o r g e S h e a r i n g . N o t t h e best October, however, he t o l d a press con-
balanced list, but no real disasters on f e r e n c e h e l d as a p r e l u d e t o N A A C P ' s
it T h e quality of Esquire's regu- F u n d D i n n e r ( a c c o r d i n g t o t h e Am-
l a r j a z z c o l u m n , The Slipped Disc i s sterdam News) : " T h e N e g r o h a s suf-
L. Grossman markedly improved with Harold f e r e d to l o n g . T h e U n i t e d States
w. r H a y e s w r i t i n g i t . T h i s issue he is i n - d o e s n ' t w a n t t o h a v e the r e s p o n s i b i l i t y
volved with an analysis of B i l l H a r r i s . of k e e p i n g Negroes on parole for 100
O l i v e r or A r m s t r o n g . . . K e n t o n or T u r k A n d J e a n S t e i n went to K a n s a s years after e m a n c i p a t i o n . W e were
M u r p h y ? It's a r a r e jazz f a n who hasn't C i t y to talk to J a y M c S h a n n , T u t t y freed 95 years ago a n d are still on
taken sides. A n d i n this e x c i t i n g book by a
C l a r k i n , and Charlie Parker's mother. parole." . . .
record-collecting college professor and a jazz
T h e a r t i c l e i s t i t l e d Why They Called
The Critics as Psychiatrist, 1: J o h n
Him "Yardbird", but covers more
W i l s o n i n T h e A u g u s t 1 7 NY Times,
O n the other h a n d , i f you've got the cour- than that. N o t h i n g new, but M i s s
a review of S o n n y R o l l i n s ' Freedom
S t e i n ' s d a t a c l a r i f i e s a n d c o n f i r m s the
wa nt to ee S ^ t o r T t o * w
e 0f y0
S
U
about"
p r e v i o u s c o n s e n s u s a b o u t these p a r t s Suite: " . . . M r . R o l l i n s ' p l a y i n g is
men like D i z z y Gillespie, S t a n K e n t o n ,
C h a r l i e P a r k e r et a l . of his life. inclined to be harsh, cold and de-
A n d on the slight possibility that you are terminedly unattractive . . . " (Italics
not p a r t i a l to either camp, we must admit . . . F i r s t - r a t e essay b y p i a n i s t B i l l y
mine). Using this same presump-
T a y l o r , The 'Lost Generation of Jazz',
tuous approach, a musician might
about the o l d e r m e n b e i n g over-
well accuse a critic from time to
l o o k e d . " . . . t o d a y t o o m a n y o f these
) New Y o r k University Press m e n m u s t s c r o u n g e a r o u n d f o r week- time of being determinedly obtuse.
ME" Washington Square, N . Y . 3 e n d dates a n d h o p e s f o r o c c a s i o n a l John Wilson, reviewing Ben Web-
r e c o r d i n g dates w i t h N o r m a n G r a n z s t e r ' s Soulville i n the O c t o b e r High
or some independent recording com- Fidelity: " H e is also capable of v e r y
p a n y w h i c h still appreciates what they p r e t t y , r o m a n t i c p l a y i n g , as h e s h o w s
a r e p l a y i n g . A n d t h e y can p l a y , r i g h t o n s e v e r a l b a l l a d s , b u t i t seems a
n o w , w i t h a l l the p o w e r a n d a u t h o r i t y little r i d i c u l o u s to c a l l h i s b a l l a d per-
of great m u s i c i a n s , i f a n y o n e w i l l formances jazz when they more
b o t h e r to l i s t e n The Ben Websters c l o s e l y p a r a l l e l w h a t m i g h t be d o n e
a n d J o Joneses and Buck Claytons with them by a skilled and sensitive
r e m a i n as s p o n t a n e o u s as e v e r . T h e y supper club singer."
s w i n g n o w m o r e t h a n ever w h e n they
have the c h a n c e . " Like who?

us
I f y o u c a n find a b a c k c o p y , t h e de- T h e Jazz L o b b y , a year-old organi-
f u n c t Duke h a d a n a r t i c l e b y B i l l y zation of Westchester jazz fans, holds
T a y l o r i n its A u g u s t , 1957 issue, r e g u l a r meetings a n d even publishes
Negroes Don't Know Anything About a regular bulletin. The Jazz L o b b y ,
Jazz, that's w o r t h reprinting. He P . O . B o x 731, N e w Rochelle, N e w
old a n d new books means the N e g r o b o u r g e o i s i e a u d i - York. . . .
ence, not N e g r o m u s i c i a n s , a n d de-
on I f y o u a r e f o l l o w i n g the s u b j e c t ,
p l o r e s t h e f a c t t h a t t h e r e a r e so f e w
N e g r o w r i t e r s o n j a z z . " W h a t n e e d s to V . S . P r i t c h e t t ' s The Beat Generation
Folklore
be d o n e r i g h t n o w , " w r o t e B i l l y , " i s t o i s w o r t h r e a d i n g i n the g e n e r a l l y
Folkmusic provocative American Literature
i n s t i l l i n m o r e N e g r o e s a sense o f
Folkdance Number ( S e p t e m b e r 6) of the New
p r i d e i n the a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s of t h e i r
Blues o w n m u s i c . " " W h e n I was g r o w i n g Statesman. S a m e issue has a s u r p r i s -
Jazz u p , " L u c k e y R o b e r t s s a i d to t h i s i n g l y k i n d r e v i e w of A Handbook of
w r i t e r recently, " m o s t m i d d l e class Jazz b y F r a n c i s N e w t o n
Jazz Magazine
Negro homes wouldn't allow the F r o m D a v i d D a i c h e s ' Literary Let-
b l u e s t o be p l a y e d i n t h e m . " . . . ter from England i n the September 7
many of them impossible to ob-
T h e v e r y best m a g a z i n e o n f o l k Sunday Times Book Review: "Among
tain elsewhere. S e n d f o r o u r new
m u s i c , e s p e c i a l l y r e c o r d i n g s , I ' v e seen university students, however, what-
catalogue now being prepared. i n E n g l i s h i s Recorded Folk Music, e v e r t h e i r s o c i a l o r i g i n , t h e r e seems
published six times a year by Collet's to b e a m o r e g e n e r a l i n t e r e s t i n a n d
H o l d i n g s L t d . , 44-45 M u s e u m Street, excitement about things A m e r i c a n .
A l l books and records reviewed L o n d o n W . C . 1. T h e e d i t o r i s A . L . T h e y , too, though r e a d i n g F a u l k n e r
o r advertised i n the Jazz Review L l o y d . F i r s t issue was J a n u a r y - F e b r u - as ' l i t e r a t u r e , ' a r e l i a b l e t o r e a d a n y
a r y , 1 9 5 8 . I ' v e seen t h e first f o u r a n d modern American fiction they c a n
available for m a i l order.
r e c o m m e n d a l l of t h e m . E r i c H o b s - find, h o w e v e r m u c h t h e y m a y l a u g h
b a w n ( w h o w r i t e s o n j a z z as F r a n c i s at its l i t e r a r y p r e t e n s i o n s , f o r the s a k e
N e w t o n i n t h e New Statesman and of the l o c a l c o l o r . ( T h e cause of this
The FOLKLORE CENTER is p a r t l y , I t h i n k , the i m m e n s e i n t e r -
Nation) h a s a p i e c e , Jazz and Folk
110 M a c D o u g a l St. GR 3-7590 est i n a n d k n o w l e d g e of modern
Music i n the M a r c h - A p r i l n u m b e r a n d
N . Y . C . 12, N . Y . O p e n 3-11 P.M. t h e r e ' s a n a r t i c l e o n Cante Jondo in A m e r i c a n jazz i n British universities
July-August today.)" . . .

48 THE J A Z Z R E V I E W
Credit D o n Nelsen of the New Y o r k attentive audience. If the stage has a George W e i n reviewing the re-
Sunday News for going up to the good enough sound, I enjoy it very viewers of the Newport Festival i n his
Offbeat at Broadway and 129th St. much, usually. I didn't happen to en- c o l u m n i n the Boston Sunday Herald:
to review Stuff S m i t h . Stuff had been joy playing at the Chinese restaurant " I still saw several articles with a
there for weeks. N o reviews i n Down too much of the time because I kept negative attitude and as of yet no one
Beat or Metronome smelling sweet and sour pork between has captured the d r a m a that unfolds
phrases." . . . in the presenting of each i n d i v i d u a l
In his regular column, The Lively
artist on stage."
Arts, i n the August 19 Berkshire A s k e d about influences, Lee s a i d :
Eagle, M i l t o n Bass wrote that " J a z z "I'm trying to influence myself, Louella Parsons is the girl for
seems at an impase right now, a though, right now, and I'm having Newport.
worrisome thing that can't even sing quite a bit of t r o u b l e . " . . .
the blues i n the night. C o o l jazz is
K o n i t z on C h a r l i e P a r k e r : " . . . at
now so frigidly r i g i d that it's prac-
one time, Charlie Parker played
tically impossible to get it out of the
tray. . . . W h e n y o u listen to a
exactly like Lester Y o u n g . H e didn't
admit this, but I know people that
FORM
modern group nowadays, y o u hear
heard h i m play that way. . . I was on (Continued from Page 15)
little that is new or unexpected." A n d
tour with Charlie once and I was
nowhere i n this brave uninformed i n -
warming up i n the dressing r o o m pie staccato phrases or direct refer-
dictment d i d Bass name a single
I happened to be playing one of ences to melody may c o m e ; l o n g lines
name. . . .
Lester's choruses and B i r d came may be interspersed with phrases of
T h e October Nugget has an article noodling into the r o o m and said, one or two bars. But I think that if
on Thelonious Monk by Charles ' H e y , you ever heard this o n e ? ' and one "listens w h o l e " such cross-refer-
Edward Smith. Title (no fault of he played Shoeshine Swing about ences will appear as echos and predic-
Smith) is The Mad Monk, a cri- twice as fast as the record. H e knew tions of what has happened and what
all that . . . " will happen i n a total structure, and
terion of the hipness of Nugget's
editors. It's built mostly from pre- A n d questioner Katz on B r u b e c k : not necessarily lacks of a cohesive
" I noticed as far as audience response development.
vious material; no evidence that
M o n k was interviewed. S m i t h i n a goes that they respond every time he Rollins has at least laid excellent
plays the alma mater. H e manages to basis for the structure of extended
rare and commendable actioncites
get the alma mater of any particular solos in the modern i d i o m and one
all his research sources. He always
school i n when the audience is begin- which seems a natural perception on
does, even in liners.
ning to d r a g , you know . . . this is how to take advantage of some of the
Max Jones interviewed Kenny k i n d of a t r i c k . " resources at h a n d .
Clarke i n the September 6 Melody F r o m D o r o t h y Kilgallen's column [ N o t e : T h i s essay is included i n Just
Maker: " T o d a y too many d r u m m e r s , " in the New Y o r k Journal-American: Jazz II, edited by Sinclair T r a i l l and
said C l a r k e , " u s e a lot of technique "Modern music connoisseurs will Gerald Lascelles, published by Peter
to disguise the fact that they're not want to latch onto The Weary Blues Davies L t d . , L o n d o n , 1958, and is
swinging as thev should If thev were with Langston Hughes. D r . L e o n a r d used by permission. It should be sup-
swinging, they wouldn't play that busy Feather supervised the poetry-with- plemented by Gunther Schuller's
way. C l a r k gave S i d Catlett as his jazz production in addition to writing essay on Sonny Rollins and " R e c o n -
conception of the ideal d r u m m e r . some of the melodies." siderations 1" i n the October issue of
T h e S e p t e m b e r / O c t o b e r Record Re Newport g i v i n g out degrees now? The Jazz Review.]
search has a fascinating article on
Edison and the Diamond Disc by
A n g u s Joss. It first appeared i n The
American Record Guide. There's also JA
a jazz survey of the E d i s o n catalogue.
A C/UGtieTly of tvncTicon itiusic ZZ
T h e S p r i n g , 1958 edition of North-
west Review, published three times a The first serious magazine devoted to America's own music and all its
year by the Student Publications
development, including traditional, mainstream and modern.
B o a r d of the University of Oregon at
Eugene, Oregon has a taped conversa-
Articles and reviews by leading critics, writers and sociologists. The first
tion with Dave Bruebeck and Lee
issue includes A Letter from London, A . J . McCarthy; A Look at the
K o n i t z . (First reference to the fea-
ture I saw was i n a R a l p h Gleason Critics, George Frazier; Big Bill's Last Session, Studs Terkel; and others.
column). The interrogators were
Steven K a t z , graduate student i n E n g -
Full Jazz LP listing of new releases each quarter.
lish, and Charles Ruff, instructor i n
literature. Send me a Charter Subscription to JAZZ, 4 issues for $3., starting Oct. '58.
Katz asked K o n i t z whether he pre-
ferred a small club setting like the Name
Confucius i n New Y o r k to the com-
mercial context of the large package Street
show with which he was playing that
night in Oregon. " W e l l , really it all
depends on how the sound is where
City Zone State
I'm playing. I like to play at this k i n d JAZZ, 2110 Haste Street, Berkeley 4, California Editor Ralph J. Gleason
of a thing generally, because it is an

DECEMBER 49
Contributors:

Julian " C a n n o n b a l l " Adderley is a D a n c e r - c r i t i c Roger Pryor Dodge's Edwy B. Lee, a s t u d e n t o f A m e r i c a n


m e m b e r of M i l e s D a v i s ' u n i t after "Harpsichords and Jazz T r u m p e t s " , h i s t o r y a n d E n g l i s h l i t e r a t u r e , is a
h a v i n g led his o w n g r o u p w i t h his p u b l i s h e d i n 1 9 3 4 i n Hound and Horn, p a i n t e r c u r r e n t l y at w o r k o n t h e s c r i p t
b r o t h e r , N a t . P r i o r to c o m i n g to N e w w a s o n e of t h e e a r l i e s t a n a l y t i c a l of a c a r t o o n f e a t u r e film, a n d a f t e r
Y o r k , Adderley taught and played in essays on jazz p u b l i s h e d i n A m e r - years of p e r f o r m i n g J o p l i n , M o r t o n ,
Florida. i c a . H e a l s o c o n t r i b u t e d a fine s t u d y Pete J o h n s o n and N a t Cole, studied
" C o n s i d e r the C r i t i c s " to Jazzmen, with John Mehegan.
a n d has been w r i t i n g on jazz ever
since.

Mimi Clar i s 2 3 , h a s s t u d i e d c l a s s i -
cal and jazz piano, and majored in
m u s i c at the U n i v e r s i t y o f C a l i f o r n i a Frank Driggs has been d o i n g re- Studs Terkel reviews jazz and folk
at L o s A n g e l e s . S h e w a s g r a d u a t e d search on jazz i n the southwest a n d m u s i c a n d b o o k s f o r the Chicago
w i t h honors. She was reviewer for w i l l c o n t r i b u t e a chapter on that area Sun-Times; is h e a r d on W F M T - F M ,
t h e Los Angeles Times a n d w o r k e d to a f o r t h c o m i n g h i s t o r y of j a z z c o - C h i c a g o ; and recently played a lead-
as a r e s e a r c h a s s i s t a n t o n W a y l a n d edited by A l b e r t M c C a r t h y and Nat i n g r o l e i n The View from the Bridge.
D. Hand's forthcoming Dictionary H e n t o f f t o be p u b l i s h e d b y R i n e h a r t
of American Beliefs and Supersti- and by Cassell.
tions. M i s s C l a r ' s a n a l y s i s o f E r r o l l
G a r n e r w i l l appear i n a f o r t h c o m i n g
issue.

Larry Gushee, currently studying


m u s i c at Y a l e , i s a s a x o p h o n i s t a n d
l o n g - t i m e student of j a z z .
B a s s i s t Bill Crow h a s w o r k e d w i t h
G e r r y M u l l i g a n , Stan Getz, Claude
T h o r n h i l l , a n d others. Guy Waterman is 2 6 , h a s w o r k e d
as a p r o f e s s i o n a l p i a n i s t a n d w r o t e
Andre Hodeir i s the a u t h o r o f Jazz:
two articles on ragtime for The
Its Evolution and Essence (Grove
Record Changer. H e is an economist
P r e s s ) , a n i m p o r t a n t b o o k of m u s i c a l
w i t h t h e C h a m b e r of C o m m e r c e o f
analysis. H e is a j a z z c o m p o s e r a n d
the U n i t e d States.
a r r a n g e r ; heads his o w n experimen-
Glenn Coulter h a s w r i t t e n o n j a z z f o r t a l u n i t i n P a r i s ; h a s a p p e a r e d at
i.e., The Cambridge Review a n d his several E u r o p e a n jazz festivals; and
s t u d y o f B i l l i e H o l i d a y w i l l be p a r t o f h i s Around The Blues w a s p e r f o r m e d
a forthcoming anthology on jazz for b y the M o d e r n J a z z Q u a r t e t a n d the
the O x f o r d U n i v e r s i t y press edited M o n t e r e y F e s t i v a l S y m p h o n y at t h i s
by Martin Williams. y e a r ' s first M o n t e r e y J a z z F e s t i v a l .
H o d e i r h a s w o r k e d as a p r o f e s s i o n a l
m u s i c i a n ; w a s t r a i n e d at t h e P a r i s P i a n i s t Dick Wellstood (who should
C o n s e r v a t o r y of M u s i c ; a n d has done be a m e m b e r o f the N e w Y o r k b a r
c o n s i d e r a b l e w r i t i n g f o r F r e n c h films. b y the t i m e this is i n p r i n t ) m a d e
his professional debut w i t h B o b W i l -
Stanley Dance h a s b e e n w r i t i n g a b o u t ber i n 1946, has w o r k e d w i t h J i m m y
jazz ( a n d s u p e r v i s i n g its r e c o r d i n g ) Archey, R o y Eldridge, gigged with
i n a n d f r o m B r i t a i n since the 'thirties. S i d n e y Bechet, R e x Stewart, R e d A l l e n
H i s " L i g h t l y and P o l i t e l y " appears Hsio Wen Shih, a n a r c h i t e c t a n d ex- a n d m a n y others. H e is a long-time
monthly in The Jazz Journal pert i n acoustics, is a student of the s t u d e n t o f " s t r i d e " p i a n o i n a l l its
(London). music of m a n y cultures. manifestations.

50 THE JAZZ REVIEW


E x c i t i n g offer to n e w m e m b e r s
TOMMY DORSEY of f h e R C A V I C T O R
POPULAR ALBUM CLUB
T h e great D o r s e y group of the
Y E S INDEED!
late 1930s and early 40s p l a y i n g
TOMMY
DORSEY t h e i r biggest h i t s . F e a t u r i n g

A 5-ALBUM
AND HIS Frank Sinatra, B u n n y Berigan,
ORCHESTRA
Jo Stafford w i t h T h e P i e d P i p e r s .
12 selections, i n c l u d i n g Marie,

SET OF SWING
Star Dust, I'll Never Smile Again,
Song of India, Opus No. 1.

********
GLENN MILLER
M i l l e r ' s best, i n c l u d i n g Moon
light Serenade, In the Mood, Tux
CLASSICS
edo Junction, String of Pearls,
American Patrol, Little Brown

for only $ ^ 9 8
Jug, St. Louis Blues, Pennsylvania
6-5000, (I've Got a Gal in) Kala- RETAIL V A L U E A S
mazoo, Boulder Bluff, Farewell HIGH A S $19.90
Blues, King Porter Stomp.

. . . if you agree to buy five albums from the Club during the

BENNY GOODMAN
next twelve months from at least 100 to be made available
rpms exciting new plan, under the direction of the Book-of-the-
1 M o n t h C l u b , enables y o u to have o n tap a variety o f popular
T h e K i n g , his band and Quartet, m u s i c f o r f a m i l y f u n a n d happier parties . . . a n d at a n i m m e n s e
at t h e i r swinging best i n 11 s a v i n g . M o r e o v e r , once a n d f o r a l l , i t takes b e w i l d e r m e n t o u t o f
masterpieces; w i t h K r u p a , Hamp building such a well-balanced collection. You pay far less for
t o n , etc. Sing Sing Sing, One
albums this way than i f y o u b u y them haphazardly. F o r example,
o'Clock Jump, And the Angels
t h e e x t r a o r d i n a r y i n t r o d u c t o r y offer d e s c r i b e d a b o v e c a n r e p r e s e n t
Sing, Stompin' at the Savoy, King
a n a p p r o x i m a t e 33H% saving i n your first year of membership.
Porters Stomp, Bugle Call Rag,
etc. T h e o r i g i n a l versions. Thereafter you can continue to save up to 3 3 V b % . A f t e r b u y i n g
t h e five a l b u m s c a l l e d f o r i n t h i s offer, y o u w i l l r e c e i v e a f r e e 1 2 - i n c h
33'A R . P . M . a l b u m , w i t h a n a t i o n a l l y a d v e r t i s e d p r i c e o f a t l e a s t
$3.98, for every two albums purchased from the C l u b . A wide

DUKE ELLINGTON choice of RCA VICTOR albums will be described each month.
O n e w i l l b e s i n g l e d o u t as t h e a l b u m - o f - t h e - m o n t h . I f y o u w a n t i t ,
y o u do n o t h i n g ; it w i l l c o m e to y o u a u t o m a t i c a l l y . I f y o u prefer
D u k e ' s a l l - t i m e best b a n d , one o f t h e a l t e r n a t e s o r n o t h i n g at a l l i n a n y m o n t h y o u c a n
1940-42, w i t h Hodges, W e b s t e r , make your wishes k n o w n o n a simple form always provided. Y o u
B l a n t o n , Stewart, W i l l i a m s , Car- pay the n a t i o n a l l y advertised p r i c e u s u a l l y $3.98, at times $4.98
ney, Ivie A n d e r s o n , H e r b Jeffries. (plus a s m a l l charge f o r postage a n d h a n d l i n g ) .
16 tunes, i n c l u d i n g "A" Train,
I Got It Bad, Perdido, Cotton Tail, A L L T H E S E A L B U M S A R E 12-INCH M M R.P.M. L O N G - P L A Y I N G . T H E Y A R E T H E
Main Stem, Blue Serge, Flaming ORIGINAL R E C O R D I N G S NOW R E P R O C E S S E D TO E N H A N C E THEIR S O U N D
Sword, Rocks in My Bed.

THE RCA VICTOR POPULAR ALBUM CLUB PIS-12
c/o Book-of-the-Month Club, Inc., 345 Hudson Street, New York 14, N. Y.

ARTIE SHAW
P l e a s e r e g i s t e r m e as a m e m b e r o f T h e RCA V l C T O l t P o p u l a r A l b u m C l u b and send m e t h e
f i v e - a l b u m set o f S w i n g C l a s s i c s , f o r w h i c h I will p a v $ 3 . 9 ! ! , p l u s a s m a l l c h a r g e f o r postage
a n d h a n d l i n g . I a g r e e t o b u y five o t h e r a l b u m s offered b v t h e C l u b w i t h i n t h e n e x t t w e l v e
m o n t h s , f o r e a c h o f w h i c h I w i l l be l u l l e d a t t h e n a t i o n a l l y a d v e r t i s e d p r i c e : u s u a l l y S 3 . 9 8 , a t
l i m e s $ 4 9 8 (plus a s m a l l M a t a M a n d h a n d l i n " c h a f e ) T h e r e a f t e r I need b u y onlv f o u r
such a l b u m s i n a n y t w e l v e - m o n t h p e r i o d t o m a i n t a i n m e m b e r s h i p I may c a n c e l my m e m b e r ,
s h i n anv t i m e a f t e r b u y i n g live a l b u m s I r o n , t h e C l u b ( i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e i n c l u d e d i n t h i s
i n t r o d u c t o r y offer) A f t e r my fifth p u r c h a s e i f I c o n t i n u e f o r e v e r v two a l b u m s I buy I mav
ARTIE SHAVV^ S h a w ' s two most successful b i g ck^r5>^dXttmfl. ""-ws". continue, y . w o aumms ouy may

bands i n 12 h i s t o r y - m a k i n g hits s
Name
recorded i n 1938-43. Includes
MOONGLOW Begin the Beguine, Nightmare, Address
Frenesi, Star Dust, Dancing in the City- -Zone- State-
N O T E : If y o u w i s h to e n r o l l through a n authorized R C A V I C T O R d e a l e r , please fill i n h e r e :
Dark, Temptation, Indian Love
Call, All the Things You Are, Dealer's Name
Serenade to a Savage, e t c . Address
P L E A S E N O T E : S e n d no money. A b i l l w i l l b e s e n l . A l b u m s c a n be s h i p p e d only to residents of the U. S . , i t s
territories and C a n a d a . A l b u m s l o r C a n a d i a n m e m b e r s a r e m a d e in C a n a d a a n d s h i p p e d duty free f r o m Ontario.
H e r e ' s a distinguished
sampling of the l a s t -
i n g l y great n e w jazz
to be f o u n d in the e x -
tensive Riverside c a t a -
l o g u e : LPs y o u ' l l be
listening to for a l o n g ,
l o n g time . . .

Max,
Roach

DH ds,

CHET BAKER, Sings: 12 great THELONIOUS in Action: ALABAMA C O N C E R T O : unique M A X R O A C H Q u i n t e t : the


standards by the West Coast Monk's quartet recorded at new c o m p o s i t i o n , f e a t u r i n g great drummer s swinging new
star. (12-2781 the 5 Spot Cafe. (12-262,1 Cannonball Adderley. (12-276) group. (12-280)