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HYUNDAI

INSTRUCTION BOOK
VOLUME II

Engine type
H21/32

Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd.


Engine & Machinery Division
1000 Bangeojinsunhwan-doro, Dong-Gu, Ulsan, Korea
http://www.hhi.co.kr
http://cs.hyundai-engine.com

Warranty Service Parts Sales


Engine CS Dep't Global Service Dep't

TEL : (82) 52-202-7411 (Marine) TEL : (82) 52-202-7418


(82) 52-202-7583 (Stationary)
FAX : (82) 52-202-7581 FAX : (82) 52-202-7582
E-mail : enginecs@hhi.co.kr E-mail : globalservice@hhi.co.kr

24/7 Hot Line: +1 212 845 9803


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Table of contents

1 Preliminary remarks .................................................................................... 5


2

1.1 Purpose of the manual ................................................................................. 5


2

1.2 Symbols, definitions, contact address .......................................................... 5


2

2 Safety ......................................................................................................... 7
2

2.1 Introduction................................................................................................... 7
2

2.2 Definition of safety instructions..................................................................... 7


2

2.3 Warning plates on the turbocharger ............................................................. 8


2

2.4 Safe operation and maintenance ................................................................. 8


2

2.5 Hazards during operation and maintenance ................................................ 11


2

2.6 Use of ABB turbochargers on gas engines .................................................. 15


2

2.7 Lifting of loads .............................................................................................. 16


2

3 Introduction ................................................................................................. 17
2

3.1 Essential information .................................................................................... 17


2

3.2 Layout and function of the turbocharger....................................................... 18


2

3.3 Storage of new turbochargers ...................................................................... 20


2

3.4 Intended use................................................................................................. 20


2

3.5 Prerequisites for operation ........................................................................... 21


2

3.6 Turbocharger rating plate ............................................................................. 23


2

3.7 CE conformity............................................................................................... 24
2

4 Removal and installation ............................................................................. 25


2

4.1 Transport ...................................................................................................... 25


2

4.2 Turbocharger weights................................................................................... 26


2

4.3 Removing the turbocharger.......................................................................... 27


2

4.4 Installing the turbocharger............................................................................ 30


2

5 Commissioning ........................................................................................... 37
2

5.1 Oil supply...................................................................................................... 37


2

5.2 Inspection procedures .................................................................................. 38


2

5.3 Commissioning after taking out of operation ................................................ 41


2

6 Monitoring during operation ........................................................................ 43


2

6.1 Oil pressure, oil temperature ........................................................................ 43


2

6.2 Turbocharger speed ..................................................................................... 44


2

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7 Operation and service ................................................................................ 47


2

7.1 Noise emission ............................................................................................. 47


2

7.2 Service procedures....................................................................................... 48


2

7.3 Expected replacement intervals.................................................................... 50


2

7.4 Stopping the engine...................................................................................... 52


2

8 Periodic maintenance................................................................................. 53
2

8.1 Foreword to maintenance ............................................................................. 53


2

8.2 Cleaning the filter silencer ............................................................................ 54


2

8.3 Cleaning the compressor during operation ................................................... 55


2

8.4 Cleaning the turbine during operation........................................................... 58


2

9 Troubleshooting ......................................................................................... 63
2

9.1 Malfunctions when starting ........................................................................... 63


2

9.2 Malfunctions during operation....................................................................... 64


2

9.3 Surging of the turbocharger .......................................................................... 67


2

9.4 Malfunctions when stopping ......................................................................... 68


2

9.5 Speed measurement system ........................................................................ 69


2

10 Disassembly and assembly ........................................................................ 71


2

10.1 Introduction ................................................................................................... 71


2

10.2 Weights of assemblies.................................................................................. 72


2

10.3 Removing / Installing air-inlets ...................................................................... 74


2

10.4 Removing / Installing compressor casing ..................................................... 75


2

10.5 Removing the cartridge group ...................................................................... 77


2

10.6 Installing the cartridge group ........................................................................ 79


2

10.7 Radial clearances N and R ........................................................................... 81


2

10.8 Axial clearance A and radial flexibility B ....................................................... 83


2

10.9 Table of tightening torques ........................................................................... 84


2

11 Taking out of operation at short notice ....................................................... 85


2

11.1 Possible emergency repairs ......................................................................... 85


2

11.2 Attaching a cover plate ................................................................................. 86


2

11.3 Cover plate drawing...................................................................................... 87


2

12 Mothballing the turbocharger...................................................................... 89


2

12.1 Taking the engine out of operation for up to 12 months ............................... 89


2

12.2 Taking the engine out of operation for more than 12 months ....................... 90
2

13 Disposal ..................................................................................................... 91
2

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14 Reserve and spare parts............................................................................. 93


2

14.1 Ordering spare parts .................................................................................... 93


2

14.2 View of turbocharger with part numbers....................................................... 94


2

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1 Preliminary remarks

1.1 Purpose of the manual

Operation manual

This operation manual will familiarise you with the turbocharger of ABB Turbo Systems and
provides information on how to use it in compliance with its intended purpose.

The operation manual explains what is important to know in order to operate the turbocharger
safely, appropriately and profitably.

The operation manual is a complement to and expansion of existing national regulations for
occupational safety and accident prevention.

Target group

The operation manual is aimed at engineers, mechanics and service staff responsible for the
proper operation of the engine and for the turbocharger connected to it.

Availability of the operation manual

An operation manual must be available where the turbocharger is used.

All persons operating or working on the turbocharger must have read and fully understood the
operation manual.

1.2 Symbols, definitions, contact address

Symbols

The following symbols are used in the documents:

Steps of a procedure

List, first level

- List, second level

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Definition of Note

Note
The note provides advice to facilitate working with the product.
NOTICE

Definition of Caution / Warning

Caution and warning signs are described in chapter Safety.

ABB Turbo Systems

ABB Turbo Systems Ltd is identified as ABB Turbo Systems in this document.

Official service stations of ABB Turbo Systems

Official service stations are identified in this document as ABB Turbocharger service stations.
They are regularly audited and certified by ABB Turbo Systems.

Contact address

ABB Turbo Systems AG


Bruggerstrasse 71a
CH-5401 Baden
Switzerland

www.abb.com/turbocharging

Customer service

The Contact Information brochure includes a global overview of the official ABB Turbocharger
service stations.

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2 Safety

2.1 Introduction
Turbochargers manufactured by ABB Turbo Systems are state of the art and comply with the
respective health and safety standards in effect at the time the turbocharger was built. This
ensures safe operation of the turbocharger. Nevertheless, there may be some residual risks
during operation of and work on the turbocharger which:

Are caused by the turbocharger itself or its accessories

Are caused by the operating equipment used and supplies or materials

Are a consequence of insufficient compliance with safety instructions

Are a consequence of insufficient or inappropriate performance of maintenance and in-


spection work

The operating company is responsible for the organisational measures that regulate the safe
handling of the turbocharger by its personnel.

All instructions contained in this chapter must be observed for safe and trouble-free operation
of the turbocharger and during all work on the turbocharger.

All further safety instructions contained and specifically identified in every chapter of this man-
ual (see section Definition of safety instructions) must also be observed.

2.2 Definition of safety instructions


The following symbols and nomenclature are used in this manual, referring to safety or indicat-
ing potential hazards:

Definition of Warning
Non-compliance or inaccurate compliance with working or operating instruc-
tions indicated by this symbol and the word WARNING can lead to serious
WARNING
injuries to personnel and even to fatal accidents.
Warning signs must always be observed.

Definition of Caution
Non-compliance or inaccurate compliance with working or operating instruc-
tions indicated by this symbol and the word CAUTION can lead to serious
CAUTION
damage to engine or property with grave consequences.
Caution signs must always be observed.

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2.3 Warning plates on the turbocharger


72080

Figure 1

81080

Figure 2

Table of warning plates

Part number Size [mm] Product


72080 175 x 22 A145
81080 105 x 74 A150
Table 1

Turbochargers supplied to the enginebuilder without insulation must be fitted later with warn-
ing plates to be affixed to the insulation. This is the responsibility of the enginebuilder.

Warning plates affixed to the turbocharger by ABB Turbo Systems must not be removed. Any
warning plates that have become unreadable must be replaced. For additional information,
please contact an ABB Turbocharger service station.

2.4 Safe operation and maintenance


The instructions specified in this section are for the safety of personnel. Together with the in-
structions in the Hazards during operation and maintenance section, they allow the user to
safely use the turbocharger.

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Occupational safety and safety at the workplace

Risk of falling
When working on the turbocharger, there is a risk of falling.
WARNING
Do not climb onto the turbocharger or onto attached parts and do not use
them as climbing aids.
Use suitable climbing aids and working platforms for work above body
height.

Comply with the general accident prevention regulations.


Only perform work on the turbocharger when you are in a physically and psychologically
stable condition.
Wear appropriate protective equipment, such as:

Helmet

Hearing protection

Safety goggles

Safety gloves

Safety boots

Protective clothing

Hair net (for long hair)

Respirator mask

Only work with suitable tools and with equipment and appliances that function properly.
Power tools must be properly earthed and cables must be undamaged.
Keep the workplace clean, clear away any loose objects and obstacles on the floor.
Keep the floor, equipment and turbocharger clean.
Have oil binding agents ready and provide or keep oil pans at hand.
Clean up any spills.
Have fire protection means and extinguishing agents available.

Welding work

When performing welding work above the turbocharger, always cover the filter silencer to
prevent the filter mat from being damaged.
Keep flammable objects and substances out of the vicinity of flying sparks.
Cover all connections on the turbocharger so that no foreign objects can enter the turbo-
charger.

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Safety during commissioning and operation

Visually inspect your working environment before starting work.


Remove any obstacles and objects littering the workplace.
Check all pipes to and from the turbocharger for damage and leaks before commissioning.
Avoid all operational practice which could negatively affect safety at the turbocharger.
Check turbocharger for recognisable damage or defects approximately every 12 hours of
operation, or at least once a day.
Report any damage and any alterations of operational characteristics to the responsible
department immediately.
In case of damage, take the turbocharger out of operation immediately and safeguard
against accidental/unauthorized use.
When switching on operating energy supplies (hydraulics, pneumatics, electricity, water),
pay attention to the risks that may occur as a consequence of this energy input.

Safety during cleaning

It is possible that detergents or solvents are used for cleaning. In this case, the safety instruc-
tions in section Hazards due to operating materials and supplies must always be observed.

Protect the floor against unintentional penetration of detergents or solvents before starting
cleaning operations.
Wear appropriate protective clothing.
Inspect the electric cables for abrasion and damage before and after your cleaning work.

Safety during disassembly, assembly, maintenance and repair

Observe the procedures for set-up, maintenance and inspection work and the inspection
intervals.
Inform the operating staff before starting any maintenance or repair work.
Before taking off any cover or removing any guard from the turbocharger, switch off the
engine and wait until the turbocharger has come to a standstill.
Make sure that the oil supply is interrupted, especially with an external oil supply.
Only restart the engine after all parts have been properly fitted again and oil supply is en-
sured.

Mechanical operations on the turbocharger


Components of the turbocharger can be damaged or destroyed.
CAUTION
Only perform operations that are described in this manual.
Only perform operations for which you have previously received instruc-
tion or training.

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Safety when taking out of operation at short notice or preparing for mothballing

Secure rotor against turning. The rotor can rotate due to the stack draught alone.
Clean the turbocharger prior to mothballing.
Wear appropriate protective clothing.

2.5 Hazards during operation and maintenance

Mechanical hazards during operation

During standard operation, no mechanical hazards are caused by the turbocharger itself if it
has been properly installed.

Physical hazards due to rotating parts


Contact with rotating parts can cause severe injury. The turbocharger must
never be used without the air-inlet casing or filter silencer, respectively. With
WARNING
the engine stopped, the rotor can rotate due to the stack draught alone.
Operate the turbocharger in compliance with the specifications.

Mechanical hazards when working on the turbocharger

During maintenance, various risks may arise due to improper handling of components, non-
compliance with safety and health standards, carelessness, or as a consequence of inade-
quate qualification.

Mechanical hazards
Severe injuries to personnel or fatal accidents can be caused by mechanical
influences as a consequence of hazardous and inadequate operational pro-
WARNING
cedure.

Secure rotor against turning.


Observe the general rules for occupational safety and prevention of acci-
dents.
Ensure workplace safety.
Only perform operations that are described in this manual.
Only perform operations for which you have previously received instruc-
tion or training.

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Noise hazards

The turbocharger's noise emission during operation is influenced by its installation and operat-
ing conditions. A noise level exceeding 85 dB(A) is harmful.

Danger due to noise


Exposure to noise can harm the hearing system. It can impair health and the
psychological state and may lead to irritation and lack of attention.
WARNING
When the engine is running, always wear hearing protection.
Always wear hearing protection if the noise level exceeds 85 dB(A).

Standard values for the maximum duration of exposure to areas of noise emission (source:
Unfallverhtungsvorschriften fr Unternehmen der Seefahrt (UVV See) [Accident Prevention
Regulations for Enterprises engaged in Seafaring]):

240

180

120

60

30
15
05
85 88 91 94 97 120 x
105
100
Figure 3

x Noise level [dB(A)]


y Maximum duration of exposure [min] per working day

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Hazards due to hot surfaces and substances

Surfaces of the turbocharger, attached parts and operating fluids (lubricating oil) get hot during
operation. The surface temperature depends on the efficacy of the existing insulation. The
temperature may rise to a level that can cause burns.

Danger of burns
Touching hot surfaces or contact with hot operating fluids can cause severe
burns.
WARNING
Do not touch hot surfaces, observe the warning plate on the turbocharger.
Wear heat-resistant safety gloves and protective clothing.
Wait for the turbocharger to cool down before carrying out any work.

Hot surfaces on the non-insulated turbocharger


Non-insulated turbochargers can cause serious injuries to personnel (burns).
WARNING ABB Turbo Systems supplies the turbocharger with or without insulation in
accordance with the purchase order received from the enginebuilder. If sup-
ply is without insulation, the enginebuilder is responsible for providing the
turbocharger with proper insulation and for providing protection against con-
tact with hot surfaces.
Compliance with the indications and specifications given by the engine-
builder to protect against hot surfaces is compulsory.

Hazards due to operating materials and supplies

Operating materials and supplies are substances required for the operation of the turbo-
charger or for the performance of maintenance work. Oils, greases, coolants, detergents and
solvents, acids and similar substances can be classified as hazardous substances. Operating
materials and supplies can be flammable and combustible.

Danger of poisoning or acid burns


Swallowing of or skin contact with toxic or caustic operating materials and
supplies or breathing of any such vapours can be harmful to health.
WARNING
Do not breathe in these substances and avoid contact with the skin.
Wear protective clothing and a breathing mask.

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Danger of fire or explosion


Flammable and combustible operating materials and supplies can catch fire
or resulting vapours can lead to an explosion.
WARNING
Open flames are forbidden when carrying out cleaning work.
Carry out cleaning in the open or provide sufficient ventilation.

Danger of environmental damage


The emission of operating materials and supplies into the atmosphere or the
contamination of ground or water systems as a result of improper disposal
CAUTION
can cause damage to the environment.
Handle operating materials and supplies with care.

Observe all instructions for use, material safety data sheets and the hazard information
provided on the containers of the operating materials and supplies.
Wear appropriate protective clothing.
Do not breathe in these substances and avoid contact with the skin.
Ensure sufficient ventilation of the workspace.
After use, close containers hermetically and put them away.
Collect used operating materials and supplies safely, store them separately in suitable con-
tainers and dispose of them properly and in an environmentally compatible manner in com-
pliance with the legal regulations.
In the event of leaks or spillage, spread binding agents immediately and dispose of them
properly and in an environmentally compatible manner in compliance with the legal regula-
tions.

Hazards due to the handling of insulation materials

Danger from insulation materials


Dust or fibres from insulation materials can have adverse effects on the
health or cause irritations. Unsuitable and combustible insulation materials
WARNING
are a fire hazard.
Handle insulation materials with care.

Only use suitable and non-combustible insulation materials.


Ensure good ventilation at the workplace.
Wear suitable work clothing (safety goggles, dust mask).
Avoid whirling up dust.
Use dust-free tools and working methods.
Remove package at the workplace only.

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Proceed with particular care when removing old insulation materials.


Dispose of insulation materials properly and in an environmentally compatible manner in
compliance with the legal regulations.

Hazards due to electrical components

Danger due to electrical components


Electrical components work with electrical voltages that can be a danger to
humans.
WARNING
Any work on or with electrical components must only be performed by
specifically qualified electricians.
National regulations must be observed.

2.6 Use of ABB turbochargers on gas engines


ABB turbochargers can tolerate a deflagration with a transient pressure increase of 12 bar. In
deflagration tests on engines with flame barriers, a maximum of 11 bar was measured. This
value is supported by the practical experience in operation gained by renowned gas engine
manufacturers. ABB turbochargers have never been damaged in the past when deflagration
events occurred.

ABB Turbo Systems recommends subjecting the turbocharger to a visual inspection after a
deflagration event. As part of the inspection, the position of the turbine casing and the position
of the compressor casing to the bearing casing must be checked, and the bearing casing must
be examined to see if it has shifted in relation to the the bracket. A crack inspection of the cas-
ings and the bellows is also recommended. The nearest ABB Turbocharger service station
should be instructed to carry out this inspection and assessment.

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2.7 Lifting of loads

Figure 4

Suspended loads
Loads that are not attached according to regulations can cause physical inju-
ries with grave consequences or fatal accidents.
WARNING
Fasten assemblies or individual parts above 25 kg carefully on properly
functional lifting gear with a sufficient load limit.
Pay attention to the correct attachment of loads on the crane hook.
No persons must remain under suspended loads.

max.
45

Figure 5

If there are two or more attachment points, the attachment angle of 45 must not be ex-
ceeded. This prevents excessive loading due to diagonal pull.

Attach components of the turbocharger as described in the respective action steps.


Before looping around the components of the turbocharger, let them cool down (maximum
80 C).
Use a suitable edge guard if there are sharp edges.
The assembly devices must be completely screwed in and must not unscrew during use.
Use assembly devices only for the described applications.
Put down dismantled components of the turbocharger in such a way that they cannot tip
over.

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3 Introduction

3.1 Essential information

Design variants

This document is valid for different design variants of turbochargers. There may be sections
and descriptions of components that are not relevant for a specific turbocharger variant.

The ABB Turbocharger service stations will be happy to provide information on questions re-
garding a design variant.

Accuracy of illustrations

The graphics and photographs presented in this document are general in nature and intended
for ease of understanding. Differences in detail are therefore possible.

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3.2 Layout and function of the turbocharger

1 2 3 4 5 6

9
10

11

12

13

Figure 6

1 Filter silencer / air suction branch 8 Gas outlet flange


2 Compressor casing 9 Nozzle ring
3 Diffuser 10 Turbine casing
4 Bearing casing 11 Turbine-end bearing flange
5 Axial thrust bearing 12 Compressor-end bearing flange
6 Radial plain bearing 13 Compressor wheel
7 Turbine

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Mode of operation

The turbocharger is a turbomachine and consists of the following main components:

Turbine

Compressor

These components are installed on a common shaft and form the rotor (See Figure 6).

The exhaust gases of the internal combustion engine flow through the turbine casing (10) and
the nozzle ring (9) onto the turbine (7). The turbine (7) uses the energy contained in the ex-
haust gas to drive the rotor and, hence, the compressor wheel (13). The exhaust gases then
reach the atmosphere through the exhaust gas pipe connected to the gas outlet flange (8).

The compressor wheel (13) sucks fresh air through the air suction branch or the filter silencer
(1). In the compressor wheel (13), the energy required for building up the pressure is trans-
ferred to the air. By flowing through the diffuser (3) and the compressor casing (2), the air is
compressed further and is then directed to the engine cylinders.

The rotor runs in two radial plain bearings (6) which are located in the bearing casing (4) be-
tween compressor and turbine. The axial thrust bearing (5) is located between the two radial
plain bearings.

The plain bearings are connected to a central lubricating oil duct which is normally supplied by
the lubricating oil circuit of the engine. The oil outlet always lies at the deepest point of the
bearing casing (4).

Turbocharger version with compressor wheel cooling

Figure 7

Depending on the application of an A100 radial turbocharger, the turbocharger is equipped


with compressor wheel cooling. With compressor wheel cooling, after the compressor air has
cooled down by passing through the charge-air cooler on the engine side, it is supplied to the
turbocharger for cooling the compressor wheel. Cooling of the compressor wheel is compul-
sory to ensure the reliability and replacement intervals for the relevant operating conditions. In
the turbocharger version with compressor wheel cooling, the cooling air is supplied through a
lateral connection in the bearing casing (1).

In addition, the turbocharger version with compressor wheel cooling is shown by the turbo-
charger type (M61, M65 or M66) on the rating plate.

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3.3 Storage of new turbochargers


New turbochargers from ABB Turbo Systems can be stored for 6 months from the date of de-
livery without additional mothballing measures.

Only dry rooms with 40-70% atmospheric humidity, in which no water condensation can form,
are suitable as storage locations.

The following mothballing measures are required after 6 months:

Remove any insulation.


Spray surfaces and all accessible spaces of the turbocharger with anticorrosive oil.

To prevent corrosion damage:

Repeat mothballing measures every 6 months.

3.4 Intended use

Use on internal combustion engines

ABB turbochargers are intended for turbocharging internal combustion engines.

For use on gas engines, the enginebuilder must assure its end customers that, in compliance
with the Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC, the turbocharger will be operated in an engine room
that has the classification "not at risk of explosion". This is also in accordance with the position
paper [2] relating to ATEX issued by EUROMOT [1].

For use on pre-mix gas engines with ignitable propellents in the gas control system, the engi-
nebuilder must implement appropriate safety measures for explosion protection [3] (such as
flame barriers in the inlet system, for example) to assure that the turbocharger will only be
exposed to a transient pressure increase up to a maximum of 12 bar as the consequence of
any deflagration.

The turbocharger supplies the engine with the air volume and associated charging pressure
required for operation.

The specific operating limits of the turbocharger were determined on the basis of information
from the enginebuilder about the intended use. These data are given on the rating plate.

ABB Turbo Systems accepts no liability and rejects all warranty claims for any non-intended
uses.

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[1] Euromot = The European Association of Internal Combustion Engine Manufacturers


[2] Directive 94/9/EC concerning equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially
explosive atmospheres (ATEX) The Euromot Position as of November 2003, ATEX Euromot
Position 191103
[3] Guidelines for proper safety design of inlet systems on gas engines, RWTV Essen, 1991

Approved operation
Any operation of the turbocharger outside of its operating limits can be haz-
ardous to personnel.
WARNING
Only trained personnel must operate the turbocharger.

The intended use of the turbocharger includes compliance with all regulations and conditions.
The following points must be specifically observed:

The operation manual

The instructions of the enginebuilder

State of the art

The turbocharger is designed and built according to the state of the art and is safe to operate.

Flawless condition

The turbocharger must only be used when it is in a technically flawless condition and operated
in compliance with its intended use.

ABB Turbo Systems excludes any liability for damage resulting from unauthorized modifica-
tions to the turbocharger.

3.5 Prerequisites for operation

Responsibility of the operating company

In awareness of its responsibility, the operating company must ensure that only authorised
personnel work on the turbocharger, who:

Are versed in the general and locally applicable regulations for occupational safety and
accident prevention

Have read and understood the operation manual

Have been instructed in the use of the turbocharger

The safety-conscious work of the personnel and adherence to the operation manual must be
checked periodically.

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Suitable working materials and personal protective equipment must be kept in a perfect condi-
tion.

Only authorised personnel may remain in the vicinity of the turbocharger when the engine is
running.

Competence of personnel

The turbocharger must only be operated and serviced by trained and authorised personnel.

Modifications to the turbocharger

Modifications to the turbocharger must be approved by ABB Turbo Systems.

The turbocharger must be taken out of operation immediately by stopping the engine if the-
re is a malfunction or any abnormal operating behaviour.
The responsible body must be notified of the malfunction.

Original parts and safety

Original parts and accessories are specially designed by ABB Turbo Systems for the ABB
turbochargers.

Use original parts


Operation of the turbocharger with non-original parts can result in hazards to
personnel and impair the safety of the turbocharger.
WARNING
Only use original parts from ABB Turbo Systems.

ABB Turbo Systems accepts no liability for any damage resulting from the use of non-original
parts and associated accessories.

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3.6 Turbocharger rating plate

9 10
1 1
2 2
6
7 5
11

8 3 4
Figure 8

Operating limits

1 Turbocharger operating limits at engine overload (110 %).


In test rig operation only, unless otherwise agreed with the engine-
builder.
2 Turbocharger operating limits during operation

Recommended checking / replacement intervals of turbocharger components

3 Checking interval of plain bearings in 1000 h


4 Replacement interval of compressor in 1000 h
5 Replacement interval of turbine in 1000 h

Further data

6 Customer part number


7 Designation for special design
8 Weight of turbocharger in kg
9 Turbocharger type
10 Serial number
11 Year of construction of turbocharger

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Explanations of the rating plate

The recommended replacement intervals and the corresponding operating limits are jointly
defined with the enginebuilder. This information is specific to the system.

Operation above the indicated values nBmax, tBmax can considerably shorten the recommended
replacement intervals. In such a case, we recommend that you contact the nearest official
service station of ABB Turbo Systems.

nMmax, tMmax normally apply only when running at overload (110 %) during trials on the engine
test bed. These limit values can also be permitted during operation for special applications.
Operation above nMmax and tMmax is not permitted.

Non-observance of the recommended replacement intervals increases the risk of unpredict-


able component failures.

Locations of the rating plates

Figure 9

One rating plate (1) each is attached on the left and the right side of the turbocharger bearing
casing.

3.7 CE conformity

Information

ABB turbochargers comply with the Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC and are incomplete ma-
chines as defined by Article 2 g.

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4 Removal and installation

4.1 Transport

Suspension of complete turbocharger unit

1a

1b 2

Figure 10

1a Turbocharger with oil-cooled bearing casing


1b Turbocharger with water-cooled bearing casing
2 Complete turbocharger unit with gas outlet casing

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4.2 Turbocharger weights


Lifting gear with a sufficient load limit must be used for removing and installing the turbo-
charger. The following weight specification is the heaviest variant possible. This standard
value may deviate from the data on the rating plate depending on the specification.

Complete turbocharger

Weights [kg]
A130 A135 A140 A145 A150 A155
190 270 460 750 -- --
Table 2

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4.3 Removing the turbocharger


Disconnect all pipes according to the instructions of the enginebuilder.

Version with compressor wheel cooling:

Loosen and remove the compressor wheel cooling connection. Close the compressor
wheel cooling opening with a screw plug.

If present:

Unplug the plug to the speed sensor (86505) and secure the rolled-up cable (2 m) on the
turbocharger. This protects the plug from being crushed.
e f

42190

c
a

86505 d
5
2
3 4

Figure 11

a Oil-cooled bearing casing b Water-cooled bearing casing


c Position of expansion sleeves A130 to A145 d Bracket A150 to A155
e Clamping nut f Standard nut

Treat the stud (2) and nut (1) with penetrating oil on the thread and let it work in.

Safeguard against wrong fitting (only for water-cooled bearing casings)


Depending on the bracket version (4), two positioning pins (5) can be used
for positioning and safeguard against wrong fitting of the turbocharger. This
NOTICE
ensures that the turbocharger can always be removed and installed vertically
from/onto the bracket.

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Gas-outlet casing (51100)


The gas-outlet casing (51100) can remain fitted in the exhaust gas pipe if the
locking nuts remain accessible. Otherwise the complete turbocharger unit
NOTICE
including gas-outlet casing must be removed.

Treat the thread of the screw fitting between the turbine casing and gas-outlet casing with
penetrating oil and let it work in. Loosen nuts.
Remove turbocharger (see following section).

4.3.1 Fastening of the turbocharger

Depending on the type and version, the turbocharger can be fastened in different ways. The
appropriate procedure must be chosen to undo the connection.

Oil-cooled bearing casing (a)

Attach lifting gear to the suspension eye.


Loosen and remove nuts.

Water-cooled bearing casing (b)

Loosen and remove water connections. Close the openings of the water connections with
screw plugs.
Attach lifting gear to the suspension eye.
Loosen and remove nuts.

Freezing of the cooling water in the bearing casing


Serious damage to property can be the consequence if the cooling water
freezes in the pipes and in the bearing casing.
CAUTION
For transport and storage of the turbocharger, drain the cooling water in
the bearing casing via one of the two bottom openings of the water con-
nections.

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Loosening the clamping nut

1/4

Figure 12

Incorrect procedure can make loosening impossible


Never relieve individual pressure screws completely. If this procedure is not
complied with, the pressure screws can get compressed, thus making it im-
CAUTION
possible to loosen them.

Relieve pressure screws only step by step.


Loosen the pressure screws in a circular order.

Break loose all pressure screws of the clamping nut in a circular order.
In circular order, loosen each of the pressure screws by about revolution.
Repeat the previous step until the pressure screws are relieved of pressure.
Loosen clamping nut by hand.

Hydraulic loosening (round special nut)

If the turbocharger was fitted by the enginebuilder with a hydraulic tool, removal is also only
possible with a hydraulic tool (see instructions of the enginebuilder).

Remove the turbocharger.


Cover the oil connections (3) on the engine side to protect against dirt.

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4.4 Installing the turbocharger

4.4.1 Placing the turbocharger on bracket

A130...A145 A150...A155
2
3
5
5 2

1 3
1

Figure 13

1 Bracket 4 Slot for gasket


2 Oil supply 5 O-rings
3 Oil drain

Inserting the gaskets


Damaged or improperly inserted gaskets lead to oil leaks.
CAUTION Always use new gaskets and insert them carefully into the slot.

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Inserting studs

A130...A145 A150...A155

1 1

2
d 2
d

L
L

Figure 14

1 Nut
2 Stud

Lightly oil the thread of the stud (2).


Screw the studs into the bracket with the aid of locknuts (1).
Remove nuts (1) again.

Product Stud Material Thread Length (L) of the stud


diameter DIN / ISO 898 length Oil-cooled Water-cooled
[mm] (Part 1) [mm] [mm] [mm]
A130 16 / M16 10.9 / 12.9 30 250 250
A135 20 / M20 10.9 / 12.9 30 270 325
A140 24 / M24 10.9 / 12.9 70 350360 410420
A145 30 / M30 10.9 / 12.9 80 415425 --
A150 -- -- -- -- - -- -
A155 -- -- -- -- - -- -
Table 3

Fixing material scope of delivery

The studs and nuts for fastening the turbocharger on the bracket are not included in the ABB
Turbo Systems scope of delivery. These parts depend on the version of the engine-side bra-
cket.

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Place and align the turbocharger

e f

42190

c
a

86505 d
5
2
3 4

Figure 15

a Oil-cooled bearing casing b Water-cooled bearing casing


c Position of expansion sleeves d Bracket A150 to A155
e Clamping nut f Standard nut

Place and align the turbocharger.


Remove the covers of the oil and water connections.
Visually inspect the gaskets (3) of the oil supply pipe and oil drain pipe.
Clean the contact surfaces of the expansion sleeves (42190) in the bearing casing.
Clean the expansion sleeves.
Attach the lifting gear to the suspension lug / eye.
Place the turbocharger on the bracket (4). If present, observe the positioning pins (5) or
centring sleeve (6) in the bracket.
Align the turbocharger and insert the expansion sleeves in the correct position (pay atten-
tion to notch) (illustration above, c)

Safeguard against wrong fitting (only for water-cooled bearing casings)


Depending on the bracket version (4), two positioning pins (5) can be used
for positioning and safeguard against wrong fitting of the turbocharger. This
NOTICE
ensures that the turbocharger can always be removed and installed vertically
from/onto the bracket.

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Gas-outlet casing (51100)


The gas-outlet casing (51100) may still be fitted in the exhaust gas pipe if
the locking nuts remain accessible for removing the turbocharger.
NOTICE

4.4.2 Steps for fastening the turbocharger

Securing the bearing casing

Fit the nuts and tighten according to one of the following variants.

The procedure for securing using a clamping nut is described separately at the end.

O = Oil-cooled bearing casing W = Water-cooled bearing casing


Hydraulic tightening (standard)
Product O B Fixing screws [mm] Hydraulic pre-tensioning forces [kN]
A130 x x M16 110
A135 x x M20 175
A140 x x M24 250
A145 x -- M30 400
Table 4
Torque-controlled tightening
Product O B Fixing screws [mm] Tightening torques [Nm]
A130 x x M16 280
A135 x x M20 560
A140 x x M24 960
A145 x -- M30 1900
A150 -- -- -- --
A155 -- -- -- --
Table 5
Angle-controlled tightening
Product O B Fixing screws [mm] Initial tightening torques Tightening angle
[Nm] []
A140 x -- M24 450 90
A140 -- x M24 540 90
A145 x -- M30 575 120
Table 6

Remove lifting gear.

Connect cable to speed sensor (86515).


Connect all gas, air and oil pipes.

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Version with water-cooled bearing casing:

Remove the screw plugs on the water connections and fit the water pipes according to the
enginebuilder's specifications.

Version with compressor wheel cooling:

Figure 16

Remove the screw plug on the connection for the compressor wheel cooling (6) and fit the
cooling air line.

Connect cable to speed sensor (86515).


Connect all gas, air and oil pipes.

4.4.2.1 Tightening the clamping nut

1 ~ 1 mm

Figure 17

Clean the thread of the bolt (1) and the contact surface.
Coat the bolt thread with grease.
Position the thrust washer (2) in place.

Pressure screws (4) must not protrude from the clamping nut (3) in the direc-
tion of the thrust washer (2)
NOTICE In order to correctly fit the clamping nuts, the pressure screws must not pro-
trude in the direction of the thrust washer.

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Tighten the clamping nut by hand and then unscrew it again by of a revolution.

The distance between the thrust washer and the clamping nut is now about 1 mm.

100% Nm 100% Nm 20
50% Nm

50% Nm
100% Nm

Figure 18

Hand-tighten the pressure screws diagonally.


Tighten two opposite pressure screws with 50 % of the tightening torque specified in the
table.
Tighten two other opposite pressure screws with 100 % of the tightening torque specified in
the table.
Tighten all pressure screws in a circular order to 100 % of the tightening torque specified in
the table.
Repeat until all pressure screws are evenly tightened (less than 20 of remaining distance).

Torque-controlled tightening
Product Fixing screw [mm] Tightening torques [Nm]
A140 M24 36
A145 M30 43
Table 7

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5 Commissioning

5.1 Oil supply

5.1.1 Introduction

In all operating states, a functioning and carefully executed oil supply is an important prerequi-
site for trouble-free operation of the turbocharger.

The lubrication of the turbocharger is usually carried out with oil from the engine oil circulation.

The directives of the enginebuilder on the selection of the lubricating oil and the oil change
intervals must be followed.

5.1.2 Pre-lubrication and post-lubrication

Pre-lubrication

Pre-lubrication must be carried out as follows:

Switch on the oil pump.


Build up oil pressure (See Table 8).
Do not exceed a pre-lubrication time of 2 minutes.
Start the engine.
Let the oil pump run until the pump driven by the engine generates sufficient pressure.

Post-lubrication

Run the engine for 5 to 10 minutes at idling speed before stopping it.
Observe the oil pressure specified for engine idling (See Table 8).

Post-lubrication is not required and not recommended for water-cooled bearing casings.

For oil-cooled bearing casings, post-lubrication is mandatory for 20 minutes if the turbine
inlet temperature (tTE) exceeds the following values when the engine is stopped:

550 C with insulated casing


600 C with non-insulated casing
At temperatures below the specified values, post-lubrication for 10 minutes is recom-
mended.

Observe the oil pressure specified for post-lubrication (See Table 8).

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5.1.3 Oil filtering

Lubricating oil filtering with a filter mesh width of 0.034 mm is sufficient for this turbocharger.

5.1.4 Oil pressure

Comply precisely with the oil pressure before the turbocharger for trouble-free operation.

The admissible values are listed in the chapter "Monitoring during operation".

5.1.5 Oil orifice for oil-cooled bearing casing

With an oil inlet pressure of more than 3 bar (when engine under load) before the turbo-
charger, the oil-cooled bearing casings are equipped as standard with an orifice at the oil inlet.

When disassembling the turbocharger, a fitted oil orifice must not be removed.

5.2 Inspection procedures

5.2.1 Introduction

The inspection procedures include preventative visual controls, monitoring and measuring
work which assure the operability of the turbocharger. They help in detecting deviations before
and during commissioning and as a result to avoid machine damage.

5.2.2 Checks before commissioning

Air filter mat (if present)

Check for damage and contamination.

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Lubricating system

Check that the oil filter is clean before commissioning.

Contaminated oil
Serious damage to engine or property can be caused by dirt and solid mate-
rial particles in the oil.
CAUTION
For the initial commissioning and after all service procedures, the com-
plete lubricating system must be flushed thoroughly with warm oil.
Use running-in filters when running in the engine and after all service pro-
cedures on the lubricating system.

Check the oil pressure in the oil supply pipes.

Air/water cooling

Version with compressor wheel cooling:

Check whether the compressor wheel cooling is fitted on the bearing casing.

Failure of compressor wheel cooling


Any prolonged failure of the compressor wheel cooling will negatively affect
the lifetime of the compressor wheel.
CAUTION
Ensure the supply of cooling air.

Version with water-cooled bearing casing

Check whether the water pipes are fitted on the bearing casing.

Failure of bearing casing cooling


Any prolonged failure of the water cooling will negatively affect the lifetime of
the turbocharger.
CAUTION
Ensure the supply of the water pipes.

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5.2.3 Checks after commissioning (engine in idle mode)

Lubricating system

Check the oil pressure in the oil supply pipes.


Check oil inlet temperature.

The admissible values are listed in the chapter "Monitoring during operation".

Gas, air, water and oil pipes

After starting the engine, check all gas, air, water and oil pipes for leaks.

5.2.4 Checks when starting up the engine

Measure speed, oil pressure and charging pressure at various engine performances.
Measure the exhaust gas temperature before and after the turbine.
Measure the air temperature before and after the compressor.

The measured values must be compared with the values of the acceptance protocol; different
operating conditions must be taken into account here.

Escape of oily fluids


Lubricants and pastes used for the assembly of the turbocharger can liquefy
or vaporise and escape as oily fluids during the initial hours of operation.
NOTICE
Continual escape of an oily fluid indicates a possible leak.
If there is a leak, contact an ABB Turbocharger service station.

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5.3 Commissioning after taking out of operation

If present

Remove cover plates (blind flanges) on the compressor casing, on the gas-inlet as well as
on the gas-outlet.

Remove the screw plugs on the water connections and fit the water pipe.

Version with compressor wheel cooling:

Remove the screw plug on the cooling air connection and fit the cooling air line.

General

Check the exhaust gas pipe before and after the turbine for combustion residues or water
residues and clean it. Remove any foreign objects that may be present.
Check and clean filter silencer or air supply line, and remove any foreign objects that may
be present.
Put engine-side oil circulation to the turbocharger into operation.
Prepare the turbocharger for operation according to section "Checks before commission-
ing".
Start the engine and put the turbocharger into operation.

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6 Monitoring during operation

6.1 Oil pressure, oil temperature

Lubricating oil pressure, oil inlet

Status for operation Oil pressure before turbo-


charger
[bar]
Normal operation 2.04.5
Engine start: Cold oil, admissible for max. 15 minutes < 8.0
Engine idling 0.52.5
Pre-lubrication and post-lubrication (engine stopped) 0.51.0
Warning signal: (nTurbocharger 0.5 x nBmax) < 1.25
Alarm signal: Stop the engine after 1 minute at the latest. < 0.6
Table 8

Assuring lubricating oil pressure


Serious damage to engine or property can result from missing or insufficient
lubricating oil supply.
CAUTION
The lubricating oil pressure for the turbocharger must be monitored during
operation and the necessary pressure assured at the oil inlet.

1 2 3 1 Turbocharger contact surface


2 Oil inlet
3 Oil outlet
M Oil pressure measuring point
T Oil temperature measuring point

T M

Monitoring of the lubricating oil pressure


For monitoring the lubricating oil pressure, ABB Turbo Systems recommends
installing an "M" manometer immediately before the turbocharger. If the
NOTICE
pressure is controlled electronically, the corresponding signals are to be trig-
gered at the warning and alarm values.

Lubricating oil temperature, oil inlet

The temperature before the turbocharger and the temperature increase can also be meas-
ured. The maximum permitted oil temperature at the oil inlet is 105 C, the maximum permit-
ted oil heating is 50 K.

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6.2 Turbocharger speed

6.2.1 Introduction

A speed measuring system enables the constant monitoring of the turbocharger speed.

6.2.2 Layout and overview

86528
32109

*) 86526
42189
42188

86515
86505

Figure 19

86505 Speed sensor 42188 Screw plug


86515 Cable connector 42189 Gasket
86526 F/I converter 1 Plug with integrated voltage limiter
86528 Tachometer *) Installation variant for speed sensor
32109 Sealing disc with cam

6.2.3 Speed differences with several turbochargers per engine

The speeds of all turbochargers on an engine vary only slightly from each other in standard
operation.

The admissible difference of the maximum and minimum turbocharger speed must not be mo-
re than 5 %, relative to the highest speed.

If this admissible difference range is exceeded, the following steps must be performed:

Reduce the engine performance immediately to the point at which the maximum turbo-
charger speed does not exceed the value 70 % of nBmax.
If the engine cannot be stopped, it can continue to be driven with this reduced engine per-
formance or turbocharger speed.
If the turbocharger surges continuously, the engine performance must be reduced further.

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Measure the temperatures in the air lines and gas lines from and to the turbochargers and
compare with normal values.

If the engine can be stopped temporarily:

Inspect air lines, gas lines and the turbochargers and remedy any malfunctions.
In any case, contacting the nearest ABB Turbocharger service station is recommended.

6.2.4 Replacing the speed sensor

Hot cable connector and hot speed sensor


Danger of burns. The cable connector and the speed sensor can reach tem-
peratures of more than 100 C during operation.
WARNING
When disassembling the cable connector and speed sensor, wear leather
gloves.

Reduce the engine performance to idling and then stop the engine. Observe post-
lubrication time (see section "Stopping the engine").
Switch off the lubricating oil supply to the turbocharger.
Disconnect the cable connector from the speed sensor.
Screw out defective speed sensor.

Screw in new speed sensor to the stop.

Observe tightening torque [(See Table 33)chapter Disassembly and assembly].

Sealing of the speed sensor


The speed sensor is designed with a sealing lip and an additional O-ring and
does not need an additional gasket for assembly.
NOTICE

Connect the cable connector with the speed sensor.


Switch on lubricating oil supply to the turbocharger.

6.2.5 Malfunction of the speed measuring system

The possible reasons for failure of the speed measuring system are described in chapter
Troubleshooting(See Table 27).

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7 Operation and service

7.1 Noise emission

Danger due to noise


Exposure to noise can harm the hearing system. It can impair health and the
psychological state and may lead to irritation and lack of attention.
WARNING
When the engine is running, always wear hearing protection.
Always wear hearing protection if the noise level exceeds 85 dB(A).

The emission sound pressure level (A-weighted) is measured at a distance of 1 meter from
the turbocharger.

The highest value of the emission sound pressure level1) is reached in the area of the filter
silencer and is 105 dB(A) maximum over the entire speed range.

The following prerequisites on the turbocharger must be fulfilled to observe this limit value:

Air-inlet system has been fitted

All standard, noise-reducing measures2) have been fitted

Bellows at the air-outlet has been properly acoustically insulated by the enginebuilder (See
Figure 20).
He is also responsible for insulating the charge air/scavenging air ducts and the charge air
cooler.

1) Directive 2006/42/EC, 1.7.4.2 / u / Paragraphs 5 + 7:


A-weighted emission sound pressure level
2) The enginebuilder must provide acoustically equivalent measures in case of deviating insula-
tion versions

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Suggestion for noise insulation, bellow

C
D

B
F

D
A

Figure 20

A Compressor casing D Insulating cushions


B Bellows E Insulating mat
C Charge-air duct / scavenging air duct F Sheet metal cover

7.2 Service procedures


Service procedures during operation include visual controls, monitoring, measuring and in-
spection, as well as function checks. This enables changes to the turbocharger to be detected
and remedied. This assures full operability of the turbocharger.

Service intervals
Service procedures on the turbocharger that are omitted or performed too
late can cause excessive fouling and operating failures.
CAUTION
Carry out the service procedures at the specified time intervals.

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7.2.1 Service work on turbocharger every 25 to 50 hours

Visual control for air, exhaust gas, water and oil leaks
Recording of operating data as well as entries in the engine logbook
In case of deviations, determine the cause.

Unknown operational changes


Damage including failure can be the consequence.
CAUTION Unknown causes must be clarified by an ABB Turbocharger service sta-
tion.

7.2.2 Service work on turbocharger at 100 hours after commissioning

Clean or replace oil filter when engine is stopped.

7.2.3 Service procedures according to instructions of enginebuilder

Clean or replace oil filter when engine is stopped.

7.2.4 Service work acc. to specifications on the rating plate

(Usually after 8,000 12,000 operating hours)

The rotor and bearing parts must be checked and assessed by an ABB Turbocharger service
station.

Remove the turbocharger from the engine and dismantle according to chapter Disassembly
and assembly. Measure clearances.
Clean nozzle ring, turbine casing and compressor casing and check for cracks and ero-
sion/corrosion.

7.2.5 Entries in the engine logbook

The monitoring of the engine system enables conclusions to be drawn on the behaviour of the
turbocharger.

The following operating data and measured values must be entered regularly in the engine
logbook of the enginebuilder:

Rating and speed of the engine

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Air intake temperature

Pressure of the charge air

Pressure loss in the charge-air cooler

Lubricating oil pressure and lubricating oil temperature

If present:

Speed of the turbocharger

Air temperature after the compressor and after the charge-air cooler

Exhaust gas temperature before and after the turbine

Pressure loss in the filter silencer.

7.3 Expected replacement intervals

Rotating components

The recommended replacement intervals for the compressor and turbine wheels are specified
based on the safety concept for rotating parts and dependent on the operating conditions.
These intervals are shown on the rating plate of the turbocharger.

Non-rotating components

Depending on the system-specific operating conditions, a differentiation must be made be-


tween the intervals to be expected for:

replacing the bearing parts

and

replacing the non-rotating components exposed to hot gas.

A decisive role is played by diverse influencing parameters which, in extreme cases, can dras-
tically reduce the replacement interval of these parts.

During the prescribed periodic service procedures, the individual parts are examined for wear
and replaced if necessary.

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Expected replacement intervals [h]

GAS / MDO HFO


Turbine casing 25'00050000 25'00050000
Nozzle ring 25'00050000 25'000
Gas outlet flange 25'00050000 25000
Heat shield 25'00050000 25000
Rotor components See rating plate data
Bearing parts 12'00024000 12'00024000
Other casings 50000 50000
Table 9
GAS = Gas
MDO = Marine Diesel Oil
HFO = Heavy Fuel Oil

The specified values are guideline values and not guaranteed values (see following section
"Influencing parameters").

Influencing parameters

The specified values are guideline values and are not guaranteed. The actual values can de-
viate considerably from the guideline values, for example, due to the following influences:

Fuel quality

Load profile (thermal cycling, also number of starts/stops, emergency shutdowns)

Gas inlet temperature

Frequency and execution of turbine and compressor cleaning

Turbocharger specification.

For bearing parts

Lubricating oil quality (oil filtering, oil condition, oil monitoring)

Load profile (speed, pressure conditions, temperature)

Imbalance of the rotor (degree of contamination)

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7.4 Stopping the engine

Stopping the engine


In the turbocharger, the heat from the lubricating oil that continues to circu-
late must be dissipated.
CAUTION
Let the engine continue to run at idling speed for 5 to 10 minutes before
stopping it.

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8 Periodic maintenance

8.1 Foreword to maintenance


Maintenance work includes regular visual controls and cleaning operations which should en-
sure the trouble-free functioning of the turbocharger.
The exterior condition and the degree of contamination of the maintenance points are deter-
mined here.

The maintenance points described include:

Filter silencer

Compressor

Turbine and nozzle ring.

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8.2 Cleaning the filter silencer

81271
81270
81136
81137

81265

81266

81010

81135
Figure 21

81010 O-ring 81265 Filter ring


81135 Filter silencer body 81266 Cover grid
81136 Absorption segment 81270 Tension band
81137 Cover sheet-metal 81271 Lock

Disassembly and assembly


The disassembly and assembly of the filter silencer is described in chapter
Disassembly and assembly.
NOTICE

Remove filter ring (81265), if present.


Clean filter ring (81265) as required or every 500 hours of operation and replace after the
fifth cleaning process at the latest.
Contamination of the filter ring depends on the degree of purity of the sucked-in air.

Cleaning the filter ring

Rinse the filter ring (81265) with water and mild detergent or, in the case of heavy contami-
nation, soak and carefully push through. Rinse in cold water. Avoid high mechanical loads
(water jet).
Let the filter ring dry completely before assembling.

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Clean the absorption segments

(See Figure 21)

Remove the tension bands (81270).


Remove the cover grid (81266).
Pull out and bend up the cover sheet-metal (81137), and remove the absorption segments
(81136).
Clean the absorption segments (81136).
When cleaning, note that the absorption segments (81136) must only be cleaned lightly
with pressurized air, with a soft brush or a moist cleaning cloth.
Have any heavily contaminated absorption segments replaced by an ABB Turbocharger
service station.

Fitting the filter silencer

(See Figure 21)

Insert the absorption segments (81136) into the cover sheet-metals (81137).
Bend the cover sheet-metals (81137) into the original shape and insert into the slotted gui-
des in the filter silencer body (81135).
Fit the cover grid (81266).
Fit the tension bands (81270) and tighten them at the locks (81271).
Any tension bands that have become damaged must be replaced.
Fit the filter ring (81265), if present.

8.3 Cleaning the compressor during operation

Introduction

The instructions for wet cleaning only apply to cleaning with pure water and under the precon-
dition that the enginebuilder approves the process.

The contamination of the compressor stage (compressor wheel and diffuser) depends on the
degree of purity of the sucked-in air.

Deposits of dirt can form in the flow channels if the following substances are sucked in with
the air:

Oil mist or salt spray

Solid combustion residues

Dust

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The contamination of the compressor stage can have a negative influence on the compressor
efficiency and on the charging pressure.

On the engine side, this causes higher exhaust gas temperatures and increased fuel con-
sumption. The contamination of the compressor can also increase the unbalance of the rotor.

Periodic cleaning of the compressor during operation never replaces the service procedures
where the turbocharger is completely dismantled and the compressor is mechanically cleaned.

Cleaning interval

The time period between the periodical cleaning cycles depends greatly on the operating con-
ditions. Cleaning should normally be every 24 to 72 hours of operation.

If the specified cleaning intervals are incompatible with operation of the engine, please contact
ABB Turbo Systems.

Cleaning method

The compressor is cleaned during operation using the wet cleaning method.
This cleaning method is tested and approved by ABB Turbo Systems.

Principle of wet cleaning

To clean the compressor stage during operation, water is injected before the compressor
wheel.

The water does not act as a solvent. The coating is removed by the mechanical action of the
impacting droplets. The process is particularly suitable as long as the fouling is not too ad-
vanced.

Corrosion and deposits when cleaning


Salt water and cooling water treatment substances damage and adversely
affect turbocharger parts.
CAUTION
Only use pure water for cleaning.

Volume of water
Uncontrolled volumes of water can damage the turbocharger and the en-
gine.
CAUTION
Never connect injection tube to a water pipe or a larger metering container
other than that specified by ABB Turbo Systems.

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V-engines

On V-engines with several turbochargers per engine, parallel cleaning of both turbochargers is
recommended. This cleaning process is faster and reduces the risk of surging of the turbo-
charger.

Sequential charging

With sequential charging, it is important to make sure that all compressors are cleaned, espe-
cially after operating periods in the lower range of performance.

8.3.1 Prerequisites

To carry out the cleaning operation checked and recommended by ABB Turbo Systems, the
engine load must be 50 % to 85 %.

8.3.2 Wet cleaning of the compressor with external water pressure vessel

Turbochargers can be equipped with an external water pressure vessel (4) for wet cleaning of
the compressor.

1 Compressor casing
2 Pressurized air inlet pipe
3 Valve activator
4 External water pressure vessel
6 5 Screw plug
6 Water pipe to filter silencer or air suction branch
1
2
5

4
3

Pressurized air from the compressor casing (1) of the turbocharger passes through the pi-
pe (2) into the water pressure vessel (4). As a result, the water is pressed in the pipe (6) and
guided to the filter silencer or air suction branch.

8.3.3 Procedure for wet-cleaning the compressor

Operation of the water pressure vessel

Remove screw plug (5).


Fill container with 0.4 dm3 pure water.

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Screw in screw plug (5) again.


Push valve activator (3) against the spring and hold for 10 to 15 seconds until the whole
volume of water is injected.

Repetitions of wet cleaning of the compressor

Before repeating the wet cleaning or after the last cleaning, observe a minimum drying time of
5 minutes with the engine running.

The success of the cleaning can be recognised based on the charging pressure or the ex-
haust gas temperature.

If the cleaning is still unsuccessful after three processes and the engine values are unsatisfac-
tory, it is recommended to have the turbocharger checked and cleaned by an ABB Turbo-
charger service station.

Cleaning parameters for each compressor

Engine load Filling amount of water pressure vessel [dm3] Water injection period [s]
5085 % 0.4 10
Table 10

8.4 Cleaning the turbine during operation

Introduction

The combustion of fuels such as marine diesel oil (MDO) and heavy fuel oil (HFO) in diesel
engines causes contamination of the turbine components of the turbocharger. Poor quality fuel
in conjunction with a high exhaust gas temperature can lead to very hard deposits on the noz-
zle ring and particularly on the gas outlet flange.

Consequences of contamination:

Poor efficiency of turbine

Elevated exhaust gas temperatures

Higher charging and ignition pressures with increasing turbocharger speed

Lower engine performance

Experience in operation shows that, with periodic cleaning during operation, the interval be-
tween overhauls can be extended. The wet cleaning of a turbine described in the following can
be used for 4-stroke applications with heavy deposits (such as MDO and HFO applications, for
example). In general, turbine cleaning is not required for the other applications.

Periodic cleaning of the turbine during operation never replaces the service work where the
turbocharger is completely dismantled and mechanically cleaned.

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Very heavily contaminated turbines can no longer be cleaned in this way. In this case, the
contaminated components must be cleaned by an ABB Turbocharger service station.

Cleaning interval

The time period between the periodical cleaning cycles depends greatly on the operating con-
ditions. Cleaning should normally be every 50 to 200 hours of operation.

If the specified cleaning intervals are incompatible with operation of the engine, please contact
ABB Turbo Systems.

Cleaning method

The turbine components are cleaned during operation using the wet cleaning method. This
cleaning method is tested and approved by ABB Turbo Systems.

The precondition for wet cleaning is that the enginebuilder approves the process and these
regulations are observed.

Principle of wet cleaning

To clean the turbine stage during operation, water is injected before the nozzle ring.

Based on an injection phase of 10 minutes, this cleaning procedure uses the principle of water
solubility of dirt deposits.

8.4.1 Prerequisites

Corrosion and deposits when cleaning


Salt water and cooling water treatment substances damage and adversely
affect turbocharger parts.
CAUTION
Only use pure water for cleaning.

Recommended operating state for wet cleaning of turbine

Characteristic/component Conditions
Engine load (guideline value) 20 40 %
*) Turbine inlet temperature TTE before water in- 350 to 380
jection (guideline value)
Stabilisation phase after TTE has been reached 10 minutes
Water supply guaranteed
Differential pressure: Water to exhaust gas at the 1.5 bar
inlet
Table 11

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*) Compared to the exhaust gas temperature after the cylinder, the temperature at the turbine
inlet is higher. This must be taken into account when setting the operating point before clean-
ing.

If necessary, the engine performance must be reduced to meet these conditions.

The cleaning cycle can be started when the above conditions are fulfilled.

8.4.2 Procedure for wet-cleaning the turbine

Open the stop valve.


Adjust required water volume flow VW according to the table with a flowmeter and inject for
10 minutes.

Inadmissible thermal stress and flooding of the turbine


Smaller amounts of water can lead to an inadequate cleaning result. Larger
amounts of water lead to inadmissible thermal stress on the turbine compo-
CAUTION
nents and can cause flooding of the turbine.
It is imperative that the turbine cleaning parameters be observed.

Close the stop valve.


Then wait for 10 minutes for stabilisation.

8.4.3 Cleaning parameters for wet cleaning

Cleaning parameters

Product Temperature before Maximum tempera- Water volume flow Injection time
turbine (guideline ture before turbine VW [dm3/min] [min]
value) before clean- during cleaning [C]
ing [C]
A130 350380 450 4.0 10
A135 350380 450 5.5 10
A140 350380 450 8.5 10
A145 350380 450 12.0 10
A150 -- -- -- --
A155 -- -- -- --
Table 12

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Maximum temperature at turbine inlet during cleaning


During cleaning, the temperature at the turbine inlet will rise and may strain
the material significantly. The temperature at the turbine inlet can be up to
CAUTION
100 C higher than the exhaust gas temperature after the cylinder. This must
be taken into account when setting the operating point before cleaning.
Make sure the maximum temperature at the turbine inlet is not exceeded
during cleaning.

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9 Troubleshooting

9.1 Malfunctions when starting

Delayed start-up

Possible causes Remedy


Turbocharger Turbocharger contaminated Clean
Bearing damaged Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Rotor rubbing
Foreign object in the turbocharger
Table 13

Vibrations

Possible causes Remedy


Engine Vibrations from engine Contact enginebuilder
Turbocharger Rotor unbalance Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Turbine or compressor damaged
Bearing damaged
Table 14

Rubbing of rotating parts

Normal behaviour, not a malfunction


Turbocharger A minimal and uniform wear at the circumference of the rotor components, caused by
slight local rubbing against adjacent components is permitted. This causes the com-
pressor or turbine blades to be somewhat shortened. To prevent significant loss of effi-
ciency, specific tolerances must be fulfilled.
If there is any doubt about the extent of the rubbing, contact an ABB Turbocharger
service station.
Have a dimensional check carried out by an ABB Turbocharger service station.
Table 15

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9.2 Malfunctions during operation

Lubricating oil pressure too low

Possible causes Remedy


Engine Oil filter heavily contaminated Clean
Oil pump in lubricating system defective Check/replace
Manometer displays incorrectly Replace manometer
Turbocharger Axial clearance of the rotor excessive Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Table 16

Drop in speed

Possible causes Remedy


Engine Defect on the connected cylinders in pulse Contact enginebuilder
charging
Turbocharger Heavy contamination of the turbine Clean
Damaged rotor components or bearing Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Pipes Defects, such as leaks, in the exhaust gas Repair
pipes or charge air ducts
Table 17

Increase in speed

Possible causes Remedy


Turbocharger Heavy fouling of the turbine (on 4-stroke Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
application)
Table 18

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Exhaust gas temperature too high

Engine performance and engine speed unchanged

Possible causes Remedy


Engine Malfunction in the injection system Repair or contact manufacturer
Turbocharger Insufficient air, such as filter silencer Clean
blocked by dirt, for example
Compressor/turbine contaminated
Exhaust gas back pressure too high Clean or repair boiler or exhaust gas si-
lencer
Turbine damaged or eroded Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Charge air coo- Cooler contaminated Clean
ler Cooling water volume too low Fill
Inlet temperature of cooling water too Check/clean cooling system
high
Insufficient ventilation Improve ventilation
Table 19

Charge air pressure too low

Engine performance and engine speed unchanged, suction condition normal

Possible causes Remedy


Engine Air receiver not sealed Repair
Gas pipe between engine and turbine not
sealed
Injection mistimed Set correctly
Valve controller misadjusted
Turbocharger Manometer display not correct Replace manometer
Supply pipe to manometer not sealed Repair leak
Filter silencer contaminated, therefore Clean
pressure drop too high
Compressor/turbine contaminated
Compressor/turbine damaged Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Exhaust gas back pressure too high Clean or repair boiler or exhaust gas si-
lencer
Table 20

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Charge-air pressure too high

Engine performance and engine speed unchanged, suction condition normal

Possible causes Remedy


Engine Malfunction in the injection system Repair or contact manufacturer
Injection mistimed Set correctly
Engine performance higher than expected Check engine performance
Turbocharger Manometer display not correct Replace manometer
Table 21

Contamination of the compressor

Reduced compressor performance/efficiency, hence engine performance losses

Possible causes Remedy


Turbocharger Heavy contamination of the compressor Clean compressor
components due to the feeding in of venti- Optimize oil separation
lation gases
Increased vibrations, compressor blade Correct the feed of ventilation gases ac-
damage due to the feeding in of ventilation cording to instructions of enginebuilder
gases
Table 22

Reduced fatigue strength of the compressor wheel, compressor blade failure

Possible causes Remedy


Turbocharger Material of the compressor wheel cor- Correct the feed of ventilation gases ac-
roded due to the feeding in of ventilation cording to instructions of enginebuilder
gases containing corrosive components
Material of the compressor wheel cor- Prevent exhaust gas leakages in the en-
roded due to intake air containing exhaust gine space
gases or salt Clean compressor
Table 23

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9.3 Surging of the turbocharger

Surging of the turbocharger

Possible causes Remedy


Engine Protective grating in front of the turbo- Clean/Replace
charger contaminated or damaged
Turbocharger Filter silencer or diffuser contaminated Clean
Heavy dirt deposits in the turbine or in
the nozzle ring
Charge air coo- Cooler contaminated Clean
ler Charge air duct blocked
Table 24

Continuous or periodic surging


Possible damage to components such as compressor wheel, turbine blades,
bearing and filter silencer.
CAUTION
Have the cause clarified and remedied immediately by an ABB Turbo-
charger service station.
Have parts assessed for damage and, if necessary, replaced by an ABB
Turbocharger service station.

Sporadic surge blows

Surging of the turbocharger can occur during certain operating states such as when reducing
the engine performance quickly when manoeuvring. At the same time, the flow direction in the
compressor is momentarily reversed. Such sporadic surge blows do not impair the safe opera-
tion of the turbocharger.

A surge blow is accompanied by a loud bang and escape of hot air from the filter silencer.

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9.4 Malfunctions when stopping

Runout noises

Possible causes Remedy


Turbocharger Turbocharger contaminated Clean
Bearing damaged Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Rotor rubbing
Foreign object in the turbocharger
Table 25

Runout time too short

Possible causes Remedy


Turbocharger Turbocharger contaminated Clean
Bearing damaged Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Rotor rubbing
Foreign object in the turbocharger
Table 26

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9.5 Speed measurement system

Possible causes Remedy


No signal or poor Assembly fault The screw plug for the sensor is fitted with an additional
signal amplitude gasket (copper ring).
present This gasket must be removed when assembling the
speed sensor. If this has been inadvertently fitted, the
distance of the sensor tip to the sealing disc giving the
signal is increased. This reduces the voltage amplitude of
the speed signal which can lead to problems with the
evaluation electronics.
This problem will be remedied by removing the gasket.
Sensor defective Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
Measured speed Fouling of the sensor As the sensor tip is magnetic, it can attract material parti-
too high tip cles. This reduces the distance to the signal-emitting
sealing disc which can lead to amplification of the noise
component and, hence, to false triggering.
Dismantle the sensor, clean the sensor tip and refit the
sensor with the specified tightening torque.
Measured speed -- Contact ABB Turbocharger service station
too low
Other causes of -- If none of the measures described above remedy the
malfunction malfunction, it is recommended to have the speed meas-
urement system checked by an ABB Turbocharger ser-
vice station.
Table 27

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10 Disassembly and assembly

10.1 Introduction

The precondition for the work described in the following is a turbocharger removed from the
engine (see chapter Removal and installation).

Further operations
Further operations that are not described here must only be carried out by
trained staff of an ABB Turbocharger service station.
CAUTION
Only perform operations that are described in this chapter.

Marking casing position for assembly


ABB Turbo Systems recommends marking casing positions prior to disas-
sembly.
NOTICE

Identification of the assembly devices

Not all assembly devices are marked with a part number. Identification is guaranteed by the
tool list. This list is enclosed in the toolbox.

Servicing the assembly devices


Assembly devices must be checked for damage before and after use.
WARNING
Visual inspection for corrosion, cracks, deformation and wear.
Damaged assembly devices must no longer be used and must be re-
placed.

Customer spare part kit

Before starting operations, make sure the required customer spare part kits are available.

See chapter Reserve and spare parts.

Oil orifice

When disassembling the turbocharger, a fitted oil orifice must not be removed.

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Tightening torques for components of the turbocharger

The specified tightening torques of the screw fittings must be observed (see chapter Disas-
sembly and assembly, section Table of tightening torques).

Tightening torques for assembly devices from ABB Turbo Systems

Unless described otherwise, the screws and nuts of the assembly devices must be tightened
so they rest firmly against the surface.

Definition of terms

Attachment point
Defined loading point on a component or an assembly (blind hole thread, eyelet, lug).

Assembly device
Devices that are fitted on the turbocharger in order to obtain an attachment point. Assem-
bly devices are specially constructed and designed for the defined use, they are not trad-
ing goods. Use assembly devices only for the described applications.

Lifting gear
Equipment for the lifting and transporting of loads (ropes, chain hoist, crane). Lifting gear is
not supplied by ABB Turbo Systems AG.

Swivel lifting eyes to be used

Two swivel lifting eyes are required for the safe lifting of loads, which are not supplied by
ABB Turbo Systems.

Swivel lifting eye Turbochar- Thread Length Minimum load Number


ger type M L limit of
A130 M10 17 mm 100 kg 2
A135 M10 17 mm 150 kg 2
180
A140 M12 21 mm 250 kg 2
A145 M12 21 mm 300 kg 2
A150 -- -- -- --
A155 -- -- -- --

360
L
M
Table 28

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10.2 Weights of assemblies


The specified weights of the individual parts or assemblies are rounded-up standard values.

4
3
2

1 12
11

10
9
8
Figure 22

Designation A130 A135 A140 A145 A150 A155


[kg] [kg] [kg] [kg] [kg] [kg]
1 Filter silencer 19 30 40 65 -- --
2 Radial air suction branch 6 8 13 21 -- --
3 Axial air suction branch 4 5 6 9 -- --
4 Compressor casing 24 40 60 95 -- --
5 Wall insert 6 8 15 24 -- --
6 Diffuser 3 4 7 11 -- --
7 Cartridge group 40 60 110 180 -- --
8 Nozzle ring 2 2 4 6 -- --
9 Burst ring 2 3 5 12 -- --
10 Turbine casing * 1 inlet 45 65 120 190 -- --
Turbine casing * 2 inlets 40 60 120 180 -- --
11 Gas outlet flange 7 13 20 23 -- --
12 Gas outlet casing 30 35 65 120 -- --
Table 29

* Including burst protection

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10.3 Removing / Installing air-inlets


A130...A145 A150...A155

82000

82010
72020
51002

82010
82000
81010

81000
Figure 23

A130 to A145

Loosen V-clamp (72020) and remove filter silencer (81000) with O-ring (81010) or air suc-
tion branch (82000) with O-ring (82010).

A150 to A155

Undo the fastening strip connection (51002) and remove filter silencer (81000) with O-ring
(81010) or air suction branch (82000) with O-ring (82010).

Installing air-inlets

A130 to A145

Fit the filter silencer (81000) or air suction branch (82000) with the V-clamp (72020).

A150 to A155

Fit the filter silencer (81000) or air suction branch (82000) with the fastening strip connec-
tion (51002).

Observe tightening torque (See Table 33).

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10.4 Removing / Installing compressor casing

72000
a

77005
90042

77000

79000

79040
79041
72012

72011

Figure 24

Loosen screws (72011) and remove with the fastening strips (72012).
Attach swivel lifting eyes (a) to the compressor casing and lifting gear.
Remove the compressor casing (72000) together with the wall insert (77000).

Loosening the compressor casing with press-off tool


If the compressor casing cannot be loosened, it can be pressed off against
the turbine casing with the press-off tool (90042).
NOTICE

Axial force of the press-off tool


A high axial force can be generated with the press-off tool. If this tool is han-
dled improperly (pressing off with too much force on one side), this may re-
CAUTION
sult in damage to the rotor.
Use the tool on both sides alternatingly and make sure not to press off too
hard on either side.

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Disassembly of wall insert A145 to A155

a
90258
77000

77005

Figure 25

A145

Attach the lifting beam (90258) to the wall insert (77000).


Attach swivel lifting eye (a) to the lifting beam.
Remove wall insert (77000) using lifting gear.

A150 to A155

Attach the swivel lifting eye M8 to the wall insert (77000).


Remove the wall insert (77000).

Installing the compressor casing

To be observed:

Install the compressor casing in reverse order accordingly (See Figure 24)

Always replace O-rings (see section Reserve and spare parts).

Thoroughly clean the fastening strips (72012) before assembly.

Observe tightening torques (See Table 33).

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10.5 Removing the cartridge group

51007
51003
51002

90042 51006

Figure 26

a Oil-cooled bearing casing

Treat the threads of the studs (51006) with penetrating oil and leave it on.
Loosen nuts (51007) and remove Verbusripp washers (51003) together with the fastening
strips (51002).
Attach the lifting gear to the frame and loop around the bearing casing as shown.

Looping around the cartridge group


The loop can slip off and lead to serious injuries to persons or even to fatal
accidents.
CAUTION
Make sure that the surface for the loop on the cartridge group and the ro-
pe are free from oil.

Remove the cartridge group. After the nozzle ring has been removed, the cartridge group
can be placed on the service support (90012).

Axial force of the press-off tool


A high axial force can be generated with the press-off tool. If this tool is han-
dled improperly (pressing off with too much force on one side), this may re-
CAUTION
sult in damage to the rotor.
Use the tool on both sides alternatingly and make sure not to press off too
hard on either side.

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Removing the nozzle ring

90012

56001

90070

56005

51002
51000

Figure 27

Place the fastening strips (51002) under the nozzle ring.


Pull out the nozzle ring (56001) with the two extraction devices (90070) and the service
support base (90012).
Remove the labyrinth sealing ring (56005).

90012

Figure 28

Place the cartridge group on the service support (90012).

Measure axial clearance A and radial flexibility B (See Table 32).

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10.6 Installing the cartridge group

Nozzle ring compression

For the nozzle ring (56001) to be fixed during operation, it must be clamped between the heat
shield (42400) and the turbine casing (51000).

Measure dimensions A, B and S on cleaned surfaces.


Calculate compression (PD).

51000

PD = A + B - S

42400
A

42001
56001

Figure 29

42001 Bearing casing 51000 Turbine casing


42400 Heat shield 56001 Nozzle ring
A130 A135 A140 A145 A150 A155
PD [mm] -0.15 ... 0.15 -0.16 ... 0.16 -0.16 ... 0.16 -0.16 ... 0.16 -- --
Table 30

If the calculated value (PD) lies outside the specified range, contact an ABB Turbocharger
service station.

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Installing the nozzle ring

56001

56005
A

51000

Figure 30

Fit the labyrinth sealing ring (56005) and, for type A130 to A145, secure it with adhesive
tape (1). At the same time, ensure correct winding of the labyrinth sealing ring (see detail
A).
Align the cams on the nozzle ring to the recesses of the turbine casing (51000).
Insert the nozzle ring (56001) into the turbine casing up to the stop. Do not remove the ad-
hesive tape (1).

Installing the cartridge group

a a

51007
51003
51002
51006

90012
Figure 31

Attach the lifting gear to the suspension lug / eye of the cartridge group. For an oil-cooled
cartridge group, see detail a.
Lift the cartridge group out of the service support (90012).
Additionally, loop the lifting gear around the cartridge group as shown.

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Looping around the cartridge group


The loop can slip off and lead to serious injuries to persons or even to fatal
accidents.
CAUTION
Make sure that the surface for the loop on the cartridge group and the ro-
pe are free from oil.

Fasten fastening strips (51002) together with nuts (51007) and Verbusripp washers
(51003).

Observe tightening torque (See Table 33).

10.7 Radial clearances N and R


N1

R2

N
R
N2

R1

Figure 32

N and R

These are theoretical values for the radial clearance between the compressor wheel and the
wall insert or between the turbine wheel and the gas-outlet flange.

The minimum and maximum values result from the manufacturing tolerances of the compres-
sor and turbine wheel or the wall insert and the gas-outlet flange.

N1, R1, N2, R2

The clearances in the bearings and casing centrings are not distributed evenly because of the
rotor weight.

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Feeler gauge

N1/N2 or R1/R2, respectively, are always measured


at the same time using two feeler gauges.

The feeler gauges must be inserted without clear-


ance between wall insert/compressor wheel or gas
outlet flange/turbine wheel.

Measurement of N and R

N1 + N2 R1 + R2
=N =R
2 2

Figure 33

The measured average values must lie within the admissible values of radial clearance N and
R.

Radial clearances N and R [mm]

A130 A135 A140 A145 A150 A155


N 0.26 ... 0.60 0.34 ... 0.70 0.45 ... 0.90 0.56 ... 0.95 -- --
R 0.45 ... 0.70 0.51 ... 0.85 0.64 ... 1.00 0.76 ... 1.20 -- --
Table 31

Clearances outside the tolerance


Serious damage to engines or property can be caused by unauthorised clea-
rance values and excessively worn parts.
CAUTION
Have the components assessed and, if necessary, replaced by an ABB
Turbocharger service station.

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10.8 Axial clearance A and radial flexibility B


B

Figure 34

After the removal and the installation of the cartridge group axial clearance A and radial
flexibility B must be measured and recorded.
For correct measurement of axial clearance A the turbine must be lifted slightly.

Axial clearance and radial flexibility [mm]

A130 A135 A140 A145 A150 A155


A 0.08 ... 0.16 0.10 ... 0.18 0.12 ... 0.21 0.15 ... 0.25 -- --
B 0.47 ... 1.00 0.58 ... 1.16 0.70 ... 1.37 0.88 ... 1.56 -- --
Table 32

Clearances outside the tolerance


Serious damage to engines or property can be caused by unauthorised clea-
rance values and excessively worn parts.
CAUTION
Have the components assessed and, if necessary, replaced by an ABB
Turbocharger service station.

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10.9 Table of tightening torques


02 04 08 09

15

11 16
Figure 35

The following tightening torques must be observed for the designated screw fittings:

Tightening torques [Nm]

Item Part number A130 A135 A140 A145 A150 A155


02 72020 M12 M12 M12 M12 -- --
60 60 60 60
04 79041 M6 M6 M6 M6 -- --
8 8 8 8
08 51007 M8 M10 M12 M12 -- --
25 45 75 75
09 51008 M8 M10 M12 M12 -- --
20 38 65 65
11 72011 M8 M10 M12 M12 -- --
35 70 105 105
15 86505 M12x1.5 M12x1.5 M12x1.5 M12x1.5 -- --
15 15 15 15
16 51101 / M10 M10 M12 M12 -- --
51103 / 38 38 65 65
51104 /
61201
Table 33

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11 Taking out of operation at short notice Page 85 / 95

11 Taking out of operation at short notice

11.1 Possible emergency repairs

Danger of fire and explosion due to lubricating oil leaks


Leaking hot oil can ignite. This can cause severe injuries to personnel or ac-
cidents resulting in fatalities.
WARNING
Seal any oil leaks immediately.

Directives for taking out of operation


Serious damage to machinery or property can be caused by disregarding the
directives for blanking off the turbocharger on the engine.
CAUTION
Follow the directives of the enginebuilder.

If the engine has to be brought back into operation again as quickly as possible in the case of
turbocharger damage, a cover plate must be attached for the emergency repair.

Remove the turbocharger (see chapter Removal and installation).

Gas-outlet casing removed

Fit the turbine casing with the gas-outlet casing into the gas pipe again.
Attach the cover plate (see following section).

Gas-outlet casing not removed

Fit the turbine casing into the gas pipe again and on the gas-outlet casing.
Attach the cover plate (see following section).

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11.2 Attaching a cover plate

51000

51006

51002
51003

51007

Figure 36

Make sure that the oil connections in the bracket are equipped with gaskets.
Close the opening in the turbine casing (51000) with the cover plate (A).
Thoroughly clean the fastening strips (51002) before assembly. Coat the threads of the
studs (51006) with ceramic paste.
Fasten the cover plate (A) with fastening strips (51002), Verbusripp washers (51003) and
nuts (51007) on the turbine casing (51000) and screw it onto the bracket.

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11 Taking out of operation at short notice Page 87 / 95

11.3 Cover plate drawing


The cover is not included in the ABB Turbo Systems scope of delivery and must be manufac-
tured by the operating company according to the following drawing.

Material: General structural steel, in compliance with DIN EN 10025-2.

B4
B5
M

15

D1

R1
R1

B3
30

B2 B7 D2
B1 B6
Figure 37

Product B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 D1 D2 R1 M
0.5 0.2 0.2
A130 65.7 60 130 11.7 1.4 150 35.7 227.7 17 105 M8
A135 79.6 80 155 14.2 1.6 180 39.6 271.7 21 125 M8
A140 98.2 102 190 17.2 2.0 220 48.2 332.5 25 153 M10
A145 116.8 120 226 20.5 2.4 260 56.8 395.9 31 182 M10
Table 34

Dimensions in [mm]

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12 Mothballing the turbocharger Page 89 / 95

12 Mothballing the turbocharger

12.1 Taking the engine out of operation for up to


12 months

State of the engine lubricating oil

The turbocharger normally remains attached to the engine. The measures to be taken for
mothballing of the turbocharger depend on the state of the lubricating oil:

If the acid number (TAN) is less than 2 mg KOH/g, no measures need to be taken.

If the engine lubricating oil is replaced with a preservative oil and circulated with the pre-
lubrication pump before the engine is taken out of operation, no measures need to be ta-
ken either. Residues of old engine oil are flushed away in this way and the bearing parts
are largely protected against corrosion.

Preparations for mothballing

If the acid number (TAN) is greater than 2 mg KOH/g, the following mothballing preparations
are necessary after taking the engine out of operation:

Dismantle the turbocharger.


The rotor and bearing parts must be dismantled and subsequently refitted by an ABB Tur-
bocharger service station.
Clean all parts.
Coat plain surfaces of steel and cast parts with anticorrosive oil.
Fit turbocharger completely.

Rotation of the rotor in the stack draught

If the rotor turns as a result of the stack draught:

Fit a blind flange between the outlet flange of the compressor casing and the charge-air
duct.

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12.2 Taking the engine out of operation for more than


12 months
If the engine is taken out of operation, the following variants are possible with regard to the
turbocharger:

Turbocharger remains attached to the engine.

The casings of the turbocharger remain attached to the engine, the rotor and bearing parts
are dismantled by an ABB Turbocharger service station and stored separately.

The turbocharger is completely removed, either as a whole unit or in single parts.

For the measures always necessary for preparing the turbocharger parts for mothballing, see
section Taking the engine out of operation for up to 12 months in Preparations for mothballing.

If the turbocharger remains attached to the engine, see section Taking the engine out of op-
eration for up to 12 months in Rotation of the rotor in the stack draught.

If the complete turbocharger is removed, or the turbocharger is fitted again from the single
parts:

Seal all openings of the turbocharger with paraffin paper and wooden lids.

Only dry rooms with 40-70 % atmospheric humidity, in which no water condensation can form,
are suitable for mothballing.

State of the mothballed turbocharger

Check the turbocharger parts annually for corrosion


If there are signs of rust: Thoroughly clean parts and renew corrosion protection.

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13 Disposal Page 91 / 95

13 Disposal
Disposal must be environmentally compatible, competent and in compliance with locally appli-
cable regulations.

The turbocharger consists largely of metal (cast iron materials, steel, nickel-steel alloys, alu-
minium and bearing brass).

Further components are: Non-metallic materials (filter components of felt and polyethylene),
lubricants (engine oil), electronic parts (speed sensor and associated components) and ther-
mal insulation.

Dispose of metals as scrap metal for recycling.


Dispose of non-metallic materials as waste.
Dispose of residues of lubricants as waste oil.
Dispose of electronic components as electronic waste.

Handling of damaged thermal insulation


Damaged thermal insulation can lead to dust exposure. The glass fibres can
cause mechanical irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tracts.
WARNING
Avoid the formation of dust
Vacuum up dust with a suitable vacuum cleaner
Wear respirator mask for particles (P1 or P2 mask)
Wear work gloves made of leather
Wear tightly fitting protective goggles.

Dispose of thermal insulation as hazardous waste.

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14 Reserve and spare parts Page 93 / 95

14 Reserve and spare parts

14.1 Ordering spare parts


Please quote the following data when making queries and ordering spare parts:

Turbocharger type

Serial number (HT)

Designation and part number

Spare parts can be ordered from an ABB Turbocharger service station.

If different model variants are not taken into account in this document, contact an ABB Tur-
bocharger service station or an ABB agency.

Required customer spare part set (97070)

For the operations described in the operation manual, the customer spare part set (97070) is
required. These parts are only available in the complete set.

Part number Designation Quantity


42012 O-ring 1
61002 * Gasket 1
77005 O-ring 1
79041 Counter-sunk screw 2
81010/ 82010 O-ring 1
Table 35

* This gasket can only be installed when a gas outlet casing from ABB Turbo Systems is used.

Spare part storage


All spare parts that were ordered together with the turbocharger must be
kept intact and ready for use.
CAUTION
Carefully clean any rusted parts and grease them.

Dispose of replaced parts and parts that are not reusable in a professional and environmen-
tally compatible manner.

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14.2 View of turbocharger with part numbers


82000 42201*
82010 72011
79041
42012
79040 10900
79000 72012
77000

72000 77005
72050
(A150...A155)
61205

72020 61200
81010 (A130...A145)
61001

81000 61002

57002
57003*

51000
51500
57210

51002
56005
56001
51105*

86526*
86505*

86515* 86528*

Figure 38

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14 Reserve and spare parts Page 95 / 95

Part number Designation


10900 Cartridge group
42008 Socket screw
42012 (in the customer spare part set) O-ring
42201* Clamping nut
51000 Turbine casing
51002 Fastening strip
51105* Metal C-ring
61200 Burst protection
61205 Protective grid
57002 Gas outlet flange
61001 Gas outlet casing
61002 (in the customer spare part set) Gasket
57003* Metal C-ring
56001 Nozzle ring
51500 Burst protection
57210 Burst ring
72000 Compressor casing
72011 Hexagon-head screw
72012 Fastening strip
72020 V-clamp (A130 to A145)
72050 Fastening strip (A150 to A155)
77000 Wall insert
77005 (in the customer spare part set) O-ring
79000 Diffuser
79041 (in the customer spare part set) Counter-sunk screw
81000 Filter silencer
81010 (in the customer spare part set) O-ring
82000 Air suction branch
82010 (in the customer spare part set) O-ring
86505* Speed sensor
86515* Cable connector
86526* F/I converter
86528* Tachometer
Table 36

* Depending on the specification of the turbocharger

2010 ABB Turbo Systems Ltd HZTL2413_EN Version 6.0 October 2010
Product Manual 26580
(Revision A)
Original Instructions

UG-25+ Actuator

Installation and Operation Manual


This is the safety alert symbol. It is used to alert you to potential personal
injury hazards. Obey all safety messages that follow this symbol to avoid
possible injury or death.
DANGERIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death
or serious injury.
DEFINITIONS WARNINGIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
death or serious injury.
CAUTIONIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
minor or moderate injury.
NOTICEIndicates a hazard that could result in property damage only (including
damage to the control).
IMPORTANTDesignates an operating tip or maintenance suggestion.

The engine, turbine, or other type of prime mover should be equipped with an
overspeed shutdown device to protect against runaway or damage to the prime
mover with possible personal injury, loss of life, or property damage.
The overspeed shutdown device must be totally independent of the prime mover
control system. An overtemperature or overpressure shutdown device may also
be needed for safety, as appropriate.

Read this entire manual and all other publications pertaining to the work to be performed before
installing, operating, or servicing this equipment. Practice all plant and safety instructions and
precautions. Failure to follow instructions can cause personal injury and/or property damage.

This publication may have been revised or updated since this copy was produced. To verify that
you have the latest revision, be sure to check the publications page on the Woodward website:
www.woodward.com/searchpublications.aspx
The current revision and distribution restriction of all publications are shown in manual 26311.

The latest version of most publications is available on the publications page. If your publication is
not there, please contact your customer service representative to get the latest copy.

Any unauthorized modifications to or use of this equipment outside its specified mechanical,
electrical, or other operating limits may cause personal injury and/or property damage, including
damage to the equipment. Any such unauthorized modifications: (i) constitute "misuse" and/or
"negligence" within the meaning of the product warranty thereby excluding warranty coverage
for any resulting damage, and (ii) invalidate product certifications or listings.

To prevent damage to a control system that uses an alternator or battery-charging


device, make sure the charging device is turned off before disconnecting the battery
from the system.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper handling, read


and observe the precautions in Woodward manual 82715, Guide for Handling and
Protection of Electronic Controls, Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

RevisionsText changes are indicated by a black line alongside the text.

Woodward reserves the right to update any portion of this publication at any time. Information provided by Woodward is
believed to be correct and reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by Woodward unless otherwise expressly
undertaken.
Woodward 2011
All Rights Reserved
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Contents

REGULATORY COMPLIANCE ........................................................................III


ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE AWARENESS ................................................. IV
CHAPTER 1. GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................... 1
How to Use This Manual ........................................................................................1
General Description ................................................................................................1
Operational Features ..............................................................................................1
Inputs / Outputs ......................................................................................................1
Available Drive Shafts ............................................................................................1
Available Terminal Shafts .......................................................................................2
UG Governor Similarities ........................................................................................2
Hydraulic Pump ......................................................................................................2
References .............................................................................................................2
Serviceability ..........................................................................................................3
CHAPTER 2. MECHANICAL INSTALLATION .................................................... 7
Introduction .............................................................................................................7
Initial Operation ......................................................................................................7
Unpacking ...............................................................................................................8
Drive Shaft Rotation .............................................................................................10
Mounting Location ................................................................................................11
Drive Connection ..................................................................................................11
Control Linkage ....................................................................................................12
Oil Supply .............................................................................................................13
Heat Exchanger ....................................................................................................16
Recommended Service ........................................................................................16
CHAPTER 3. ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION .................................................... 17
Introduction ...........................................................................................................17
Unit Grounding .....................................................................................................17
Shielded Wiring ....................................................................................................18
Electrical Connections ..........................................................................................18
Customer I/O Terminal Position Assignment .......................................................27
Detailed Description of UG-25+ Actuator Electrical I/O ........................................28
High Potential Testing ..........................................................................................30
Insulation Resistance Testing ..............................................................................31
CHAPTER 4. DESCRIPTION OF OPERATION ................................................. 32
General .................................................................................................................32
Principal of Operation ...........................................................................................33
Fault Detection and Annunciation ........................................................................35
Shutdown Details..................................................................................................35
CHAPTER 5. TROUBLESHOOTING ............................................................... 37
Introduction ...........................................................................................................37
General System Troubleshooting Guide ..............................................................37
Engine/Generator Troubleshooting ......................................................................39

Woodward i
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Contents

CHAPTER 6. SERVICE OPTIONS ..................................................................41


Product Service Options .......................................................................................41
Woodward Factory Servicing Options ..................................................................42
Returning Equipment for Repair ...........................................................................42
Replacement Parts ...............................................................................................43
Engineering Services ............................................................................................43
How to Contact Woodward ...................................................................................44
Technical Assistance ............................................................................................44
APPENDIX A. ACRONYMS / ABBREVIATIONS ...............................................45
APPENDIX B. UG-25+ ACTUATOR SPECIFICATIONS .....................................46
I/O Specifications ..................................................................................................48
REVISION HISTORY ....................................................................................49

Illustrations and Tables

Figure 1-1a. UG-25+ Actuator Outline Drawing ......................................................4


Figure 1-1b. UG-25+ Actuator Outline Drawing ......................................................5
Figure 1-2. UG-25+ Drive Shaft Configurations ......................................................6
Figure 2-1. UG-25+ Actuator Overview ...................................................................9
Figure 2-2. Terminal Shaft Travel .........................................................................12
Figure 2-3. Linear Linkage....................................................................................13
Figure 2-4. Non-linear Linkage .............................................................................13
Figure 2-5. Oil Chart .............................................................................................14
Figure 2-6. Viscosity Comparisons .......................................................................15
Figure 3-1. Access Cover Instruction Label .........................................................19
Figure 3-2. UG-25+ Actuator Application Wiring ...................................................22
Figure 3-3a. Connector Wiring .............................................................................23
Figure 3-3b. Connector Wiring .............................................................................24
Figure 3-3c. Connector Wiring..............................................................................25
Figure 3-3d. UG-25+ Actuator Terminals ..............................................................26
Figure 3-4. Internal Block Diagram .......................................................................28
Figure 3-5. Correct and Incorrect Wiring to Power Supply ...................................29
Figure 3-6. Relay Driver Output............................................................................29
Figure 4-1. UG-25+ Actuator Front Panel .............................................................32
Figure 4-2. UG-25+ Actuator Functional Overview ...............................................34

ii Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Regulatory Compliance
European Compliance for CE Marking:
These listings are limited only to those units bearing the CE Marking.

EMC Directive: Declared to 2004/108/EC COUNCIL DIRECTIVE of


15 Dec 2004 on the approximation of the laws of the
Member States relating to electromagnetic
compatibility and all applicable amendments.

Other European Compliance:

Machinery Directive: Compliant as a component with 98/37/EC COUNCIL


DIRECTIVE of 23 July 1998 on the approximation of
the laws of the Member States relating to machinery.

Pressure Equipment Compliant as SEP per Article 3.3 to Pressure


Directive: Equipment Directive 97/23/EC of 29 May 1997 on
the approximation of the laws of the Member States
relating to machinery.

Marine Compliance (APPROVALS PENDING):

Special Conditions for Safe Use:


Wiring must be in accordance with North American Class I, Division 2 wiring
methods as applicable, and in accordance with the authority having jurisdiction.

Field wiring must be suitable for at least 105 C.

EXPLOSION HAZARDDo not connect or disconnect while circuit is


live unless area is known to be non-hazardous.

RISQUE DEXPLOSIONNe pas raccorder ni dbrancher


tant que linstallation est sous tension, sauf en cas
lambiance est dcidment non dangereuse.

Woodward iii
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Electrostatic Discharge Awareness


All electronic equipment is static-sensitive, some components more than others.
To protect these components from static damage, you must take special
precautions to minimize or eliminate electrostatic discharges.

Follow these precautions when working with or near the control.

1. Before doing maintenance on the electronic control, discharge the static


electricity on your body to ground by touching and holding a grounded metal
object (pipes, cabinets, equipment, etc.).

2. Avoid the build-up of static electricity on your body by not wearing clothing
made of synthetic materials. Wear cotton or cotton-blend materials as much
as possible because these do not store static electric charges as much as
synthetics.

3. Keep plastic, vinyl, and Styrofoam materials (such as plastic or Styrofoam


cups, cup holders, cigarette packages, cellophane wrappers, vinyl books or
folders, plastic bottles, and plastic ash trays) away from the control, the
modules, and the work area as much as possible.

4. Do not remove the printed circuit board (PCB) from the control cabinet
unless absolutely necessary. If you must remove the PCB from the control
cabinet, follow these precautions:

Do not touch any part of the PCB except the edges.

Do not touch the electrical conductors, the connectors, or the


components with conductive devices or with your hands.

When replacing a PCB, keep the new PCB in the plastic antistatic
protective bag it comes in until you are ready to install it. Immediately
after removing the old PCB from the control cabinet, place it in the
antistatic protective bag.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper


handling, read and observe the precautions in Woodward manual
82715, Guide for Handling and Protection of Electronic Controls,
Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

iv Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Chapter 1.
General Information

How to Use This Manual


The following summarizes how to install a UG-25+ actuator into a new or existing
system:
Unpack and inspect the hardware.
Mount and wire the hardware following the procedures and
recommendations in Chapters 23.
Specifications and Troubleshooting information are provided in the Appendixes.

General Description
The Woodward UG-25+ actuator is a microprocessor controlled mechanical
hydraulic actuator used in conjunction with an external governor for controlling
diesel, gas, or dual fuel engines, or steam turbines.

The UG-25+ actuator provides a fast-acting and high-work-output actuator,


without the need for any auxiliary devices such as a start booster or oil cooler.

The UG-25+ actuator uses an internal, self-contained oil system operating at


1034 kPa (150 psi) internal pressure with an internal oil pump driven from the
actuator's drive shaft. Oil pressure is maintained by a relief valve system with a
drain to an internal oil sump.

Operational Features
The UG-25+ actuator terminal shaft assumes a position which is directly
proportional to the (4 to 20) mA analog input signal.

Inputs / Outputs
The following inputs and outputs are available:
Input Power (single or dual)
Unit Healthy Status discrete output
Analog (4 to 20) mA input controlling terminal shaft position

Available Drive Shafts


The following drive shafts are available:

Standard
0.62536 serrated drive shaft
0.625 keyed drive shaft with 0.625-18 thread

Available (for special applications at additional cost)


Extended 0.625 keyed drive shaft

Woodward 1
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Available Terminal Shafts


The following output terminal drive shafts are available:

Standard
0.62536 serrated terminal shaft (25 ft-lb version only)
0.750-48 serrated terminal shaft (31 ft-lb version only)

Available (for special applications at additional cost)


0.562 / 0.625 D-shaped terminal shaft

UG Governor Similarities
The base is designed to fit any engine drive designed for a UG8 governor. The
terminal shaft location relative to the mounting base is similar to a UG8 governor.

Hydraulic Pump
The UG-25+ actuator is equipped with a Gerotor fixed displacement pump
(similar to the 3161 governor type) with a relief valve. The pump/relief valve uses
oil from its self-contained sump to provide 1035 kPa (150 psi) internal operating
pressure.

Two displacements are offered to cover the speed range up to 1700 grpm. The
large displacement pump (22.22 mm / 0.875 inch thick) is intended to be used
with actuator drive speeds from 350 to 1200 rpm. Running the large
displacement pump continuously above 1200 grpm will result in excessive oil
temperatures. The small displacement pump (15.88 mm / 0.625 inch thick) is
designed to be used with drive speeds between 500 and 1700 rpm maximum
continuous operation.

The direction of rotation is selected by pump housing alignment. The pump


operates in the selected direction only. The drive uses a maximum of 335 W
(0.45 hp).

References
The following publications provide additional information about installation,
operation, and storage of Woodward products. All are available on the
Woodward website (www.woodward.com).

Publication
25071 Oils for Hydraulic Controls
25075 Commercial Preservation Packaging for Storage of Mechanical-
Hydraulic Controls
50516 Governor Linkage for Butterfly Control Valve
03386 UG-25+ Actuator Product Specification
36684 Booster Servomotor

Contact your nearest Woodward Distributor or Authorized Independent Service


Facility about repairs.

2 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Serviceability
The UG-25+ actuator has no field-replaceable parts.

The UG-25+ actuator is not equipped with an overspeed trip function.


The engine, turbine, or other type of prime mover should be
equipped with an overspeed shutdown device to protect against
runaway or damage to the prime mover with possible personal injury,
loss of life, or property damage.

The overspeed shutdown device must be totally independent of the


prime mover control system. An overtemperature or overpressure
shutdown device may also be needed for safety, as appropriate.

Woodward 3
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Figure 1-1a. UG-25+ Actuator Outline Drawing

4 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Figure 1-1b. UG-25+ Actuator Outline Drawing

Woodward 5
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Figure 1-2. UG-25+ Drive Shaft Configurations

6 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Chapter 2.
Mechanical Installation

Introduction
This chapter describes receiving, storage, and installation requirements for the
UG-25+ actuator.

Due to typical noise levels in turbine or engine environments,


hearing protection should be worn when working on or around the
UG-25+ actuator.

The surface of this product can become hot enough or cold enough
to be a hazard. Use protective gear for product handling in these
circumstances. Temperature ratings are included in the specification
section of this manual.

Use of an independent device for positive shutdown, such as a fuel


shut-off valve, is highly recommended. Failure to comply with this
recommendation can cause personal injury and/or property damage.

Use of an external spring to return to minimum fuel is highly


recommended. Failure to comply with this recommendation can
cause personal injury and/or property damage.

Use of a predicted minimum fuel shutdown procedure is highly


recommended. Failure to comply with this recommendation can
cause personal injury and/or property damage.

Use care while handling and installing the UG-25+ actuator. Be


particularly careful to avoid striking the drive shaft, terminal shaft, or
the electrical connector. Abuse can damage seals, internal parts, and
factory adjustments. Do not set the actuator on its drive shaft.

Initial Operation

Before initial operation of the engine equipped with a UG-25+ actuator,


read all of Chapters 2 and 3, Installation Procedures and Electrical
Installation. Make sure that all installation steps have been correctly
accomplished and all linkages are secured and properly attached.
Carefully review the direction of rotation for the actuator oil pump.

Woodward 7
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580
+
Follow this procedure when putting a new or repaired UG-25 actuator into
service.

1. Check that the actuator is full of the proper type and grade of clean oil (refer
to the Oil Supply section in this manual).

2. Properly adjust the linkage (refer to the Control Linkage section in this
manual).

To prevent possible serious injury or loss of life, or damage to the


engine, be sure to allow sufficient overtravel at each end of the
terminal shaft so the actuator can shut down the engine, and also
give maximum fuel when required. Misadjusted linkage could prevent
the actuator from shutting down the engine.

3. Adjust the external control system to give a low Position Command signal to
the UG-25+ actuator to achieve a low speed setting to give low engine speed
at initial start-up.

Be prepared to make an emergency shutdown when starting the


engine, turbine, or other type of prime mover, to protect against
runaway or overspeed with possible personal injury, loss of life, or
property damage.

4. Follow the engine manufacturer's instructions, and start the engine.

5. Adjust the selected speed setting of the control system to bring the engine
to rated speed.

6. Obtain system stability by adjusting the control system's dynamics. (If less
than the recommended actuator output stroke is used, it may cause for less
than optimum engine stability or response.)

All operating adjustments of the UG-25+ actuator are made during factory
calibration. Additional adjustment should not be needed.

Unpacking
Be careful when unpacking the unit. Check the unit for signs of damage, such as
bent or dented panels, scratches, and loose or broken parts. Notify the shipper
and Woodward if damage is found.

Receiving
After factory testing and calibration, the UG-25+ actuator is drained of oil. This
leaves a light film of oil on internal parts to prevent rust. External parts are
painted or coated with a spray lubricant/rust inhibitor.

No internal cleaning or flushing is necessary before installation and operation.


The little oil left in the actuator is clean, multi-viscosity engine oil, which will not
contaminate the oil selected to operate the actuator.

8 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation
Fill the actuator with 2.1 liters (2.2 quarts) of oil selected to match the expected
operating conditions. (If the actuator is a direct replacement for a UG governor,
you may use the same grade and weight of oil that was being used in the
governor.) Use only new, clean oil in the actuator. Do not allow dirt or
contamination to enter the actuator while filling with operating oil. Do not use oil
drained from the UG governor.

L-Series
Electrical Connection
L-Series Controller

Oil Fill
Plug/Breather

Wiring Access Panel

Oil Level Gauge

Front Panel

Terminal Shaft

Case

Oil Drain Plug

Base

Drive Shaft

Figure 2-1. UG-25+ Actuator Overview

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UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Storage
The UG-25+ actuator may be stored for short periods of time (less than a year) as
received from the factory. For long-term storage (more than a year), storage in an
environment with large temperature changes, humid or corrosive atmosphere, etc.,
or if the actuator is installed on the engine for storage, fill the actuator with oil and
follow preservation packaging instructions in Woodward manual 25075,
Commercial Preservation Packaging for Storage of Mechanical-Hydraulic Controls.

Drive Shaft Rotation


The actuator drive-shaft rotation is one direction only. Rotation, as viewed from
the top of the actuator, must be the same as that of the engine drive when
looking down on the mounting pad.

If the actuator oil pump is rotated in the wrong direction, no oil pressure will be
generated in the actuator.

Be sure engine mounting-pad drive and actuator-drive rotation are


the same. Incorrect drive rotation will cause the actuator to become
inoperative, and may cause actuator damage.

Use the following procedure to change the direction of rotation:


1. Remove the four pump-housing screws located on the bottom of the
UG-25+ actuator.
2. Index the pump plate 180 degrees to align the arrow corresponding to the
direction of rotation selected with the reference notch in the base.
3. Replace the four screws, and torque the screws to 10.2 Nm (90 lb-in).
4. Make sure that the actuator drive shaft rotates freely.

10 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Mounting Location
Locate the UG-25+ actuator at a distance from sources of extreme radiant heat,
such as exhaust manifolds, turbochargers, or live steam lines. The ambient
operating temperature range of the control is (0 to 55) C / (32 to 131) F
(maximum allowable actuator case temperature is 100 C / 212 F max). In
spark-ignited applications, make sure the UG-25+ actuator is located away from
the ignition coil, and that harness wires are not routed next to the spark plug
wires.

As shown in the specifications, the UG-25+ actuator has been designed for and
validated to a given accelerated life vibration test level at the mounting surface of
the actuator. The user should be aware that in any application, bracket design
could significantly change the vibration levels at the actuator base. Therefore,
every effort should be made to ensure the bracket is as stiff as possible so that
engine vibrations are not unduly amplified, creating an even more severe
environment at the actuator.

Attitude
The UG-25+ actuator can be installed in a vertical or near vertical position without
affecting its calibration. Do not install more than 45 degrees from vertical. See
the outline drawing for installation instructions and dimensions.

Mounting Dimension
When using the O-ring supplied with the actuator to seal between the UG-25+
actuator and actuator mounting pad on the engine, the mounting hole should
have dimensions of (82.7 to 83.2) mm / (3.255 to 3.275) inches in order to
provide the correct amount of squeeze on the o-ring. The mounting hole must be
concentric with the drive in order to avoid side-loading the UG-25+ actuator drive
shaft.

Drive Connection
Make sure the UG-25+ actuator drive shaft turns freely before installing the
actuator. The drive gear or coupling must slip freely into the actuator drive of the
engine.

In case of a keyed drive shaft, torque the nut that secures the drive gear to
(34 to 41) Nm / (25 to 30) lb-ft maximum.

Do not apply external force. The drive must be free of binding, side load, or
excess end-play. Improper alignment or fit between the parts can result in
excessive wear or actuator-drive seizure.
+
Mount the UG-25 actuator squarely on the mounting pad. Torque the mounting
bolts evenly. There can be no movement or rocking of the actuator on the
engine-mounting pad.

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UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Control Linkage
The terminal shaft has a travel of 42 degrees. Use 2/3 of the total rotation
between no load and full load. The additional overtravel should be split and
used at both ends to provide maximum fuel when required and to assure
shutdown at minimum-fuel actuator position (see Figure 2-2).

To prevent possible serious injury or loss of life, or damage to the


engine, be sure to allow sufficient overtravel at each end of the
terminal shaft so the actuator can shut down the engine, and also
give maximum fuel when required. Misadjusted linkage could prevent
the actuator from shutting down the engine.

Many control problems are related to the linkage between the actuator and the
engine. Use only high-quality rod-ends for the linkage which will last under the
nearly constant motion associated with precise speed control. The linkage must be
stiff, not subject to engine-caused vibration. The linkage must be as light as
possible and still maintain the attributes of stiffness. Linkage which is too heavy
can damage the actuator as well as make it difficult to achieve steady control.

Installed linkages must operate smoothly, be free of binding, and free of lost
motion due to worn parts. If there is a collapsible member in the linkage, be sure
it does not yield each time the actuator moves the linkage rapidly.

Figure 2-2. Terminal Shaft Travel

12 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation
Use a linear linkage for most diesel applications. Most gas-fueled engines will
require a non-linear linkage. See Figures 2-3 and 2-4 for information on the
arrangements of linear and nonlinear connections. Linear linkage moves the fuel
setting shaft in direct proportion to the movement of the actuator terminal shaft.

Figure 2-3. Linear Linkage Figure 2-4. Non-linear Linkage

A non-linear fuel arrangement lets the actuator move the fuel setting more at
maximum settings than it does at minimum settings. Woodward application note
50516, Governor Linkage for Butterfly Throttle Valves, provides more information
about non-linear linkage.

Design the linkage so the power output of the engine is proportional to the
position of the actuator terminal shaft.

Follow the engine manufacturer's instructions on linkage selection, installation,


and adjustment. In almost all cases, the linkage designed for a UG-8 governor
+
will work with the UG-25 actuator, with the exception that the standard terminal
shaft size (for the 25 ft-lb version) is 0.625-36 serrated versus the UG-8 standard
size of 0.50-36 serrated. The terminal shaft size for the 31 ft-lb version is
0.750-48 serrated. In the case of a direct exchange, make sure that the engine
fuel linkage is in good condition and the installation of the terminal lever on the
actuator is in the same position as it was on the old governor.

Oil Supply
See Woodward manual 25071, Oils for Hydraulic Controls, for more details on oil
supply.

Use the information given in Figures 2-5 and 2-6 as a guide in the selection of a
suitable oil. Oil grade selection is based on the operating temperature range of
the actuator. Also use this information to aid in recognizing and correcting
common problems associated with oil used in the actuator. Many operation and
maintenance problems associated with UG-25+ actuators are directly related to
the selection and condition of the oil in the actuator. Use care in the selection and
make sure that the oil in the actuator is not contaminated.

The oil in the UG-25+ actuator is both a lubricating and hydraulic oil. It must have
a viscosity index that allows it to perform over the operating temperature range
and it must have the proper blending of additives that cause it to remain stable
and predictable over this temperature range.

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UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Figure 2-5. Oil Chart

The UG-25+ actuator is designed to give stable operation with most oils, if the
fluid viscosity at the operating temperature is within a 50 SUS to 3000 SUS
(Saybolt Universal Seconds) range (see Figure 2-6). Poor actuator response or
instability can be an indication that the oil is too thick or too thin.

Actuator oil must be compatible with seal material, that is, nitrile, polyacrylic, and
fluorocarbon. Many automotive and gas engine oils, industrial lubricating oils,
and other oils of mineral or synthetic origin meet these requirements.

Fill the UG-25+ actuator with about 2.1 liters (2.2 quarts) of oil, to a level visible in
the oil sight glass. After the engine is started and the actuator is at operating
temperature, add oil if necessary. Oil must be visible in the glass under all
operating conditions.

14 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation
Excessive component wear or seizure in the actuator indicates the possibility of:

1. Insufficient lubrication caused by:


an oil that flows slowly when it is cold, especially during start-up;
no oil in the actuator.

2. Contaminated oil caused by:


dirty oil containers;
an actuator exposed to heating and cooling cycles, which created
condensation of water in the oil.

3. Oil not suitable for the operating conditions caused by:


changes in ambient temperature;
an improper oil level which creates foamy, aerated oil.

Operating an actuator continuously beyond the high limit temperature of the oil
will result in oil oxidation. This is identified by varnish or sludge deposits on the
actuator parts. To reduce oil oxidation, lower the actuator operating temperature
with a heat exchanger or other means, or change to an oil more oxidation-
resistant at the operating temperature.

To prevent possible serious injury or loss of life, or damage to the


engine, resulting from engine overspeed or a runaway engine, be
sure to use only oil that falls within the 50 SUS to 3000 SUS range.
Using oils outside this range could cause the actuator to be unable
to prevent a runaway engine.

Figure 2-6. Viscosity Comparisons

Oil Maintenance
Replace the actuator oil if it is contaminated, and change it if it is suspected of
contributing to instability. Drain the oil while it is still hot. Flush the actuator with a
clean solvent having some lubricating quality (fuel oil or kerosene) before refilling
with new oil. If drain time is insufficient for the solvent to completely drain or
evaporate, flush the actuator with the same oil it is being refilled with to avoid
dilution and possible contamination of the new oil.

Woodward 15
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580
Oil that has been carefully selected to match the operating conditions and is
compatible with actuator components should give long service between oil
changes. Check oil conditions regularly and change oil if any deterioration or
contamination is suspected.

Regularly scheduled oil changes will extend the life of the actuator and improve
actuator operation. Properly selected oil should permit annual oil changes, but
more frequent changes are recommended. Too long an interval between oil
changes can result in sticking of components and plugged oil passages.

Do not remove covers or connect/disconnect electrical connectors


unless power has been switched off or the area is known to be non-
hazardous.

Ne pas enlever les couvercles, ni raccorder / dbrancher


les prises lectriques, sans vous en assurez auparavant
que le systme a bien t mis hors tension; ou que vous
vous situez bien dans une zone non explosive.

Heat Exchanger
A heat exchanger for the UG-25+ actuator is not available from Woodward.

Recommended Service
Carefully consider the choice of actuator oil with your oil supplier. Monitor the
condition of the oil, especially the build-up of deposits, to ensure that the oil
remains within the operating conditions defined by the oil supplier. See manual
25071 for more information on oil and oil maintenance.

To change oil, remove the drain plug and drain out the old oil. Flush the UG-25+
actuator by filling it with fuel oil, and with the prime mover running at low speed,
cycle the actuator. Let the actuator hunt for a minute or two, then stop the engine
and drain the UG-25+ actuator. Flush the actuator once again. Refill the UG-25+
actuator with oil (see Chapter 2, Oil Supply).

Restart the engine and reset the control system's stability.

Woodward recommends the UG-25+ actuator be overhauled after 20 000 hours


of normal operation to inspect for wear and to replace seals, bearings, etc. Units
may need to be re-manufactured/overhauled before that time if there is oil
leakage, parts become loose, or if the unit experiences severe operating
conditions of heat or vibration.

16 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Chapter 3.
Electrical Installation

Introduction
This chapter provides instructions for making the proper electrical connections to
the UG-25+ actuator. Detailed wiring diagrams and recommended wiring practices
are given to make the electrical installation as straightforward as possible. The only
input that is absolutely required is a power connection and a position command
signal; all others are optional features. All wiring and accessories (wire ferrules,
cable gland nuts, etc) are provided by the customer, but are shown in this chapter
for ease of assembly.

The UG-25+ actuator has an operating voltage range of (18 to 32) V (dc). This
input is protected against reverse input polarity, and consumes approximately 27
W maximum power at a peak current of 1.5 A (18 V) at 25 C. Maximum power at
the UG-25+ actuator is only realized if an internal fault occurs. Nominal operating
current will be less than 500 mA at 24 V (dc) nominal.

The control system should be protected with a 6 A fuse in the voltage supply
lines. The application should be configured to apply power to the UG-25+
actuator when the engine is first cranked, or slightly before.

Unit Grounding
The UG-25+ actuator housing must be electrically bonded to earth ground
through the mechanical mounting interface in order to ensure proper EMC and
Safety compliance. Do this using a 1" wide braided grounding strap with as short
a length as possible. The ground strap can be tied to the ground post on the front
of the actuator, directly below the user interface panel. Assure the ground strap is
in contact with bare (unpainted) metal.

Tie Ground Strap Here

Due to the hazardous location listings associated with this product,


proper wire type and wiring practices are critical to operation.
Do not connect any cable grounds to instrument ground, control
ground, or any non-earth ground system. Make all required electrical
connections based on the wiring diagrams (Figures 3-2 and 3-3).

Woodward 17
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Shielded Wiring
The use of cable with individually shielded-twisted pairs is required where
indicated by the control-wiring diagram (Figure 3-2). Cable shields must be
terminated as indicated in the control-wiring diagram using the installation notes
described below. DO NOT attempt to directly ground the shield at both ends or
an undesired ground loop condition may occur. It is best to terminate the shield
at the UG-25+ actuator, leaving the other end of the shield unterminated or
electrically floating.

Installation Notes

Wires exposed beyond the shield should be as short as possible, not


exceeding 50 mm (2 inches).
The shield termination wire (or drain wire) should be kept as short as
possible, not exceeding 50 mm (2 inches), and where possible the diameter
should be maximized.
Installations with severe electromagnetic interference (EMI) may require
additional shielding precautions. Contact Woodward for more information.

Failure to provide shielding can produce abnormal conditions which are difficult
to diagnose. Proper shielding at the time of installation is required to assure
satisfactory operation of the product.

EXPLOSION HAZARDDo not connect or disconnect while circuit is


live unless area is known to be non-hazardous.

External independent safety devices are always recommended by


Woodward. Fuse the Power Input +(Terminal 19) with a 6 A fuse.

This UG-25+ actuator does NOT provide for power-loss annunciation.


Woodward recommends that the device that is powered by this
UG-25+ actuator have an independent power-loss annunciation.

Electrical Connections
Prior to installation, refer to the wiring diagrams and the representative I/O
interfaces schematic in this chapter. Also, review the hardware I/O specifications
in Appendix B.

Use 1.3 mm (16 AWG) stranded copper wire with insulation that meets
temperature requirements in the harness design. A wiring harness stress relief
within 400 mm (16 inches) of the UG-25+ actuator is recommended.

Contain the harness with wire loom or sheath to make it into a single bundle or a
cable with an overall jacket containing the signal wires. Use grommets when
passing the harness through metal panels.

18 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Recommended Signal Wire Specifications


1.3 mm (16 AWG), Minimum Insulation O.D. 1.96 mm (0.077 inch), 65 C to
+200 C, 1000 V (rms), 19/29 Stranded Conductor, Teflon Insulation (TFE).

All field communications and commands enter the UG-25+ actuator through a
threaded port in the top of the UG-25+ actuator User Interface panel assembly.
These signal wires should be contained in a cable with an overall jacket or
bundled together with an overall sheath. To maintain the IP-56 ingress protection
rating, the field cable must be installed through a cable gland nut, which is
threaded into the cable entry port in the top of the User Interface panel. Several
suggested gland nut sizes are listed in table below, depending on the overall
diameter of the field cabling used in the installation.

Remove the wiring access cover plate located on the front of the User Interface
panel by removing the six M4 x 0.7, 10 mm long locking screws (Woodward part
number 1031-1806) to access all customer field connection terminal blocks.
Securely replace the wiring cover plate after completing the wiring connections to
ensure the integrity of electromagnetic noise interference capabilities of the
+
UG-25 actuator.

The UG-25+ actuator will not meet ingress protection requirements


unless the cover is in place. See Figure 3-1 for warning label found
on the inside of the cover.

Figure 3-1. Access Cover Instruction Label

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UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580
Slide the cable gland over the end of the cable with the cable gland threads
toward the cable end. Select the appropriate cable gland from the chart below,
depending upon the cable size.

Woodward Part Heyco Part


Cable Diameter in mm Mounting Hole Size
Number Number
1325-4007 4572 9.5 to 12.5 0.750-14 (3/4" NPT)
1325-4008 4573 12.5 to 16 0.750-14 (3/4" NPT)
1325-4009 4574 16 to 20.5 0.750-14 (3/4" NPT)

Remove approximately 100 mm (4 inches) of the overall cable jacket to provide a


sufficient service loop inside the User Interface panel to land the individual signal
wires on the proper internal terminal.

Strip approximately 10 mm (0.4 inch) of insulation from each individual signal


wire and crimp on a wire ferrule, Woodward part number 1606-667 (Phoenix part
number 3200043) for 16 AWG wire, to the end of each signal wire. Use the
proper crimp tool, CRIMPFOX 6H Woodward part number 8996-2197 (Phoenix
part number 12 12 046) to crimp the ferrules onto the signal wires with a
hexagonal crimp. The wire should extend to the end of the ferrule, but not
beyond it. If the wire extends beyond the end of the ferrule, cut the excess wire
off with wire cutters. The ferrule assures the signal wire does not slip out of the
terminal block in high vibration environments. Tinning (soldering) the ends is not
an acceptable option since the spring terminals will not grip the wires as well.

Remove the threaded plug from the customer wiring port located on the top of
the User Interface panel. Insert the ferrules and wires through the threaded port
far enough to hook up the wiring. Use the small terminal release tool (Woodward
part number ST-15011, WAGO part number 236-332), located inside the wiring
+
cavity of the UG-25 actuator, to assist in the insertion of the ferrule on the end of
each signal wire into its associated terminal location. The terminal release tool is
the best way to release the spring-loaded connection clamp located in the wiring
terminal block, but a thin, flat-bladed screw driver can also be used if the terminal
release tool is not available.

To provide better access to the terminal blocks, install wires going into Terminals
8 through 1 first, followed by the wires going into Terminals 16 through 9 next,
and then wires going to Terminals 22 through 17 next.

After installing the wires, apply thread sealant (Woodward part number
2001-4002, Loctite 572 or equivalent) to the NPT threads and screw the cable
gland into the customer wiring port in the top of the UG-25+ actuator User
Interface panel assembly. Make sure that the cables overall jacket extends
slightly past the cable gland so that the rubber seal completely and tightly grips
the cable jacket.

20 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Tighten the NPT thread to 10 Nm (88 lb-in).

Then tighten the cable gland top dome nut securely against the rubber gland as
shown below.

Incorrect
Installation

Do not over-tighten the top dome nut. Over-tightening the top dome nut causes
the rubber gland to bulge out the top of the dome nut, as shown above, and
compromises the IP-56 ingress protection seal.

Replace the wiring access cover plate and the six M4 screws holding it to the
User Interface panel. Torque all six screws to (3.4 0.2) Nm / (30 2) lb-in.

When routing cables, allow a sufficient service loop when routing the cable
around corners. Two customer cable clamp mounting holes are located on the
top, front corners of the User Interface panel and accept M5 x 0.8, 10 mm long
screws, Woodward part number 1029-972.

Woodward 21
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Figure 3-2. UG-25+ Actuator Application Wiring

22 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Figure 3-3a. Connector Wiring

Due to the hazardous location listings associated with this product,


proper wire type and wiring practices are critical to operation.

Do not connect any cable grounds to instrument ground, control


ground, or any non-earth ground system. Make all required
electrical connections based on the wiring diagrams (Figures 3-2 and
3-3).

The Hi-Pot jumper must be installed for normal operation, and must
be removed only during a Hi-Pot test.

Woodward 23
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Figure 3-3b. Connector Wiring

24 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Figure 3-3c. Connector Wiring

Woodward 25
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Figure 3-3d. UG-25+ Actuator Terminals

26 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Customer I/O Terminal Position Assignment


Terminal Position Description Comment Type
1 (TB2-1) No Connection N/A
2 (TB2-2) Optional Power Out Return for Supply Power. Output
(Return for 18 V to 32 V Do not connect Analog
(dc) supply input) Ground to this terminal.
3 (TB2-3) Analog Ground Do not connect Analog N/A
Ground to Input Power ()
4 (TB2-4) Chassis Ground This terminal connects to N/A
Chassis ground through the
circuit board, and then to
+
the UG-25 actuator metal
housing.
5 (TB2-5) Optional Power Out + This is an output only! Do Output
(Supply Power, 18 V to not connect external power
32 V (dc), 1.5 A max.) to this power output. This
output voltage follows the
Power Input(+) minus a
protection diode drop.
6 (TB2-6) No Connection N/A
7 (TB2-7) No Connection N/A
8 (TB2-8) No Connection N/A
9 (TB3-1) No Connection N/A
10 (TB3-2) No Connection N/A
11 (TB3-3) External Status Output This provides for a remote Output, open drain, low-
Unit Healthy status. See side switch.
+
UG-25 actuator
Application Wiring Figure
3-2.
12 (TB3-4) Shield This terminal is a N/A
conditioned shield tie point.
(capacitively coupled to
Chassis Ground)
13 (TB3-5) Position Command + This is the positive input of Input
the (4 to 20) mA circuitry
from the actuator's Position
Command signal.
14 (TB3-6) Position Command This is the negative input of Input
the (4 to 20) mA circuitry
from the actuator's Position
Command signal.
15 (TB3-7) No Connection N/A
16 (TB3-8) No Connection N/A
17 (TB4-1) Hi-Pot Test Jumper Input
18 (TB4-2) Hi-Pot Test Jumper Input
19 (TB4-3) Power Input + Supply Power, (18 to 32) V Input
(dc), 1.5 A max.
20 (TB4-4) Power Input Return for (18 to 32) V (dc) Input
Supply Input.
21 (TB4-5) Power Input Return for (18 to 32) V (dc) Input
Supply Input.
22 (TB4-6) Power Input + Supply Power, (18 to 32) V Input
(dc), 1.5 A max.

Woodward 27
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Detailed Description of UG-25+ Actuator Electrical I/O

Figure 3-4. Internal Block Diagram

Power Supply Input 1 (18 V to 32 V Power Input (+) at Terminal 19, Power Input
() at Terminal 21)
Power Supply Input 2 (18 V to 32 V Power Input (+) at Terminal 22, Power Input
() at Terminal 20)

The two power-supply inputs are high-signal selected using diodes, so the input
with the higher voltage will conduct, and other will remain in "standby" mode until
the first supply's voltage drops below the "standby" supply's voltage. Both can
remain connected, and there will be no electrical current flow from one power
source to the other.
+
The UG-25 actuator will handle a voltage range of 18 V to 32 V (dc), with an
absolute maximum of 60 V.

The power supply terminals are reverse polarity protected, and in the case that a
reverse polarity condition exists, the UG-25+ actuator will not power-up.

Woodward recommends using a 6 A fuse on the power supply line feeding


Terminals 19 and 22 of the UG-25+ actuator.

The input power must be fused. Failure to fuse the UG-25+ actuator
could, under exceptional circumstances, lead to personal injury,
damage to the control valve, and/or explosion.

If circuit ground and chassis ground are shorted together at the


UG-25+ actuator, there is an increased risk of EMI susceptibility.

28 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Figure 3-5. Correct and Incorrect Wiring to Power Supply

Woodward recommends using a standard 6 A fuse on the (18 to 32) V (dc) input
as show in Figure 3-2. Do NOT use a slow-blow-type fuse in this application.

Relay Driver Output (Status/Unit Healthy)


A discrete output is provided to serve as a status indicator, mimicking the front
panel Unit Healthy LED. This switchable discrete output is a closure to ground
capable of sinking 500 mA maximum with an output voltage rise of less than 1.5
V, and it is available to power external relays for devices such as alarms or fuel
shutoff solenoids. The circuit is protected internally against over-current and
inductive spikes, so external clamping is not necessary.

Figure 3-6. Relay Driver Output

Analog Position Command


This input accepts a 4 mA to 20 mA current input that comes from an external
electronic control system's speed setpoint.

The user must provide an external means to clamp the position


command input at 3 mA and 21 mA. An analog position command
input below 3 mA or above 21 mA is out of the normal 4 mA to 20 mA
input range and may cause the analog position command function to
become disabled even though the Analog indication LED remains on.

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UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

To avoid EMI interference between the wire bundle and the interface
panel, route the wires out of the connectors away from the panel
controls. Do not allow the interface wiring to drape in front of the
panel controls.

MAGNETIC FIELDSDuring installation, avoid placing the interface


panel in close proximity with any source of strong magnetic field
(permanent magnet motor, magnetized tools, etc.). Strong magnetic
fields can inject error into the adjustments available on the front of
the interface panel.

High Potential Testing


Occasionally, marine certification requires that a high potential (HI-POT) test of
the engine or prime mover be performed after the UG-25+ actuator is installed.
The UG-25+ actuator is designed to accommodate this testing. Before performing
any HI-POT testing, remove the small HI-POT jumper, Woodward part number
2008-1443, located between Terminals 17 and 18, which are found under the
wiring access cover plate on the front of the User Interface panel.

The HI-POT test voltage is +755 V (dc). Repeat the test with the polarity reversed
at 755 V (dc).

Apply the HI-POT voltage between all customer input and output terminals
(located under the wiring access cover plate on the front of the User Interface
panel) connected together and chassis ground (located on the front of the
+
UG-25 actuator), except that Terminal 4 (chassis ground) and Terminal 12
(shield) must remain un-connected and not electrically tied to the other terminals
during this test. The HI-POT test voltage ramp-up time is 5 seconds, and dwell is
60 seconds, or as specified by the certification authority.

Use the ground terminal located on the outside of the User Interface panel as the
chassis ground tie point for the HI-POT test. Using Terminal 4 as the chassis
ground tie point during the test does not properly check the internal chassis to
circuit board connection.

Do not perform AC Hi-Pot testing on this assembly.

Securely replace the jumper between Terminals 17 and 18 after completing the
HI-POT test to ensure that the electrical power surge protection on the electrical
circuit board is maintained during normal operation.

Install the jumper between Terminals 17 and 18 for normal operation.


The UG-25+ actuator may be damaged by power surges if this jumper
is not properly installed.

30 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Insulation Resistance Testing


Occasionally, marine certification requires that an insulation resistance test of the
engine or prime mover be performed after the UG-25+ actuator is installed. The
UG-25+ actuator is designed to accommodate this testing. Before performing any
insulation resistance testing, remove the small HI-POT jumper, Woodward part
number 2008-1443, located between Terminals 17 and 18, which is found under
the wiring access cover plate on the front of the User Interface panel.

Connect the plus (+) probe of a multi-meter to each terminal block location in turn
and the minus () probe to chassis ground.

Do not use test equipment that is powered from a power source that
exceeds 64 V (dc) to perform the insulation resistance testing. It may
damage the actuator electronics.

The resistance measured between each terminal block location (Terminals 1


through 3, 5 through 11, 13 through 16, and 19 through 22) and chassis ground
must be greater than 830 k.

Use the ground terminal located on the outside of the User Interface panel as the
chassis ground tie point for the insulation resistance test. Using Terminal 4 as the
chassis ground tie point during the test does not properly check the internal
chassis to circuit board connection.

Securely replace the jumper between Terminals 17 and 18 after completing the
insulation resistance test to ensure that the electrical power surge protection on
the electrical circuit board is maintained during normal operation.

Install the jumper between Terminals 17 and 18 for normal operation.


The UG-25+ actuator may be damaged by power surges if this jumper
is not properly installed.

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UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Chapter 4.
Description of Operation

General
The UG-25+ actuator receives a 4 mA to 20 mA Position Command signal from
an external electronic control. This mA position command is converted into a
direct proportional output position for the actuator's terminal shaft. This
conversion is such that a 4 mA position command directs the terminal shaft to go
to minimum position, a 20 mA position command directs the terminal shaft to go
to maximum position, and a 12 mA position command directs the terminal shaft
to go to mid position.

The actuator terminal shaft provides a maximum rotational travel of 42 degrees


for controlling diesel, gas, or dual fuel engines, or steam turbines.
+
The UG-25 actuator front panel provides a convenient operating interface for the
user, and includes:

UNIT HEALTHY LEDThis LED illuminates when there is electrical power


supplied to the UG-25+ actuator and the L-Series electronic controller internal to
the UG-25+ actuator is working properly. This LED turns off off if supply power is
removed or there is a fault in the L-Series electronics.

Figure 4-1. UG-25+ Actuator Front Panel

The control has a switching power supply with excellent spike, ripple, and EMI
(electromagnetic interference) rejection. Discrete inputs are capable of rejecting
EMI and variable resistance in switch or relay contacts. Analog inputs are
differential type with extra filtering for common-mode noise rejection.

32 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation
The control provides one discrete output, which provides a Unit Healthy
indication.

The UG-25+ actuator should not be used as the primary means of


shutting down the engine.

Principal of Operation
The UG-25+ actuator consists of the following 3 main components:
L-Series Controller
Assumes a rotary output position directly proportional to the (4 to 20) mA
input current from an external control.
Hydraulic Amplifier
Amplifies the work output of L-Series control.
User Interface
Provides local Unit Healthy status. Also provides electrical connector for
power and customer inputs.

The hydraulic amplifier operation is depicted in Figure 4-2, which illustrates the
working relationship of the various parts. The main elements of the hydraulic
amplifier are listed below:

Oil Pump
The oil pump is a Gerotor-type pump element, driven by the actuator drive-shaft to
provide oil pressure for the actuator. The pump is fed oil from the self-contained
sump.

Relief Valve
Set to maintain an internal operating pressure set at 1034 kPa (150 psi).

Rotary to Linear Conversion Mechanism


This mechanism converts the rotary output position of the L-Series controller into
linear motion required to operate the pilot valve of the amplifier.

Return Spring
The conversion mechanism incorporates a return spring which is used to move
the pilot valve to the minimum fuel position upon loss of function of the L-Series
controller.

Pilot Valve Plunger


The 3-way pilot valve directs oil flow to the control side of the differential area of
the power piston or towards the actuator drain.

Power Piston, Terminal Shaft Lever, and Terminal Shaft


The terminal shaft lever converts the linear motion of the differential-type power
piston into a rotary motion of the terminal shaft, which in turn moves the fuel
linkage. The terminal-shaft position is fed back to the pilot valve to provide the
proportional control.

Woodward 33
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Figure 4-2. UG-25+ Actuator Functional Overview

Increase in Position Command Signal


An increase in the externally supplied Position Command signal causes the
L-Series controller output shaft to rotate CCW when viewed from the top on the
UG-25+ actuator. This, in turn, causes the pilot valve to lift allowing control oil
pressure to act on the underside of the power piston. This oil pressure
underneath the power piston opposes the pump outlet oil pressure acting on the
topside and causes the piston to rise, since the piston bottom has twice the area
of the topside.

34 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation
As the power piston rises, the power piston rod moves with it and rotates the
terminal shaft, converting the output motion back to rotary. One end of the
floating lever is directly connected to the power piston rod and this end rises
correspondingly.

When the desired terminal shaft position is reached, the floating lever provides a
mechanical feedback/restoring signal between the power piston rod and the pilot
valve. During this condition, the pilot valve will be at its null position. Therefore,
the L-Series control and the hydraulic amplifier are proportional devices with their
positions a direct function of the externally supplied Position Command signal.

Decrease in Position Command Signal


A decrease in the externally supplied Position Command signal causes the L-Series
controller output shaft to rotate CW. This, in turn, causes the pilot valve to lower
allowing the control oil pressure acting on the underside of the power piston to flow to
drain. The pump outlet oil pressure acting on the topside of the power piston will
cause the piston to lower.

As the power piston lowers, the power piston rod moves with it and rotates the
terminal shaft towards the minimum fuel direction. The floating lever then lowers
its end coupled to the power piston rod and provides its position
feedback/restoring feedback to the power piston and pilot valve.

Loss of Position Command


Upon loss of the Position Command signal, the actuator terminal shaft goes to
minimum fuel, thus offering a safety feature. With loss of power supply voltage,
the L-Series controller loses torque and the force of the loading or return spring
causes the center adjustment to lower. The pilot valve follows, keeping the
control port uncovered. Trapped oil under the power piston escapes to drain, and
the servo power piston moves down until it reaches minimum fuel position.

Fault Detection and Annunciation


The UG-25+ actuator provides complete shutdown fault monitoring. A detected
shutdown condition forces the actuator to go to the minimum fuel (0 %) position.
When the shutdown condition no longer exists, the UG-25+ actuator is returned to
a non-shutdown state. Faults are globally set as non-latching. When the
condition no longer exists, the fault is automatically cleared without any reset.

Shutdown Details
ShutdownVoltage Sense Fail
Indicates an out-of-range signal on the input power. Could indicate input power
out of range or a fault in the supply voltage sense circuitry.

This shutdown causes the Unit Healthy LED to turn off and the External Status
output (Terminal 11) to open-circuit, turning off any External Status device that is
connected.

Failure levels: >33 V and <6.25 V


Persistence: 650 ms

Woodward 35
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580
ShutdownTemp Sense Fail
Indicates a failure of the internal on-board Temperature Sensor.

This shutdown causes the Unit Healthy LED to turn off and the External Status
output (Terminal 11) to open-circuit, turning off any External Status device that is
connected.

Failure levels: >150 C and <45 C


Persistence: 650 ms
Hysteresis: 5 C (<145 C or >40 C to clear)

ShutdownOverTemp
If the on-board temperature sensor reads a temperature above 125 C, this error
will be set. The Current Limiting based on temperature will effectively make the
output "limp" by reducing the drive current to zero (see Current Limiting Based on
Temperature section for details).

This shutdown causes the Unit Healthy LED to turn off and the External Status
output (Terminal 11) to open-circuit, turning off any External Status device that is
connected.

Failure levels: >125 C


Persistence: 650 ms
Hysteresis: 5 C (<120 C to clear)

ShutdownEEPROM Fail (internal fault)


EEPROM Fail indicates failure or corruption of the internal non-volatile memory.
This is a hard-coded internal shutdown. If detected, the control output will go
limp. A power cycle is required to clear this fault.

This shutdown causes the Unit Healthy LED to turn off and the External Status
output (Terminal 11) to open-circuit, turning off any External Status device that is
connected.

36 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Chapter 5.
Troubleshooting

Introduction
This chapter presents several broad categories of application failures typically
experienced in the field, possible causes, and some tests used to verify the
causes. The exact failure experienced in the field is the product of the
mechanical/electrical failure. Ideally, the troubleshooting chart contains
information about mechanical, electrical, engine, and load failures in addition to
the possible actuator failures.

The troubleshooting scenarios listed below assume that the user has a digital
multimeter for testing voltages and checking continuity, and assume that the
application has been engineered and tested thoroughly.

There are four parts to the troubleshooting section:


General Troubleshooting
Engine/Generator Troubleshooting

The actions described in this troubleshooting section are not always


appropriate in every situation. Always make sure that any action taken
will not result in loss of equipment, personal injury, or loss of life.

The UG-25+ actuator is not equipped with an overspeed trip function.


The engine, turbine, or other type of prime mover should be
equipped with an overspeed shutdown device to protect against
runaway or damage to the prime mover with possible personal injury,
loss of life, or property damage.
The overspeed shutdown device must be totally independent of the
prime mover control system. An overtemperature or overpressure
shutdown device may also be needed for safety, as appropriate.

The UG-25+ actuator is used on prime movers that typically have a


high noise level. Always use appropriate hearing protection while
working around the UG-25+ actuator.

The UG-25+ actuator wiring must be in accordance with North


American Class I, Division 2 or Zone 2 wiring methods as applicable,
and in accordance with the authority having jurisdiction.

General System Troubleshooting Guide


The following is a general troubleshooting guide for areas to check which may
present potential difficulties. Make these checks before contacting Woodward for
technical assistance.
Is the wiring correct? Refer to wiring diagram Figure 3-2.
Is the drive shaft rotation direction correct?
Is the direction of the stroke correct?
Is the direction of the failsafe shutdown correct?

Woodward 37
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580
Does the output shaft move through its proper stroke smoothly?
Does the output travel its full stroke?
Can mid-stroke be obtained and held?
Does the output fully seat (close)?
Does the output fully open?

Oil
Keep the actuator oil level to the mark on the oil sight glass with the unit
operating. Dirty oil causes actuator problems. Use clean, new, or filtered oil. Oil
containers used must be perfectly clean. Oil contaminated with water breaks
down rapidly, causing foaming, and corrodes internal actuator parts.

Preliminary Inspection
Actuator problems are usually revealed in speed variations of the prime mover,
but it does not necessarily follow that such variations are caused by the actuator.
When improper speed variations appear, the following procedure should be
performed:

1. Check the load to be sure the speed changes are not the result of load
changes beyond the capacity of the prime mover.

2. Check engine operation to be sure all cylinders are firing properly and that
the fuel injectors are in good operating condition and properly calibrated.

3. Check the linkage between the actuator and fuel racks or valve. There must
be no binding or lost motion.

4. Check that the actuator oil is clean and oil level is correct at operating
temperature. The source of most problems in any hydraulic actuator stems
from dirty oil. Grit and other impurities can be introduced into the actuator
with the oil, or form when the oil begins to break down (oxidize) or becomes
sludgy.
The internal moving parts are continually lubricated by the oil within the unit.
Valves, pistons, and plungers will stick and even freeze in their bores, due
to grit and impurities in the oil.
When in doubt, change the oil.
If this is the case, erratic operation and poor response can be corrected (if
wear is not excessive) by flushing the unit with fuel oil or kerosene.
The use of commercial solvents is not recommended as they may damage
seals or gaskets.
To change oil, remove the drain plug and drain out the old oil. Flush the
actuator by filling it with fuel oil, and with the prime mover running at low
speed, cycle the actuator. Let the actuator hunt for a minute or two, then
stop the engine and drain the actuator. Flush the actuator once again. Refill
the actuator with oil (see Chapter 2, Oil Supply).
Restart the engine.

5. Check that the drive to the actuator is correctly aligned and free of
roughness, side loading, and excessive backlash.

38 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Engine/Generator Troubleshooting
Problem Possible Cause Suggested Test/Correction
Engine hunts or The problem may be originating in Block the throttle, fuel racks, or steam valve in the direction
surges the actuator or prime mover. of increase fuel (never block the actuator output shaft in the
direction that would prevent a complete shutdown).

The UG-25+ actuator is not equipped with an overspeed


trip function. The engine, turbine, or other type of prime
mover should be equipped with an independent
overspeed shutdown device to protect against runaway
or damage to the prime mover with possible personal
injury, loss of life, or property damage.
That overspeed shutdown device must be totally
independent of the prime mover control system. An
overtemperature or overpressure shutdown device may
also be needed for safety, as appropriate.

If hunting and/or surging continues while the actuator output


shaft is blocked, the problem is in the prime mover.

If, after removing the block, hunting and/or surging starts


again, the problem can be in the actuator or in the prime
mover. Go through the dynamics adjustment procedure for
the prime mover control system. If the problem is still there,
replace the actuator. If the hunting and/or surging continues,
the problem is in the prime mover.
Oil varnish, which causes sticking Return the actuator to a Woodward authorized service
of parts. facility for overhaul.
Dirty oil (sludge) in actuator. Return the actuator to a Woodward authorized service
facility for overhaul.
Lost motion in engine linkage or Repair linkage and/or pumps.
fuel pumps.
Binding in engine-to-actuator Repair and realign linkage and/or pumps.
linkage or fuel pumps.
Actuator output shaft travel too Adjust travel until proper travel is obtained.
short to provide full fuel.
Low oil pressure. Return actuator for repair.
Fuel linkage incorrectly set. This Rework or reset the linkage from actuator to unit to obtain
might occur if the actuator has the linear relationship.
been changed or removed and
replaced. Relationship of actuator
travel to power output of engine
should be per engine
manufacturer's layout.
Faulty linkage. Linkage should be free of binding and lost motion
throughout service life of unit. Check yield links, shutdown
arrangements, etc, to be sure that prime mover power
changes for very small increments of actuator output shaft
travel. Stability and good steady-state performance will
suffer unless this condition is met.
Incorrect non-linear relationship Adjust linkage from actuator to gas valve to obtain linear
between actuator travel and relationship between actuator travel and engine output. See
power output of the prime mover. Figures 2-3 and 2-4. Also, see application note 50516.
Engine may hunt with light loads
and be stable with a heavy load.
Gas or steam pressure too high. Adjust gas or steam pressure.
Engine misfiring (bad fuel injector Check pyrometer readings of each cylinder and make
or low pilot fuel on dual fuel necessary repairs or adjustments.
engine).
Actuator dynamics/stability issue. See control system adjustments.
Actuator worn. Return actuator for repair.

Woodward 39
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Problem Possible Cause Suggested Test/Correction


Jiggle at actuator Rough engine drive or actuator Inspect drive mechanism.
output shaft drive. a. Check alignment of gears.
b. Inspect for rough gear teeth, eccentric gears, or
excessive backlash in gear train.
c. Check gear keys and nuts or set screws holding drive
gears to shafts.
d. Check for bent drive shaft.
e. Check serrated or spline coupling for wear and
alignment.
f. Tighten chain between crankshaft and camshaft (if
used).
g. Check engine vibration damper (if used).
Actuator is not aligned properly. Loosen actuator mounting screws and move the actuator
slightly on its mounting pad to align the drive shaft with its
coupling.
Engine does not Stuck throttle/frozen shaft Move throttle by hand. Assess smoothness, friction, and
start return spring force.
Power not applied to control Test for (+18 to +32) V (dc) between input power pin and
ground pin.
The actuator is The control has detected a Reset the control.
not opening the shutdown situation and has not
fuel control valve been reset.
during engine
cranking. There is no power supplied to the Check fuse, wiring, and battery voltage.
control.

The control does not read any Verify the speed signal to the control.
speed. Speed sensor defect or
wiring defect.
Engine unstable Improperly tuned dynamics. Tune the control system dynamics.
Unable to develop Non-indexed linkage slipped on Manually verify full travel of fuel linkage.
full power shaft.
Unit Healthy LED No power or voltage out of range. Verify supply voltage. Test for (18 to 32) V (dc) between
is off input power (+) terminal and () terminal.

Controller fault. Return actuator for repair.


Discrete output Wiring fault. Check the wiring leading to Terminal 11 for open
not working connections or misconnections.

Verify that Terminal 11 is not connected directly to input


power or ground.

Internal actuator fault. Verify Unit Healthy Status LED functionality. Both Discrete
out and LED are driven from the same controller terminal
and should activate together (L-Series Terminal B on
TB5-2).

Verify on/off command signal to discrete out using Service


Tool (overview tab).

40 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Chapter 6.
Service Options

Product Service Options


If you are experiencing problems with the installation, or unsatisfactory
performance of a Woodward product, the following options are available:
Consult the troubleshooting guide in the manual.
Contact the manufacturer or packager of your system.
Contact the Woodward Full Service Distributor serving your area.
Contact Woodward technical assistance (see How to Contact Woodward
later in this chapter) and discuss your problem. In many cases, your
problem can be resolved over the phone. If not, you can select which course
of action to pursue based on the available services listed in this chapter.

OEM and Packager Support: Many Woodward controls and control devices are
installed into the equipment system and programmed by an Original Equipment
Manufacturer (OEM) or Equipment Packager at their factory. In some cases, the
programming is password-protected by the OEM or packager, and they are the best
source for product service and support. Warranty service for Woodward products
shipped with an equipment system should also be handled through the OEM or
Packager. Please review your equipment system documentation for details.

Woodward Business Partner Support: Woodward works with and supports a


global network of independent business partners whose mission is to serve the
users of Woodward controls, as described here:
A Full Service Distributor has the primary responsibility for sales, service,
system integration solutions, technical desk support, and aftermarket
marketing of standard Woodward products within a specific geographic area
and market segment.
An Authorized Independent Service Facility (AISF) provides authorized
service that includes repairs, repair parts, and warranty service on Woodward's
behalf. Service (not new unit sales) is an AISF's primary mission.
A Recognized Engine Retrofitter (RER) is an independent company that
does retrofits and upgrades on reciprocating gas engines and dual-fuel
conversions, and can provide the full line of Woodward systems and
components for the retrofits and overhauls, emission compliance upgrades,
long term service contracts, emergency repairs, etc.
A Recognized Turbine Retrofitter (RTR) is an independent company that
does both steam and gas turbine control retrofits and upgrades globally, and
can provide the full line of Woodward systems and components for the
retrofits and overhauls, long term service contracts, emergency repairs, etc.

You can locate your nearest Woodward distributor, AISF, RER, or RTR on our
website at:
www.woodward.com/directory.aspx

Woodward 41
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Woodward Factory Servicing Options


The following factory options for servicing Woodward products are available
through your local Full-Service Distributor or the OEM or Packager of the
equipment system, based on the standard Woodward Product and Service
Warranty (5-01-1205) that is in effect at the time the product is originally shipped
from Woodward or a service is performed:
Replacement/Exchange (24-hour service)
Flat Rate Repair
Flat Rate Remanufacture

Replacement/Exchange: Replacement/Exchange is a premium program


designed for the user who is in need of immediate service. It allows you to
request and receive a like-new replacement unit in minimum time (usually within
24 hours of the request), providing a suitable unit is available at the time of the
request, thereby minimizing costly downtime. This is a flat-rate program and
includes the full standard Woodward product warranty (Woodward Product and
Service Warranty 5-01-1205).

This option allows you to call your Full-Service Distributor in the event of an
unexpected outage, or in advance of a scheduled outage, to request a
replacement control unit. If the unit is available at the time of the call, it can
usually be shipped out within 24 hours. You replace your field control unit with
the like-new replacement and return the field unit to the Full-Service Distributor.

Charges for the Replacement/Exchange service are based on a flat rate plus
shipping expenses. You are invoiced the flat rate replacement/exchange charge
plus a core charge at the time the replacement unit is shipped. If the core (field
unit) is returned within 60 days, a credit for the core charge will be issued.

Flat Rate Repair: Flat Rate Repair is available for the majority of standard
products in the field. This program offers you repair service for your products with
the advantage of knowing in advance what the cost will be. All repair work carries
the standard Woodward service warranty (Woodward Product and Service
Warranty 5-01-1205) on replaced parts and labor.

Flat Rate Remanufacture: Flat Rate Remanufacture is very similar to the Flat
Rate Repair option with the exception that the unit will be returned to you in like-
new condition and carry with it the full standard Woodward product warranty
(Woodward Product and Service Warranty 5-01-1205). This option is applicable
to mechanical products only.

Returning Equipment for Repair


If a control (or any part of an electronic control) is to be returned for repair,
please contact your Full-Service Distributor in advance to obtain Return
Authorization and shipping instructions.

When shipping the item(s), attach a tag with the following information:
return authorization number;
name and location where the control is installed;
name and phone number of contact person;
complete Woodward part number(s) and serial number(s);
description of the problem;
instructions describing the desired type of repair.

42 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Packing a Control
Use the following materials when returning a complete control:
protective caps on any connectors;
antistatic protective bags on all electronic modules;
packing materials that will not damage the surface of the unit;
at least 100 mm (4 inches) of tightly packed, industry-approved packing
material;
a packing carton with double walls;
a strong tape around the outside of the carton for increased strength.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper


handling, read and observe the precautions in Woodward manual
82715, Guide for Handling and Protection of Electronic Controls,
Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

Replacement Parts
When ordering replacement parts for controls, include the following information:
the part number(s) (XXXX-XXXX) that is on the enclosure nameplate;
the unit serial number, which is also on the nameplate.

Engineering Services
Woodward offers various Engineering Services for our products. For these services,
you can contact us by telephone, by email, or through the Woodward website.
Technical Support
Product Training
Field Service

Technical Support is available from your equipment system supplier, your local Full-
Service Distributor, or from many of Woodwards worldwide locations, depending
upon the product and application. This service can assist you with technical
questions or problem solving during the normal business hours of the Woodward
location you contact. Emergency assistance is also available during non-business
hours by phoning Woodward and stating the urgency of your problem.

Product Training is available as standard classes at many of our worldwide


locations. We also offer customized classes, which can be tailored to your needs
and can be held at one of our locations or at your site. This training, conducted
by experienced personnel, will assure that you will be able to maintain system
reliability and availability.

Field Service engineering on-site support is available, depending on the product


and location, from many of our worldwide locations or from one of our Full-
Service Distributors. The field engineers are experienced both on Woodward
products as well as on much of the non-Woodward equipment with which our
products interface.

For information on these services, please contact us via telephone, email us, or
use our website: www.woodward.com.

Woodward 43
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

How to Contact Woodward


For assistance, call one of the following Woodward facilities to obtain the address
and phone number of the facility nearest your location where you will be able to
get information and service.

Electrical Power Systems Engine Systems Turbine Systems


Facility---------------- Phone Number Facility---------------- Phone Number Facility---------------- Phone Number
Brazil ------------- +55 (19) 3708 4800 Brazil ------------- +55 (19) 3708 4800 Brazil ------------- +55 (19) 3708 4800
China ----------- +86 (512) 6762 6727 China ----------- +86 (512) 6762 6727 China ----------- +86 (512) 6762 6727
Germany--------- +49 (0) 21 52 14 51 Germany---------- +49 (711) 78954-0 India --------------- +91 (129) 4097100
India --------------- +91 (129) 4097100 India --------------- +91 (129) 4097100 Japan -------------- +81 (43) 213-2191
Japan -------------- +81 (43) 213-2191 Japan -------------- +81 (43) 213-2191 Korea -------------- +82 (51) 636-7080
Korea -------------- +82 (51) 636-7080 Korea -------------- +82 (51) 636-7080 The Netherlands - +31 (23) 5661111
Poland--------------- +48 12 295 13 00 The Netherlands - +31 (23) 5661111 Poland--------------- +48 12 295 13 00
United States ---- +1 (970) 482-5811 United States ---- +1 (970) 482-5811 United States ---- +1 (970) 482-5811

You can also locate your nearest Woodward distributor or service facility on our
website at:
www.woodward.com/directory.aspx

Technical Assistance
If you need to telephone for technical assistance, you will need to provide the following information.
Please write it down here before phoning:

Your Name
Site Location
Phone Number
Fax Number
Engine/Turbine Model Number
Manufacturer
Number of Cylinders (if applicable)
Type of Fuel (gas, gaseous, steam, etc)
Rating
Application
Control/Governor #1
Woodward Part Number & Rev. Letter
Control Description or Governor Type
Serial Number
Control/Governor #2
Woodward Part Number & Rev. Letter
Control Description or Governor Type
Serial Number
Control/Governor #3
Woodward Part Number & Rev. Letter
Control Description or Governor Type
Serial Number

If you have an electronic or programmable control, please have the adjustment setting positions or
the menu settings written down and with you at the time of the call.

44 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation

Appendix A.
Acronyms / Abbreviations

CCW counterclockwise
CW clockwise
CMRR common-mode rejection ratio
CRC cyclic redundancy count
EMC electro-magnetic compatibility
I/O inputs/outputs
L-Series Woodward electronic engine governor that contains both a rotary
governor and a controller circuit board
O.D. outside diameter
OEM original equipment manufacturer
PID proportional/integral/derivative
ppm parts per million
TPS travel position sensor

Woodward 45
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

Appendix B.
+
UG-25 Actuator Specifications
Actuator
Power Supply (18 to 32) V (dc), dual inputs at 2.5 A max. each
Power Consumption Reverse polarity protection, 32 W max

Torque/Work Output (minimum):


Standard Version
(0.625 inch diameter terminal shaft) 45.4 Nm (33.5 lb-ft) torque; 32.9 J (24.3 ft-lb) of
work over 42 degrees
Increased Output Version
(0.75 inch diameter terminal shaft) 55.5 Nm (40.9 lb-ft) torque; 40.2 J (29.6 ft-lb) of
work over 42 degrees

Continuous Speed 500 rpm to 1700 rpm (drive shaft speed) max
(0.625 inch pump);
350 rpm to 1200 rpm (drive shaft speed) max
(0.875 inch pump)
Hysteresis 1.0 % or less (measured over full terminal shaft
travel)
Temperature Drift 1.0 % of full terminal shaft travel between 27 C
and 77 C (80 F and 170 F)
Linearity 2.5 % or less (measured over full terminal shaft
travel)
Slew Rate 180 degrees/second or better at full actuator oil
pressure for 34 J (25 ft-lb) of work output
145 degrees/second or better at full actuator oil
pressure for 41 J (31 ft-lb) of work output

NOTEAll performance specifications are valid


while operating at a case temperature between
71 C and 93 C (160 F to 200 F) with an oil
viscosity of 20 cSt to 65 cSt (100 to 300 SUS).

Weight 27 kg (60 lb), dry weight


Customer Connections Terminal blocks located inside front access plate
(field wiring enters the top of the unit through a
cable gland available commercially or from
Woodward)

Actuator Drive / Hydraulic System


Input Shaft Options 0.625 keyed drive shaft with 0.625-18 threads or
0.625-36 serrated
Output 42.2 0.6 degrees rotary
Terminal Shaft Options 0.625-36 serration (34 J / 25 ft-lb version)
0.750-48 serration (41 J / 31 ft-lb version)
Drive Power Requirement 335 W (0.45 hp) max.
Internal Hydraulic Pressure 1034 kPa (150 psi)
Oil Self-contained sump (2.1 L / 2.2 quart capacity).
See Woodward manual 25071, Oils for
Hydraulic Controls, for oil recommendations.
Drive Rotation Pump can be configured to operate in CW or
CCW direction

46 Woodward
Manual 26580 UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation
Environment
Ambient Operating Temperature (0 to 55) C / (32 to 131) F
Actuator Case Temperature 100 C (212 F) maximum
Storage Temperature (40 to +85) C / (40 to +185) F, limited by
electronics
EMC EN61000-6-4, 2007: EMC Part 6-4: Generic
StandardsEmissions for Industrial
Environments
EN61000-6-2, 2005: EMC Part 6-2: Generic
StandardsImmunity for Industrial
Environments
Humidity US MIL-STD 810E, Method 507.3, Procedure III
Shock MS1-40G 11 ms sawtooth
Vibration Validation Power Spectral Density (PSD) must not exceed
the level or frequency as shown in the curve
while the governor is running on a loaded
engine, as measured at governor base.

Frequency Allowed PSD


(Hz) Level (G/Hz)
20 0.00240
40 0.00414
80 0.00736
220 0.00736
540 0.03197
700 0.03197
860 0.05453
1340 0.07452
1480 0.05339
1960 0.01595

Thermal Shock SAE J1455, Paragraph 4.1.3.2


Ingress Protection IP45 for entire unit. IP56 for User Interface per
EN60529 and only if proper cable glands are
used as described in this manual.
Functions
I/O (4 to 20) mA analog Position Command control signal
Unit Healthy discrete out
Front Panel Indications Unit Healthy status indication

Woodward 47
UG-25+ Actuator Installation and Operation Manual 26580

I/O Specifications
Power Input (1 and 2)
Parameter Value
Range (18 to 32) V (dc)
Power Consumption Nominal consumption is less than 500
mA. If internal failures occur, the device
can draw 32 W maximum. (18 V @ 1.8 A)
Protection Reverse-polarity protected
Isolation None

Status (Unit Health) Output


Parameter Value
Output Type Low-side output driver
Max Contact Voltage (Open) 32 V
Max Current 0.5 A
Max Contact Voltage at 0.5 A (Closed) 1.5 V
Max Delay Time for Opening Contact 6.5 ms
Default at Power Up On (conducting), if there are no faults
During Error Condition Off
Driving Inductive Loads Yes, internally protected low-side switch
Protection Utilizes circuitry that will open the contact
when output contacts are short-circuited.
Self-resetting when fault is removed

Position Command
Parameter Value
Input Type (4 to 20) mA
Input Scaling 4 mA is minimum position signal
20 mA is maximum position signal
Max Input (Full Scale) 0 mA to 25 mA
Input type Differential
3 db Circuit Bandwidth 30 Hz
Input Impedance 200
Anti-Aliasing Filter 1 anti-aliasing pole at 0.47 ms (338 Hz)
Resolution 10 bits
Accuracy 0.8 % of full scale at 25 C
Drift 80 ppm/C
I/O Latency 6.5 ms
CMRR 60 dB
Common-Mode Range 45 V (dc)

48 Woodward
Revision History

Changes in Revision A
Figure 1-1Updated call-outs
Figure 1-2Updated dimension lines
We appreciate your comments about the content of our publications.
Send comments to: icinfo@woodward.com

Please reference publication 26580A.

PO Box 1519, Fort Collins CO 80522-1519, USA


1000 East Drake Road, Fort Collins CO 80525, USA
Phone +1 (970) 482-5811 Fax +1 (970) 498-3058

Email and Websitewww.woodward.com

Woodward has company-owned plants, subsidiaries, and branches,


as well as authorized distributors and other authorized service and sales facilities throughout the world.
Complete address / phone / fax / email information for all locations is available on our website.

2012/3/Colorado
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
OF
TURNING GEAR
FOR DIESEL ENGINES

YRTG (H32-40)

YURIM INDUSTRIAL CO., LTD.


#26-2 SANKYUK 2-DONG, BUK-KU DAEGU(702-012), S-KOREA
TEL : 82-53-384-4894 FAX : 82-53-384-0030
INDEX

1. SPECIFICATIONS 1

2. GENERAL CONSTRUCTION
OF YURIM TURNING GEARS 2

3. MAINTENANCE 3

4. LUBRICATING OIL 3

5. OPERATION PROCEDURE 5
FOR MANUAL OPERATION

6. REPLACEMENT OF PARTS 6

7. DISASSEMBLE 6
& ASSEMBLE

8. INSTALLATION 7

9. MAINTENANCE 8
& SERVICING PROCEDURES

10. BRAKE 10

11. ASSEMBLY DRAWING 10

12. SPARE PARTS 10


1. 1. SPECIFICATIONS

1. : 0.75 Kw, 4, 440V,60 Hz 1. MOTOR : 0.75 Kw,4POLES,440V,60 Hz


2. : DC 90 V 2. BRAKE : DC 90V
3. : 1/243.36 3. REDUCION RATIO : 1/243.36
4. : 7.07 RPM 4. OUTPUT SPEED : 7.07 RPM
5. : 78 Kg-m (NOMINAL) 5. OUTPUT TORQUE : 78 Kg-m (NOMINAL)
149Kg-m (INITIAL BREAK 149Kg-m (INITIAL BREAK
-AWAY MOMENT) -AWAY MOMENT)

2. 2.GENERAL CONSTRUCTION
OF YURIM TURNING GEARS
( ) YURIM TURNING GEAR(hereinafter referred to as
1 TURNING GEAR) is reduced by first Geared motor.
2 After that second Bevel gear in Gear box, and that
,3 third Helical Gear. So, The construction of Turning
Gear consisits of gears which has simple, high reduc
. tion ratio, and the shape of unparalleled reliability.
The output shaft can be rotated either clockwise or
. anticlockwise. Each gears is manufactured
in high precision with good materials and optimum
heat treatments(hardening). Also, Turning Gear
. has device to relief first impulsion when it is
started up. Even if you are an unskilled operator,
you can handle it easily. however, An improper
handling may be caused an unexpected trouble,
herefore you must read operating manual certainly
. and carefully before starting Turning Gear. All the
time, Turning Gear should be used at normal con-
-dition. It is righe, if only it can be used momentary
. at Max. tourque condition may cause the life of
, Turning Gear to be shorten, resulting in the damage
, , of E-Motor & Bearing.
.
3. 3.MAINTENANCE
, . Tighten loose bolts & nuts check up.
Check the level of gear oil and supply oil if
. necessary. Pay attention to noise, vibration
and abnormal rise of temp. during initial start.
, . The temperature of T/G casing may rise more
10-40 10 to 40 than that of ambience, but it will be kept
. up the optimum temperature when T/G is reached a
constant running. In the event of excessive heat,
. noise and vibration during running, stop immediately
, and check it. Try it again after repair.
,
.

4. 4.LUBRICATING OIL
The oil supply method of the internal parts of gear
box is self-lubricating(oil bath system) and gear head
. is adopted by Grease method.
, , Kinds of oil & grease and the times of exchanging
. oil follow "LUB OIL LIST". Before operating,
supply the designated lub.oil so that oil level is
5 just above the indication line of the oil gauge.
However, renew gear oil once a half year under
. the severe condition or in order to recove foreign
1 particles after initial running.
1 ,
6
.

* Exchanging oil
1. (YU-H32-40-012) 1. Loosen drain plug.(YU-H32-40-012)
2. 2. Drain out the oil throughly.
3. 3. Retighten drain plug after sealing
4.(YU-H32-40-014) the screw with Teflon.
5. . 4. Loosen the air vent plug.(YU-H32-40-014)
, 5. Renewed the oil into the gear box
. through the pipe.
LUBRICATING METHOD AND INTERVAL



Information
Method of
Quantity of Interval
Lubricating
lub.oil


1
Internal parts APPROX.14
OIL BATH ONCE A YEAR
of gear box

2500-3000
APPROX. 100g
Gear head GREASE 2500-3000 HR

Practicable Application Lub.Oil

MAKER GEAR OIL GREASE

CASTROL ALPHA SP 460 SHPEEROL EPL2

CALTEX MEROPA 460 MULTIFAK EP2

SK SUPER GEAR EP 460 CROWN EP2

ESSO SPARATAN EP 460 BEACON EP2

SHELL OMALA 460 ALAVANIA EP2

BP ENERGOL GR-XP 460 ENERGREASE LS EP2

ISU CARTER EP 460 MULTIS DEP2


5. 5. OPERATION PROCEDURE FOR
MANUAL OPERATION
Operate emergency method as follows when
E-MOTOR can not rotate well by damage or the
. failure of electric power.

5-1 5-1
Extract the fixing pin of handwheel.
.

5-2 5-2
4 . Loosen and extract the bolts(4ea) of brake cover

5-3 5-3
(M8X40L) 2 By tightening the bolts(M8X40L) to the clockwise,
,(B3) (B7) the pushing disc(B3) pushes the spring(B7) and the
brake is released.

5-4 5-4
YU-H32-40-B02 Turn the handle after engaging with output shaft as
Drawing(YU-H32-40-B02).
.

5-5 5-5
Return to the original state in the opposite order
. after completing manual operation.

5-6 5-6
Check the contact between pushing disc(B3) and
(M8X40L)) 2 friction disc(B2) whether it is closely adhered(Before
(B3) (B2) normal operation, the contact will be come close
. by tighting bolts(M8X40L) to the anticlockwise.
Operate T/G after re-assembling the brake cover
. certainly.

5-7 5-7
Fix the handle of output shaft to the original state.
.

6. 6.REPLACEMENT OF PARTS
6-1 6-1
() As gears & shafts are of special design, contact
. us in case of their replacement.
6-2 6-2
Most of bearings are commercially available
. because of using standard production
6-3 6-3
With regard to the seal, A considerable deterioration
may be developed owing to surrounding environ-
, ments temperature and contamination of lub.oil &
. other reasons. Replace the oil seal with new one
periodically. Also, should be replaced the oil seal
. when the parts included oil seal are disassembled
for some reasons or others.
During replacement, pay specially attention to the
turnover of the lip and the direction of the oil seal as
well.

7. 7.DISASSEMBLE AND ASSEMBLE


7-1 7-1 Disassembly
1) 1)Disassemble T/G after reading over operating
. manual in accordance with Assembly
2) , 2)Make clear the purpose of disassembly
. in order to minimize parts disassembled.
3) 3)Disassemble Turning Gear after marking if there
. is no match mark on a part to be disassembled.
4) 4)Neither strike parts strongly nor pull each part
, . forcibly.
5) 5)Taps are provided covers and other parts to
,. facilitate disassembly and transportation.
6) , 6)In case of any trouble during disassembly,
. Check the drawing carefully and try it again.

7-2 7-2 Assembly


1) 1)Always keep clean surrounding.
2) , 2)Each parts should be completely washed out with
cleaning oil and made assembly after applying
. grease or lub.oil to defective parts.
3) . 3)Check and assemble parts in order after
4) putting together the alignment mark.
4)Apply three bond or equivalent to threads in the
(TAB WASHER) . gear box to prevent loose bolts from vibration
5) and other reasons.
. 5)Renew cover gaskets when assembly.
: THREE BOND NO.1215 Gear sealing : THREE BOND NO.1215
: FORMA GASKET NO.2 : FORMA GASKET NO.2
: SILICON BOND : SILICON BOND
6) 6)Once assembly is completed, check if Turning
rotates smoothly.

8. 8.INSTALLATION
Turning Gear should be installed on a
strong bed and mounting bolts & nuts tightened
. throughly. Should be noted that an improper
installation may cause excessive noise or vibration,
, resulting in aconsiderable decrease in the life time
. and damage.
9. 9.PROCEDURE OF MAINTENANCE
AND SERVICE

80


,
6

.

,
, ,


.





,
.

6
,


, 6

(,) ,

6




CHECK CHECK METHOD
ITEM REMEDY INTERVAL
POINT AND POSITION
As
Replenish the same
QUANTITY Check the oil lever guage. occasion
oil.
demands

Keep the temp.to


80 Stop T/G, As
TEMPE- Check the temp. of G/BOX
Operate it again after occasion
RATURE casing
L remedy in case of demands
U abnormal rise.
B
Renew the oil in case
Take sample oil from drain plug
CLEANN- of including foreign 6
and check the contamination of
ESS particles or month
oil.
terioration.

Oil seal parts of input & output Replace oil seal and
6
LEAKAGE shaft. Gasket parts of casing gasket with new one
month
cover. in case of leakage.

As
B TIGHTE-
Check the bolts. Retighten loose bolts occasion
O MNING
demands
L
T
As
S Check the bolts whether damage Replace bolts in case
DAMAGE occasion
or fine crack. of damage or crack.
demands

Replace it with new


Check it whether damage or wear one in case of exce- 6
B Friction disc
down. ssive wear out or month
R
damage
A
K
E Check clearance of pushing disc Re-adjust gap of it
CLEARANCE
6
& coil with feeler gauge. month

O
t
As
h NOISE & Excessive noise or vibration is Stop T/G
occasion
e VIBRATION present immediately.
demands
r
s
10. 10.BRAKE
10-1 10-1 Construction and Operation
(YU-H32-40-14) The pushing disc(B3) adhere closely together
(B7) (B3) with friction disc ordinary times.
(B2) (B6) However, if electric power is supplied to the
. magnetic coil(B1), Friction disc(B2) is separated
(B1) from Pushing disc(B3) by Magnetic power.
So, the brake is released and T/G can be turned
. freely.
10-2 10-2 Pay attention to handling
, Check and keep clean the space of pushing disc,
. friction disc & coil.
10-3 10-3 Adjustment of Gap
(YU-H32-40-14) (B6) 4 Adjust the gap of pushing disc and coil to 0.3mm
0.3 mm evenly.

.
10-4 10-4 Replacement of parts
Replace friction disc with new one when it wears
, out excessively. After exchanging it, be sure to
. readjust clearance.

11. 11.ASSEMBLE DRAWING


( ) (Seperately appendix)

12. 12.SPARE PARTS


( ) (Seperately appendix)
Leader Heat Exchanger | www.lhe.co.kr
ISO9001 ISO14001 OHSAS18001

PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER


INSTRUCTION MANUAL
(ENGINE TYPE)
COMPACT
HEAT EXCHANGER

LHE
This manual of instruction is a guide for installation, operation, maintenance
for LHE plate heat exchanger. It is meant for those who are responsible for the
installation, use and maintenance of the heat exchangers. We recommend you
to read this manual carefully before commencing any work.
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
C O N T E N T S

01. General |
1-1 FOREWORD & INTRODUCTION | &
1-2 PRINCIPLE OF PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER |
1-3 NAME PLATE |

02. Component and functions |


2-1 PLATES |
(1) CORNER HOLES OF PLATES | Port Hole
(2) RIGHT AND LEFT PLATE | R L
(3) CHANGING OF PLATES |
(4) MARKING OF PLATES |
2-2 GASKETS
- TYPES OF GASKETS | Gasket
2-3 SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM |
2-4 ARRANGEMENT OF PLATES & GASKETS | & Gasket

03. Installation |
3-1 SPACE REQUIREMENTS |
3-2 TRANSPORT, LIFTING & STORAGE | , Lifting &

04. Operation |
4-1 COMMISIONING & PRE-CHECKS | Commisioning &
4-2 PROCEDURE FOR START-UP | Start-up
4-3 PROCEDURE DURING OPERATION |
4-3 SHUT-DOWN / TROUBLE | Shut-down /

05. Maintenance |
5-1 OPENING |
5-2 CLEANING |
5-3 REPLACEMENT OF PLATES & GASKETS | & Gasket
5-3 ASSEMBLING OF PHE |

06. Fault detection and remedies |

07. Rebuilding and spare parts |


7-1 ORDERING PROCEDURE |
7-2 SPARE PARTS |
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

01 General

1-1 FOREWORD & INTRODUCTION | &

This manual of instruction is a guide for installation, operation, maintenance for LHE plate heat exchanger. It is meant for
those who are responsible for the installation, use and maintenance of the heat exchangers. We recommend you to read this
manual carefully before commencing any work.
This manual is applicable to all heat exchangers produced by LHE. We are not responsible for any damage due to incorrect
installation, use or maintenance of our heat exchangers as well as not complying with our instruction manual.

Please note that our plate heat exchangers are specially designed and built for the operating conditions (Pressure, temperature,
capacity, type of fluid etc.) provided by the customer. Sudden pressure peaks beyond the normal operating pressure, which can
occur during starting up or stopping of the system can severely damage the heat exchanger and should be prevented. We are
not responsible for any damage as a result of any operation deviating from the original design conditions.

If you would like to contact LHE about any plate heat exchanger, then please refer to the plate type, serial and drawing number
as mentioned in the name plate of our item.

[LHE] , , , ,
. .
[LHE] , [LHE] , ,
.

[LHE] [, , , ] Design
. Start-up
, .
[LHE] Design .

[LHE] , /
.

2 General
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

1-2 PRINCIPLE OF THE PLATE HEAT EXHCHANGER | (Engine type)

An engine type plate heat exchanger consists of a frame, which consists of a fixed cover, movable cover, guiding bar, protection
cover, lifting I-bolt and a number of tie bolts. In between fixed and movable cover, a number of plates are pressed together.

Heat is transferred from one medium to another medium through alternate metal plates, which have been pressed into a
special pattern. The hot and cold fluids alternate between each of the plates. Because each of the plates has a large surface
area, the plates provide each of the fluids with an extremely large heat transfer area. So, it is capable of transferring much
more heat due to high heat transfer efficiency of the plates.

Each plate is supplied with an elastomeric gasket, so that the plates form a closed system of parallel flow channels, through
which the medias flow alternately at every second interval. Each plate is equipped with a double sealing system that keeps
the fluids between the channels. The gaskets are glued on to the plates, which secure tightness between fluids and the
atmosphere. There shouldnt be any mixing between two fluids. Every second plate has to be turned 180 degrees so that the
plates form a closed system of flow channels, through which the fluids flow alternatively. The heads include connections to
permit the entry of the process fluid into the plate pack. The channel formed by two adjacent plates is the key to the heat
exchanger efficiency. Units are custom selected to effectively optimize the available pressure drop. Plate heat exchangers are
well suited for applications, which require close temperature approaches.

Model Engine type Fixed cover, Movable cover, Guide bar, Protection cover, Lifting Eye-Bolt
Tie Bolt .
Fixed Cover Movable Cover ,
, . .

.
Gasket . 2 ,
. Double sealing
.
Gasket . .
2 180.
Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ] .
Key ,
. .

General 3
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

1-3 NAME PLATE |

On the movable cover a nameplate is mounted. The concerned plate is stamped with important information about the plate
heat exchanger. The nameplate indicates the type, manuf. Date, serial no, class, material, surface area, fluid name & rate, max.
working press, inlet & outlet temp, weight, assembly measure(tightening measure) of plate heat exchanger. The figure below
(Fig 1) shows the name plate for our plate exchanger.

Movable Cover , .
Model , , Serial , , , , & , , & ,
, .
.

Example

TYPE NO. : HT062H - 1P - 9


HULL NO. ENGINE TYPE Qty of plates
COOLER TYPE MANUF. DATE
Arrangement of plate.
1P means 1 Pass

H High Channel
Combination of two high-theta heat plate
HYD.TEST PRESS.
L Low Channel
Combination of two low-theta heat plate

M Medium Channel
Combination of one high-theta plate &
one low-theta plate

Model of LHE PHE


[ Fig 1 ] Name plate of LHE

4 General
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

02 Components and functions


Other components of the plate heat exchanger are plates, gaskets, nameplate, hot and cold inlet/outlet connections.
The two bars are suspended between the frame plates. The plates hang from a two guide bar and are kept in line.
Connection holes permit the fluid to enter into the heat exchanger. With the package of plates hanging, a number of tie bolts
are used to press the thin plates together, to bring them into metallic contact and to pressure the gaskets, enough to seal off
the narrow passages which have now been formed between the plates.
Heat is transferred through the surface, which is contained by the gasket, except for some small areas near the corners.
The number of plates of the heat exchanger is determined by the size of the heat transfer surface required for the system.

, Gasket, , . , bar Fixed


Cover Movable Cover . Guide Bar Line . Hole
. Guide Bar Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ] Tie
bolt . , Gasket , .
Port hole Gasket ,
.

8
The left figure shows the exploded view of the engine
6 2
type plate heat exchanger.
The different parts of the heat exchanger is
mentioned by numbers, which are as follows.

Engine type

.
4

7 1. Fixed cover 5. Tie bolts


2. Movable cover 6. Protection cover
5
3. Guide bar 7. Plane washer
3 4. Plate pack 8. Lifting Eye-Bolt

[ Fig 2 ] Exploded view of a plate heat exchanger(Engine type)


(Engine type)

Components and functions 5


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

2-1 PLATES |

Each plate is made from pressable materials such as stainless steel, titanium, etc. and is formed with a series of corrugation.
The corrugated plates are ductile enough for pressing. The plate package consists of plates with a groove along the rim of
the plate and around the port. The number of plates as well as size and dimension depends on the required thermal output.
Depending on the thermal application, stainless steel or titanium plates are selected.

The heat transfer plates separate the two process fluids; the channel is the space established by two heat transfer plates,
through which process fluids are distributed and heat transfer is carried out. The channel formed by two adjacent plates is
the key to the plate heat exchangers high efficiency. The fluid shear stresses are also higher in case of plate heat exchangers,
which always tend to keep the channels much cleaner.

Stainless steel Titanium .


Pressing , . Gasket
. Size ,
Stainless Titanium .

. , .
Key .
.

(1) The corner holes of the plates | Port hole

Depending on the required liquid flow in the plate heat exchanger the 4 corner holes have to be opened. The corner holes
named with numbers starting left side on the top of the plate (to be seen from the gasket side) as no.1 after that continues
no.2, 3 and 4 counterclockwise. The corner holes are opened as you see on the diagram drawings, describing the liquid flow in
the plate heat exchanger. (Fig 3)
The openings of the corner holes are described in a code. For instance: 1234 means that all the corner holes are opened. Code
0204 means that hole 2 and hole 4 are open, and the holes 1 and 3 are closed.

4 Hole .
Hole No1, No2, No3, No4 (Fig 3),
Diagram Port hole . Port hole
. , 1234 Port Hole , 0204 Hole 2 Hole 4
, Hole 1 Hole 3 .

6 Components and functions


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

F1

F4

F2
F3

[ Fig 2 ] [ Fig 4 ] PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER DIAGRAM


(1) Right and left plates |R L


1 4 1 4

On a right plate the flow runs from hole 3 to hole 4 or reverse from hole 4 to hole 3.
On a left plate the flow runs from hole 1 to hole 2 or reverse from hole 2 to hole 1.
(Fig 4)
L R
3 Hole 4 Hole
4 Hole 3 Hole .
1 Hole 2 Hole
2 Hole 1 Hole . 2 3 2 3

[ Fig 4 ] Flow distribution of L & R plate


L & R
In above figure, if we name the left plate as L plate and right plate as R plate, then
next figure shows that by turning the L plate upside down, we can get R plate.
, L R
, L , R .

The LHE plates are designed so they can be used both as right and as left plates.
The plates just have to be turned 1800. (Fig 5)
[LHE] Design . 180 .

(Fig 5)

L plate. R plate.

Components and functions 7


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

(3) Changing of plates |

Changing and mounting of plates can be done after disconnection and removal of the assembling tie bolts. Before mounting of
spare parts, please check if the new plates are completely identical with the old plates to be changed. For removal of plates
the condition is such that the plates should be removed two by two so that the plate stack after reduction is still mounted by
turning right and left plates. The plates to be removed should have all four corners opened. It is also necessary to correct the
minimum tightening measure after a possible reduction.
The reduction of number of plates means that the heat transfer area of the plate heat exchanger is reduced corresponding to
the plates being removed. L removal of plates may cause a rise in pressure drop over the plate heat exchanger.

Tie bolt , ,
.
, 2 .
Port Hole , .
. L
.

(1) Marking procedure |

[ Fig 4 ] Marking of plates


Method of Identification |
4 0 0 5 0 4 1 2 0 3 0 0 5
1. 400(1,2,3) indicate MATERIAL of PLATE - ( UNS )
(Based on a standard of UNS)
2. 5(4) indicate THICKNESS of PLATE(0.5t=5, 0.6t=6) -
3. 04(5,6) indicate YEAR(2005 - indicate 05) -
4. 12(7,8) indicate MONTH( August - indicate 08) -
5. 03(9,10) indicate DATE(DATE 5 - indicate 05) -
6. 005(11,12,13) indicate MILL SHEET NO(:005) - Mill sheet
7. It will be marked before forming of press - Press Marking

8 Components and functions


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

2-2 GASKETS
Each plate heat exchangers plate is fitted with gasket. The groove along the rim of the plate and around the ports hold a
gasket, usually made up of a rubber type material. The gaskets are used partly to seal and partly to distribute the process fluids.
The main purpose of gasket is to prevent intermixing of the media and leakage to the outside.
An elastomer gasket is included in each plate, which contains the pressure and control the flow of each medium.
The gasketed plates are assembled in a pack, mounted on upper and lower guide bars and compressed between two end
frames by compression tie bolts. Gasket material is chosen to withstand the operating temperature at hand and the properties
of the processing fluid. Heat is transferred through the surrounding, which is contained by the gasket, except for small areas
near the corner. Any leakage of fluid across either gasket escapes from the heat exchanger through the slots. It is important
that these openings are not permitted to plug. If that should happen, then there is a risk of leakage. In that region of the plate,
there might be a local pressure builds up, which could make one medium leak over and mix with the other. Care should be
taken not to cut or scratch the gaskets while handling plates.

Gasket .
, Gasket .
Gasket ,
. Gasket .
Gasket Tie bolt Cover Carrying Bar ,
.
Gasket
. Gasket
. Gasket
.
, ,
.
,
.
Gasket .

[ Fig 7 ] Marking of plates



(1) TYPES OF GASKETS | Gasket

- New gasket ( Start Gasket )- On the enclosed diagram an order list for the gaskets is shown.
The first plate after the fixed cover and intermediate frames is to be mounted with a gasket grooves. These gaskets are cut
out of ordinary gaskets. Therefore please note the cutting out of the old gaskets before removing them.

Components and functions 9


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

Gasket Oder list .


Fixed Cover Movable Cover Start Gasket Start Gasket .
Gasket Gasket . , Start Gasket Gasket
.

- Glue less or glued gaskets - Some plate heat exchangers are delivered with glue less (clip or snap type) gaskets.
In these units it is possible to change the gaskets without using glue. However, the gasket on the first plate after the head and
intermediate frame should be glued.
Gasket (clip or snap type) .
Gasket . , Cover Gasket
.

- Glue type - Nitrile rubber glues on soluble basis (25% solid materials) are employed.
The glues are partly thermoplastic so that old gaskets can be unsticked by boiling-water heating.
(25% ) .
Gasket .

2-3 FUNCTION OF THE PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER |

- Schematic Flow Diagram -

The diagram (Fig 8) shows the plate heat exchanger. It shows the plate composition and the liquid flow in the plate stack.
When the plates are pressed together, the holes at the corners form continuous channels, leading the fluid from the inlets into
the plate package, where they are distributed into the narrow passages between the plates. There are two arrow marks, A & B.
The bold A arrow marks show right plates and B arrow marks show left plates. During the passage through the system, the hot
Fluid will give some of its heat energy to the thin wall, which instantly looses it again to the cold fluid on the other side.
The hot fluid loses its temperature and the cold fluid is heated up same time. Finally, the fluids are led into similar hole-tunnels
at the other end of the plates and discharged from the heat exchanger. After clamping of the plate pack, the plates, which are
fitted with gaskets-ensure an effective seal between fluids and atmosphere. In addition, intermixing of the fluids is eliminated
by a double gasket seal around the inlet ports. Every second plate in the stack has to be turned 180, so that the plates form a
closed system of parallel flow channels, through which the medias flow alternately at every second interval.

In order to form a passage of fluid flow between plates and proper heat transfer,
the plates should be properly arranged. The main point of consideration
for plate arrangement is that the two adjacent plates should make
a honeycomb structure everywhere. The plates should be arranged
upwards and downwards alternatively for making this honeycomb
structure.

[ Fig 8 ] Arrangement of plates & gasket


& Gasket

10 Components and functions


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

[FIG:8] .
Plate pack [Plate + Gasket] .
, Port Hole , Plate pack [Plate + Gasket]
.
A & B .
A B .
. .
. , Hole
.
Plate pack [Plate + Gasket] Sealing .
, Gasket . 180 .
,
.

, .
.
.

A: Start plate with gasket.


A B C D B: R flow plate with gasket.
C: L flow plate with gasket.
D: End plate with gasket.
[ Fig 9 ] Rather than H (High) & L (Low) Plate style

A plate, which has four holes through which the fluid flows into the nozzle, is always placed next to the fixed cover.
The fluid cannot flow through the deflector as all gaskets are clogged. After assembling A plate, 2nd plate should be B or C
plate depends on the flow directions of the hot and cold fluids.
In case of B plate, fluid flows through the right side. So, only right side connections are opened and left side connections are
closed.
In case of C plate, fluid only flows through the left side. So, left side connections are opened and right side connections are
closed.

Components and functions 11


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

In case of D plate, which is placed at the end, all left and right side holes are closed. This means all four connections are closed.
The 2nd plate can be upwards or downwards, which depends on the fluid flow directions of the heat exchanger. But after
assembling the 2nd plates, the B & C plates are arranged in upwards and downwards directions alternatively up to the end to
form the honeycomb structure. There is no chance of mixing of fluids due to this kind of arrangement of fluids. The fluid flows
through left side connection always passes in left side and fluid flows through right side connection always flows through right
side.
The main point of consideration for assembling plates is that the plates should be placed upwards and downwards alternatively
throughout the heat exchanger for making the honeycomb structure everywhere. Due to this kind of arrangement, it can handle
a large quantity of fluid and pressure loss is also very small.

Hole Fixed Cover .


Gasket Deflector .
A , B C .
B , . , ,
.
C , . ,
.
D , , Hole .
.

.
B & C .
.

.

.
, , .

12 Components and functions


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

03 Installation

For Installation of a plate heat exchanger, two things are very important to consider.
.
- Space requirements ( ) - Pipe installation ( )

3-1 SPACE REQUIREMENTS |

The plate heat exchanger requires enough space with regard to opening for inspection or servicing (renewal of plates,
tightening of package etc.) without any problem. It is necessary for the plates and the assembling tie bolts to have so much
space that they can be mounted and dismounted without problems. (Fig 10) The follow cover has to be pulled back to the
column before opening for service can be done without problems.

, [ , Package ]
. Tie Bolt .
Movable Cover .

[ Fig 10 ] Recommended space for opening and closing


NOTE
The measurements given in the picture are minimum, recommended by LHE, to provide reasonably good working conditions during
installation of the heat exchanger as well as for future maintenance and service.

(LHE) ,
.

Installation 13
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

3-3 Transport, Lifting & Storage | , Lifting &

For safe transportation, it is desirable to transport item, valve or pipe without


assembling. Install shackle on the Lifting Eye-Bolt and hook bar on the shackle
before transportation with crane.
Please keep in mind not to lift the item by using the connections or studs around
them.
In case of storage of the unit for a longer period, certain precautions should be
taken in order to prevent unnecessary damage to the equipment.
It is preferable to store the heat exchanger inside room with temperature around
15 to 20 C and humidity of max.70%. If this is not possible, then place the heat
exchanger in a wooden case which is provided with a lining on the inside against
penetration of moisture.

,
Item
. Lifting Eye-Bolt
Shackle Hook bar .
Bolt
[ Fig 11 ] .
,
,
15 20 70%
. ,
.

NOTE!!
There should not be any ozone producing equipment in the room, like electric
motors or arc-welding equipment as ozone destroys many rubber materials.
Also dont store organic solvents or acids in the room and avoid heat or ultraviolet
radiation.
Arc-welding
.
CAUTION
When lifting the unopened packing , .
case (or skid) use a crane (or forklift),
please observe where to place lifting
device & the centre of gravity
of PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER.

14 Installation
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

04 Operation

4-1 COMMISIONING AND PRE-CHECKS | COMMISIONING

Commissioning should only be done by staffs, which has been trained specially for the job. Control, maintenance and repair of
the installation should be done by authorized, trained and properly trained staff.

Maintenance and cleaning should always be done with a shut down heat exchanger.

Check if all connections are correctly fitted or not. The media flowing through the heat exchanger should not contain any bigger
particles and if necessary, filters should be fitted. Check the pressure and temperatures of the media and make sure that the
values are not more than the specified value on the identification plate.

Commissioning , ,
.
, .
.
Spec .

4-2 PROCEDURE FOR START-UP | Start-up

Before starting up for first time or after a long run shut down of system, make sure that the plate pack is compressed to the
right measurement.
It is very important that the system, to which the heat exchanger is connected, is protected against sudden and extreme
variations of temperature and pressure to avoid any damages. It also applies to piping system and all equipments.
Before the initial start-up,
- Check that the operating data does not exceed that given on the heat exchangers nameplate.
- Check that all tie bolts are properly tightened.

Start-up Plate Pack [Plate+Gasket]


. , .
.
Start-up , Tie Bolt
.

Operation 15
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

(1) Pumps |
Before starting any pump, check if there is any instructions for any pump to be started first. If the pumps can deliver a higher
pressure than the rated pressure for the heat exchanger, safety valves must be installed. The pumps must not suck in air.

Start-up .
, . .

(2) Start-up
To avoid pressure shock the pumps must be started against closed valves. The valves in the inlet and outlet should be opened
at same time as far as possible. The flow rate is then increased slowly until operating temperature is reached.
Hammering must be avoided; otherwise the rubber gaskets may be displaced and leakage result. Check that the exit valve is
fully opened during starting condition. Then, open the vent, start the pump, open the valve slowly.

Start-up .
. , .
Hammering Gasket .
Start-up . , ,
.)

(3) Venting
Immediately after start-up the equipment must be vented. Remaining air can cause air locks and serious scorching of the
plates, reducing the heat transfer capacity and increasing the risk of corrosion.

Start-up , Vent . ,
.

4-3 PROCEDURE DURING OPERATION |

During operation, temperatures and pressure drops must be regularly checked. Increased pressure drop and/or falling
temperatures indicate that there are coatings on the plates. The plate heat exchanger now needs cleaning. During operation,
the same precautions against rises of pressure must be observed as during start-up. The following points must be observed for
running.

, .

. , Start-up
. .

16 Operation
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

(1) Working pressure |


On the head of the plate heat exchanger a nameplate is mounted.
The maximum working pressure is stated and it must not be exceeded.
.
, .

(2) Pressure pulsation and vibrations |


No pressure pulsations and vibrations must be transferred from positive pumps or equipment like that. If these are
transferred to the plate heat exchanger fatigue fracture in the plates can arise.
.
.

(3) Longer working pauses |


A plate heat exchanger, which is out of work for a longer period, ought to be emptied and cleaned. After emptying and cleaning
the plate heat exchanger is tightened gently and covered with black plastic to pre-vent the gaskets from being damaged by
daylight. Before the plate heat exchanger is put to work again it must be tightened according to minimum measure.
.
Gasket Port Hole
. .

For operation |
Start cold fluid first than the hot fluid.

The operation steps should be as follows.


.

(1) Tightening measure check.


.
(2) Close isolation valves between pump and plate heat exchanger.
.
(3) Open the vent valve
Vent .
(4) Start the circulation pump.
..
(5) When all the air has escaped from the plate heat exchanger, close the vent valves.
Vent .

The above steps should be repeated for secondary fluid.


.

Operation 17
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

4-4 SHUT-DOWN / TROUBLE | /

(1) Shut-down for a short-period |

If the plate heat exchanger has to be shut down for a short period, please follow the following procedure.
.

(1) Slowly close the control valve in the hot circuit while maintaining the full flow in the cold circuit.
Control .
(2) Switch off the hot circuit pump.
.
(3) Cool down the heat exchanger to the level of cold medium.
.
(4) Slowly close the control valve in the cold circuit.
Control .
(5) Switch off the cold circuit pump.
.
(6) Close all remaining isolating valves.
.

(2) Shut-down for a long-period |

If the unit is to be taken off for an extended period of time, the please follows the following procedures as below.
, .

(1) Allow the unit to cool down.


.
(2) Drain all circuits.
Drain .
(3) Lubricate tie bolts.
Tie Bolt .
(4) Loosen the tie bolts until the plate pack is relaxed.
Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ] Tie Bolt .
(5) The tie bolts should not be removed or loosened to such an extent that dirt is not allowed to enter in between the plates.
Tie Bolt .
(6) Cover the plate pack with black plastic to exclude any sunlight
Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ] .

18 Operation
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

(3) External Leakage |

- Maybe the plate heat exchanger is running with a higher working pressure than mentioned on the nameplate. In that case the
pressure has to be controlled and if too high it has to be reduced immediately to what is written on the nameplate.

- Tighten the plate heat exchanger to the minimum measure, which is mentioned on the nameplate. It goes without saying that
the plate heat exchanger has to be pressureless before tightening.

- The plate heat exchanger is separated for inspection. Check that the plates are without scaling and undeformed.
Check the gaskets. They have to be elastic, undeformed and to have a clean surface. All gaskets and plates are cleaned
carefully - even a grain of sand on the gasket surface can cause a leak. A plate stack, assembling to a minimum measure after
cleaning, has to be tight. If a leakage is still present the gaskets normally have to be changed. If there is a leakage through the
drain holes of the gaskets the reason can be a defective gasket in the drained zone or a corroded plate in the drained zone.

- .
.

- .
.

- . Gasket
Gasket . Gasket , .
Gasket Gasket ,
Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ] .
Gasket . Vent hole
Vent zone Gasket .

(4) Inside Leakage |

If the liquid is mixed it is due to holes in one or more plates. The leaks can only be repaired by changing the
defective plates.
A suspected leakage can be located in one of the following ways:
- Remove a pipe on one of the bottom pipe connections, then put the opposite side under pressure. After the pressure is
stabilized the liquid must not run off from the removed pipe connection. If the liquid continues to run off there is a leak on one
or more plates. The plate stack is demounted and every single plate is examined carefully.
- The plate heat exchanger is separated and all the plates are dried. After drying the plates are put into the plate heat
exchanger and assembled. Now the liquid is circulated with full capacity but only on one side (every second plate interval).
The other half of the plate interval is kept without pressure and without liquid. The circulation is stopped after a few minutes
and the plate heat exchanger is opened carefully so that no water is sprayed on the dry plate side. The plates are examined
carefully and thus it is possible to find the wet areas on the dry plates.
- Restart : Same as 4.2

Operation 19
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

hole .
.
.

- , .
.
. Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ]
.

- . .
[ ] .
.
.
, .

- 4.2 .

20 Operation
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

05 Maintenance

5-1 OPENING |

Before opening the plate heat exchanger, it must be cooled below 35C, and it must not be pressurized.
If the plate heat exchanger is opened at a temperature higher than 35C, the gaskets can get loose from the plates.
35 , .
35 , Gasket .

The steps involved for opening are as follows:


(1) Slowly close the valves on the inlets.


.
(2) Switch off pumps and close the valves on both outlets.
.
(3) If system is hot, then wait till temperature is be cooled down to min. 40 0C.
, 40 .
(4) Open the drain & vent valve. (Open the first drain valve, and vent valve)
Drain Vent . (Drain Vent .)
(5) Check sliding surface of carrying bar and roller of movable cover.
Movable Cover Guide bar . 1 4
(6) Mark the no. of plates in sequence.
.
(7) Remove the tie bolts from the cover as a rule in the plate heat exchanger.
Cover Plane washer .
(8) Remove the tie bolts from the cover as a rule in the plate heat exchanger.
3 2
Cover Tie Bolt .
[ Fig 13 ]
(9) Clean the threads of the tie bolts and lubricate with grease.
Tie Bolt .
(10) Move the movable cover for disassembling the plate from frame.
Frame Movable Cover .
(12) Opening of plate package.
Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ] . The above figures (Fig 13) show the sequence of opening
of tie bolt structure for plate package
Plate pack [ Plate + Gasket ] Tie Bolt
.)

Maintenance 21
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

5-2 CLEANING |

All marine systems, where working fluid is used are exposed to fouling. Fouling may occur in ports and at the plates
entry region. It can increase the pressure drop and reduce the low rate resulting in insufficient heat transfer. So
cleaning is very much necessary to remove these fouling. Foulings on the plates can be removed manually (cleaning
in place). The cleaning of the plate heat exchanger depends on the capacity as well as the corrosion
resistance of the system.

.
. .
. ,
. .

(1) MANUAL CLEANING |

The plate heat exchanger is separated and the plates are pulled from each other. Use a soft and a qualified cleaning
material for cleaning the plates. If the cover thick, from scale or organic material the plates are put in a vat with a
qualified cleaning material. Neither the plates nor the gaskets can bear heavy-handed / robust treatments.

.
. .
Gasket .

Cleaning of Plates |
- Use nylon or other types of soft scrubbing brushes with detergent.
- Use acetone or other types of solvents which do not contain chlorine to remove old gasket glue. Alternatively use and LP gas
flame heating the reverse side of the plate.
- Do not use any other type of gas which may produce a harder flame. Boiling water can be used with some success.
- Consult a cleaning specialist for a suitable choice of detergent.
- Ensure that all detergents used are compatible with the plate and gasket material before use.
- In case the plates are removed for chemical cleaning, make sure they are re-fitted in the same order.
- Always remove plates one by one and number them properly.
- A high pressure cleaner can be used with absolute care and never add abrasives.
- If the cover is thick from scale or organic material the plates can be put in a barrel with qualified cleaning material.
- .
- Gasket .
.

22 Operation
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

- . .
- .
- Gasket .
- .
- .

Important:
Cleaning is an important part, influencing the effectiveness of the plate heat exchanger.
Insufficient cleaning can have the following results.
- Too low circulation flow.
- Insufficient thermal output.
- Life time of the heat exchanger will be shortened.
If a plate has to be renewed because of serious damage, one should make sure that the
plates next to this plate are also being replaced.

.
.
-
- [ Fig 14 ]
-
, .

Cleaning materials |

A qualified cleaning material is one, which can remove the scaling on the plates without damaging the plates and gaskets.
Stainless steel has a passivated (protecting) film. This film must not be destroyed, as the film assists in preserving the
resistance of the stainless steel.
We advise you to ask for a confirmation from the supplier of the cleaning detergent that it will not damage the materials of the
heat exchanger.
If the solution requires recirculation, select a flow that is as high as possible and certainly no less than the service or product
flows.
Follow the instructions carefully as given by the detergent supplier/cleaning specialist. We recommend that for recirculated
cleaning detergent methods, the fluid should be pumped through the exchanger for no less than 30minutes.

Gasket Scaling .
Stainless steel . Stainless steel
.
.
/ .
30 .

Maintenance 23
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

Rinsing |
After using any type of cleaning agent, always rinse thoroughly with fresh water. If cleaning in place, then recirculate fresh
water for at least 10 minutes.

. 10
.

Some Cleaning Detergents |


- Oil and grease is removed with a water emulsifying oil solvent.
- Organic and grease cover is removed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) -maximum concentration 1.5% max. temp.85C
Concentration = 5.00 ltr. 30% NaOH per 100 ltr. water.
- Stone and limestone is removed with nitric acid (HNO3) - max concentration 1.5% - max. temp. 65C
Mixture of 1.5% concentration = 2.4 ltr. 62% (HNO3) per 100 ltr. of water.
Nitric acid also has an effective build up effect on the passivation film of stainless steel.

- .
- Cover [Na OH] .
( 85 1.5%, 5.00 ltr. 100 ltr 30% .)
- [HNO3] .
( 65C 1.5%. 1.5% = 100 ltr 62% 2.4 ltr
stainless steel .)

Control of Cleaning |
ACleaning is an important part, influencing on the effectiveness of the plate heat exchanger. Therefore the plate heat
exchanger has to be separated for inspection and especially in the commissioning period. You will obtain important experience
concerning circulation times, temperatures, and chemical concentrations.
- too short cleaning period.
- too low chemical consumption compared to the scaling of the plates.
- too long running intervals between the cleanings.
If the plate heat exchanger is out of operation for a long time, it is advisable to empty it, separate the plates, and clean the unit.
Clamp the plate heat exchanger lightly together and leave it covered in order to protect the gaskets against dirt and effect of light.

. ,
.
, .
-
- Scaling
-
, , , .
Gasket Cover

24 Maintenance
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

5-3 REPLACEMENT OF PLATES & GASKETS | & Gasket

1) REMOVAL OF PLATE |

(1) Damaged plates can be easily replaced by the same spare plates.
.)
(2) The damaged plate and the adjacent plate, two in sum (only the plate with four holes) may be safely removed
without replacement. However the performance of the unit is slightly lowered.
, (4 Hole ) .)
, .
For removal of plates, push the pressure plate against the support column and then remove plates.
, .

2) REPLACEMENT OF GASKET (GLUE TYPE) | Gasket []

(1) Remove the old gasket from the plate, and then wipe the gasket groove with a clean cloth moistened with a solvent
(methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, xylene, trichloroethylene etc.)
Gasket , [ , , ]
Gasket .
(2) Apply a thin layer of cement with a brush over the rough side of the gasket and the gasket groove of the plate.
Gasket Gasket .
(3) Allow the cement to dry for three to five minutes, and when it does not feel sticky when touched with fingers ,
apply the face to the gasket groove.
3 5 , Gasket
.
(4) Apply the gasket controlling the length not to elongate it too much.
Gasket .
(5) When all are applied, pile up only A-plate (or B-plate) and press them from above (with a weight), and leave them a half
to one day.
Gasket ( ) A B
.
(6) Dry them fully and install to the frame.
Frame .

3) REPLACEMENT OF GASKET (NON-GLUE TYPE) | Gasket [ ]

LHE-Clip can be fixed tightly and quickly on the plate in the optimum condition with the clip or snap type fixing device.
LHE Gasket .

Maintenance 25
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

5-4 ASSEMBLING OF PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER |

The steps involved for closing of the plate package are mentioned as follows.
Plate pack[ Plate + Gasket ] .

(1) Check that all sealing surfaces (surfaces in contact with heat transfer medium) should be
free from any kind of dusts.
Sealing [ ] .
RIGHT PATTERN WRONG PATTERN (2) Check that all gaskets are in good and correct condition.
(HONEYCOMB)
Gasket .
[ Fig 15 ] The pate side view honeycomb
structure of the plates. (3) Clean and lubricate the sliding surfaces of the carrying bar.
Guide Bar Sliding .
.
(4) Inspect the pressure plate cooler.
.
(5) The plates should be hanged in proper order.
.
(6) Press the plate assembly together and it should form a honeycomb structure.
, .
(7) Clean and lubricate the threads with a thin layer of grease.
Tie Bolt Fixed Cover .
[ Fig 16 ]
(8) Tightening of the tie bolts should be carried out alternately and diagonally.
Tie Bolt .
(9) Check the position of the tie bolts during tightening.
Tie Bolt .
(10) Tighten them keeping parallel the movable cover and the fixed cover as in
disassembly. The tightening size should be that given on the nameplate attached to
fixed cover. On completion, the plate heat exchanger can be pressure tested at the
mention valve in the datasheet.
Movable Cover Fixed Cover .
Movable Cover . ,
Datasheet .

1 4

3 2
[ Fig 17 ] The sequence of closing of tie bolt structure for plate Package
Plate pack[ Plate + Gasket ] Tie Bolt

26 Maintenance
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

CAUTION
The plate heat exchanger must not be assembled
smaller than the minimum tightening measure (A)
.

TIGHTENING MEASURE(A)
[ Fig 18 ]

- The equipment shall be hydro test at the hydro test pressure to ensure that there is no leakage for the equipment.
- The hydro test shall be done with De-mineral water and that shall be contaminated.
- All Air bubble shall be vented and the hydro test shall be carried out in stage 50%,75%,90% and 100% hold pressure
for 30 minutes, Depressurize slowly.
- There is no leakage than equipment shall be used for startup., No torque is permitted after the hydro test.

- Design Test .
- Test Test .
- Test Vent , 50%, 75%, 90%, 100%
30 . .
- Test Start-up , Test Torque .

Maintenance 27
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

06 FAULT DETECTION AND REMEDIES


Problem Possible Cause () Possible Solution ()

- Check the rubber liners (if fitted)


Rubber Lining [ ]
- Check the flange packing (if fitted)
Flange Packing ( )
At the connections ( )
- Check the O-ring on the first plate
Start O-ring
- Fit the pipes tension-free

Leakage Mixing of primary and secondary circuit - Check the plates for hole and/or cracks
12 Hole Crack
- Check the assembly tightening distance

In plate package - Check the condition of the packings
Plate Pack[ Plate + Gasket ] Plate pack[ Plate + Gasket ]
- Check the proper position of the packings
Plate pack[ Plate + Gasket ]
The operating conditions deviate from the specification - Adjust the operating conditions properly

- De-aerate the pipe system


Air in the System
- Check the pipe work for possible air traps

Insufficient Capacity The operating conditions deviate from the specification - Adjust the operating conditions properly

- Clean the heat exchange
The heat exchanger is dirty ( )

The connections have been interchanged - Redo the fitting work

Flow larger than the design flow - Adjust the flow perfectly

Channels in plate(s) blocked - Flush/Clean properly


Incorrect measurement - Check the pressure indicator for correct measurement



Too high pressure drop
- Addition of for instance anti-freeze will increase
Medium deviating from the design
the pressure drop
Data
.

- De-aerate the pipe system


Air in the system
- Check the pipe work for possible air traps

28 Fault Detection and Remedies


PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER INSTRUCTION MANUAL

07 REBUILDING AND SPARE PARTS


7-1 ORDERING PROCEDURE |

The plate heat exchanger is module built up and therefore flexible as regards enlargements or reduction i.e. it is
easy to change the capacity by respectively enlarging or reducing the number of plates.
LHE files contain all data of delivered plate heat exchangers. We gladly forward suggestions/quotations concerning
rebuild of an existing plate heat exchanger. LHE only has to know the manufacture number stamped on the
nameplate and the modifications you want. LHE then delivers with the necessary parts for rebuild a complete
description of the way in which the plate heat exchanger is rebuilt. Afterwards the rebuilt plate heat exchanger
data will be put into LHE files to keep them up-to-data.
.
. LHE [] Data , LHE []
. LHE []
.
Data LHE [] .

7-2 SPARE PARTS |

The type designation of the plate heat exchanger and the manufacture number (is one the name plate which is
placed on the fixed cover) ought to be mentioned by ordering spare parts. This is to prevent fault delivery.
[Fixed Cover ] .
.

(1) By ordering plates it is important to mention the right pattern code and if it is right or left plates, please refer the plates of
our manual.
Pattern Code ,
.

(2) By ordering a complete set of gaskets and the glue for these and the cleaning fluid, it is enough to mention the manufacture
number or the number of the drawing.
Gasket , .

- For ordering single gaskets, it is important to mention the correct quality. The quality appears from the diagram and the color
marks on the gasket.
Gasket , . Gasket Gasket Marking .

- For ordering assembling tie bolts, it is necessary to measure the old assembling tie bolts to secure delivery of the right size of
tie bolts.
Tie Bolt , Tie Bolt , .

Rebuilding and Spare Parts 29


LHE INSTRUCTION MANUAL
PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER

LHE200907
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 1 of 12

1.0

2.0

3.0

4.0

5.0

6.0

7.0

SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD


AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 2 of 12

1. Outline

The air cooler is a heat exchanger cooling the air supplied to the
diesel engine to the specified temperature, and cooling water flows on
the inside of the fin tube, while the air flows along the outside of
the fin tube.
,
.

2. Construction(refer to the assembly drawing)


( )

The heat transmission tubes are composed of fin tubes with fins on
the outside. Both ends of the heat transmission tubes are installed in
the tube sheets by tube expansion.
The tube sheets are bolted via gaskets to the casing side plate and
the flange respectively.
The cooling water inlet header and the cooling water return header
are bolted via gaskets to the respective tube sheets.
The header flanges are provided with threaded holes for push bolts,
and they can be disassembled easily by use of push bolts.
Hoisting fittings for hoisting of the air cooler are provided at the
header top and at the casing top.(Some types have hoisting plates or
threaded holes for hoisting bolts.)
.
.

.


,
.
SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 3 of 12

.(
.)

3. Storage

When the air cooler is not to be used immediately, it should be


stored under consideration of the following items.
,
.

3-1 Management for the air side


(1) Execute storage at a clean and dry place


(2) The cooler should be covered so that it will not be exposed to
dust
(3) Storage outdoors or in moist places must avoided.
(4) Storage in atmospheres with ammonia or other agents having a bad
influence onto copper alloys must be avoided.

Storage should be executed under sufficient observation of the above


items, and according to the storage conditions, inspections for
rusting should be executed from time to time.

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4) copper alloys

,
.

SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD


AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 4 of 12

3-2 Management for the water side


(1) The cooling water inlet and outlet flanges should be covered with
blinds to prevent entry of dirt, dust, te.
(2) When anticorrosion paint(or Neoprene coating, rubber lining, etc.)
has been applied to the header inside, care should be taken not to
damage it.
(3) When the cooler has been stored or not operated for a long time
after trial operation or filling with water, the entire cooling water
should be drained from the cooler.

When industrial water etc. remains in the heat transmission tubes, it


will evaporate and condensate and become a cause for
corrosion(breakage, holes) of the heat transmission tubes because of
its corrosive components, so that care is required.

(1) , , .
(2) anticorrosion ( Neoprene , )
, .
(3) ,
.
, (, )
.

4. Installation

For the installation, attention should be paid to the following items.


(1) When the installation method is bad, air may leak from the duct
connection surfaces or water may leak from the header flange surfaces,
so that sufficient care is required.
(2) Special care is required for the parallelity between the outer
duct surfaces and the parallelity between the piping connection
SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 5 of 12

surfaces.
(3) When installation is mot made on a support or a duct with
sufficient strength, the air cooler may be destroyed by abnormal
vibrations.

.
(1) ,
, .
(2)
.
(3)
.

5. Operation

Only the water specified at the time of ordering should be used for
operation of the air cooler. The air cooler should be operated
according to the following sequence.

.
.

5-1 Operation of the cooling water side


(1) Operation start
1) Start the water flow to the air cooler.
At the start of the water flow, open the air vent valve(or cock) of
the header.
(water chamber), and vent the air until the air bubbles disappear
the from escaping cooling water. When this is neglected, air will
remain in the cooling water inside the air cooler, which will not
only impair the performance, but also may cause accidents during
operation, so that special care is required
2) When the air cooler has been filled with water, close the air vent
SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 6 of 12

valve(or cock).
(2) Confirmation items during the initial time of operation
1) After the pressure has been raised to the specified pressure,
confirm that there are no abnormalities in regard to bolts, nuts and
gaskets. If water should be leaking from the gaskets, retighten the
bolts and nuts.
2) During operation, the max. use pressure(design pressure) should
not be exceeded in the air cooler and in the connection piping.
3) During operation, the flow speed and the water volume in the heat
transmission pipes in the air cooler should not exceed the max.
permissible values. Excessive flow speed becomes a cause for erosion
of the heat transmission pipes, so that the max. permissible values
must be observed.

5-1
(1)
1)
, () ( )
. ,

.
2) , .
(2)
1) , ,
.
.
2) , ()
.
3) ,
.
.

SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD


AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 7 of 12

5-2 Operation of the air side


(1) Operation start
Confirm that the operation on the cooling water side is normal, and
then pass air with the specified density, pressure and flow volume.
(2) Confirmation items during the initial time of operation
1) Confirm that there is no air leakage from the connection parts of
cooler and duct.
2) Control the flow volume, the pressure and the temperature of the
air.
3) After operation start for the air side, again confirm that the
connections of the cooling water side and the air side are secure.

5-2
(1)
, , , .
(2)
1)
2) , ,
3) ,

5-3 Operation stop


For stop of operation, first stop the air side and then the cooling
water side. When stop is to be executed for several days or for a long
period, open the drain valve(or cock) at the lowest part of the header
and drain all water from the cooler to prevent corrosion and freezing
during the winter.

5-3
, .
,
.

SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD


AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 8 of 12

6. Maintenance and inspections


6-1. Cooling Management

(1) With use for a long time, dirt becomes attached on the water side
and the air side and the performance of the cooler will drop. As the
following items are criteria for confirmation of a performance drop,
the performance during operation should be grasped.

- Temperature difference between inlet and out let side for air and
water
- Pressure loss for air and water
When a pressure loss has been confirmed, execute washing and
cleaning(item)

6-1.
(1) ,
. ,
.

- ,
-
, .

(2) The air cooler has been designed to have a sufficient cooling
effect for improvement of the engine performance, but drain may be
caused on the air side by excessive cooling with high humidity in
summer or with a low cooling water temperature in winter.
When drain is confirmed, adjust the cooling water flow volume.

(2)
.
.
SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 9 of 12

, .

6-2. Gaskets and O-rings


(1) Because of their characteristics and sufficient tightening
strength, gaskets and O-rings will not leak with normal operation, but
slow creep may occur for the gaskets with the passage of time during
storage without use or at the time of stop, so that the clamping
pressure of the gaskets and O-ring may decrease.
In order to prevent leakage troubles for gaskets and O-rings from this
phenomenon, the bolts should be retightened.
(2) At the time of reassembly after header disassembly for inspection,
washing, protection metal exchange, tetc., the gaskets and O-rings for
the connection parts shall be exchanged for new ones. Execute bolt
tightening in the sequence of 12 oclock, 6 oclock, 3 oclock, and
9 oclock.

6-2.
(1)
,

.
(2) , ,
. 12
, 6, 3, 9 .

6-3. Protection metal(when the cooling water is sea water)


A protection metal(consumption part) is installed inside the
header(water chamber) of the air cooler to protect the cooler from
corrosion. When operation is continued after the protection metal has
been used up, notable corrosion will occur for the header in case of
standard equipment or for the tubes and tube plates when the header is
equipped with anticorrosion rubber lining etc., so that this metal
should be inspected periodically and should be replenished as required.
The inspection for this equipment should be executed every 3 months.
SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 10 of 12

Care should be taken that the surface of the protection metal and the
threaded part are free of oil, paint, tec.

6-3. ( )
()
() . ,


..

3 .
.

6-4. Repair of the coating on the inside of the header


When the inside of the header is coated with Neoprene, Hypalon, tar
epoxy, etc. for protection against corrosion by the cooling water, the
inside coating should be inspected at the time of header disassembly
for inspection, washing, etc., and any damage should be repaired
immediately.

6-4.
Neoprene, Hypalon, tar epoxy
,
.

When operation continued with damaged lining, local corrosion will


occur for the damaged part, and the header will be destroyed.
As the coating is applied up to the flange surface, careful handling
is required at the time of disassembly so that the surface will not be
damaged.
,
, .
,
.
SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 11 of 12

6-5. Use of the blind plugs for the heat transmission tubes
When a heat transmission tube becomes broken because of corrosion or
for some other reason, use the accessory blind plugs to plug both ends
of the heat transmission tube. The blind plugs should be installed
according to the following sequence.
(1) Drain the water completely from the header
(2) Remove the header installation bolts(nuts), and remove the header.
When removal is difficult, push bolts should be used.
(3) Drive the blind plugs into both ends of the broken heat
transmission tube.

6-5.
,
.
.
(1) .
(2) () , . ,
.
(3) .

7. Cleaning

7-1. Cleaning of the cooling water side


(1) How to use nylon brush
1) Drain water from the cooler completely.
2) Disconnecting the cooling water pipelines, replace the header. If
the flange surface are hard to disassemble, separate them by using
jack bolts is mentioned before.
3) While the inside of tubes is wet, clean it with a nylon brush.
(2) In the case of chemical cleaning
If impossible to restore performance to its original state with brush
cleaning, resort to it. If chemical cleaning fails, the tubes and
SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD
AIR COOLER MANUAL
Doc. No. SJI-MANUAL-01 Page No. 12 of 12

others will be damaged, resulting in shortening the life of


apparatuses markedly. If you have no experience in chemical cleaning,
consult the manufacturer.

7-1.
(1)
1)
2) , . ,
.
3) , .
(2)
, .
,
. , .

7-2. Cleaning of the air side


(1) Slight dirts can be removed with compressed air.
(2) As for dirts due to oil and grease which can not be removed with
compressed air, replace the cooler heater and clean it with steam
blasts(0.3~0.7Mpa, 150 or less) or (hot water and compressed air).
(3) Chemical cleaning operation must be carried out only in case it is
impossible to clean by the abovementioned method. When chemical
cleaning operation is carried out, consult with the manufacturers.
7-2.
(1) .
(2)
(0.3~0.7Mpa, 150 ) (
) .
(3) .
.

SEJIN INNOTECH CO.,LTD


YURIM GEAR PUMPS
YRB 400 / 500

Maintenance and Service


Instruction

YURIM INDUSTRIAL CO., LTD


#26-2,San gyuk 2-Dong ,Buk-Gu, Daegu, Korea
TEL:82-53-384-4894
FAX:82-53-384-0030
E-Mail:ldbeom@chol.com
Exploded view
Gear pump
YRB 400 / 500
24

38
39

21

2
1

16
20 12
23 1
28
27 36 1
35
3 29 30
5 13 34
19 25
18 17 6

10
15 22
9
4 8

33
7

14 26

List of components
POS. NO Denomination Q'TY YRB400 YRB500 POS. NO Denomination Q'TY YRB400 YRB500
01 DRIVING COVER 1 21 JAW COUPLING 1
02 CONNECTION COVER 1 22 GUIDE PIN 1 5 X 12 5 X 12
03 DRIVIING GEAR SHAFT 1 M6 X 11 M6 X 11 23 SOCKET HEAD BOLT 3 M6 X 20 M6 X 20
04 GEAR SHAFT 1 M6 X 11 M6 X 11 24 MOTOR 1 13kW 13kW
05 GEAR HOUSING 1 25 WASHER 2 18X13X1 18X13X1
06 VALVE HOUSING 1 26 WASHER 2 22X15X1 22X15X1
07 PLUG 2 PF1/4 PF1/4 27 HEX'S HEAD BOLT 4 M16 X 45 M16 X 45
08 PISTON 1 28 O-RING 1 G150 x 3.t G150 x 3.t
09 COMPRESSION SPRING 1 29 RUBBER PLATE 2
10 SPRING HOUSING 1 30 COVER PLATE 2
11 STOP NUT 1 M14 M14 31 NAME PLATE 1
12 CAP NUT 1 M14 M14 32 RIVETS 4 2 X 10 2 X 10
13 HEX'S HEAD BOLT 4 M16 X 295 M16 X 295 33 HEX'S HEAD BOLT 8 M16 X 20 M16 X 20
14 O-RING 1 G150 X 3.1t G150 X 3.1t 34 SCREW FOR SETTING 1
15 BUSH 4 DU4540 DU4540 35 O-RING 1 G55 X 3.1t G55 X 3.1t
16 PIN 2 10 X 30 10 X 30 36 VALVE COVER 1
17 HEX'S HEAD BOLT 4 M16 X 40 M16 X 40 37 NAMEPLATE 1
18 OIL SEAL 1 45X62X8 45X62X8 38 KEY 1 10 X 8 X 35 12 X 8 X 55
19 SNAP RING 1 R62(HOLE) R62(HOLE) 39 SET SCREW 2 M8 M8
20 KEY 1 12 X 8 X 50 12 X 8 X 50
INDEX

1. 1. Design specification

2. Gear pump 2. Function of gear pump

3. 3. Maintenance and service

4. 4. Lubricating oil, grease

5. 5. Dismantling and assembling

6. 6. Replacement of parts

7. 7. Mount, installation

8. 8. Assembly drawing

9. 9. Spare parts list


1. 1. Design specification

1-1 1-1. Electric motor


TYPE YRB400 YRB500 TYPE YRB400 YRB500
rpm 1,740 1,740 rpm 1,740 1,740
Voltage (V) 3 X 440 3 X 440 Voltage (V) 3 X 440 3 X 440
Frquency(Hz) 60 60 Frquency(Hz) 60 60
Protection IP55 IP55 Protection IP55 IP55

1-2 1-2 Pump


TYPE YRB400 YRB500 TYPE YRB400 YRB500
rpm 1,740 1,740 rpm 1,740 1,740
capacity (m/h) 41.2 50.2 capacity (m/h) 41.2 50.2
Max.Work press(bar) 3.5 3.5 Max.Work press(bar) 3.5 3.5
Min.Work press(bar) 1 1 Min.Work press(bar) 1 1

2. 2. Function of gear pump

Prelubricating oil pump is a kind of gear type pump


which is operated by electric motor. It supply, deliver
30 lubricating oil to each inside driving part of the engine
by operating pump 30 minutes before engine start-up
. and used only for engine start-up.

3. 3. Maintenance and service

3-1 3-1. At the initial start-up stage of gear oil pump, inside of the
. pump should be fully filled with oil. It is applicable in
+23 ~+90 . the range of +23~+90, however, it is normally
+40~ +60 . operated at +40~+60.
3-2 +15 3-2. When oil temperature is under 15, it should
be driven after heating. And if it generates excessive
, heat, noise and vibration, deenergize it immediately
and investigate causes, then use it again after have
. removed causes.

4. 4. Lubricating oil

Oil used in gear oil pump applies to SAE#30/40.


SAE#30/40 The time that change and replace oil is in accordance
. with main engine's.
. .

5. 5. Dismantling and assembling

5-1. 5-1. Dismantling


5-1-1 5-1-1 Dismantle after clearly understand about drawing
. which is attached in guideline.
5-1-2 , 5-1-2 Ensure the object of dismantling and minimize
. parts to dismantle.
5-1-3 5-1-3 When dismantling, certainly mark the position
. of every part and arrange it by dismantling order.
5-1-4 5-1-4 Do not hammer or load excessive pressure
. . on each part in any cases.
5-1-5 5-1-5 If you find any difficulty on dismantling work,
. recheck drawing and try again after understand
structure completely.
5-2 5-2 Assembling
5-2-1 . 5-2-1 Ensure that there is not any dust in surrounding environment.
5-2-2 , 5-2-2 Clean every parts thoroughly with cleaning fluid
. and assemble it after grease connecting coupling part.
5-2-3 . 5-2-3 Marked position at dismantling stage should be observed.
5-2-4 5-2-4 When pump assembling is completed, coupling
. connection axle should turning(rounding) softly by hand.
5-2-5 . 5-2-5 Assemble motor with pump in final.

6. 6. Replacement of parts

6-1 6-1 As driving gear shaft is a special product designed


. by Yurim industries, request purchase order if necessary.
6-2 6-2 Bearing for motor is standardized goods, therefore
. it is purchasable from market.
6-3 6-3 As oil seal is made of rubber material, its capacity
might fall off by rubber deterioration that caused by
, working environment, so need to be replaced regularly.
. And it should be replaced with new one by any reasons
. when dismantled. When replace it, special care must be
. observed that inside and outside of parts are not damaged.

7. 7. Mounting, Installation

, Pre oil pump make vertical, horizontal mounting as


a principle and set-up bolt should be tightened firmly
. to stand against vibration or impact and so on.
Inappropriate installation might reduce pump's
, service life extremely and cause serious damage
. and injury.

8. 8. Assembling drawing

attached

9. 9. spare parts list

Po No TYPE Po No TYPE
YRB400 YRB500 YRB400 YRB500
18 1 18 OIL SEAL 1
0 0 0 0
DATE 2009. 10. 07
DOC No KIM-49(E)
PAGE 05
REV 0

INSTRUCTION MANUAL

MODEL KTM-WA
NAME THERMOSTATIC ELEMENTS
VALVE

KORVAL CO., LTD.


<<HEAD OFFICE & FACTORY>>
#1508-6, DADAI-DONG, SAHA-GU, BUSAN, KOREA
TEL : +81-51-790-9700 FAX : +81-51-790-9799
E-MAIL : rnd@korval.co.kr http://www.korval.co.kr
INSTRUCTION MANUAL PAGE
02/05
THERMOSTATIC ELEMENTS VALVE

INDEX
Features of Item......................................................................... page 03

Mode of operation...................................................................... page 03

Regulation of Fluid temperature in the system................................page 04

Construction & Assembly...............................................................page 04

Thermostatic Element valve operation Checking..............................page 05

Trouble-Shooting AND Solution......................................................page 05


INSTRUCTION MANUAL PAGE
03/05
THERMOSTATIC ELEMENTS VALVE

1. FEATURES (Our item's Features are as follows)

Sturdy compact-regulator in T-form.


Independent of any external power supply.
Particularly easy to service because of the "simple" construction.
Thermostats can cover for any capacity of system.
Insensitive to vibration and pressure.
Disassembly and assembly of element is easy, just using only on-board tools.
Protected against corrosion through a special surface treatment.
Easy-flow design, therefore low pressure loss.
Suitable for high operating and differential pressure(up to 1.6 MPa).

Thermostatic valves which are particularly easy to service.


They offer-as all Korval Thermostatic valves, the same well know tried
and tested sturdy design, taking into account the special conditions to be
met when the unit is attached to the item. These thermostatic elements valves, too,
have of course the typical easy of maintenance as for all Korval temperature regulating
valves, which makes it possible, if necessary or desired, to change the element in a
very short time. using only on board tools. There is no need for any adjustment.

2. Mode of operation

The Korval thermostatic elements valves are equipped


with internal easily replaceable wax filled thermostats
absorb the temperature of the medium surrounding
them at the measurement point(point of installation)
and transform it into another physical value, namely
into expansion and thus a change in path or
length(the valve stroke).
Korval Thermostatic element valves KTM series do not need any auxiliary power supply. When
the temperature rises and exceeds the starting temperature, the sleeve valve is raised up
from the seat and open.
INSTRUCTION MANUAL PAGE
04/05
THERMOSTATIC ELEMENTS VALVE

3. Regulation of Fluid temperature in the system.

The thermostatic element have each temperature


range. Because the part of element, named wax,
have different mixture. It means each mixture
have different reaction on different temperature.
Basically, The thermostatic element valve operate
by wax mixture's expend of temperature. Change
each low-material percentage for the mixture,
can make different reaction on the temperature.
So Each element must have characteristic
temperature range. At the first, we must check the system's requirement. Our normal
type of element do not need to adjust the temperature. Because it already finished to
adjust the temperature range by "POS" When the temperature of medium pass the start
temperature(normally it's 5 below the setting temp'), The wax start to expend the
volume. It can make the power to push the piston in the element, than the sleeve slide
to the by-pass and/or cooler So the medium will be mixed and/or divided in the valve
by this action.

4. Construction & Assemble

Without Emergency manual Handle Assemble


The part name of element is on the
drawing. When the element assemble or
dis-assemble, Please check the part by
the attachment first. The dis-assemble
procedure is as follows;

1) Stop the system.


2) Remove the cover after remove the
bolt on the cover(if it was installed by
the cover.).
3) All internals are then accessible and
can easily be removed by hand.
4) After remove the element, check all
parts of wear or damage, if you can
find it, replace the element.
INSTRUCTION MANUAL PAGE
05/05
THERMOSTATIC ELEMENTS VALVE

6. Thermostatic Element valve operation Checking


Korval Thermostatic Element valve can be checked for correct operation as follows step ;
1) Check the Element's Temp' stamped on Element. It's shown the start operation Temp'.
It should be correct for the system's requirement.
2) Checking Thermostatic Element part should be fully immersed in the fluid. (checking point 1)
3) The fluid should be circulated for the ensure even heat distribution.
4) When the fluid will be heated, check the temperature of fluid.
5) Check the element will be started to operate when the temperature of fluid will reach the start
temperature. (checking point 2)
6) When the temperature of fluid will reach at 10 above, the element should be fullly strocked.
In this case, the movement should be taken a little bit time(normally less than 5 min).

7. Trouble-Shooting
KORVAL Thermostatic valve require minimal Maintenance. Elements in normal service are
designed for many years of trouble-free operation. Excessive Temperature, Chemical,
Electrolytic attack or cavitation can shorten the life of the Elements, seats, sleeves and
seals. All of this are easily replaceable parts. Unless definite problems are detected
during operation, valve usually do not require inspection.
Trouble Cause Remedy
1. element leakage(to-cooler). 1. In case of system,
2. Wrong nominal element installation or cooling
temperature selected. problem, Fix the
The System Temperature 3. The capacity of valve is too big
problem.
will be too cold or cooling capacity of system much
greater than required. 2. In case of element
(can't heated).
4. Thermostatic valve installed backwards problem, replace the
5. Element is not operated normally. element or change the
6. sleeve is stacked by foreign matter. part of element.
1. element leakage(to by-pass). 1. In case of system,
2. Wrong nominal element installation or cooling
temperature selected. problem, Fix the
The System Temperature 3. The capacity of valve is too small
problem.
will be too hot or cooling capacity of system much
smaller than required. 2. In case of element
(over heated).
4. Thermostatic valve installed backwards problem, replace the
5. Element is not operated normally. element or change the
6. sleeve is stacked by foreign matter. part of element.
1) Deterioration or
1) Replace with a new
Leakage at the seal abrasion of gasket,
one.
section O-ring or packing.
2) Re-tighten it.
2) Set bolt is loosened.
setting temperature
range does not Moving section is
Overhaul.
correspond to sticked.
the valve position.
Cooler side is not
opened, even if the upper
Exchange the
limit of the setting Wax leakage.
thermostat assembly.
temperature
range is exceeded.
The setting temperature Exchange the
Wrong selection.
is to be changed. thermostat assembly.
Pressure and Temperature Controls
Data sheet
Pressure transmitters
MBS 5100 and 5150
Danfoss block
components

The block concept has been developed to The range contains pressure controls,
save space, weight, and costs. pressure transmitters, test valves and
The product is intended for use in many accessories.
applications, for example: monitoring, alarm
indication, shut-down, diagnosing on The concept meets the strict demands on ma-
equipment such as motors, gears, thrusters, rine equipment, including EU stipulations on
pumps, filters, compressors, etc. such products.

MBS 5100 and MBS 5150 MBS 5100 and MBS 5150 are block transmit- Advantages
block transmitters ters designed for use in the marine industry. Compact design
MBS 5150 has a built-in pulse-snubber. Low installation costs
The transmitters can be easily mounted Fast and easy to operate
directly on the MBV 5000 block test valve or Version with pulse-snubber (MBS 5150)
the threaded pressure connection can be used. Zero point and span adjustment
Ten ship approvals
High accuracy and small thermal drift

Approvals Lloyds Register of Shipping Bureau Veritas


Det Norske Veritas NKK, Nippon Kaiji Kyokai
Germanischer Lloyd Polski Rejestr Statkw
RINA, Registro Italiano Navale MRS, Maritime Register of Shipping
American Bureau of Shipping Korean Register of Shipping

Dimensions

Plug Pg 13.5, DIN 43650 Plug Pg 9-11, DIN 43650

February 2001 DKACT.PD.P20.Q2.02


520B0787
Data sheet Pressure transmitters MBS 5100 and MBS 5150

Technical data Performance


Accuracy (Incl. non-linearity, hysteresis and repeatability) 0.1% FS (typ.)
0.3% FS (max.)
Non-linearity (Best fit straight line) < 0.2% FS
Hysteresis and repeatability 0.1% FS
Thermal zero point shift 0.1% FS/10K (typ.)
0.2% FS/10K (max.)
Thermal sensitivity (span) shift 0.01% FS/K (typ.)
0.02% FS/K (max.)
Response time < 4 ms
Max. operating pressure See ordering table, page 4
Burst pressure See ordering table, page 4

Electrical specification
Rated output signal 4 to 20 mA
Supply voltage, Vsupply (polarity protected) 10 to 32 V d.c.
Voltage dependency < 0.01% FS/V
Current limitation (linear output signal up to 1.5 nom range) 28 mA (typ.)
V supply - 10 V
Max. load, RL RL ____________ -10 [W]
0.02 A

Environmental conditions
Operating temperature range -40 to 85C
Compensated temperature range 0 to 80C
Transport temperature range -50 to 85C
EMC - Emission EN 50081-1
Air 8 kV EN 50082-1 (IEC 801-2)
Electrostatic discharge
Contact 4 kV EN 50082-1 (IEC 801-2)
field 10 V/m, 26 MHz - 1 GHz EN 50082-1 (IEC 801-3)
EMC - Immunity
RF conducted 3 Vrms, 150 kHz - 30 MHz EN 50082-1 (IEC 801-6)
conducted 1 Vrms, 10 kHz - 50 MHz RINA, Lloyds Reg.
LF conducted 3 Vrms, 50 Hz - 10 kHz RINA, Lloyds Reg.
burst 4 kV (CM), Clamp EN 50082-1 (IEC 801-4)
Transient
surge 1 kV (CM,DM) at Rg = 42W EN 50082-1 (IEC 801-5)
Insulation resistance > 100 MW at 100 V d.c.
Mains frequency 500 V, 50 Hz SEN 361503
Sinusoidal 20 g, 25 Hz - 2 kHz IEC 68-2-6
Vibration stability
Random 7,5 g rms, 5 Hz - 1 kHz IEC 68-2-34, IEC 68-2-36
Shock Shock 500 g / 1 ms IEC 68-2-27
resistance Free fall IEC 68-2-32
Enclosure IP 65 - IEC 529

Mechanical specification
Pressure connection G 1/4, ISO 228/1 or flange
Electrical connection DIN 43650 plug
versions without flange connection AISI 316L, W.no 1.4404
Pressure connection AISI 316L
Wetted parts,
Plug ETG 88 Zn 10F
material versions with flange connection
Plug gasket W.no. 1.0388 Sn5
O-ring for flange NBR
Housing material Anodized AIMgSiPb
Weight 0.4 kg

Electrical connection
2-wire, 4 - 20 mA

1. Supply +
2. Supply -
3. Function test
Connected to MBS transmitter enclosure

2 DKACT.PD.P20.Q2.02 Danfoss 02-2001


Data sheet Pressure transmitters MBS 5100 and MBS 5150

MBS 5150 with integrated MBS 5150 has an integrated pulse snubber
pulse snubber for protection of the sensor element against
extreme pressure peaks and pulsations. Such
conditions may be caused by pumps or fast
operating valves in both high and low pres-
sure plants.

The integrated pulse snubber is designed as


an 0.3 mm orifice mounted in the pressure
connection. The medium should not contain
particles which may clog up in the orifice. The
viscosity has only little effect on the response
time. Even at viscosities up to 100 Cst. the
response time will not exceed 4 msec.

Mechanical connection
Thread Flange

Adjustment
Span
5 ... + 5 % FS

Zero
Pressure range Adjustment
0-1 to 0-10 bar 5 ... +20 % FS
0-16 to 0-40 bar 5 ... +10 % FS
0-60 to 0-600 bar 5 ... +2.5 % FS

DKACT.PD.P20.Q2.02 Danfoss 02-2001 3


Data sheet Pressure transmitters MBS 5100 and MBS 5150

Ordering of standard
MBS 5100 and MBS 5150
Relative pressure version, G 14 with flange connection, DIN 43650 Pg 11 plug, 4 - 20 mA output
Pressure Max. operating Min.burst MBS 5100 MBS 5150
range pressure pressure
bar bar2) bar1) Type no. Code no. Type no. Code no.
0 to 1 2 50 MBS 5100-1011-1DB04 060N1032 MBS 5150-1011-1DB04 060N1081
0 to 2,5 8 50 MBS 5100-1411-1DB04 060N1033 MBS 5150-1411-1DB04 060N1083
0 to 4 8 50 MBS 5100-1611-1DB04 060N1034 MBS 5150-1611-1DB04 060N1084
0 to 6 20 50 MBS 5100-1811-1DB04 060N1035 MBS 5150-1811-1DB04 060N1063
0 to 10 20 50 MBS 5100-2011-1DB04 060N1036 MBS 5150-2011-1DB04 060N1064
0 to 16 50 100 MBS 5100-2211-1DB04 060N1037 MBS 5150-2211-1DB04 060N1065
0 to 25 50 100 MBS 5100-2411-1DB04 060N1038 MBS 5150-2411-1DB04 060N1085
0 to 40 80 800 MBS 5100-2611-1DB04 060N1039 MBS 5150-2611-1DB04 060N1066
0 to 60 200 800 MBS 5100-2811-1DB04 060N1040 MBS 5150-2811-1DB04 060N1086
0 to 100 200 800 MBS 5100-3011-1DB04 060N1041 MBS 5150-3011-1DB04 060N1087
1)
200 bar for abs. pressure versions
2)
FS 300 bar min. 2 x FS; FS > 300 bar min. 1,5 x FS

Ordering of customized
types Type no: MBS 5100- xx x x- x xxxx
Type no: MBS 5150- xx x x- x xxxx

Measuring 0 - 1 bar 10 CA05 M 10 1 female Pressure


range 0 - 1.6 bar 12 CA07 M 12 1.5 female connection
0 - 2.5 bar 14 CB02 G 1/8 female
0 - 4 bar 16 CB04 G 1/4 female
0 - 6 bar 18 CC04 NPT 1/4 female
0 - 10 bar 20 DA05 M 10 1 female with flange
0 - 16 bar 22 DA07 M 12 1.5 female with flange
0 - 25 bar 24 DB02 G 1/8 female with flange connection
0 - 40 bar 26 DB04 G 1/4 female with flange connection
0 - 60 bar 28 DC04 NPT 1/4 female with flange connection
0 - 100 bar 30
0 - 160 bar 32
0 - 250 bar 34 0 No plug (DIN 43650 A) Electrical
0 - 400 bar 36 1 Pg 11 plug (DIN 43650 A) connection
0 - 600 bar 38 2 Pg 13.5 plug (DIN 43650 A)
Others xx 3 Pg 9 plug (DIN 43650 A)

Pressure Relative 1 1 4-20 mA Output


reference Absolute 2 signal

An order form has been worked out The order form with code no. 991L1099 can
PRESSURE SWITCH TYPE

Specification form
Order specification MBC5000 and MBC5100
DSC Contact person Customer

Order No. Order date Quantity

Code No. Type No. Delivery week


0 6 1 B M B C 5 0 0 - -

Approvals Pressure connection


No approvals ............................................. 0 C A 0 5 M10 x 1 female *
Ship-approvals .......................................... 1 C A 0 7 M12 x 1,5 female *
Other ** ..................................................... X C B 0 2 G1/8 female *
C B 0 4 G1/4 female
C C 0 4 NPT 1/4 female *

to facilitate specification of special be ordered from Danfoss.


Measuring range D A 0 5 M10 x 1 female with flange *
-1 - 1 bar ..................................................................... 1 0 D A 0 7 M12 x 1,5 female with flange *
-1 - 4 bar ..................................................................... 1 2 D B 0 2 G1/8 female with flange connection *
-1 - 10 bar ..................................................................... 1 4 D B 0 4 G1/4 female with flange connection
1-6 bar ..................................................................... 2 2 D C 0 4 NPT 1/4 female with flange connection *
1 - 10 bar ..................................................................... 2 4 X X X X Other **
5 - 20 bar ..................................................................... 3 2
5 - 30 bar ..................................................................... 3 4
5 - 40 bar ..................................................................... 3 6 Electrical connection
10 - 100 bar ..................................................................... 4 2 0 No plug (DIN 43650 A)
Other ** ........................................................................... X X 1 Standard plug (DIN 43650 A), PG11
2 GL approved plug (DIN 43650 A), PG13,5
X Other **
Type
Low pressure below (-1 - 10 bar) ............................................... 1
High pressure below (-1 - 30 bar) ............................................... 2
Low pressure diaphragm (1 - 20 bar) ......................................... 3 Microswitch

MBS block transmitters.


High pressure diaphragm (5 - 100 bar) ...................................... 4 1 0,1A, 250V (AC11); 12W, 125V (DC11)
Other ** ....................................................................................... X X Other **

* On request
** Please state below

Application Medium Medium temperature

Comments / special requirements


991L1100 udg. 12.94

For DN use only


OB-nr. Dato Bekrftet uge Prod. spec. udsendt dato NSP AG-S sign.

ISO 9001 quality approval


Danfoss A/S is certificated in accordance with international standard ISO 9001.
ISO This means that Danfoss fulfils the international standard in respect of product develop-
9001 ment, design, production and sale.

4 DKACT.PD.P20.Q2.02 Danfoss A/S AC-TMP 02-2001


INSTRUCTION MANUAL
FOR
THERMOCOUPLE

HERIANA CO., LTD


#688-1,JURE1-DONG, SASANG-KU, BUSAN, KOREA
TEL : 82-51-313-6690~1
FAX : 82-51-313-6693
E-mail : iheriana@hanmail.net
http://www.heriana.co.kr
-CONTENTS LIST-

1.General

2.Constitution

3.Installation and wiring

4.Type of thermocouple

5.Presumption cause about the trouble state


1.General
Thermocouple is manufactured by connecting both ends of two dissimilar metal wires,

and when temperature difference occurs on the contacts on these two ends, terminal

electro motive force occurs in this closed-circuit and electric current floes on this circuit.

The size and the polarity of this electric motive force are determined by the temperature on

both ends and the combination of the two metal wires and are not affected by the thickness or

the length of the metal wire. As the electro motive force can be pre-reading according to the

temperature can be measured.

Thermocouple not only requires selection of appropriate wires according to the temperature

measurement range, situation of the measuring places and the required accuracy but also

requires the maintaining of sure performance even when it is used for a long period of time.

2. Constitution
* Thermocouple wire : The wire ends are welding to create the temperature checking

contacts

* Protecting tune : This protecting tube protects the thermocouple wire and insulators from

surrounding conditions to which components and terminal read are

connected. As the conditions of the protecting tube vary consider

ably according to the temperature checking places.

It is necessary to select materials and shapes. which suit the operating

temperature atmosphere and the purpose use.

* The bolts and plugs : There are used for fixing the measuring spot.

* The terminal head : This is the head to connect the thermocouple to the outer leading wire.

* Insulators : This insulators used to insulated between the thermocouple wires and between

protecting tubes to prevent short-circuit, use high-purity aluminium or

insulators.

-1-
3. Installation and wiring
Please pay your attention for the followings in case of the installation

(1). It is necessary to choose the suitable place and the method for the installation which can

transmit the temperature correctly and can follow the variation of the

temperature as quickly as possible.

Please take care not to bend the tube in view of the construction of the thermocouple.

(2). Please choose the suitable place which has the smallest vibration, the least

dirts, and the lowest moisture. Then, please install the thermocouple at the place which is

convenient for the maintenance and inspection.

(3) In case of the connection of wires, please confirm the wire sign in order to

avoid the wires, and connect the wires firmly by using the compression

terminals to avoid the trouble such as the breaking wire and the short -circuit.

4. Type of Thermocouple
1) "N" Type : This is called Nicrosil. nisil Thermocouple, and it`s composition and

characteristics are very similar to those of type "K".

2) "K" Type : Thermocouple which combines a positive wire of an alloy consisting mainly of

nickel and chromium with negative wire of an alloy consisting mainly of nickel.

3) "J" Type : Thermocouple which combines a positive wire of iron with thermocouple is

resistant in reducing atmosphere and is also resistant to hydrogen and carbon.

However it should not be used atmospheres that will oxidize.

4) "T" Type : Thermocouple which combines a positive wire of copper with a negative wire of

an alloy mainly of copper and nickel.

It is suitable for low temperatures from -200~-100.

5) "E" Type : Thermocouple which combines a positive wire of thermocouple "K"with

a negative wire of thermocouple "J"

-2-
5. Presumption cause about the trouble state
Trouble state Presumption cause Treatment
Breaking out of the
Thermal vibration and shock
wires
A. Exchange the bad
As for the low temperature the one for the spare
infiltration of the sea water, part.
and the oil due to the badness of The pointer of the
Bad insulation the instruments tester does not move in case of
B. breaking the wire
As for the high temperature the and it shows less
chemical change of the insulation, than 1 in case of the bad
due to the high temperature insulation
Badness of the distance of the
Short-circuit
leading-wire.

Connect the standard


A.
resistor instead of the resistance
Badness of the indicator
bulb,
B.
and find which of the measuring
In case that the Badness of the resistance bulb
device or the
allowance
device or the detector
increase gradually (1) The increase of the internal
is bad.
while resistance
Exchange for the spare
using (2) The decrease of the internal
parts.
resistance
Take off the protection
(3) The increase of the dirt attached to the
tube and take away the
protection tube
dirt.

A.
Abnormality of the measuring
In case that the
device
allowance
B. Exchange for the spare
increases suddenly
Badness of the resistance bulb part.
while
C.
using
Bad connection of the wire, due to the
looseness of the screw.

-3-
5-1. method of repairing
(1) Do in accordance with the receiving order of that of opening.

(2) Concerning the one for the high temperature, the protection against burning out should be

carried out around the installation screws at the side of the engine.

5-2. Confirmation items


(1) Confirm whether the leading-wire is connected correctly.

(2) Confirm the tightness of the cover

(3) Confirm the fixed part of the bolts, plugs, etc

(4) Turn on the switch for the electric source

-4-
Specification of Type (HT201)
1. Scope
This specification applies to that thermocouple which used to every part
of machinery.

2. Specification
(1). Element wire : Alumel/Calomel (K-Type)
(2). Nominal value: 0 at 0
(3) Thermocouple of standard element: according to JIS C 1605-1995
(4) Tolerance temperature : 0.0075t
Note 1. Tolerance is referred to as the maximum allowable deviation
between measuring junction temperature and the temperature
derived from the emf table
2. t= means measuring temperature indicator with the temperature.
(5) Wireing
Thermocouple which combines a positive wire of an alloy consisting mainly of
nickel and chromium with negative wire of an alloy consisting mainly of nickel.

-- Possible items to test in our company--


* Insulation resistance: It is to be the following table.

Insulation resistance()
500V / over 10

*High Voltage : It is to be the following table.

High Voltage
500V / 1minutes

*Performance test : It is to be the following table

Performance test
Temperature : 0 --> 0 (allowable error: 0.3%)

-5-
This Thermocouple is made up of Element wire (Alumel/Calomel) , protecting tube
terminal head and it has the advantage of following items at fitting state.

Item I(Change Spare)


Loosen the nut like us following diagram, than internal element can be pulled out from outer
protecting tube.
The element can be changed to new spare one at fitting place, at this time, take off the cable
from terminal head and lossen the fitting screw of terminal cover from terminal head then can
be changed to spare one.

Item II
It can performance test easily with out disconnection of cable from terminal head at fitting
place.
Multimeter is used to voltage(uV) to measurement .

Fitting State

Item I (Change Spare)

-6-
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
FOR
RESISTANCE BULB

HERIANA CO., LTD


#688-1,JURE1-DONG, SASANG-KU, BUSAN, KOREA
TEL : 82-51-313-6690~1
FAX : 82-51-313-6693
E-mail : iheriana@hanmail.net
http://www.heriana.co.kr
-CONTENTS LIST-

1. General

2. Constitution

3. Installation and wiring

4. Wiring method of resistance bulb

5. Maintenance method

6. Presumption cause about the trouble state


1. General
In general metal electric resistance of the metal is variable in proportion
to the temperature. So, it possible to tell the temperature by measuring

the resistance , after the investigation of the relation between the electric

resistance and the temperature

There is detector used the theory of resistance variation in proportion to the

temperature of the platinum wire in the result, and this is called

"PLATINUM RESISTANCE BULB".

The resistance bulb consists of the resistance element ( the resistance wire wound

to the bobbin ) the internal leading wire, the protecting tube, the terminal head ,etc.

The resistance bulb has the high pure platinum wire as the resistance element

which is put in the sus tube in order to protect against the circumstance

condition such as the moisture, the vibration and the shock. Moreover, it has the

terminals for the connection of the wire and steel equipment for fixing the part of detecting

the temperature

2. Constitution
The resistance element to internal leading wire inside of the platinum and outside consists of

the protecting tube the bolts , the plugs the terminal box, and etc.

* Protecting tube : This is used for protecting so that the resistance element to internal

leading wire inside of the platinum.

This is not touch the measure thing directly.

* The bolts and plugs : There are used for fixing the measuring spot.

* The terminal head : This is the head to connect the resistance bulb to the outer

leading wire.

* insulator : This is used to insulate between internal lead wire and wires and to prevent

short-circuit. Teflon tube is used.

-1-
3. Installation and wiring
Please pay your attention for the followings in case of the installation

(1). It is necessary to choose the suitable place and the method for the installation which can

transmit the temperature correctly and can follow the variation of the

temperature as quickly as possible.

Please take care not to bend the tube in view of the construction of the resistance bulb.

(2). Please choose the suitable place which has the smallest vibration, the least

dirts, and the lowest moisture. Then, please install the resistance bulb at the place which is

convenient for the maintenance and he inspection.

(3) In case of the connection of wires, please confirm the wire sign in order to

avoid the wires, and connect the wires firmly by using the compression

terminals to avoid the trouble such as the breaking wire and the short -circuit.

4. Wiring method of resistance bulb


4-1) Three -conductor Type : use to eliminate the effect of conductor, care should be taken

for long-distance transmission because a variation of resistance conductors has an effect on

accuracy.

-2-
4-2) Four -conductor Type : This type of connection is used four high-accuracy

measurement and standards because it is not afftected by conductor resistance,

Generally, a constant current is applied and resistance value is measured by a

potential difference.

5. Maintenance method
* Ture off the electric switch.
* Do taping around the end of the outer lead-wire which is taken off.

* Never open the internal resistance element at the spot.

* Taken off the cover of the terminal head.

* loosen the terminal screw of the cable.

* loosen the cable grand

-3-
6. Presumption cause about the trouble state
Trouble state Presumption cause Treatment
Breaking out of the
Thermal vibration and shock
wires
A. Exchange the bad
As for the low temperature the one for the spare
infiltration of the sea water, part.
and the oil due to the badness of The pointer of the
Bad insulation the instruments tester does not move in case of
B. breaking the wire
As for the high temperature the and it shows less
chemical change of the insulation, than 1 in case of the bad
due to the high temperature insulation
Badness of the distance of the
Short-circuit
leading-wire.
Connect the standard
A. resistor instead of the resistance
Badness of the indicator bulb,
B. and find which of the measuring
In case that the
Badness of the resistance bulb device or the
allowance
(1) The increase of the internal device or the detector
increase gradually
resistance is bad.
while
(2) The decrease of the internal Exchange for the spare
using
resistance parts.
(3) The increase of the dirt attached to the Take off the protection
protection tube tube and take away the
dirt.
A.
Abnormality of the measuring
In case that the
device
allowance
B. Exchange for the spare
increases suddenly
Badness of the resistance bulb part.
while
C.
using
Bad connection of the wire, due to the
looseness of the screw.

-4-
6-1. Method of repairing
(1) Do in accordance with the receiving order of that of opening.
(2) Concerning the one for the high temperature, the protection against burning out should be
carried out around the installation screws at the side of the engine.

6-2. Confirmation items


(1) Confirm whether the leading-wire is connected correctly.
(2) Confirm the tightness of the cover
(3) Confirm the fixed part of the bolts, plugs, etc
(4) Turn on the switch for the electric source

-5-
Specification of Type (HR101/HC301)
1 . Scope

This specification applies to the resistance blub which used to every part
of machinery.

2. Specification

* Element wire : platinum

* Nominal resistance value: Pt 100 at 0

* Regulated current : 2

* Operating temperature : 0~200 class B

* Resistance value of standard element: according to JIS C 1604-1997

* Allowance against temperature : 0.12(0.3+0.005 t)


note. 1.Allowance is defined as the maximum allowable deviation from the
temperature vs. resistance reference table.
2. t= modulus of temperature in degrees Celsius without regard sign.

*Wiring :
Three -conductor Type : use to eliminate the effect of conductor, care should be taken for
long-distance transmission because a variation of resistance conductors has an effect on
accuracy.

-6-
-- Possible items to test in our company--
* Insulation resistance: It is to be the following table.

Insulation resistance()
500V / over 10

*High Voltage : It is to be the following table.

High Voltage
500V / 1minutes

*Performance test : It is to be the following table

Performance test
Temperature : 0 -->100.00 (allowable error: 0.3%)

-7-
This HR101-P Resistance bulb is made up of internal element , protecting tube
terminal head and it has the advantage of following items at fitting state.

Item I(Change Spare)


Loosen the nut like us following diagram, than internal element can be pulled out from
outer protecting tube.
The element can be changed to new spare one at fitting place, at this time,
take off the cable from terminal head and lossen the fitting screw of terminal
cover from terminal head then can be changed to spare one.

Item II
It can performance test easily with out disconnection of cable from terminal
head at fitting place.
Multimeter is used to resistance() to measurement

Fitting State

Item I (Change Spare)

-8-
Item II (Performance Test)

-9-
Technical Manual 26415
(Revision E)
Original Instructions

Atlas-II Digital Control

Control Part Numbers 8273-552, -553, -555, -556,


-557, -560, -562, -565, -570, -571, -584, -586

Installation and Operation Manual


This is the safety alert symbol. It is used to alert you to potential personal
injury hazards. Obey all safety messages that follow this symbol to avoid
possible injury or death.
DANGERIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death
or serious injury.
DEFINITIONS WARNINGIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
death or serious injury.
CAUTIONIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
minor or moderate injury.
NOTICEIndicates a hazard that could result in property damage only (including
damage to the control).
IMPORTANTDesignates an operating tip or maintenance suggestion.

The engine, turbine, or other type of prime mover should be equipped with an
overspeed shutdown device to protect against runaway or damage to the prime
mover with possible personal injury, loss of life, or property damage.
The overspeed shutdown device must be totally independent of the prime mover
control system. An overtemperature or overpressure shutdown device may also
be needed for safety, as appropriate.

Read this entire manual and all other publications pertaining to the work to be performed before
installing, operating, or servicing this equipment. Practice all plant and safety instructions and
precautions. Failure to follow instructions can cause personal injury and/or property damage.

This publication may have been revised or updated since this copy was produced. To verify that
you have the latest revision, be sure to check the Woodward website:
www.woodward.com/pubs/current.pdf
The revision level is shown at the bottom of the front cover after the publication number. The latest
version of most publications is available at:
www.woodward.com/publications
If your publication is not there, please contact your customer service representative to get the
latest copy.

Any unauthorized modifications to or use of this equipment outside its specified mechanical,
electrical, or other operating limits may cause personal injury and/or property damage, including
damage to the equipment. Any such unauthorized modifications: (i) constitute "misuse" and/or
"negligence" within the meaning of the product warranty thereby excluding warranty coverage
for any resulting damage, and (ii) invalidate product certifications or listings.

To prevent damage to a control system that uses an alternator or battery-charging


device, make sure the charging device is turned off before disconnecting the battery
from the system.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper handling, read


and observe the precautions in Woodward manual 82715, Guide for Handling and
Protection of Electronic Controls, Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

RevisionsText changes are indicated by a black line alongside the text.

Woodward Governor Company reserves the right to update any portion of this publication at any time. Information
provided by Woodward Governor Company is believed to be correct and reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed
by Woodward Governor Company unless otherwise expressly undertaken.
Woodward 2007
All Rights Reserved
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Contents

IOLOCK. When a CPU or I/O module fails, watchdog logic drives it into an
IOLOCK condition where all output circuits and signals are driven to a known
de-energized state as described below. The System MUST be designed such that
IOLOCK and power OFF states will result in a SAFE condition of the controlled
device.

CPU and I/O module failures will drive the module into an IOLOCK state.
CPU failure will assert an IOLOCK signal to all modules and drive them into
an IOLOCK state.
Discrete outputs / relay drivers will be non-active and de-energized.
Analog and actuator outputs will be non-active and de-energized with zero
voltage or zero current.

The IOLOCK state is asserted under various conditions including:


CPU and I/O module watchdog failures
PowerUp and PowerDown conditions
System reset and hardware/software initialization
Entering configuration mode

NOTE: Additional watchdog details and any exceptions to these failure states
are specified in the related CPU or I/O module section of the manual.

REGULATORY COMPLIANCE ........................................................................ V


ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE AWARENESS ................................................ VIII
CHAPTER 1. GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................... 1
Introduction .............................................................................................................1
Atlas-II Control Description .....................................................................................1
Control Versions .....................................................................................................2
Control Accessories................................................................................................6
CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION.......................................................................... 7
Introduction .............................................................................................................7
General Installation.................................................................................................7
Shipping Carton ......................................................................................................7
Mounting .................................................................................................................8
Environmental Specifications .................................................................................8
Electrical Connections ............................................................................................9
Grounding .............................................................................................................11
Non-Marine Enclosure Application Information ....................................................13
Marine Enclosure Application Information ............................................................14
General Enclosure Application Information ..........................................................15
Input Power ..........................................................................................................20
Maintenance .........................................................................................................22
Application Guidelines ..........................................................................................23
CHAPTER 3. POWER SUPPLY BOARD ......................................................... 27
General Description ..............................................................................................27
Specifications .......................................................................................................28
Troubleshooting Guide .........................................................................................28
CHAPTER 4. SMARTCORE CPU A5200 BOARD ......................................... 31
General Description ..............................................................................................31

Woodward i
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Contents

Hardware Specifications .......................................................................................38


SmartCore CPU A5200 Board Operation .............................................................42
Troubleshooting Guide .........................................................................................53
CHAPTER 5. ANALOG COMBO BOARD ........................................................56
General Description ..............................................................................................56
Specifications........................................................................................................57
Analog Combo Board Operation ..........................................................................62
Troubleshooting Guide .........................................................................................67
CHAPTER 6. POWERSENSE BOARD ............................................................69
General Description ..............................................................................................69
Features................................................................................................................69
Physical ................................................................................................................69
Hazardous Live .....................................................................................................69
Specifications........................................................................................................73
PowerSense Board Operation ..............................................................................76
Power Calculations ...............................................................................................84
Troubleshooting Guide .........................................................................................91
CHAPTER 7. 12-CHANNEL RELAY MODULE ................................................93
General Information ..............................................................................................93
Relay Information..................................................................................................94
Shielding ...............................................................................................................94
Board Status Lights ..............................................................................................94
Wiring ....................................................................................................................94
CHAPTER 8. DLE SERIAL COMMUNICATION BOARD....................................96
General Information ..............................................................................................96
Application Developer Information........................................................................99
CHAPTER 9. PC104 PROFIBUS INTERFACE...............................................100
Introduction .........................................................................................................100
Profibus Software and Hardware Requirements ................................................100
Hardware for End Users .....................................................................................100
Software for Application Developers ..................................................................105
CHAPTER 10. SERVICE OPTIONS ..............................................................107
Product Service Options .....................................................................................107
Woodward Factory Servicing Options ................................................................108
Returning Equipment for Repair .........................................................................108
Replacement Parts .............................................................................................109
Engineering Services ..........................................................................................109
How to Contact Woodward .................................................................................110
Technical Assistance ..........................................................................................110
APPENDIX A. ACRONYMS AND GLOSSARY OF TERMS ...............................111
Acronyms ............................................................................................................111
Glossary of Terms ..............................................................................................112
APPENDIX B. WIRING DIAGRAMS..............................................................113
APPENDIX C. FLASH CODES ....................................................................118
APPENDIX D. BOARD ADDRESSES............................................................120
DECLARATIONS .......................................................................................121

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Illustrations and Tables

Figure 1-1. Atlas-II, Example Module Layout .........................................................3


Figure 1-2a. Physical Dimensions ..........................................................................4
Figure 1-2b. Physical Dimensions ..........................................................................5
Figure 2-1. Screw Connection Terminal Block Used on A5200 SmartCore
Board .................................................................................................9
Figure 2-2. Spring Clamp Terminal Block ............................................................10
Figure 2-3. Fixed Terminals..................................................................................11
Figure 2-4. Descriptions of Main Cabinet Cabling Options ..................................17
Figure 3-1. Atlas-II Power Supply Board (601-1008) ...........................................27
Figure 3-2. Discrete Output Wiring Example ........................................................29
Figure 4-1. SmartCore CPU A5200 board, Connectors .......................................31
Figure 4-2. Block DiagramAtlas-II SmartCore CPU A5200 Board....................33
Figure 4-3. SmartCore CPU A5200 Communications Ports (SIO1, SIO2) ..........35
Figure 4-4. CPU Service Port (mini-DIN6F) .........................................................36
Figure 4-5. CAN Communication Ports ................................................................36
Figure 4-6. MPU Minimum Input Magnitude in Vrms ...........................................38
Figure 4-7. MPU Maximum Input Magnitude in Vrms ..........................................39
Figure 4-8. MPU Typical Input Impedance Magnitude and Phase ......................39
Figure 4-9. Wiring ExampleMPU Interface to the SmartCore Board .................43
Figure 4-10. Wiring ExampleOpen Collector Proximity Probe to the SmartCore
CPU A5200 Board ...........................................................................43
Figure 4-11a. Wiring Example420 mA Input Interface to the SmartCore CPU
A5200 Board ....................................................................................44
Figure 4-11b. Wiring Example420 mA Input Interface using External Loop
Power ...............................................................................................45
Figure 4-12. Wiring ExampleAnalog Output Interface to the SmartCore CPU
A5200 Board ....................................................................................45
Figure 4-13. Wiring ExampleActuator Output Interface to the SmartCore CPU
A5200 Board ....................................................................................46
Figure 4-14. Wiring ExampleDiscrete Input Interface to the SmartCore CPU
A5200 Board ....................................................................................47
Figure 4-15. Serial #1RS-232 Pinouts................................................................48
Figure 4-16. Serial #1RS-422 Pinouts................................................................48
Figure 4-17. Serial #1RS-485 Pinouts................................................................49
Figure 4-18. Serial #2RS-232 Pinouts................................................................49
Figure 4-19. Serial #2RS-422 Pinouts................................................................50
Figure 4-20. Serial #2RS-485 Pinouts................................................................50
Figure 4-21. Wiring ExampleRS-232 Interface to the SmartCore CPU A5200
Board ...............................................................................................51
Figure 4-22. Wiring ExampleRS-422 Interface to the SmartCore CPU A5200
Board ...............................................................................................51
Figure 4-23. Wiring ExampleRS-485 Interface to the SmartCore CPU A5200
Board ...............................................................................................51
Figure 4-24. Wiring ExampleAlternate Multipoint Wiring....................................51
Figure 5-1. Atlas-II Analog Combo Board Connections .......................................56
Figure 5-2. Atlas-II Analog Combo Board Block Diagram ....................................57
Figure 5-3. Minimum MPU Voltage ......................................................................61
Figure 5-4. Wiring ExampleMPU Interface to the Analog Combo Board ...........62
Figure 5-5a. Wiring ExampleAnalog Input Interface ..........................................63
Figure 5-5b. Wiring ExampleAnalog Input Interface with External Loop Power 64
Figure 5-6. Wiring Example420 mA Input Interface .........................................64
Figure 5-7. Wiring ExampleRTD Input Interface ................................................64
Figure 5-8. Wiring ExampleAnalog Output Interface ..........................................66

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Illustrations and Tables

Figure 6-1. Terminal Block Covers .......................................................................70


Figure 6-2. PowerSense Board Connections .......................................................71
Figure 6-3. PowerSense Board Block Diagram....................................................72
Figure 6-4. Wiring ExampleWye Connected System .........................................78
Figure 6-5. Wiring ExampleWye Connected System .........................................79
Figure 6-6. Example WiringWye Connected System .........................................80
Figure 6-7. Wiring ExampleDelta Connected System ........................................81
Figure 6-8. Wiring ExampleDelta Connected System ........................................82
Figure 6-9. Wiring ExampleCT Interface to the PowerSense Board ..................85
Figure 6-10. Wiring ExampleCT Interface to the PowerSense Board ................86
Figure 6-11. Wiring ExampleSpeed Bias Output Interface ................................87
Figure 6-12. Wiring ExampleSpeed Bias Output Interface ................................88
Figure 6-13. Wiring ExampleVoltage Bias Output Interface ...............................89
Figure 6-14. Wiring ExampleVoltage Bias Output Interface ...............................89
Figure 6-15. Wiring ExampleLON Interface to the PowerSense Board .............90
Figure 7-1. 12-Channel Relay Module .................................................................93
Figure 7-2. 12-Channel Relay Module Wiring Diagram........................................95
Figure 8-1. DLE Connections ...............................................................................96
Figure 8-2. Terminator Locations .........................................................................97
Figure B-1. SmartCore CPU A5200 board Connections ....................................113
Figure B-2. Analog Combo Board Connections .................................................114
Figure B-3. PowerSense Board Connections.....................................................115
Figure B-4. 12-Channel Relay Module Connections ..........................................116
Figure B-5. DLE Connections .............................................................................117
Figure D-1. Board Address Numbers .................................................................120

Table 1-1. Atlas-II Modules.....................................................................................2


Table 1-2. VxWorks Atlas-II Item Numbers ............................................................2
Table 2-1. Power Supply Requirements ...............................................................21
Table 4-1. Ethernet Port Pinout ............................................................................35
Table 4-2. SmartCore CPU A5200 Failure Codes ...............................................53
Table 5-1 Analog Combo Failure..........................................................................67
Table 6-1. PowerSense Failure Codes ................................................................90
Table 8-1. DLE Failure Codes ..............................................................................98
Table 9-1. ProfibusType A Cable ....................................................................101
Table 9-2. ProfibusType B Cable ....................................................................101
Table 9-3. Belden Profibus Cable.......................................................................102
Table 9-4. ProfibusSiemens RS-485 Bus Connector / Plastic ........................102
Table 9-5. ProfibusSiemens RS-485 Bus Connector / Metal .........................103
Table 9-6. I/O Connector Pinout .........................................................................103
Table C-1. SmartCore CPU A5200 Failure Codes .............................................118
Table C-2 Analog Combo Failure Codes ...........................................................118
Table C-3. PowerSense Failure Codes ..............................................................118
Table C-4. DLE Failure Codes ...........................................................................119

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Regulatory Compliance
European Compliance for CE Marking:
These listings are limited only to those units bearing the CE Marking.

EMC Directive: Declared to 2004/108/EC COUNCIL DIRECTIVE of 15


December 2004 on the approximation of the laws of the
Member States relating to electromagnetic compatibility
and all applicable amendments.

ATEX - Potentially Declared to 94/9/EC COUNCIL DIRECTIVE of 23 March


Explosive 1994 on the approximation of the laws of the Member
Atmospheres States concerning equipment and protective systems
Directive: intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres.
Zone 2, Category 3, Group II G, Ex nA IIC T3 X

North American Compliance:


These listings are limited only to those units bearing the UL identification.

UL: UL Listed for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, & D,


T3C at 70C surrounding air temperature. For use in
Canada and the United States.
UL File E156028
The 16-channel relay interface modules are suitable for
ordinary or non-hazardous locations only.

Marine Compliance

American Bureau ABS Rules 2006 SVR 4-2-1/7.3, 7.5.1, 7.9.3/17,


of Shipping 4-9-4/23, 4-9-7/Table 9

Det Norske Veritas Standard for Certification No. 2.4, 2006: Temperature
Class B, Humidity Class B, Vibration Class A, and EMC
Class A

Lloyds Register LR Type Approval Test Specification No. 1, 2002 for


of Shipping Environmental Categories ENV1, ENV2, and ENV3

Special Conditions For Safe Use:


This Equipment is Suitable For Use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D or
Non-Hazardous Locations Only.

This equipment is suitable for use in European Zone 2, Group IIC environments.

This equipment is intended to be installed in a metal cabinet or enclosure to


provide protection against the entry of dust or water and to protect against
mechanical impact. For ATEX compliance, a minimum ingress protection rating
of IP54 is required for the enclosure.

For ATEX compliance, this equipment must be protected externally against


transient disturbances. Provisions shall be made to prevent the power input from
being exceeded by transient disturbances of more than 40% of the rated voltage

Wiring must be in accordance with North American Class I, Division 2, or


European Zone 2, Category 3 wiring methods as applicable, and in accordance
with the authority having jurisdiction.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
A fixed wiring installation is required and a switch or circuit breaker shall be
included in the building installation that is in close proximity to the equipment and
within easy reach of the operator and that is clearly marked as the disconnecting
device for the equipment. The switch or circuit breaker shall not interrupt the
protective earth conductor.

Do not connect more than one main power supply to any one fuse or circuit
breaker.

Protective Earth Grounding is required by the input PE terminal (see Chapter 2,


Installation).

Ground leakage current exceeds 3.5 mA.

For Communications wires, use wires with a temperature rating of at least 5 C


above surrounding ambient. All others use wires with a temperature rating of at
least 10 C above surrounding ambient.

The Atlas-II A5200 board contains a single cell primary battery. This battery is
not to be charged and is not customer replaceable.

Control is suitable for installation in pollution degree 2 environments.

Unmarked inputs are classified as permanently connected IEC measurement


Category I. To avoid the danger of electric shock, do not use inputs to make
measurements within measurement categories II, III, or IV. See individual inputs
for additional information on transient overvoltage input ratings.

EXPLOSION HAZARDDo not connect or disconnect while circuit is


live unless area is known to be non-hazardous.
Substitution of components may impair suitability for Class I,
Division 2 applications.

RISQUE DEXPLOSIONNe pas raccorder ni dbrancher


tant que linstallation est sous tension, sauf en cas
lambiance est dcidment non dangereuse.
La substitution de composants peut rendre ce matriel
inacceptable pour les emplacements de Classe I,
applications Division 2.

The Atlas-II is designed for installation in a standard metal cabinet. If


the cabinet door is open or Atlas-II is not installed in a metal cabinet,
some degraded performance can occur on RTD and thermocouple
inputs in the presence of radio wave energy. Radio wave energy may
be from transmitters such as cell phones or push to talk radios.
This degraded performance is in the form of a slight change in the
accuracy of the RTD and thermocouple input measured temperature.
It is recommended that operation of such radio wave devices be kept
more than 3 m (10 ft) from the Atlas-II control. This will prevent
performance degradation. Installation of the Atlas-II control in a
metal enclosure, as intended, will also prevent performance
degradation.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

The Atlas-II Actuator and Analog outputs are intended to drive loads
that are isolated from protective earth, like actuators and meters.

The Atlas-II is protected from indirect lighting strikes. However,


during a lighting strike to protective earth (PE), or similar transient
events, if the Actuator or Analog outputs are connected to earth-
referenced devices, the device may significantly reduce performance
of the Atlas-II.
Protective earth connections separated by a significant distance (>30
m) can see a large voltage difference due to transient surge events.
The non-isolated device may cause a ground fault with significant
current flow through the analog signal lines, causing signal input
measurement errors beyond Analog I/O to occur.
Adding an isolator between the Atlas-II and its analog loads will
solve this issue. Alternatively adding clamping circuitry, like Metal
Oxide Varistors (MOV) or Transient Voltage Suppression (TVS)
diodes, from chassis to signal lines at both ends will also solve this
issue. (See the appropriate sections for more details.)

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Electrostatic Discharge Awareness


All electronic equipment is static-sensitive, some components more than others.
To protect these components from static damage, you must take special
precautions to minimize or eliminate electrostatic discharges.

Follow these precautions when working with or near the control.

1. Before doing maintenance on the electronic control, discharge the static


electricity on your body to ground by touching and holding a grounded metal
object (pipes, cabinets, equipment, etc.).

2. Avoid the build-up of static electricity on your body by not wearing clothing
made of synthetic materials. Wear cotton or cotton-blend materials as much
as possible because these do not store static electric charges as much as
synthetics.

3. Keep plastic, vinyl, and Styrofoam materials (such as plastic or Styrofoam


cups, cup holders, cigarette packages, cellophane wrappers, vinyl books or
folders, plastic bottles, and plastic ash trays) away from the control, the
modules, and the work area as much as possible.

4. Do not remove the printed circuit board (PCB) from the control cabinet
unless absolutely necessary. If you must remove the PCB from the control
cabinet, follow these precautions:

Do not touch any part of the PCB except the edges.

Do not touch the electrical conductors, the connectors, or the


components with conductive devices or with your hands.

When replacing a PCB, keep the new PCB in the plastic antistatic
protective bag it comes in until you are ready to install it. Immediately
after removing the old PCB from the control cabinet, place it in the
antistatic protective bag.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper


handling, read and observe the precautions in Woodward manual
82715, Guide for Handling and Protection of Electronic Controls,
Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

viii Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Chapter 1.
General Information

Introduction
This manual describes the Woodward Atlas-II Digital Control. It provides a
variety of useful information for the user ranging from simple basic descriptions to
detailed information on wiring, specifications, and functionality. Included are:
General information on the Atlas-II platform and available versions
A physical description of the control hardware
A description of all Atlas-II modules
A listing of accessories that may be used with the platform
Information on Atlas-II communications and distributed I/O interfaces
Installation and maintenance
Troubleshooting information
For information on programming, networking, and communication protocols,
refer to the software manual provided with the control.

Atlas-II Control Description


The Atlas-II digital control platform fits a wide range of prime mover applications.
These include small mechanical-drive units with a minimum of complexity on up
to large two-shaft gas turbine generator sets that require unit sequencing and
load control. The Atlas-II control is programmed to the specific needs of the
prime mover and its driven load.

At the heart of the Atlas-II control is a 32-bit microprocessor that runs a powerful
Real Time Operating System. This operating system is specifically designed to
control the proper timing of all application code so that dynamic performance of
the final control system is absolutely guaranteed. Each piece of the application
code is scheduled under a Rate Group structure that ensures execution of the
code at a predetermined time.

Application programming is accomplished via Woodwards GAP Graphical


Application Program. GAP is a pictures-to-code system that provides a high-level
programming environment for users who have control expertise but do not have
specific programming skills. Once the application program has been generated
and loaded into the Atlas-II control, the user can view variables and tune the
control with a variety of Woodward service tools. Connection to other devices,

such as an HMI, is accomplished by means of serial Modbus * or Ethernet ports
on the control. The desired information flow is programmed into the control via
GAP. If required, distributed I/O can be connected using optional communication
modules that support Profibus and DLE Communications.
*Modbus is a trademark of Schneider Automation Inc.

The hardware platform is based on the industry-standard PC/104 bus structure. In


the Atlas-II control, the backplane is the SmartCore board. The PC/104 modules
are stacked onto the SmartCore board in order to add I/O or other functionality.
Each of the stacked modules has an on-board DIP switch that is positioned to the
unique address of that particular module. The Atlas-II control uses a second stack
called the Power Bus Stack. This stack is used primarily for power-related I/O. The
control runs on low-voltage DC power (1832 Vdc). Atlas-II field wiring is
accomplished via terminal blocks that plug into the control modules.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Control Versions
The Atlas-II control provides a flexible platform that can be structured into a wide
variety of configurations of I/O and communications. The required number of I/O
modules and the types of communication modules that are required will depend
entirely on the specific application scenario. Table 1-1 shows the various
modules that are available.

Atlas-II Module List


Power Supply
SmartCore CPU A5200
PowerSense
Analog Combo I/O
DLE Communications
Profibus

Table 1-1. Atlas-II Modules

Atlas-II
Item Operating Atlas-II Power- Analog DLE Cooling
Number System A5200 Sense Combo Com Profibus Fan Description
ATLAS II, 2 X 5, A5200, LV, 2
8273-552 VxWorks 1 2 2 X
COMBO, 2 PROFIBUS
ATLAS II, 2 X 4, A5200, LV, 1
8273-553 VxWorks 1 1 1
COMBO, 1 DLE
8273-555 VxWorks 1 3 X ATLAS II, 2 X 4, A5200, LV, 3 COMBO
ATLAS-II, 3 X 4, A5200, LV, PSENSE,
8273-556 VxWorks 1 1 1
1 COMBO
ATLAS-II, 3X4 A5200, PSENSE, LV, 2
8273-557 VxWorks 1 1 2 X
COMBO
ATLAS-II, 2X5, A5200, LV, 3 COMBO,
8273-560 VxWorks 1 3 1 X
1 PROFIBUS
ATLAS II, 3 X 5, A5200, PSENSE, LV,
8273-562 VxWorks 1 1 2 1 X
2 COMBO, 1 PROFIBUS
8273-565 VxWorks 1 1 ATLAS-II, 2 X 2, A5200, LV, 1 COMBO
ATLAS-II, 2 X 4, A5200, LV, 1
8273-570 VxWorks 1 1 1 X
COMBO, 1 PROFIBUS
8273-571 VxWorks 1 2 ATLAS-II, 2 X 4, A5200, LV, 2 COMBO
8273-584 VxWorks 1 ATLAS II, 2 X 2, A5200, LV
8273-586 VxWorks 1 1 ATLAS-II, 3 X 2, A5200, LV, PSENSE

Table 1-2. VxWorks Atlas-II Item Numbers

NOTEDepending on the configuration, the control may or may not contain a


fan. See Table 1-2 above.

Figure 1-1 shows diagrammatically the physical arrangement of the modules in


the Atlas-II control hardware. The hardware uses two stacked-bus arrangements
to provide the required structure. The Power Bus Stack is used for the power-
related I/O as well as the discrete output drivers. The PC/104 Stack is used
primarily for the signal I/O, the main processor, and communications modules. All
configurations contain a SmartCore CPU A5200 module that spans both the
Power Bus Stack and the PC/104 Stack. If real power sensing is required in the
application, a PowerSense module is stacked above the SmartCore module and
also spans both bus stacks. If a PowerSense module is not specified, then an
additional Analog I/O module can be substituted. Figure 1-1 shows a maximum
example configuration (5 levels high).

2 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Figure 1-1. Atlas-II, Example Module Layout

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Figure 1-2a. Physical Dimensions

4 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Figure 1-2b. Physical Dimensions

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Control Accessories
The Atlas-II digital control platform is designed to interface with several
Woodward service tools and commercial software products. Available tools are
listed below with a brief description of their functionality:
Monitor GAPAn Ethernet connection to the control allows on-line GAP
monitoring, debug, and tunable configuration.
Watch WindowProvides an Ethernet or serial connection to the control to
allow 1) initial configuration of the unit; 2) monitoring and tuning of system
variables; and 3) management of configuration and setpoints.
Control AssistantEthernet connection to the control for Tunable
Management, viewing of high-speed data captures, and other useful utilities.
Application ManagerEthernet access to the control for program loading,
network configuration and support, and system diagnostics.
HMI (Human Machine Interface)Commercially available HMI programs
interface to the Atlas-II control through Ethernet or serial connections to
provide operator access and control of the application machinery.

6 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Chapter 2.
Installation

Introduction
This chapter provides the general information for mounting location selection,
installation, and wiring of the Atlas-II control. Hardware dimensions, ratings,
and requirements are given for mounting and wiring the control in a specific
application.

General Installation
When selecting a location for mounting the Atlas-II control, consider the
following:
Protect the unit from direct exposure to water or to a condensation-prone
environment.
The control is deigned for installation in a protective metal enclosure such
as a standard cabinet with ingress protection rating of IP54.
A standard EMC cabinet is required when installing into a Marine Type
Approval applications.
Provide an ESD strap inside the cabinet for handling the equipment and
plugging/unplugging the connectors.
The operating range of the Atlas-II control is 40 to +70 C
(40 to +158 F) except when the Profibus module is used. See the
Environmental Specifications for more details.
Provide adequate ventilation for cooling. Shield the unit from radiant heat
sources.
Do not install the unit or its connecting wires near inductive, high-voltage, or
high-current devices. If this is not possible, shield both the system
connecting wires and the interfering devices or wires.
Allow adequate space around the unit for servicing and wiring.
Do not install where objects can be dropped on the terminals.
Ground the chassis for proper safety and shielding.
When installing on a generator set package, provide vibration isolation.

Shipping Carton
Before unpacking the control, refer to the inside front cover and page vi of this
manual for WARNINGS and CAUTIONS. Be careful when unpacking the control.
Check for signs of damage such as bent or dented panels, scratches, and loose
or broken parts. If any damage is found, immediately notify the shipper.

The Atlas-II control was shipped from the factory in an anti-static foam lined
carton. This carton should always be used for transport of the control or for
storage when the control is not installed.

Woodward 7
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Mounting
Figure 1-2 shows the Atlas-II control layout and mounting pattern. The Atlas-II
digital control is to be mounted in an appropriate enclosure for the installed
environment. This equipment is designed for installation within a control room
panel or cabinet.

This equipment is intended to be installed in a metal cabinet or


enclosure to provide protection against the entry of dust or water
and to protect against mechanical impact. For ATEX compliance, a
minimum ingress protection rating of IP54 is required for the
enclosure.

The standard Atlas-II package must be mounted to allow sufficient room for
wiring access. Eight front panel mounting holes permit secure mounting.
Depending on its configuration, the Atlas-II weighs between 3.4 and 4.5 kg (7.5
and 10 pounds). A minimum of 25 mm (1 inch) of clear space around the outer
surfaces of the Atlas-II is adequate for ventilation, however approximately 75 mm
(3 inches) of space may be required for wiring, depending on wire size.

Environmental Specifications
Operating Temperature
The Atlas-II Control Platform operates in a specified ambient temperature of
40 to +70 C (4 to +158 F) with forced convection cooling. When the Atlas-II
contains a single Profibus module, the operating temperature is limited to 20 to
+60 C (4 to +140 F). When the Atlas-II contains (2) Profibus modules, the
operating temperature is limited to 20 to +55 C (4 to +131 F).

Continuous operation with insufficient airflow or higher operating


temperatures will lead to reduced reliability and possible damage to the
control.

Storage Temperature
The Atlas-II Control Platform is designed to be stored without applied power at
the temperature range of 40 to +85 C (40 to +185 F). Any unit with Profibus
is limited to 20 to +70 C (4 to +158 F).

Component life is adversely affected by high-temperature, high-humidity


environments. Room temperature storage is recommended for long life. If the
unit is to be stored for a long period of time, operating power must be applied at
least for one hour every 18 to 24 months.

Shock
The Atlas-II Control Platform was designed to meet the shock requirements
specified by MIL-STD-810C procedure 516.2, procedure 1 (30g, 11 millisecond
half sine pulse). During Shock, relay bounce shall be limited to less than 100 ms.

Vibration (Sinusoidal)
The Atlas-II Control Platform was designed and tested to meet Lloyds Test
Specification No. 1, 2002, Vibration Test 1. The Vibration test profile includes 3
16 Hz, 1 mm and 16150 Hz, 1.0g.

8 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Audible Noise Emission
The Atlas-II Control Platform does not emit an audible noise above 70 dBA as
measured 1 meter away, with or without a fan.

Enclosure Protection
In order to meet Zone 2 European Group IIC, the Atlas-II Control must be
mounted in an enclosure that meets or exceeds IP 54.

Altitude
The Atlas-II Control Platform is designed to operate up to 3000m / 9800 feet.

Electrical Connections
Most of the Atlas-II controls terminal blocks are designed to be removed
by hand. The Atlas-II Control uses two different styles of pluggable terminal
blocks: Screw Connection (limited to the A5200 SmartCore board) and
CageClamp.

The pluggable terminal blocks on the SmartCore CPU A5200 board all utilize the
Screw Connection style terminal blocks (see Figure 2-1 for torque and
screwdriver requirements). The Screw Connection terminal blocks accept wires
from 0.081.5 mm (2816 AWG). Two 0.8 mm (18 AWG) wires or three 0.3
mm (22 AWG) wires can be easily installed in each terminal.

The pluggable terminal blocks on the modules (other than the A5200 SmartCore)
are screwless, CageClamp style blocks. The spring clamp can be actuated by
using a standard 2.5 mm (3/32 inch) flat bladed screwdriver (see Figure 2-2).
These terminal blocks accept wires from 0.081.1 mm (2818 AWG). Two 0.5
mm (20 AWG) wires or three 0.3 mm (22 AWG) wires can be easily installed in
each terminal.

Most of the Atlas-II controls terminal blocks are designed to be removed by


hand. After Atlas-II input power is disconnected, the terminal blocks can be
removed one at a time by pulling them straight out. Be careful not to pull the plug
out at an angle, as this will fracture the end terminal. Wires for the all the
pluggable I/O terminal blocks should be stripped at 8 mm (0.3 inch).

Torque range for screws of Screw


Connection Terminal Blocks: 0.220.25
Nm (1.952.21 lb-in).

Screwdriver blade: 0.4 X 2.5 mm (0.016 X


0.10 inch)
Screwdriver available as Woodward PN
8992-005

Figure 2-1. Screw Connection Terminal Block Used on A5200 SmartCore Board

Woodward 9
Atlas-II Digital Co
ontrol Manual 26415

Metthod #1 Method #2
F
Free Hand (ho
olds spring op
pen) Bench (momentarily
( opens
spring while
w force is applied)
a

Figure 2-2. Spring Clamp Terminal Block

The Atlas-II
A fixed te
erminal blockks used for the e power suppply input accept wires
from 0.081.1
0 mm (2818 AWG G). Two 0.5 mm
m (20 AWG G) wires or thrree 0.3
mm (22
( AWG) wirres can be ea asily installed in each termiinal. Wires forr the fixed
mounnted power terrminals should be stripped d 5 mm (0.2 in
nch).

W
Wiring Fixed Terminal

Do
D not tin (so older) the wirres that term
minate at the Atlas-II term
minal
blocks.
b The spring-loade
s d CageClamp terminal blocks are de esigned
to flatten straanded wire, and
a if those strands
s are tinned
t togethher, the
connection
c lo
oses surfacee area and is degraded.

EXPLOSION
E HAZARDD Do not conneect or discon
nnect while circuit
c is
liive unless arrea is known
n to be non-h
hazardous.

RISSQUE DEXPL LOSIONNe e pas raccord


der ni dbranncher
tantt que linstallation est so
ous tension, sauf
s en cas
lam
mbiance est dcidment
d non dangereeuse.

10 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
All AC wiring for voltages and currents is done with fixed screw barrier blocks
rather than pluggable terminal blocks. The fixed screw barrier blocks accept
wires terminated into terminal lugs for #6 screws.

Figure 2-3. Fixed Terminals

Grounding
Protective Earth (PE) must be connected to the termination point on the backside
of the unit next to the label with the symbol to reduce the risk of electric shock.
This connection will be made using a thread-forming screw (M4 x 6 mm). The
conductor providing the connection shall have a properly sized ring lug and wire
larger than or equal to 3.3 mm (12 AWG).

The unit also needs low impedance grounding to earth, e.g. the cabinet or
enclosure used. The low impedance ground can be accomplished by one or
more of the following:
A short 15 cm (6 inch) protective earth wire
A 1.3 cm (0.5 inch) wide flat hollow braid less than 1 m long
A 1.3 cm (0.5 inch) wide flat tin or lead/tin plated copper strap less than 1 m long
The use of the eight mounting bolts and paint breaking washers.

Do not connect chassis ground or PE ground to signal common.

Safety Ground Wire Installation


Safety wires must be routed against the grounded cabinet structure. Locate
safety ground wire 150 mm (6 inches) from unshielded cabling and 75 mm
(3 inches) from shielded cabling inside the cabinet, and 150 mm (6 inches)
from any I/O cabling exiting the cabinet.

Woodward 11
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Recommended Grounding Practices


Providing the proper ground for the Atlas-II control is important. Improper
connection of the control chassis to the protective earth / building ground plane
may lead to stray currents between the reference point for the AC signal sources
(current and voltage transformers), and the reference point for the sensing inputs
on the Atlas-II control. Differences in potential between these two points results
in equalizing current flow which then produces unacceptably high common mode
voltages. Common mode voltages may result in improper readings for the
sensed AC inputs, or even damage to the Atlas-II control in extreme cases. To
minimize this problem, it is necessary to provide a low resistance path between
the AC signal reference point, and the chassis of the Atlas-II control. Typically
this point is the designated ground for the generator set and related instrument
transformers.

Shields and Grounding


All signal lines except PT/CT, relay outputs, contact inputs, and power supply
wiring should be shielded to prevent picking up stray signals from adjacent
equipment.

Shielding of PT/CT, relay outputs, contact inputs, and power supply


wires inside the metal enclosure is required for Marine Type
Approval installation applications. Relay outputs, contact inputs, and
power supply wiring do not normally require shielding for other
installations, but may be shielded if desired.

All shielded cable must be twisted conductor pairs. The Atlas-II control is
designed with shield terminations to earth ground at the control. An individual
shield termination to earth is provided at the terminal block for each of the signals
requiring shielding. Do not tin (solder) or attempt to tin the braided shield for
connection into the terminal block. Wire exposed beyond the shield should be as
short as possible, not exceeding 50 mm (2 inches).

If intervening terminal blocks are used in routing a signal, the shield should be
continued through the terminal block. If shield grounding is desired at the
terminal block, it should be AC coupled to earth. All shield terminations not at the
Atlas-II or entry into its metal enclosure should be AC coupled to earth through a
capacitor. (A 1000 pF, 500 V capacitor is typically sufficient. The intent is to
provide a low impedance path to earth for the shield at frequencies of 150 kHz
and higher.)

Multiple, spread out, direct or high capacitance connections of a shield to earth


should be avoided. Multiple connections risks high levels of low frequency
ground current, like 50/60 Hz, flowing within the shield.

Shield termination can be a deterministic process. AC shield connections


(capacitors) may be dictated at the control, instead of the direct earth connection
provided. Typically, shields at signal inputs are connected directly to earth, and
shields at signal outputs are AC-coupled to earth or floating. See Woodward
application notes 50532, Interference Control in Electronic Governing Systems,
and 51204, Grounding and Shield Termination, for more information.

12 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Shielded Wire Preparation


Where shielded cable is required, cut the cable to the desired length and prepare
the cable as instructed below.
1. Strip outer insulation from both ends, exposing the braided or spiral wrapped
shield. Do not cut the shield or nick the wire inside the shield.
2. Using a sharply pointed tool, carefully spread the strands of the braided
shield to form a hole.
3. Pull inner conductor(s) out of the shield. If the shield is the braided type, twist
it to prevent fraying.
4. Remove 6 mm (1/4 inch) of insulation from the inner conductors.
5. Connect wiring and shield as shown in plant wiring diagram.
6. If a shield connection is not required or desired, fold back and secure or
remove the excess shield as needed.

General Wiring Guidance


For noise suppression reasons, it is recommend that all low-current wires be
separated from all high-current wires and high-voltage be separated from low-
voltage.

Input power ground terminal, not power return, should also be wired to earth
ground.

Installations with severe electromagnetic interference (EMI) may require


additional shielding precautions, such as wire run in conduit or double shielding.
Contact Woodward for more information.

Shields from the control to its loads or inputs can be directly grounded to earth at
both ends, if the cable length is sufficiently short to prevent ground loop current in
the shield (e.g. within a single cabinet).

Enclosure Installations: If the control is installed in a metal enclosure, as


intended, shielded I/O must be AC or DC terminated directly to the cabinet (earth
ground) at the entry to the cabinet, as well as at the control shield pins.

Specifics are provided in each individual installation section.

Non-Marine Enclosure Application Information


Cabinet Structural Grounding
The cabinet needs to be a six-sided metal enclosure.
Do not use cabinet doors with windowsdoors should be solid metal.
The enclosure floor and/or top panels must provide holes for cable entry.
Top and bottom cable entry areas must be restricted in size. Cable entry
aperture sizes should be minimized to the extent possible, the largest
dimension of any aperture (hole) is no greater than 152 mm (6 inches). This
is particularly important when RF transmitters, like push to talk radios or cell
phones, can be located near the cable access areas.
An enclosed metal cable area or cable way joining to the cabinet may be
thought of as part of the enclosure; If it has no holes larger than 152 mm
(6 inches) and no RF transmitters can be present with in it. This allows larger
holes in the enclosure cable access plate. The enclosed cableway effectively
becomes part of the enclosure.
The cabinet enclosure frame and device mounting areas must be bonded
(grounded) together.
The frame shall be electrically connected at each structural interface
(<2.5 m).

Woodward 13
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Mounting plates shall be electrically connected to structural frame (<2.5 m).
4 corners minimum4 corners + 2 mid-points preferred.
Doors must be electrically connected to the main structural frame (<2.5 m).
1 place minimum, 3 places preferred, use of 25 mm (1 inch) wide bond
straps is preferred.
Optimally install bond straps at the locations that cables cross the door
hinge. If no cables cross the hinge point, locate straps to break up the
size of gaps or openings in the metal structure to door interface.
Cover panels shall be electrically connected to structural frame (<10 m).
1 place minimum, 2 places preferred (placed at opposite corners).
Floor and top panels must be electrically connected to structural frame (<2.5
m).
1 place minimum, 4 places at the corners is preferred.
DIN rails must be electrically connected to structural frame (<2.5 m).
Once every 12, use a minimum of 2 screws to bond a DIN rail to cabinet
frame or mounting panel.
The cabinet must provide a shield termination point for cables as they enter
the enclosure. Shielded I/O must be AC or DC terminated directly to the
cabinet (earth ground) at the entry to the cabinet, as well as to the Atlas-II
shield pins.

The grounding section covers how to create shield terminations and


when to ground shields: directly to earth or indirectly to earth
through a capacitor. There must be one earth ground.

Marine Enclosure Application Information


Cabinet Structural Grounding
The cabinet needs to be a six-sided EMI shielded metal enclosure. The
interior surfaces must be conductive and coated with corrosion protection
treatments.
Do not use cabinet doors with windowsdoors should be solid metal.
The enclosure floor and/or top panels must provide holes for cable entry.
Top and bottom cable entry areas must be restricted in size. Cable entry
aperture sizes should be minimized to the extent possible, the largest
dimension of any aperture (hole) is no greater than 152 mm (6 inches). This
is particularly important when RF transmitters, like push to talk radios or cell
phones, can be located near the cable access areas.
The cabinet/enclosure frame and device mounting areas must be bonded
(grounded) together.
The frame shall be electrically connected at each structural interface (<2.5
m).
Mounting plates shall be electrically connected to structural frame (<2.5 m).
4 corners minimum, 4 corners + 2 mid-points preferred.
Doors must be electrically connected to the main structural frame (<2.5 m)
and must be mounted to contact an EMI gasket all the way around the
perimeter when the door is closed.
Bond strap 1 place minimum, 3 places preferred, use of 25 mm (1 inch)
wide bond straps is preferred.
Optimally, install bond straps at the locations that cables cross the door
hinge. If no cables cross the hinge point, locate straps to break up the
size of gaps or openings in the metal structure.

14 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Cover panels shall be electrically connected to structural frame (<10 m)
and must be mounted to contact an EMI gasket all the way around the
perimeter when the panel is mounted.
Bond strap 1 place minimum, 2 places (placed at opposite corners)
preferred.
Floor and top panels must be electrically connected to structural frame (<2.5
m) and must be mounted to contact an EMI gasket all the way around the
perimeter when the panel is mounted.
Bond strap 1 place minimum, 4 places preferred.
DIN rails must be electrically connected to structural frame (<2.5 m).
Once every 12, use a minimum of 2 screws to bond a DIN rail to cabinet
frame or mounting panel.
The cabinet must provide a shield termination point for cables as they enter
the enclosure. Shielded I/O must be AC or DC terminated directly to the
cabinet (earth ground) at the entry to the cabinet, as well as at the Atlas-II
shield pins.
All cables that have sections going outside the cabinet must be shielded from
the cabinet entry/exit point to the cable end point inside the cabinet. Cables
normally unshielded may limit the shield to just the section inside the cabinet,
with shield terminations to the cabinet at each end.

The grounding section covers how to create shield terminations and


when to ground shields: directly to earth or indirectly to earth
through a capacitor. There must be one earth ground.

General Enclosure Application Information


Cable Entry Locations
Cable shield termination hardware must be installed at cable entry points.
Cable shield terminations must be electrically connected to structural frame
and shall allow direct grounding (<2.5 m) or AC grounding of cable shields
as specified.
Route each of the shielded cable types separately, by type. A minimum of 5
cm (2 inches) between types should be maintained.
Maintain unshielded cables within 0-10 mm (0.0-0.4 inches) of the enclosure
metal mounting panels, frame rails, etc, until they get close to the Atlas-II.
Approximately 152-203 mm (6-8 inches) near the Atlas-II may be moved
away from the enclosure ground by as much as needed to get to the
connector.
The cable shielding of shielded cables performs better if the shielded cables
follow the same routing instructions given for unshielded cables, however this
is not required.
Atlas-II cable shields termination pins, except for CAN shield, are designed
connected directly to chassis. If this direct connection is used, cables at the
cabinets cable entry point should also be directly connected to the cabinet.
All signal lines going outside the cabinet must be shielded while inside the
cabinet to prevent picking up stray signals.

Shielding of PT/CT, relay outputs, contact inputs, and power supply


wires inside the metal enclosure is required for Marine Type
Approval installation applications. Relay outputs, contact inputs, and
power supply wiring do not normally require shielding for other
installations, but may be shielded if desired.

Woodward 15
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

The grounding section covers how to create shield terminations and


when to ground shields: directly to earth or indirectly to earth
through a capacitor. There must be one earth ground.

Equipment Zoning (Segregation)


Separate the equipment types inside the enclosure/cabinet, as possible:
Analog equipment area
Discrete I/O equipment areas
Shielded I/O area
Un-shielded I/O area
Power
AC mains PT & CT monitoring area
Light Industrial EMC compliant equipment area
Monitor/kybd/pointing device (HMI if applicable)
Other equipment area
Maintain a minimum or 6 of separation between equipment type areas

Light Industrial equipment is defined as equipment that is designed


and tested to comply with European Union (EU) directives (e.g.
EN61000-6-1 and EN61000-6-3) for Light Industrial environments.
Industrial compliant equipment is designed and tested for the EU
directives for Heavy Industrial environments (e.g., EN61000-6-2 and
EN61000-6-4).

Third Party Hardware Located Inside the Cabinet


Use only CE Compliant or Marine Type Approved devices
CE Compliant to Light Industrial Levels
Locate cables (to and from Light Industrial) away from all I/O cables that
enter or exit the cabinet by 305 mm (12 inches)
Locate cables (to and from Light Industrial) away from all other cables
not going outside the cabinet, separated by greater than 150 mm (6
inches).
CE Complaint to Industrial Levels
Locate based on zoning restrictions

Installation of Other Equipment, Fans, Meters, etc.


Shield Termination Schemes
Follow general guidance above and see Application Note 51204 for this
information.

Input Power Routing and Filtering


Input power coming inside the cabinet from outside it or going outside the
cabinet from inside it must be routed separately from all other circuits as it
enters the cabinet and while inside the cabinet.

16 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
If input power feeding the Atlas-II is ever outside the cabinet, it must be
routed separately from all other circuits as it enters the cabinet and while
inside the cabinet. Marine Type Approval applications also require input
power that leaves the cabinet to be shielded while inside the cabinet. Shield
termination at the cabinet entry point and just before the device input.
Route Atlas-II power coming from outside the cabinet along the left side of
middle, at the back of the cabinet. Route it directly against the mounting
panel. All other I/O and internal cabling must be kept more than 152 mm (6
inches) away.
Input power must route directly to controls that are Industrial compliant.
Input power that must route to controls that are Light Industrial compliant
must be filtered with a minimum of 20 dB filtering.
Input power that must be routed near other cabling will be filtered prior to the
point the cables follow a common path. Filter with a 20 dB filter.

Cabinet Cabinet Cabinet

Atlas-II Atlas-II Atlas-II

Field Iterim Field Field


Device Device Device Device

Interim Device: Isolator, Relay Box, FTM, etc.


Field Device: Actuator, Valve, Sensor, Meter, Profibus Head, etc.

Figure 2-4. Descriptions of Main Cabinet Cabling Options

Shielded Cable Routing & Shield Termination

Do not connect chassis ground or PE ground to signal common.

Field Device not in Cabinet, No Interim Device (Figure 2-4)


Use shielded cable from Atlas-II to field device (Isolator, FTM, Analog Driver,
indicator meter, etc).
Route the cable from Atlas-II to the cabinet exit point with the cable against
cabinet metal structure.
AC or DC ground the cable shield at entry point to cabinet and at the Atlas-II
shield termination pin.
If the I/O cable is AC grounded or floated at the field device end of the cable,
it must be directly ground at the cabinet and Atlas-II shield termination pin.
If the I/O cable is directly grounded (DC coupled) at the field device end of
the cable, it should be ground with a capacitor (AC ground) at the cabinet.
AC ground it both at the Atlas-II shield pin and at the cable entry point into
the cabinet.

Woodward 17
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Two separate I/O cable shields:
If over braided (two shields), directly ground over braid shield to cabinet
and shield pindirectly connect inner braids at field device termination
point. The inner braid must have at least one point directly grounded to
earth.

Field Device not in Cabinet, with Interim Device in the Cabinet (Figure 2-4)
Locate interim device away from unshielded discrete areas > 152 mm (6
inches).
Use shielded cable from Atlas-II to field device (Isolator, FTM, Analog Driver,
indicator meter, etc.)
Route the cable from Atlas-II to the interim device with the cable against
cabinet metal structure.
The interim device must have one AC shield and one DC shield connection.
The following are the shield termination combinations, starting from outside
the cabinet and working to the Atlas-II.

Interim Interim
Field Cabinet Device Device
Device Entry Out In Atlas-II Status
DC AC AC DC DC Allowed / Preferred
AC AC AC DC DC Allowed
AC AC AC DC AC Allowed /
Not Preferred
AC DC DC AC DC Allowed /
Not Preferred
AC DC DC AC AC Allowed /
Not Preferred
DC AC or DC AC AC or Not allowed
DC DC
DC DC DC AC AC or Not allowed
DC

Two separate I/O cable shields:


If over braided (two shields), directly ground over braid shield to cabinet
& shield pindirectly connect inner braids at field device termination
point. The inner braid must still have at least one point directly grounded
to earth.

Field Device in Cabinet, No Interim Device (Figure 2-4)


Locate field device away from unshielded discrete areas > 152 mm (6
inches).
Use shielded cable from Atlas-II to field device (Isolator, FTM, Analog Driver,
indicator meter, etc.)
Locate field device as close to I/O cable entry point as possible.
Route the I/O cable against cabinet metal wall from entry point to field
device.
Ground the I/O cable shield directly at both ends.
If over braided (two shields), directly ground over braid shield to
cabinetdirectly connect inner braids at field device termination point.
The inner braid must have at least one point directly grounded to earth.
If single shield, ground the shield to the cabinet and/or shield pin at both
ends.

18 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Unshielded Cable Routing & Termination


Field Device not in Cabinet, No Interim Device (Figure 2-4)
Route the I/O cable against the metal cabinet wall, from cabinet entry point to
the Atlas-II.
Limit the length of unshielded I/O cable inside the cabinet. Lengths over 915
mm (36 inches) are too long.
If lengths greater than 915 mm (36 inches) are required, special
considerations should be used to separate this unshielded wiring from other
circuits and minimize electromagnetic coupling into or from the cable.
Do not let other cables within 305 mm (12 inches) of unshielded cables if
they are parallel for greater than 610 mm (24 inches).
Do not let other cables within 150 mm (6 inches) of unshielded cables if they
are parallel for less than 610 mm (24 inches).

Field Device not in Cabinet, with Interim Device in the Cabinet (Figure 2-4)
Locate unshielded field devices > 152 mm (6 inches) away from other field
devices.
Locate field device as close to I/O cable entry point as possible.
Route the I/O cable against the metal cabinet wall, from cabinet entry point to
the interim device.
Route the I/O cable against the metal cabinet wall, from the interim device to
the Atlas-II.
Limit the length of unshielded I/O cable inside the cabinet. Lengths over 915
mm (36 inches) are too long.
If lengths greater than 915 mm (36 inches) are required, special
considerations should be used to separate this unshielded wiring from other
circuits and minimize electromagnetic minimize electromagnetic coupling into
or from the cable.
Do not let other cables within 305 mm (12 inches) of unshielded cables if
they are parallel for greater than 610 mm (24 inches).
Do not let other cables within 150 mm (6 inches) of unshielded cables if they
are parallel for less than 610 mm (24 inches).

Field Device in Cabinet, No Interim Device (Figure 2-4)


Locate field device as close to I/O cable entry point as possible.
Route the I/O cable against the metal cabinet wall, from cabinet entry point to
the Atlas-II.
Limit the length of unshielded I/O cable inside the cabinet. Length over 915
mm (36 inches) is too long and may couple.
If lengths greater than 915 mm (36 inches) are required, special
considerations should be used to separate this unshielded wiring from other
circuits and minimize electromagnetic minimize electromagnetic coupling into
or from the cable.
Do not let other cables within 305 mm (12 inches) of unshielded cables if
they are parallel for greater than 610 mm (24 inches).
Do not let other cables within 150 mm (6 inches) of unshielded cables if they
are parallel for less than 610 mm (24 inches).

Woodward 19
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Input Power
The Atlas-II control requires a nominal voltage source of 18 to 32 Vdc. Input
power requirements vary depending on the control version. Table 2-1 contains
information for the maximum configuration.

Power must be applied to the Atlas-II control at least 60 seconds


prior to expected use. The control must have time to do its power up
diagnostics to become operational. Failure of the diagnostics will
disable control function.

The Atlas-II power supply board must have the input power removed
before installing or removing.
This Equipment is Suitable For Use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A,
B, C, D or Non-Hazardous Locations Only.
This equipment is suitable for use in European Zone 2, Group IIC
environments.
Wiring must be in accordance with North American Class I, Division
2, or European Zone 2, Category 3 wiring methods as applicable, and
in accordance with the authority having jurisdiction.
Do not connect more than one main power supply to any one fuse or
circuit breaker.
For Communication wires, use wires with a temperature rating of at
least 5C above surrounding ambient. All others use wires with a
temperature rating of at least 10C above surrounding ambient.

For ATEX compliance, this equipment must be protected externally


against transient disturbances. Provisions shall be made to prevent
the power input from being exceeded by transient disturbances of
more than 40% of the rated voltage.

The power supply output supplying the Atlas-II must be of a low impedance type
for proper operation of the control. DO NOT power a control from a high voltage
source containing dropping resistors and zener diodes. If batteries are used for
operating power, an alternator or other battery-charging device is necessary to
maintain a stable supply voltage.

To prevent damage to a control system that uses an alternator or


battery-charging device, make sure the charging device is turned off
before disconnecting the battery from the system.

If an alternator is used to charge batteries supplying the Atlas-II


power, the alternator must be a suppressed/clamped type or have
external load dump transient suppression. The Atlas-II does not have
sufficient energy handling capability to suppress a full alternator
load dump.

Significant inrush currents are possible when current is applied to the Atlas-II
control. The magnitude of the inrush current depends on the power source
impedance, so Woodward cannot specify the maximum inrush current. Time-
delay fuses or circuit breakers must be used to avoid nuisance trips.

20 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Input Power Wiring


Protective earth ground (PE) must be connected to the chassis at the termination

point on the unit labeled with . The power supply grounding


terminals should also be connected to earth to ensure grounding of the power
supply printed circuit boards. The grounding conductor must be the same size as
the main supply conductors or the combined PT wires, whichever is larger.

The controls power supplies are not equipped with input power
switches. For this reason, a fixed wiring installation is required and a
switch or circuit breaker shall be included in the building installation
that is in close proximity to the equipment and within easy reach of
the operator and that is clearly marked as the disconnecting device
for the equipment. The switch or circuit breaker shall not interrupt
the protective earth conductor.

It is expected that the installation of this equipment will include over current
protection between the power source and the Atlas-II control. This over current
protection may be accomplished by series connection of properly rated fuses or
circuit breakers. Branch circuit protection of no more than 250% of the maximum
Atlas-II power supply input current rating must be provided. See Table 2-1 for
maximum recommended fuse ratings. This value meets the 250% UL listing
requirements. The use of properly sized UL class CC, J, T, G, RK1, or RK5 fuses
meet the requirements for branch circuit protection. Do not connect more than
one Atlas-II control to any one fuse. Use only the wire size specified in Table
2-1 or equivalent metric size which meets local code requirements. Time delay
fuses should be used to prevent nuisance trips.

Table 2-1 provides the power supply holdup time specification; which is the time
the supply will continue to operate within specification after its input power is
interrupted. This information may be useful in specifying uninterruptible power
supply (UPS) systems.

Input Voltage Fuse


Range (Current Rating) Fuse (I2t Rating) Wire Size* ** Holdup Time
1832 Vdc** 9A >800 2/4 mm 8 ms
12/14 AWG
Table 2-1. Power Supply Requirements

* 4 mm (12 AWG) is the largest wire gauge size that may be


connected to the control power input terminal blocks.

** The minimum input voltage allowed is 18 V at the power input of


the control. The length, size of wire, and load current will determine
the minimum supply output voltage. The minimum supply voltage
measured at the source should always be greater than 18 V.
Example: two (source and return) 20 foot (6 m) lengths of 14 AWG (2
mm) wire carrying 1.2 A (maximum rated current) will result in a
voltage drop from source output to control power input of approx.
0.16 volts. The resulting supply voltage from the example must be
greater than 18.16 volts.

*** A fuse or circuit breaker shall not interrupt the protective earth
conductor.

Woodward 21
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Input Power Wiring Diagram


The power supply and ground connections are located on the power supply
board (see also Recommended Grounding Practices).

AtlasPC
Power Supply Board
3

Optional Common
- System
Ground
2
Switching
Power 24V
Supply +
1

Maintenance
The only part of the Atlas-II control system that may require user maintenance is the
cooling fan (Woodward part number 1886-439). In the event that the fan must be
replaced, please use the following procedure to remove a faulty fan from the chassis:
Use a #2 Phillips screwdriver
Power down the control to avoid overheating or other hazards.
Disconnect fan wires from terminal block. Cut the tie-wrap supporting the
wires to the cover.
Remove, the four retaining screws holding the fan and guard to the cover.
Remove fan and guard from unit.
Remove guard from faulty fan
Install new fan of same size and flow rate.
Reinstall fan (flow arrows should point "OUT")
Reinstall fan guard with the 4 screws. Torque screws to 0.1 Nm (1 lb-in)
max to avoid damage to the flange of fan.
Trim leads to a reasonable length.
Connect RED wire to the + fan terminal and BLACK wire to - fan terminal.
If desired strain relief leads to cover with a new tie-wrap.

22 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Application Guidelines
The following items are general guidelines intended to educate the system
integrator on potential installation and application issues that might arise when
the Atlas-II controller is applied.

The Atlas-II platform must use Coder 4.05 or higher.

Analog Inputs
The readback output on the AO_420_ATL block can be used to detect a fault
condition associated with the analog output. The readback output is available on
all analog output channels associated with the Atlas-II main board (A5200). The
readback fault output can also be used to monitor the analog outputs. It is
intended to detect a gross fault in the actual current versus current setpoint. Note
that the readback output does not have the same specifications as the analog
output. The readback function is intended as a gross check only. It is also
recommended that application software have filtering to use multiple rate groups
for readback indication before enunciating a fault.

Two of the connectors used for the analog inputs are identical. It is possible for
the end user to connect the wrong connector to the wrong input. The terminals
are numbered to minimize the chance of this happening however it is possible.
The system integrator should take precautions to ensure that it is easy to view
the terminal labels or design other methods to allow the user to easily identify the
correct cable for each connector.

Analog Input cables are shielded, and shields should be terminated directly at the
Atlas-II end and the cabinet entry/exit point.

Actuator Outputs
The actuator outputs on the Atlas-II main board have readback monitoring on
both the source side of the current driver circuit and the return side of the circuit.
The readback outputs can fault. These outputs can be used to monitor the
current loop associated with the actuator for open circuit conditions. These
monitoring inputs are intended to be used to detect a gross error in the actuator
driver current loop. It is also recommended that application software have filtering
to use multiple rate groups for readback indication before enunciating a fault.

Analog Output cables are shielded, and shields may be terminated directly
(preferred) or via AC coupling at the Atlas-II end and the cabinet entry/exit point.

Discrete Inputs
Two of the connectors used for the discrete input connections are identical. It is
possible for the end user to connect the wrong connector to the wrong input. The
terminals are numbered to minimize the chance of this happening however it is
possible. The system integrator should take precautions to ensure that it is easy
to view the terminal labels or design other methods to allow the user to easily
identify the correct cable for each connector.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Discrete Input cables are only required to be shielded for Marine Type Approval
applications, and shielding may be limited to the cabinet interior. Cable shields
should be terminated directly at the Atlas-II end and the cabinet entry/exit point.

CAN Network
The connectors used for the CAN network connections are identical. It is possible
for the end user to connect the wrong connector to the wrong input. The
terminals are numbered to minimize the chance of this happening however it is
possible. The system integrator should take precautions to ensure that it is easy
to view the terminal labels or design other methods to allow the user to easily
identify the correct cable for each connector.

The CAN Networks cables are shielded, and the shield should only be directly
terminated to earth at one point. The Atlas-IIs CAN shield pins are AC coupled to
earth and the shield may be direct connected (preferred) or AC coupled at the
Atlas-II end and the cabinet entry/exit point depending on the rest of the network.

Serial Ports
The connectors used for the serial port connections are identical. It is possible for
the end user to connect the wrong connector to the wrong input. The terminals
are numbered to minimize the chance of this happening however it is possible.
The system integrator should take precautions to ensure that it is easy to view
the terminal labels or design other methods to allow the user to easily identify the
correct cable for each connector.

Serial port cables are shielded and should be terminated directly at the Atlas-II
end and the cabinet entry/exit point. Take care with the shield termination at the
field device end.

Ethernet Connectors
The Atlas-II has four Ethernet connectors that are arranged in one connector.
The physical spacing between connectors is limited. This can create the situation
where it is easy to connect the wrong cable to the connector. Another
consideration is that the Ethernet cables are located on the side of the controller
which was not used for connections on the original AtlasPC. In certain
installations, the space to access these connectors may be limited.

To mitigate the risk the system integrator should implement an Ethernet cable
labeling process to allow the user to easily identify which Ethernet cable
connects to each Ethernet port. The Atlas-II also has application level checks
that the system integrator should be aware of when designing a system.

At the GAP application level there are functions available to monitor the Ethernet
ports. The following functions can be implemented depending on the application
requirements.

Ethernet Status Block (ENET_STAT)


Monitors the number of packets received and transmitted by each physical
Ethernet port.
Provides diagnostic information about the low level Ethernet interface.

24 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Modbus Communications
Each Modbus interface block has a link error output that should be
monitored in the GAP application and appropriate action taken when a link
error occurs.
The link error will not go FALSE unless the cables are connected properly.

EGD Communications
The EGD interface block has a link error output that should be monitored in
the GAP application and appropriate action taken when a link error timeout
is detected.
The link error will not go FALSE unless the cables are connected properly.

Ethernet Based Distributed IO


Distributed IO interfaces will have a timeout diagnostic similar to the link
error function on the communication blocks. The application programmer
must ensure that the timeouts and action taken, when a timeout is detected,
is appropriate for the application requirements.

Woodward Service Tools


Woodward service tools will only work when the laptop is connected to
Port1.

Ethernet port cables are shielded. Cable shields are terminated directly at the
Atlas-II end and the cabinet entry/exit point. An Ethernet Field Termination
Module (FTM), available from Woodward, may be used to break the shield path
between the field device and the Atlas-II.

Speed Sensor Ports


Speed Sensor port cables are shielded. Cable shields are terminated directly at
the Atlas-II end and the cabinet entry/exit point. Refer to the SmartCore CPU
A5200 module for additional information and wiring requirements.

Installation Functional Check Guidelines


In general all IO points should be functionally tested prior to starting the prime
mover. The IO points should be checked for ground loops and other possible
sources of noise as well as isolation from other power sources that are not
related to the specific IO circuit. These installation guidelines are given as
general guidelines only. The system integrator / end user are responsible for
understanding the application and defining a field checkout procedure that
addresses the requirements of the system being installed.

When performing IO checkout, appropriate safety precautions must


be taken to ensure that the devices being tested are properly locked
out or that a safety issue is not created.

Analog Inputs
The field signal should be validated to ensure that the correct field signal is
connected to the correct analog input channel. It is recommended that this
validation is done by viewing the field signal in the GAP application.
Example: If the analog input comes from a pressure transducer then a
pressure tester could be used to vary the analog output that is being
input to the Atlas. This signal can then be verified to be correct in the
GAP application.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Analog Outputs
Analog output values should be forced from the Atlas-II controller and
verified at the receiving device. Outputs should be checked at min and max
current values (4 20 ma).
Example: If the analog output is used to drive an indicator then the
output should be forced to several values and the indicator should be
monitored to ensure that the indicator is connected to the correct analog
output as defined by the GAP application.
Verify that the total loop resistance is less than the specification limit defined
in the hardware manual.

Discrete Inputs
The field contacts should be operated to ensure that the correct field device
is connected to the correct discrete input on the Atlas-II.
Example: If the discrete input tells the Atlas-II that a certain motor is
running then the motor should be operated and the input should be
viewed in the GAP software to ensure that software sees the change of
state.
Verify that only the 24Vdc wetting voltage is connected to the discrete
inputs.
Check for AC by measuring all inputs from the input terminals to chassis
ground.
Check the discrete input common with respect to other power supply
commons to ensure that the discrete inputs are isolated from other
power supplies that are not used with the discrete inputs.

Discrete Outputs
The discrete outputs should be forced and the resulting signal should be
confirmed at the field device.
Example: If the discrete output is input to another PLC then the output
should be forced from the GAP logic and verified in the PLC logic. If the
output drives a field device such as a motor starter then the output
should be forced and verified at the motor starter. Note: Before forcing
outputs to field devices verify that all necessary safety precautions are in
place.

Ethernet Connections
The Ethernet connections should be removed one at a time and expected
faults should be verified in the Atlas-II software and also in the other device.
Example: If port 2 is connected to an HMI using the Modbus TCP
protocol then removing the Ethernet cable connected to port 2 should
cause a Link Error in the GAP application and a comm. fault in the HMI
application.
Note: Due to the identical design of the Ethernet ports and the potential
for similar cables, labeling is important to ensure that the user can easily
identify which cable goes to each connector.

CAN Connections
The CAN network connections should be verified to ensure that the correct
networks are connected to the correct connector.
Note: Due to the identical design of the two CAN ports and the potential for
similar cables, labeling is important to ensure that the user can easily
identify which network is connected to the CAN connectors.

26 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Chapter 3.
Power Supply Board

General Description
The Atlas-II power supply contains the power supply and twelve discrete
output driver channels. The discrete outputs are low-side drivers having short
circuit and thermal shutdown protection. The discrete output drivers are not
isolated from each other, and are powered by an external +12 Vdc or +24 Vdc.
They are isolated from the internal power supplies of the Atlas-II Control platform.

Input power connections are made to the power supply through terminals on the
front of the power supply.

The Atlas-II power supply board must have the input power removed
before installing or removing.
This equipment is suitable for use in Class 1, Division 2, Groups A,
B, C, and D, Zone 2, Group IIC, or non-hazardous locations only.
Wiring must be in accordance with Class I, Division 2 or Zone 2
wiring methods and in accordance with the authority having
jurisdiction.

855-741B
02-11-21

Figure 3-1. Atlas-II Power Supply Board (601-1008)

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Specifications
Power Supply Input (Power Supply Board)
Range 1832 Vdc
Input Current 2.7 A @ 24 Vdc
3.61 A @ 18 Vdc
Input Power less than 65 W at 70 C
Interrupt Time Holdup 8 ms @ >/= 24 V
Efficiency 70% minimum over operating input
voltage range
Reverse Polarity Protection 56 V
Input Wiring Constraints The Atlas-II control platform must be
wired such that no other device receives
power from the wiring between the
Atlas-II Control Platform and the power
supply source.

Discrete Output Drivers (Power Supply Board)


Number of channels 12
Type Low-side driver with short circuit and
overvoltage protection
Current drive rating 200 mA
Discrete Output Supply Voltage 932 V

Power Supply Monitoring Circuit (Power Supply Board)


LVdc Maximum voltage measured 35 Vdc
Resolution in volts 0.15 Vdc
Maximum Error due to temperature change 1.0 Vdc
Maximum Error due to load change 1.0 Vdc
Total maximum error at 25 C 1.2 Vdc
(over 15 to 35 V range)

Electric Shock
The Atlas-II control platform shall not present an electrical shock hazard to the
operator or maintenance personnel when used in a normal manner per the
National Electrical Code Handbook, ANSI/NFPA 70 HANDBOOK-1990. Safety is
ensured by certification through the safety agencies specified in the Regulatory
Compliance section of this document.

Troubleshooting Guide
Power Supply Checks
The following is a troubleshooting guide for checking areas, which may present
difficulties. If these checks are made prior to contacting Woodward for technical
assistance, system problems can be more quickly and accurately assessed.
Is the input voltage within the controls specified input voltage range
(measured at control power supply input)?
Is the input power free of switching noise or transient spikes?
Is the power circuit dedicated to the Atlas-II control only?

28 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Discrete Output Checks


The Atlas-II power supply contains twelve discrete output driver channels. The
discrete outputs are low-side drivers having short circuit and thermal shutdown
protection. The discrete output drivers are not isolated from each other, and are
powered by an external +12 Vdc or +24 Vdc. They are isolated from the internal
power supplies of the Atlas-II Control platform.
Is the input power within the range of 932 V?
Is the input free of switching noise or transient spikes?
Is the power circuit dedicated to the control only?
Are the individual discrete output lines current limited by external series
connected components (example: relay coils) to <200 mA?

+ -

855-745
00-01-25 KDW

Figure 3-2. Discrete Output Wiring Example


(Discrete Output Interface Wiring to the Power Supply Board)

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figure 3-2 for discrete output wiring.
Discrete outputs are not normally shielded, however may be shielded and
are required to be shielded for Marine Type Approval applications.
o When shielding cables, shield at least from the Atlas-II to the cabinet
entry/exit point. Terminate the shield directly to the cabinet at the
entry/exit point and Atlas-II.
The discrete output commons are tied together, so each power supply board
accepts only one voltage source.
Power for the discrete outputs must be externally supplied, the external
supply must be capable of supplying a voltage between 932 V while
supplying up to 2.5 A. As specified in the Input Power Wiring Section,
branch circuit protection of no more than 250% of the maximum rated
current of the load (Discrete Output power input current plus 12 times the
maximum Discrete Output channel current) shall be provided. Fuse current
rating should not exceed 6.25 A (time delay fuses are recommended).

Woodward 29
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Chapter 7 contains a relay module that can be used with these discrete outputs.

Shielding of relay (discrete) output wires inside the metal enclosure


is required for Marine Type Approval installation applications. Relay
outputs do not normally require shielding for other installations, but
may be shielded if desired.

30 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Chapter 4.
SmartCore CPU A5200 Board

General Description
The SmartCore CPU A5200 board contains 4 Ethernet communication ports as
well as circuitry for 2 speed sensor inputs, 6 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs, 2
proportional actuator drivers, 2 CAN communication ports, 2 isolated serial ports,
1 debug serial port (isolated), and 24 discrete inputs. Each speed sensor input
may be either from a magnetic pick-up or a proximity probe. Analog input and
output circuits are 420 mA. The actuator driver outputs may be configured as
either 420 mA or 20220 mA. The user serial ports are configurable as RS-232,
RS-422, or RS-485.

Figure 4-1. SmartCore CPU A5200 board, Connectors

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Features
5 ms update rate
On-board processor for automatic calibration of the I/O channels
PowerPC 5200, low power version
64 MB DDR-266 MHz, DRAM
8/16 bit PC/104 Interface (ISA bus)

Communications
(4) RJ45 10/100 Base-TX Ethernet
(2) isolated CAN ports
(2) isolated and configurable RS-232 / RS-422 / RS485 Serial ports, 115.2K
baud max
(1) isolated RS-232 Debug Service Port

Hardware I/O
(24) Discrete inputs
(2) Speed Sensor Inputs (MPU / Proximity), 16 bit minimum resolution
(6) Analog inputs have 16 bit resolution
(4) Analog outputs have 15 bit resolution
(2) Actuator outputs with 15 bit resolution

32 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Block Diagram
The Atlas-II boards connect to each other through either the PC/104 bus
connectors or the power bus connectors. All of the boards are held together and
to the chassis, by bolts. The SmartCore CPU A5200 board is the size of two
analog boards.

Smartcore A5200
Two Serial
Speed J11 Debug
PC104 BUS
Inputs TB8 Port
MPU or
PROX

PC104 PC104 PC104 Actuator


Three Buffer ADDRESS DATA CTRL Out 1-2
RCVR XCVR XCVR XCVR Analog
Analog TB7 Out 1-4
Inputs
4-20mA
TB12 Serial
FPGA Power
Port 2
PC104 BUS Bus

Three CONTROLLER XCVR


Analog TB6 A/D
Converter
Inputs
4-20mA 32MHz
DISC
IN
RCVR

CAN 2 TB5 TB11 Serial


64MB FLASH
Port 1
ADDRESS DATA
File System, On-Board BUFFERS BUFFERS
Reserved Boot Sectors

TB4
CAN 1

Power
Four
64MByte Bus
DDR SDRAM MOTOROLA TB10 Analog
Eight (high) Outputs
Digital TB3 MPC5200 4-20 mA
Inputs
64MByte
DDR SDRAM
(low)

Eight RESET*
Digital TB2
Inputs LOCAL PWR Two
MONITOR
Ethernet
5.0V_FAIL TB9 Actuators
Controller LOCAL
3.3V_FAIL POWER 4-20 or
Four
10/100
2.5V_FAIL SUPPLY 20-200mA
1.8V_FAIL
Eight 1.5V_FAIL
Digital TB1 1.2V FAIL
Inputs

Ethernet 1-4

Figure 4-2. Block DiagramAtlas-II SmartCore CPU A5200 Board

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Module Configuration
Hardware Configuration. This module is factory configured as module 1 of the
Atlas platform. No user hardware configuration is necessary.

Network Configuration. Ethernet port #1 can be re-configured for the customer


network as desired. See the on-site Network Administrator to define an
appropriate I/P address configuration for port #1. Please note that each Ethernet
port is required to be on a separate domain.

This module has been factory configured with fixed Ethernet IP


addresses of:
Ethernet #1 = 172.16.100.20, Subnet Mask = 255.255.0.0
Ethernet #2 = 192.168.128.20, Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0
Ethernet #3 = 192.168.129.21, Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0
Ethernet #4 = 192.168.130.22, Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0

Network Configuration Utility (AppManager)


Woodward's AppManager software can be used to load GAP Control software,
monitor diagnostic faults, and configure Network settings. The AppManager utility
can be downloaded from www.woodward.com/software. A PC to Atlas-II
connection must be made using an Ethernet cable and Ethernet port #1.

Locate the Atlas-II ControlName on the chassis and highlight it using


AppManager.
To VIEW the IP address configuration, select menu option CONTROL -
CONTROL INFORMATION. Look for the Ethernet adapter addresses under the
Footprint Description.
To CHANGE the IP address configuration, select menu option CONTROL -
CHANGE NETWORK SETTINGS.

Module Indicators (LEDs)


The SmartCore CPU A5200 module has the following LEDs.

LED Name Description


CPU FAULT (RED)Active upon reset and flashes CPU fault
FAULT
RD FAULT codes as necessary.
RUN (GREEN)Active GREEN after the CPU Operating system is
GR RUN RUN loaded and running.

LINK ACTIVE (GREEN)A valid Ethernet connection to another


G LINK LINK device exists
ETH TX/RX (YELLOW)Active YELLOW when data is transmitted or
Y TX/RX TX/RX
received.
CAN LEDs
GR CAN #1, #2 CAN #1, #2 (GREEN/RED)Active GREEN or RED when data is
RD transmitted or received through CAN port #1 or #2.

34 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

10/100 BaseT Ethernet Ports


There are four 10/100 BaseT Ethernet Ports (RJ45) available to the application
software. These ports are full duplex, auto switching, and do not require the use
of an Ethernet shield box.

Max cable length is 30 meters. Double shielded, Cat 5 Ethernet


cables (SSTP) are required for customer installations.

Connector Signal Mnemonic


RJ45F Shielded RJ45 female
receptacle

1 RX+
2 RX-
3 TX+
4 --
5 --
6 TX-
7 --
8 --
Shield Chassis EARTH

Table 4-1. Ethernet Port Pinout

RS-232/422/485 Serial Ports


Two isolated, pluggable RS-232 / 422 / 485 serial ports (SIO1, SIO2) are
available for customer use and can be configured by the GAP software
application. The baud rate is selectable from 300 baud to 115.2 kBaud. Shielded
cable is required when connecting to the CPU modules serial port. Using
shielded cable will help ensure the robustness of the serial communications.

Pin 1 RS-232 Transmit


Pin 2 RS-232 Receive
1
Pin 3 Signal Ground
Pin 4 RS-485/422 Receive (+)
10 Pin 5 Termination Resistor (+)
Pin 6 Termination Resistor ()
Pin 7 RS-485/422 Receive ()
Pin 8 RS-422 Transmit (+)
Pin 9 RS-422 Transmit ()
Pin 10 Chassis EARTH

Figure 4-3. SmartCore CPU A5200 Communications Ports (SIO1, SIO2)

RS-232 Service Port


An isolated RS-232 service port is located near one corner of the A5200 CPU
module. This port is for VxWorks * operating system use only and cannot be
configured for application software use. The communication settings are fixed at
38.4 kBaud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop-bit, and no flow control.
*VxWorks is a trademark of Wind River Systems, Inc.

Woodward 35
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
For debug use, a null-modem cable and 5450-1065 Serial Adapter cable (PS2M
to DB9F) is required to attach this port to a PC. This port is to be used by trained
Field Service personnel only!

Shielded cable is required when connecting to the Service Port. Using shielded
cable will help ensure the robustness of the serial communications.

Pin 1 RS-232 Receive


Pin 2 RS-232 Transmit
Pin 3 Signal Ground
Pin 4 Not Used
Pin 5 Signal Ground
Pin 6 Not Used
Connector Shell Chassis EARTH

Figure 4-4. CPU Service Port (mini-DIN6F)

CAN Communication Ports


Two CAN ports (5 pin pluggable connectors, screw down) are available for
communication with Woodward Valves and other CAN devices. A maximum of
15 Woodward valves configured for operation in the 10 ms rate group may be
used.

Pin 1 not used


5 Pin 2 CAN High (white)
1
Pin 3 CAN Shield (14Meg + AC coupled to EARTH)
Pin 4 CAN Low (blue)
Pin 5 CAN Signal Ground (black)

Figure 4-5. CAN Communication Ports

CAN networks must include 120 terminations at each end of the trunk line.
Drop cables connecting a device to the trunk line should be as short as possible
and less than 6 meters. It is recommended to design the network to be less than
100 meters with a max cumulative drop length of less than 39 meters.

Network Speed Max Trunk Length Max Trunk Length Max Drop Max Cumulative
(Thick cable) (Thin cable) Length Drop Length
500 Kbps 100 m 100 m 6m 39 m
250 Kbps 250 m 100 m 6m 78 m
125 Kbps 500 m 100 m 6m 156 m

CAN
Valve Valve
Device
Pigtail Drop Cable
5417-1117 (1m) TB TB TB
or Similar

Termination 7/8" Tee


Thick Pigtail Drop
Cable 5417-1117
or Similar
... Termination
Resistor (F) F 1635-1463 F F F Resistor (male)
1635-1465 1635-1464
Thick Trunk Cable
Atlas-II M F
5417-1113 (3m) or Similar
M F M F M F

EARTH Ground the overall cable


braid at the cabinet exit point

36 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

CAN Cable Specification


Thick cable is preferred and recommended for all uses. Most CAN / DeviceNet
(trademark of ODVA, Inc.) cable is not rated for temperatures above 80 C so be
careful during installation to avoid hot routing areas. Always use shielded cables
for improved communications in industrial environments.

Impedance: 120 10% at 1MHz


DC resistance: < 7ohms per 1000 ft.
Cable capacitance: 12 pF/ft at 1kHz
Propagation delay 1.36 ns/ft (maximum)
Data Pair: 19 strands, 1.0 mm corresponds to 18 AWG, individually tinned, 3 twists/foot
Power Pair: 19 strands, 1.5 mm corresponds to 15 AWG, individually tinned, 3 twists/foot
Drain / Shield Wire: 19 strands Tinned Copper shielding braid or shielding braid and foil
Cable type: twisted pair cable. 2x2 lines
Bend Radius: 20x diameter during installation or 7x diameter fixed position
Signal attenuation: 0.13 dB/100 ft @ 125 kHz (maximum)
0.25 dB/100 ft @ 500 kHz (maximum)
0.40 dB/100 ft @ 1000 kHz (maximum)

Recommended Bulk Cable


Cable manufacturer Turck and Belden are widely available in North America.
Turck, Lumberg, and Lapp Cable products are available in Europe. All cables
below are suitable for DeviceNet trunk and drop cabling. Be aware that cable
vendors may not use the same wire colors on individual conductors.

*Note: Turck and Lumberg can also provide custom length cordsets with connectors.
Manufacturer part number Website
Belden 3082A DeviceNet Thick CableGrey www.belden.com
Belden 3083A DeviceNet Thick CableYellow www.belden.com
Lapp Cable 2710-250 Unitronic DeviceNet Thick www.lappcable.com
Lumberg STL 613 www.lumbergusa.com
Turck Type 575, DeviceNet Thick Cable Grey www.turck.com

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Hardware Specifications
Digital Speed Sensor Inputs
Number of channels 2, selectable as MPU or proximity probe, by terminal block wiring
and correct software switches
Input frequency 10025 000 Hz (MPU), 0.5-25 000 Hz (Prox)
(25 kHz is the max reading available using the TSS_ATL GAP
block)
Input frequency (max) 25 000 Hz
Resolution Dependent on frequency, 16 bit minimum at maximum speed
Accuracy Less than 0.08% full scale from 40 to +85 C internal temperature
Shielded cable is required when connecting to the Digital Speed Sensor Inputs.

MPU Inputs
Input magnitude (min) See Figure 4-6
Input magnitude (max) See Figure 4-7
Input impedance (typ) See Figure 4-8
Input impedance (min) 1450 Ohm at 1 Vrms and 100 to 25 000 Hz input
Input impedance (min) 450 Ohm at 14.6 Vrms and 100 to 300 Hz input
Input impedance (min) 1450 Ohm at 14.6 Vrms and 301 to 25 000 Hz input
Isolation voltage 500 Vac minimum, each channel is isolated from all other channels
and from the Atlas-II platform

When choosing to wire either a MPU or proximity speed input, make


sure the unused MPU/PROX(+) terminal block input is shorted to
MPU/PROX ().

MPU Minimum Input Magnitude

4
Minimum Input Magnitude (Vrms)

3.5

2.5

1.5

0.5

0
10 100 1000 10000 100000
Frequency (Hz)

Figure 4-6. MPU Minimum Input Magnitude in Vrms


To convert to V peak to peak, multiply by 2.828.

38 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

MPU Maximum Input Magnitude

21.0
20.6

Maximum Input Magnitude (Vrms)


20.0

19.0
18.3
18.0

17.0
16.8
16.0 15.9
14.9
15.0 14.6

14.0
10 100 1000 10000 100000
Frequency (Hz)

Figure 4-7. MPU Maximum Input Magnitude in Vrms


To convert to V peak to peak, multiply by 2.828.

MPU Input Impedance Magnitude and Phase


Typ Impedance Magnitude at 14.6 Vrms Input Typ Impedance Magnitude at 14.6 Vrms Input
Typ Impedance Magnitude at 1 Vrms Input Typ Impedance Phase at 14.6 Vrms Input
Typ Impedance Phase at 14.6 Vrms Input Typ Impedance Phase at 1 Vrms Input
10000 90
80
70
60
3066 50
2427 40
40 2001
28 30
1718
1503 1498 1553
1470 26 25 20
Impedance (Ohms)

23

Phase (Deg)
1216 17 10
10
1000 9 0
1 1
600 -10
-20
-30
-40
-50
-60
-70
-80
100 -90
10 100 1000 10000 100000
Frequency (Hz)

Figure 4-8. MPU Typical Input Impedance Magnitude and Phase

Woodward 39
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Proximity Probe Inputs


Voltage threshold /duty cycle at 5 kHz at 16 Vin, duty cycle = 3.596.5%
at 24 Vin, duty cycle = 3.596.5%
at 28 Vin, duty cycle = 3.596.5%
Voltage threshold /duty cycle at 25 kHz at 16 Vin, duty cycle = 17.5-82.5%
at 24 Vin, duty cycle = 17.5-82.5%
at 28 Vin, duty cycle = 17.5-82.5%
Input threshold (V low) < 8 Vdc
Input threshold (V high) > 16 Vdc
Input voltage (V high range) 1628 Vdc
Minimum Input Resistance (Ohm) @ 8V 37730
Minimum Input Resistance (Ohm) @ 16V 7160
Minimum Input Resistance (Ohm) @ 28V 4190
Available power none
Isolation 500 Vac minimum, each channel is isolated from
all other channels and from the Atlas-II platform
Input frequency 0.525 000 Hz

A derivative output is provided to the application software. Generally, the


derivative error increases with frequency input. The typical six-sigma
performance with input frequencies < 5000 Hz is better than 8 Hz/s. The
typical six-sigma performance with input frequencies > 5000 Hz is better
than 24 Hz/s. Note: Field wiring may introduce additional signal error due to
cable length, cable routing, and other sources.
No proximity probe power is provided.

When choosing to wire either a MPU or proximity speed input, make


sure the unused MPU/PROX(+) terminal block input is shorted to
MPU/PROX ().

Analog Inputs
Number of channels 6
Input type 420 mA , (full scale = 24 mA)
Max. input current > 23 mA
Max. input voltage 24V @ 25 C
Common mode rejection 80 dB minimum
Input common mode range 40 V minimum
Safe input common mode volt 40 V minimum
Input impedance 211 (1.3%)
Anti-aliasing filter (ch1-4) 2 poles at 10 ms
Anti-aliasing filter (ch5-6) 2 poles at 5 ms
Resolution Greater than 16 bits
Accuracy @ 25 C less than 0.1% of full scale
Temp Drift 171 ppm/C, maximum (1.1% of full scale, 0.275 mA)
30 ppm/C, typical (0.20% of full scale, 0.05 mA)
I/O Latency 1 ms
Shielded cable is required when connecting to the Analog Inputs.

Loop power for the analog inputs is NOT available.


Only 420 mA inputs are supported. This is a change from the previous
SmartCore module that allowed both current and voltage inputs.

oExternal loop powered transducers must be individually protected


with a 100 mA fuse on each channel.

40 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Analog Outputs
Number of channels 4
Output type 420 mA outputs, non-isolated, (full scale = 25mA)
Common Mode Voltage 15 Vdc 10%
Max current output 25 mA 5%
Min. load resistance 0
Max load resistance 300 at 22 mA
Resolution 15 bits of full scale
Accuracy @ 25 C less than 0.1% of full scale
Readback Accuracy @ 25 C 1% of full scale
Temperature Drift 140 PPM/C, maximum (0.23 mA)
70 ppm/C, typical (0.45% of full scale, 0.1125 mA)
Shielded cable is required when connecting to the Analog Outputs.

Actuator Outputs
Number of channels 2
Actuator Type Proportional, non-isolated,
Output Type 4-20 or 20-200 mA, software selectable
(full scale = 31 mA or 233 mA)
Isolation None
Max current output 27 mA +10% (4-20 mA range)
218 mA +10% (20-200 mA range)
Min. load resistance 10
Max load resistance 300 at 22 mA (4-20 mA range)
40 at 200 mA (20-200 mA range)
Resolution 15 bits of full scale
Accuracy @ 25 C less than 0.1% of full scale
0.029 mA (4-20 mA range)
0.220 mA (20-200 mA range)
Readback Accuracy @ 25 C 1.0 % of full scale
Temperature Drift 140 PPM/C maximum
0.26 mA maximum (4-20 mA range)
2.00 mA maximum (20-200 mA range)
70 ppm/C typical 0.45% of full scale,
0.13 mA (4-20 mA range)
1.00 mA (20-200 mA range)
Readbacks Actuator source and return currents
Dither Current 25 Hz, fixed duty cycle, software variable amplitude
Shielded cable is required when connecting to the Actuator Outputs.

Discrete Inputs
Number of channels 24
Input type Optically isolated discrete input
Input thresholds < 8 Vdc = OFF
> 16 Vdc = ON
Input current 3 mA @ 24 Vdc
Contact voltage 24 Vdc isolated output (100 mA max, internally protected)
Max input voltage 28 Vdc
Isolation voltage 500 Vac, all channels are isolated from the Atlas-II platform
Shielded cable is only required when connecting to the Discrete Inputs and it is a
Marine Type Approval installation.

For EMC compliance, the on-board, isolated, +24 Vdc supply is


recommended for use as power to contacts, 100 mA maximum.
All channels are common to each other. Isolation is with respect to the
Atlas-II platform and other I/O types.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Serial I/O
Number of channels 3 isolated ports, 115.2K max
Channel configuration 1 - RS-232 Debug Port (PS2 style, mini-DIN6F connector)
2 - RS-232/RS-485/RS-422 software configurable, terminal block
connections
Termination Resistor Located on the board and are accessible via field wiring. Termination
resistors are provided for RS-485 and RS-422 Receive.
Isolation Voltage 500 Vdc
Shielded cable is required when connecting to the Serial I/O.

SmartCore CPU A5200 Board Operation


This board includes no potentiometers and requires no field calibration.

Speed Sensor Inputs


The MPU and proximity probe inputs are read and the speed is provided to the
application program. A derivative output is also provided. The speed sensor
inputs are filtered by the SmartCore CPU A5200 board with the filter time
constant being selectable in GAP software between 5 and 160 ms. Eight
milliseconds should be acceptable for most turbine applications, while 16
milliseconds may be necessary for very slow speed applications. The speed
range is selected in the application software and determines the maximum speed
that the board will detect. The control output of the software will detect a
minimum speed of one fiftieth of the speed range. This allows detection of failed
speed sensors to help prevent overspeed due to slow update times at very low
speeds. The monitor output of the GAP block will read down to 0.5 Hz,
regardless of the speed range. An application may use any combination of
accepted MPU and proximity probes, and any combination of speed ranges.

The SmartCore CPU A5200 board uses speed sensing probes mounted on a
gear connected or coupled to the turbines rotor to sense turbine rotor speed.
Either of the A5200 boards speed channels accept passive magnetic pickup
units (MPUs) or proximity probes.

It is not recommended that gears mounted on an auxiliary shaft coupled to the


rotor be used to sense speed. Auxiliary shafts tend to turn more slowly than the
rotor (reducing speed sensing resolution) and have coupling gear backlash,
resulting in less than optimum speed control. For safety purposes, it is also not
recommended that the speed sensing device sense speed from a gear coupled
to a generator or mechanical drive side of a systems rotor coupling.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Atlas

MPU+
+ Passive
55
MPU
Jumpered
PROX+
56

-
57

GND
(isol)
58

Figure 4-9. Wiring ExampleMPU Interface to the SmartCore Board

A proximity probe may be used to sense very low speeds. With a proximity
probe, speed can be sensed down to 0.5 Hz. When interfacing to open collector
type proximity probes, a pull-up resistor is required between the supplied
proximity probe voltage and the proximity probe input to the SmartCore CPU
A5200 board.

Atlas Atlas
Active
+V Pickup
Jumper Jumper
55 55 Active
+V Pickup

56 56

57 57

58 58

PNP Type NPN Type

Figure 4-10. Wiring ExampleOpen Collector Proximity Probe to the SmartCore


CPU A5200 Board

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Configuration Notes
Refer to Figures 4-9 and 4-10 for speed sensor wiring.
Each speed input channel can only accept one MPU or one proximity probe.
Proximity probe power is not provided.
Proximity probes onlyExternal pull-up resistors are required when
interfacing to open collector type proximity probes.
If the proximity probe inputs are used, the corresponding MPU inputs must
be jumpered as shown.

Speed Sensor Input Software Configuration Limitations


(TxMxR)/60 must be < 25 000 Hz
T = gear teeth
M = (overspeed test limit setting x 1.2)
R = gear ratio

Analog Inputs
The analog inputs accepts a 4-20 mA current signal and may be used with two-
wire ungrounded (loop powered) transducers or isolated (self-powered)
transducers. All Analog inputs have greater than 40 Vdc of common mode
rejection. If interfacing to a non-isolated device, which may have the potential of
reaching over 40 Vdc with respect to the controls common, the use of a loop
isolator is recommended to break any return current paths, which could produce
erroneous readings.

For a 420 mA input signal, the SmartCore CPU A5200 board uses a 211
resistor across the input.

Atlas

+ 4-20 mA
+ 38
Transducer Self
Powered

-
37

39

Figure 4-11a. Wiring Example420 mA Input Interface to the SmartCore CPU


A5200 Board

44 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

(+) Loop Power


Atlas
100 mA Fuse
+ 4-20 mA
38 Transducer Loop
Powered

37 (-) Loop Power

39

Figure 4-11b. Wiring Example420 mA Input Interface using External Loop


Power

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figures 4-11a,b for analog input wiring.
All 4-20 mA inputs have an input impedance of 211 .
Loop power is NOT provided by the Atlas control, it must be sourced
externally.

External loop powered transducers must be individually protected


with a 100 mA fuse on each channel.

Analog Outputs
The analog outputs are 420 mA with a full scale range of 025 mA. The
SmartCore CPU A5200 board has four analog outputs.

Atlas

+15 Vdc

69 +
A

4-20 mA
70

71

Figure 4-12. Wiring ExampleAnalog Output Interface to the SmartCore CPU


A5200 Board

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Configuration Notes
Refer to Figure 4-12 for analog output wiring.
Only 420 mA signals are output.
See the specifications section for the maximum analog output load.
Care should be taken to prevent ground loops and other faults when
interfacing to non-isolated devices.
Each output provides readback capability that can be used to detect field
wiring or device faults as needed.
The analog outputs have a 15 V common mode voltage, with respect to
Atlas-II control common.

Avoid misconnection of the Analog Output (+) to the Actuator Output


(). This will damage internal components, making the control
inoperable.

Signal Isolators should be used when connecting to non-isolated


field devices greater than 30 meters away.
Beware of Analog and Actuator output connections to non-isolated
field devices that are located greater than 30 meters away from the
Atlas-II Control. Ground potentials between different locations can be
severe enough under certain EMC/Surge events to cause control
malfunction.

Actuator Outputs
The (2) proportional actuator driver outputs are software configurable as either 4-
20 mA or 20-200 mA with a full scale range of 031 mA or 0-233 mA. Each driver
output provides both current source and return readbacks that can assist in
troubleshooting and detection of field wiring or device failures.
Atlas

+15 V
Source
Current
Readback

63 + Proportional
Actuator
Return
Current 64
Readback

65

Figure 4-13. Wiring ExampleActuator Output Interface to the SmartCore CPU


A5200 Board

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figure 4-13 for actuator output wiring.
420 mA or 20-200 mA signals are output.
See the specifications section for the maximum actuator output load.

46 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Care should be taken to prevent ground loops and other faults when
interfacing to non-isolated devices.
Application software selects the actuator type, the output range, and the
dither amount.
Each output provides readback capability that can be used to detect field
wiring or device faults as needed.

Avoid misconnection of the Analog Output (+) to the Actuator Output


(). This will damage internal components, making the control
inoperable.

Signal Isolators should be used when connecting to non-isolated


field devices greater than 30 meters away.
Beware of Analog and Actuator output connections to non-isolated
field devices that are located greater than 30 meters away from the
Atlas-II Control. Ground potentials between different locations can be
severe enough under certain EMC/Surge events to cause control
malfunction.

Discrete Inputs
The SmartCore CPU A5200 board accepts 24 discrete inputs. Contact wetting
voltage may be supplied by the SmartCore CPU A5200 card. Optionally, an
external 1828 Vdc power source can be used to source the circuit wetting voltage.

Atlas

1
Dry
Contact

+24V 25
(isol)
GND
(isol)
26

Figure 4-14. Wiring ExampleDiscrete Input Interface to the SmartCore CPU


A5200 Board

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figure 4-14 for discrete input wiring.
The discrete input commons are tied together, so each SmartCore CPU
A5200 board accepts only one voltage source, which can be internally or
externally supplied.
All contact inputs accept dry contacts.
If an external power supply is used, it must be rated to 28 Vdc max from
Class 2 type source for North America (SELV type source for applications
outside North America). Power supply outputs must be fused with
appropriately sized fuses (a maximum, current rating of 100 V, where V is
the supplys rated voltage, or 5 A, whichever is less).
The 24 V isolated contact power is protected by a 0.3 A poly switch that is
rated for 0.1A continuous use. This may not prevent interruption in control
operation due to a short in the field wiring, but should protect the control from
damage. The poly switch will reset itself when the short condition is resolved.
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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
If unused (floated) Discrete Inputs have an extended cable length attached
for future use, they must be ignored in software. Events such as large
transient pulses near the unused cable can cause them to momentarily
toggle.
Marine Type Approval installations require Discrete Input cabling inside the
cabinet to be shielded if it leaves the cabinet.

Serial I/O
The SmartCore CPU A5200 accepts (2) user serial I/O connections. Both isolated
ports are configurable for RS-232, RS-422, or RS-485. RS-232 is specified to 50
feet (15 m) while RS-485 and RS-422 are specified to 4000 feet (1219 m).

Serial #1 - RS-232

Atlas
90

Isolated
+5V

RS 232C Isolated
Transceiver Ground
83

RXB COM
82 TXB
RXB
TXB
81 Twisted RS 232
Pair Device

Figure 4-15. Serial #1RS-232 Pinouts


Serial #1 - RS-422

Atlas
90

RS 422
Transceiver 89
422R
422T +
+ 88 Twisted
+
Pairs
422R 87
+ 422T
+
243 RS 422
86 Device
SIG GND
140
Isolated
+5V 85 Jumpers to
243 use optional
termination
84 resistor
+

83

Isolated 82
Ground

81

Figure 4-16. Serial #1RS-422 Pinouts

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Serial #1 - RS-485

Atlas
90

RS 485
Transceiver 89

- 88 Twisted
Pair
+ 87 -

+
243 RS 485
86 Device
SIG GND
140
Isolated
+5V 85
Jumpers to
243
use optional
termination
84
resistor
+

83

82
Isolated
Ground
81

Figure 4-17. Serial #1RS-485 Pinouts

Serial #2 - RS-232

Atlas
100

Isolated
+5V

RS 232C Isolated
Transceiver Ground
93

RXB COM
92 TXB
RXB
TXB
91 Twisted RS 232
Pair Device

Figure 4-18. Serial #2RS-232 Pinouts

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Serial #2 - RS-422

Atlas
100

RS 422
Transceiver 99
422R
422T +
+ 98 Twisted
+
Pairs
422R 97
+ 422T
+
243 RS 422
96 Device
SIG GND
140
Isolated
+5V 95 Jumpers to
243 use optional
termination
94 resistor
+

93

Isolated 92
Ground

91

Figure 4-19. Serial #2RS-422 Pinouts

Serial #2 - RS-485

Atlas
100

RS 485
Transceiver 99

- 98 Twisted
Pair
+ 97 -

+
243 RS 485
96 Device
SIG GND
140
Isolated
+5V 95 Jumpers to
243 use optional
termination
94 resistor
+

93

92
Isolated
Ground

91

Figure 4-20. Serial #2RS-485 Pinouts

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Figure 4-21. Wiring ExampleRS-232 Interface to the SmartCore CPU A5200


Board

ATLAS RS422 Device


(Isolated) 4000 feet max (1200m)

422T 422R TERM 422T 422R TERM


+ + + + + +

VIS-161
**Shield to be hard grounded at 1 end only and optionally AC coupled at other devices. 31JAN08

Figure 4-22. Wiring ExampleRS-422 Interface to the SmartCore CPU A5200


Board

ATLAS RS485 Device RS485 Device


(Isolated)

RS485 TERM RS485 TERM RS485 TERM


+ - + - + - + - + - + -

VIS-162
**Shield to be hard grounded at 1 end only and optionally AC coupled at other devices. 31JAN08

Figure 4-23. Wiring ExampleRS-485 Interface to the SmartCore CPU A5200


Board

Figure 4-24. Wiring ExampleAlternate Multipoint Wiring


(without a separate signal ground wire for the SmartCore CPU A5200 board)

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Configuration Notes
RS-232. Refer to Figure 4-21 for RS-232 wiring. The transmit data (TXD),
receive data (RXD), and signal ground (SIG GND) must be properly
connected as shown. In addition the shield (SHLD) should be connected in
at least one location.
RS-422. Refer to Figure 4-22 for RS-422 wiring. The transmit data pairs
(422T+ and 422T-), receive data pairs (422R+ and 422R-), and signal
ground (SIG GND) must be properly connected as shown. In addition, the
shield (SHLD) should be connected in at least one location. Only the
receiver at each end of the network should be terminated with a resistor.
RS-485. Refer to Figure 4-23 for RS-485 wiring. The data lines (485+ and
485) and signal ground (SIG GND) must be properly connected as shown.
In addition, the shield (SHLD) should be connected in at least one location.
The unit at each end of the network should be terminated with a resistor.
Termination Resistors. The Atlas-II has termination resistors (TERM RES)
built into the SmartCore CPU A5200 board that can be jumpered-in as
required for RS422 and RS485 communication networks.
The serial ports must be properly configured in the application software for
the appropriate communication parameters.

Reference Grounds
The serial ports are individually isolated from each other, and from the rest
of the Atlas-II control. The RS-422 and RS-485 specifications state that a
ground wire is needed if there is no other ground path between units. The
preferred method for isolated ports is to include a separate wire in the
ground cable that connects the circuit grounds together.
Non-isolated nodes may not have a signal ground available. If signal ground
is not available, use the alternate wiring scheme of connecting all circuit
grounds of isolated nodes to the shield, and connecting the shield to earth
ground at a non-isolated node.

Troubleshooting and Tuning


The SmartCore CPU A5200 module runs off-line and on-line diagnostics that
display troubleshooting messages through the debug Service Port and
AppManager. Off-line diagnostics run automatically on power-up and upon reset.
On-line diagnostics run during normal Control System operation when the GAP
application is active. More information on diagnostics tests, subsequent LED
flash codes, and serial port messages is contained in the VxWorks manual.

Fault Detection (Board Hardware)


Each SmartCore CPU A5200 board has a red fault LED that is turned on when
the system is reset. During initialization of a board, which occurs after every CPU
reset, the CPU turns the Fault LED on. The CPU then tests the board using
diagnostic routines built into the software. If the diagnostic test is not passed, the
LED remains on or blinks. If the test is successful, the LED goes off. If the fault
LED on a board is illuminated after the diagnostics and initialization have been
completed, the SmartCore CPU A5200 board may be faulty.

52 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
A table of the CPU fault LED flash codes is shown below:

Failure Flash Code


RAM Test Failure 1, 4
Real Time Clock Test Failure 2, 2
Floating Point Unit Test Failure 2, 3
Flash Test Failure 2, 4
HD1 Flash Test Failure 2, 5
I2C Bus Test Failure 2, 6
Module Installed in wrong slot 2, 7
Main Chassis CPU switch must be set to 0 3,5
Remote RTN Rate Group 5 Slip 3, 7
Remote RTN Rate Group 10 Slip 3, 8
Remote RTN Rate Group 20 Slip 3, 9
Remote RTN Rate Group 40 Slip 3, 10
Remote RTN Rate Group 80 Slip 3, 11
Remote RTN Rate Group 160 Slip 3, 12

Table 4-2. SmartCore CPU A5200 Failure Codes

Fault Detection (I/O)


In addition to detecting board hardware faults, the application program may
detect I/O faults.
Analog Input FaultsThe application software may set a high and low latch
set point to detect input faults.
Speed Sensor Input FaultsThe application software may set a high and
low latch set point to detect input faults.
Serial Port FaultsThe system monitors the serial communications on the
serial ports for various communication errors.
Microcontroller FaultsThe system monitors a software watchdog, a
hardware watchdog, and a software watchdog on the PC/104 bus
communications. All outputs are shutdown in the event of a microcontroller
fault.

Troubleshooting Guide
Speed Sensor Inputs
MPUsIf a magnetic pickup input is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Measure the input voltage on the terminal block. It should be greater than 1
Vrms.
Verify that the signal waveform is clean and void of double zero crossings.
Verify that no signal return to ground connections exist and that the 60 Hz
signal resulting from ground loops is absent.
Measure the frequency. Frequency should be in the range of 100 Hz to 25
kHz.
Check the wiring. Look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Proximity ProbesIf a proximity probe input is not functioning properly, verify
the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Measure the input voltage on the terminal block. It should be in the range of
1628 V peak, and the duty cycle should be within the specified range for
the input voltage.
Verify that the signal waveform is clean and void of double zero crossings.
Verify that no signal return to ground connections exist and that the 60 Hz
signal resulting from ground loops is absent.
Measure the frequency. Frequency should be in the range of 0.5 Hz to 3
kHz.
Check the wiring. Look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables. If an open collector probe is used,
check to ensure that the pull-up resistor is installed properly.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly.
Verify that the corresponding MPU input is jumpered.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

Analog Inputs
If an Analog input is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Measure the input voltage on the terminal block. It should be in the range of
05 V.
Verify that there are no or minimal AC components to the analog input
signal. AC components can be caused by improper shielding or grounding.
Check the wiring. If the inputs are reading 0 or the engineering units that
correspond to 0 mA, look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables. If the unit is a 420 mA input, check
for proper jumper installation on the terminal block.
If all of the inputs are reading high, check that the power is not connected
across the input directly.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly.
If the input is loop powered, ensure that power is provided externally, the
Atlas control does not provide this power.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

Analog Outputs
If an Analog output is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Check the load resistance, ensure that it is less than the specification limit
for the output current.
Check to ensure that the load wiring is isolated.
Check the wiring, look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Disconnect the field wiring and connect a resistor across the output. If the
output is correct across the resistor, there is a problem with the field wiring.

54 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Check the software configuration to ensure that the output is configured
properly.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

Proportional Actuator Outputs


If an Actuator output is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Check the load resistance, ensure that it is less than the specification limit
for the output current.
Check to ensure that the load wiring is isolated.
Check the wiring, look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Disconnect the field wiring and connect a resistor across the output. If the
output is correct across the resistor, there is a problem with the field wiring.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the output is configured
properly.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

Discrete Inputs
If a discrete input is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Measure the input voltage on the terminal block. It should be in the range of
1828 Vdc.
If an external wetting voltage source is used, check the voltage source is
referenced to the A5200 wetting voltages common.
Check the wiring, look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

Serial I/O
If a serial port is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check the wiring, look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Check to be sure that termination resistors are properly installed where
needed on the network.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly.
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Chapter 5.
Analog Combo Board

General Description
Each Analog Combo board contains circuitry for two speed sensor inputs, fifteen
analog inputs, one cold junction, and two Analog outputs. The first eleven analog
inputs may be 420 mA inputs or thermocouple inputs, and the remaining four
analog inputs may be 420 mA inputs or RTD inputs.

Features

5 ms update rate
On-board processor for automatic calibration of the I/O channels
Analog inputs have 15 bit resolution
Analog outputs have 12 bit resolution
First 11 analog inputs are software configurable 420 mA or thermocouple
(in pairs)
Last 4 analog inputs are software configurable 420 mA or RTD
(individually)
First 11 analog inputs are isolated as a group, from the other inputs, and
from control common
Last 4 analog inputs are isolated as a group, from the other inputs, and from
control common
A cold junction measurement is provided on the board

855-740
02-2-22

Figure 5-1. Atlas-II Analog Combo Board Connections

56 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Physical
The Atlas-II Analog Combo board connects to the CPU board through the
PC/104 bus. It does not connect to the Atlas-II power bus directly, it requires a
SmartCore CPU A5200 board for this purpose.

Dualport
PC/104 Interface PC/104 Interface
RAM
Signals and Decode Logic Memory

Board Address
Dip Switches BDM
Port
Speed
Speed Sensor Sensing
Inputs (2) Circuitry 32.768 kHz
MC68332 Crystal
Microcontroller
Isolated Watchdog
Optocouplers & LED

Flash memory
256 Kbyte
Two16-bit
Thermocouple or 4- Mux & 4-channel Isolation
20mA Inputs (15) Input cfg. Serial A/D Circuits EEPROM
converters non-
volatile
memory

One16-bit
RTD or 4-20mA 8-channel Isolation Analog Out 4-20mA Analog
Input cfg. Serial A/D Circuits
Inputs (4) circuitry Outputs (2)
Converter
VIS-003
00-01-18 KDW

Figure 5-2. Atlas-II Analog Combo Board Block Diagram

Specifications
Thermocouple/420 mA Analog Inputs
Number of channels 11
Input type 420 mA, type J or type K, thermocouple
(required)
Max. input current 24 mA if configured for 420 mA
Max. input voltage 72.8 mV for thermocouples inputs
Thermocouple Range Type E:9.83 mV (267.68 C/449.82 F) to
72.8 mV (952.60 C/1746.68 F)
Type J:8.09 mV (209.72 C/345.50 F) to
69.55 mV (1199.94 C/2191.89 F)
Type K:6.45 mV (263.95 C/443.11 F) to
54.88 mV (1371.81 C/2501.26 F)
Type N:4.34 mV (263.14 C/441.65 F) to
47.51 mV (1299.92 C/2371.86 F)
Type R:0.22 mV (48.27 C/54.89 F) to
21.10 mV (1767.88 C/3214.18 F)
Type S:0.23 mV (48.60 C/55.48 F) to
18.69 mV (1767.76 C/3213.97 F)
Type T:6.25 mV (265.71 C/446.28 F) to
20.87 mV (399.97 C/751.95 F)
Common mode rejection 80 dB minimum for analog inputs
96 dB typical for analog inputs
110 dB minimum for thermocouple inputs
120 dB typical for thermocouple inputs
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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Input common mode range 11 V minimum
Safe input common mode volt 40 V minimum
Input impedance 103 (1%) for 420 mA inputs
Anti-aliasing filter 2 poles at 10 ms (channel 11 has 2 poles at 5
ms)
Resolution 15 bits
Accuracy
Thermocouple Input Accuracy @ 25C (%)
Range
T/C type
< 25 C > 25 C < 300 C > 300 C
Typ Max Typ Max Typ Max Typ Max
E or K 0.15 0.45 0.075 0.25
J 0.10 0.30 0.05 0.20
N 0.15 0.60 0.10 0.30
R or S 0.15 0.50 0.10 0.30
T 0.50 1.50 0.15 0.60

Terminal block wiring must use multi-stranded wires to provide best results.
Due to the clamping action of the spring-loaded terminal blocks, lower level
signals (like TC and RTD inputs) are susceptible to glitches when using
single solid-core wiring.

The Atlas may experience degraded performance of the thermocouple (TC)


inputs of the Analog Combo cards from ~900 MHz to 1.1 GHz at field
strengths greater than 10 V/m. Fields of 1020 V/m degrade the steady-state
performance from a 0.25% tolerance to a 1.2% tolerance. Installation of the
Atlas in a metal cabinet will minimize this degradation.

420 mA Input Accuracy @ 25C (%)


Input type Typ Max
420 mA 0.05 0.10

The Atlas may experience degraded performance of these 420 mA inputs of


the Analog Combo cards from 410 MHz to 450 MHz at field strengths greater
than 10 V/m. Fields of 1020 V/m degrade the steady-state performance from
a 0.1% tolerance to a 0.36% tolerance. Installation of the Atlas in a metal
cabinet will minimize this degradation.

Temperature Drift
Max % Error
Max Drift Max Drift over 25 C Delta
Input Type Full Scale Degree C/C a/C) (% of full scale)
E 999.4 C 0.22472989 0.56
J 1200 C 0.29615393 0.62
K 1370 C 0.43528413 0.79
N 1300 C 0.46956505 0.90
R 1760 C 1.43793547 2.04
S 1756 C 1.62240259 2.31
T 399 C 0.32912099 2.06
420 mA 25 mA 4 A 0.40

For thermocouple inputs, the Max % Error example is calculated for a


25 C delta using the full scale for the corresponding thermocouple
type. For the 420 mA inputs, the Max % Error example is calculated
for a 25 C delta using the 25 mA full scale.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
CJ update time 5 ms
Latency 1 ms for odd channels and 3 ms for even
numbered channels
Failure detection Open wire detection provided for thermocouples
Isolation All input channels are isolated from the rest of
the Atlas-II platform to 500 Vac, however they
are not isolated from each other. The inputs are
differential, with a high impedance between
channels.
CJ accuracy 3 C worst case at 25 C, (1 C typical at 25
C) uncalibrated
1 C worst case at 25 C, (0.5 C typical at 25
C) calibrated
4 C over the full temperature range (40 to
+85 C) uncalibrated
2 C over the full temperature range (40 to
+85 C) calibrated
Loop power for the analog inputs must be supplied by an external supply, if
needed.
420 mA, or type J or K T/C is selected in the GAP block software, for each
input. GAP configuration sets input gain via software.
Maximum wire size, one 16 AWG (1.5 mm), or two 20 AWG (0.5 mm)
wires. Wires must be shielded.
Channels 110 must be configured in pairs, that is, channels 1 and 2, 3 and
4, etc., must both be configured as 420 mA inputs or must both be
configured as thermocouple inputs.
Any unused channel of a pair, Channels 110, must have its input shorted
to prevent measurement errors on the in-use channel of the pair.

External loop powered transducers must be individually protected


with a 100 mA fuse on each channel.

RTD/420 mA Analog Inputs


Number of channels 4
Input type 100 or 200 3-wire
Max. input current 24 mA, if configured for 420 mA
Max. input resistance 781 , if configured for RTD
RTD range European Curve (Type 385):
100 RTD: 18.49 (200 C/328 F) to
390.48 (850 C/1562 F)
200 RTD: 37.04 (200 C/328 F) to
533.10 (457 C/854.6 F)
American Curve (Type 392):
100 RTD: 59.57 (100 C/148 F) to
269.35 (457 C/854.6 F)
200 RTD: 119.14 (100 C/148 F) to
538.70 (457 C/854.6 F)
Common mode rejection 80 dB minimum for analog inputs
96 dB typical for analog inputs
96 dB minimum for RTD inputs
115 dB typical for RTD inputs
Input common mode range 11 V minimum
Safe input common mode volt 40 V minimum
Input impedance 103 (1%) for 420 mA inputs
Anti-aliasing filter 2 poles at 10 ms
Resolution 15 bits

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Accuracy
RTD and 420 mA Input Accuracy @ 25 C (%)
Input type Typ Max
100 American and European, 200 American 0.05 0.10
200 European 0.10 0.20
420 mA 0.05 0.10

Temp Drift
Temperature Drift
Input Type Typ (ppm/C) Typ error (%) Max (ppm/C) Max error (%)
100 European Curve 30 0.20 290 1.89
100 American Curve 50 0.33 290 1.89
200 European Curve 20 0.13 290 1.89
200 American Curve 20 0.13 290 1.89
420 mA 105 0.68 160 1.04

Terminal block wiring must use multi-stranded wires to provide best


results. Due to the clamping action of the spring-loaded terminal
blocks, lower level signals (like TC and RTD inputs) are susceptible
to glitches when using single solid-core wiring.

For RTD inputs, percent error is for full scale for 65 degree delta (25
to 40 C). For 420 mA inputs, percent error is for 25 mA full scale
input for 65 degree delta (25 to 40 C).

Update time 5 ms
I/O Latency 1 ms
Isolation All input channels are isolated from the rest of
the Atlas-II platform to 500 Vdc, however inputs
are not isolated from each other.
Loop power for the Analog inputs must be supplied by an external supply if
needed.
420 mA, or RTD is selected in the GAP block software, for each input.
GAP configuration sets input gain via software.
Maximum wire size, one 16 AWG (1.5 mm), or two 20 AWG (0.5 mm)
wires. Wires must be shielded.

External loop powered transducers must be individually protected


with a 100 mA fuse on each channel.

Digital Speed Sensor Inputs


Number of channels 2, MPU only
MPU Inputs:
Input frequency 10024 950 Hz
Minimum input amplitude See Figure 5-3.
Maximum input amplitude 70 V peak-to-peak
Input impedance >550
Isolation voltage 500 Vac, each channel is isolated from all other
channels, and from the Atlas-II platform
Resolution dependent on frequency, 13 bit minimum at
maximum speed
Accuracy less than 0.08% of full scale from 40 to +85
C internal temperature

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

4.0

3.5

Minimum MPU Magnitude (Volts RMS)


3.0

2.5

2.0

1.5

1.0

0.5

0
100 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000

Frequency (Hz)

Figure 5-3. Minimum MPU Voltage

A derivative output is provided. The inherent noise on this output, due to


resolution, increases with frequency. At 1000 Hz, it can be as much as 2.5
Hz/s. At 5000 Hz, it can be as much as 12.5 Hz/s. At 10 kHz, it can be as
much as 25 Hz/s. At 20 kHz, it can be as much as 80 Hz/s. Typically, at
3600 Hz, noise on the MPU signal due to wiring runs, will make the noise
contribution due to resolution, insignificant.
Maximum wire size, one 16 AWG (1.5 mm), or two 20 AWG (0.5 mm)
wires. Wires must be shielded and the shield terminated to the shield pin
and cabinet entry/exit point.

Analog Outputs
Number of channels 2
Output type 420 mA outputs, non-isolated
Current output 420 mA
Max current output 25mA 5%
Isolation 0 Vdc
Min. load resistance 0
Max load resistance 300 at 22 mA
Resolution 12 bits
Accuracy less than 0.1% of full scale at 25 C (after
software calibration)
Temperature drift 140 ppm/C, maximum, =0.23 mA
70 ppm/C, typical (0.45% of full scale),
=0.11375 mA
01 mA OUTPUTS ARE NOT SUPPORTED, WITHOUT A GREATER THAN 4
BIT LOSS OF RESOLUTION. RESULTING RESOLUTION WOULD BE 7 BITS.
Common mode voltage is 15 Vdc.
Maximum wire size, one 16 AWG (1.5 mm), or two 20 AWG (0.5 mm)
wires. Wires must be shielded.
When interfacing to non-isolated devices, an isolator should be used
between the Atlas-II and the device.

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Analog Combo Board Operation


This board includes no potentiometers and requires no field calibration.

Speed Sensor Inputs


The MPU inputs are read and the speed is provided to the application program. A
derivative output is also provided. The speed sensor inputs are filtered by the
Analog Combo board, and the filter time constant is selectable at 8 milliseconds
or 16 milliseconds. Eight milliseconds should be acceptable for most turbine
applications, sixteen milliseconds may be necessary for very slow speed
applications. The speed range is selected in the application software and
determines the maximum speed that the board will detect. The control output of
the software will detect a minimum speed of one fiftieth of the speed range. This
allows detection of failed speed sensors to help prevent overspeed due to slow
update times at very low speeds. The monitor output of the GAP block will read
down to .5 Hz, irrespective of the speed range. An application may use any
combination of accepted MPUs, and any combination of speed ranges.

The Analog Combo board uses speed sensing probes mounted on a gear
connected or coupled to the turbines rotor to sense turbine rotor speed. Any of
the boards speed channels accept passive magnetic pickup units (MPUs) or
proximity probes. It is not recommended that gears mounted on an auxiliary shaft
coupled to the rotor be used to sense speed. Auxiliary shafts tend to turn more
slowly than the rotor (reducing speed sensing resolution) and have coupling gear
backlash, resulting in less than optimum speed control. For safety purposes, it is
also not recommended that the speed sensing device sense speed from a gear
coupled to a generator or mechanical drive side of a systems rotor coupling.

Atlas

+ Passive
57
MPU

58

GND
(isol) 59

Figure 5-4. Wiring ExampleMPU Interface to the Analog Combo Board

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figure 5-4 for speed sensor wiring.

Speed Sensor Input Software Configuration Limitations


(TxMxR)/60 must be < 25 000 Hz
T = gear teeth
M = (overspeed test limit setting x 1.2)
R = gear ratio

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Analog Inputs
The Analog inputs may be current or temperature inputs. The first 11 inputs can
be thermocouple inputs, and the other 4 inputs can be RTD inputs. The software
must be configured for the correct input type. This allows the Analog Combo card
to use the applicable hardware calibration values, and to configure the
appropriate hardware gains. The first 10 inputs must be configured in pairs, that
is, channels 1 and 2 must both be thermocouples or must both be 420 mA
inputs. Channels 1115 may be configured individually.

All 420 mA inputs may be used with two-wire ungrounded (loop powered)
transducers or isolated (self-powered) transducers. All Analog inputs have 11
Vdc of common mode rejection. If interfacing to a non-isolated device, which may
have the potential of reaching over 11 Vdc with respect to the controls common,
the use of a loop isolator is recommended to break any return current paths,
which could produce erroneous readings.

RTD inputs must be configured to use either the European or American curve.
200 RTDs are limited to the maximum temperature on the American curve,
even when the European curve is used. The RTD source current is 2 ma, and the
RTD sense input should be tied to the negative side of the RTD, at the RTD.

See the specifications section for supported thermocouple types. The cold
junction sensor is provided on the Atlas-II Analog Combo board. If the actual cold
junction in the field wiring occurs elsewhere, the temperature of that junction
must be brought into the control as a thermocouple, RTD, or 420 mA input, and
the application software must be configured to use the appropriate cold junction
temperature.

The first 11 analog inputs are isolated as a group from control common, earth
ground, and the other 4 analog inputs. The last 4 analog inputs are also isolated
as a group from control common, earth ground, and the first 11 analog inputs.
For a 420 mA input signal, the Analog Combo board uses a 100 resistor
across the input.

Atlas

+ Thermocouple
1
Transducer or 4-20 mA
Analog - Transducer
Input #1
2

Figure 5-5a. Wiring ExampleAnalog Input Interface


(to the Analog Combo Board for 420 mA
and thermocouple inputs on inputs 111)

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(+) Loop Power
Atlas
100 mA Fuse
+ 4-20 mA
1 Transducer Loop
Powered
Analog
Input #1
2 (-) Loop Power

Figure 5-5b. Wiring ExampleAnalog Input Interface with External Loop Power

Atlas

+ 4-20 mA
35 Transducer Loop
- Powered

Analog
36
Input #12

37

38

Figure 5-6. Wiring Example420 mA Input Interface


(to the Analog Combo Board for inputs 1215)

Atlas

sense
Analog 35
Input #12

(-)
36 RTD

AC
Current (+)
Source 37

38

Figure 5-7. Wiring ExampleRTD Input Interface


(to the Analog Combo Board for inputs 1215)

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Configuration Notes
Refer to Figures 5-5, 5-6, and 5-7 for analog input wiring.
420 mA inputs are supported, 05 V inputs are not.
The application software must be configured to match the input type used,
that is, 420 mA, 100 RTD, k-type thermocouple, etc.

External loop powered transducers must be individually protected


with a 100 mA fuse on each channel.

RTDs

Only 100 and 200 RTDs are supported.


RTD inputs can use the European or American curve. 200 RTDs are
limited to the maximum temperature on the American curve, even when the
European curve is used.
The RTD source current is 2 mA.
The RTD sense input should be tied to the negative side of the RTD, at the
RTD.

Thermocouples

See the specifications section for supported thermocouple types.


The cold junction sensor is provided on the Atlas-II Analog Combo board. If
the actual cold junction in the field wiring occurs elsewhere, the temperature
of that junction must be brought into the control as a thermocouple, RTD, or
420 mA input, and the application software must be configured to use the
appropriate cold junction temperature.
The thermocouple and cold junction input units (C or F) should be
consistent in the application software.

420 mA Inputs

All 420 mA inputs have an impedance of 100 .


No loop power is provided.

External loop powered transducers must be individually protected


with a 100 mA fuse on each channel.

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Analog Outputs
The Analog outputs are 420 mA with a full scale range of 024 mA. The Analog
Combo board has four Analog outputs.

Atlas +V

51 + 4-20 mA
Output
On earlier versions of the
52 Analog Combo board, the cable
#1 shield termination went directly
to earth.
53

Figure 5-8. Wiring ExampleAnalog Output Interface


(to the Analog Combo Board)

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figure 5-8 for analog output wiring.
Only 420 mA signals are output.
See the specifications section for the maximum analog output load.
Care should be taken to prevent ground loops and other faults when
interfacing to non-isolated devices.
The output does not contain fault detection. If it is necessary to detect
failures, then the device that is driven by the Analog output, for example an
actuator driver, must contain reference failure detection.
The Analog outputs have a 15 V common mode voltage, with respect to
Atlas-II control common.
+V is 15 V

Avoid misconnection of the Analog Output (+) to the Actuator Output


(). This will damage internal components, making the control
inoperable. This applies only when a SmartCore CPU A5200 board is
installed in the control.

Fault Detection (Board Hardware)


Each Analog Combo board has a red fault LED that is turned on when the
system is reset. During initialization of a board, which occurs after every CPU
reset, the CPU turns the Fault LED on. The CPU then tests the board using
diagnostic routines built into the software. If the diagnostic test is not passed, the
LED remains on or blinks. If the test is successful, the LED goes off. If the fault
LED on a board is illuminated after the diagnostics and initialization have been
completed, the Analog Combo board may be faulty or may have the address DIP
switches configured incorrectly. The DIP switch setting must match the module
address set in the GAP application program.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Number of LED Flashes Failure
1 Microprocessor failure
2 Bus, address, any unexpected exception error
5 Failure during EE test or erasing
7 Kernel software Watchdog count error
12 Failure during CPU Internal RAM test
13 Dual port RAM error

Table 5-1 Analog Combo Failure

Fault Detection (I/O)


In addition to detecting board hardware faults, the application program may
detect I/O faults.
Analog Input FaultsThe application software may set a high and low latch
set point to detect input faults. For thermocouple inputs, open wire detection
is provided.
Speed Sensor Input FaultsThe application software may set a high and
low latch set point to detect input faults.
Microcontroller FaultsThe system monitors a software watchdog, a
hardware watchdog, and a software watchdog on the PC/104 bus
communications. All outputs are shutdown in the event of a microcontroller
fault.

Troubleshooting Guide
Speed Sensor Inputs
If a magnetic pickup input is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Measure the input voltage on the terminal block. It should be greater than
that shown in Figure 5-3.
Verify that the signal waveform is clean and void of double zero crossings.
Verify that no signal return to ground connections exist and that the 60 Hz
signal resulting from ground loops is absent.
Measure the frequency. Frequency should be in the range of 100 Hz - 25
kHz.
Check the wiring. Look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly; check the hertz to rpm ratio, and the maximum speed.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

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Analog Inputs
If an Analog input is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Measure the input voltage on the terminal block. It should be in the range of
05 V for 420 mA inputs. RTD inputs have a 2 mA current source.
Thermocouple inputs should have the appropriate millivolt signal.
Verify that there are no or minimal AC components to the Analog Input
signal. AC components can be caused by improper shielding or grounding.
Thermocouple inputs are extremely sensitive to signal fluctuations.
Check the wiring. For a 420 mA input if the input is reading 0 or the
engineering units that correspond to 0 mA, look for a loose connection at the
terminal blocks and disconnected or misconnected cables.
For RTD inputs, check for proper connection of the sense line.
For thermocouple inputs, check for proper cold junction location.
If the input is reading high, check that the power is not connected across the
input directly.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly. Ensure that the proper RTD or thermocouple type is selected, if
applicable.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

Analog Outputs
If an Analog output is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Check the load resistance, ensure that it is less than the specification limit
for the output current.
Check to ensure that the load wiring is isolated.
Check the wiring, look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Disconnect the field wiring and connect a resistor across the output. If the
output is correct across the resistor, there is a problem with the field wiring.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the input is configured
properly.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Chapter 6.
PowerSense Board

General Description
Each PowerSense board contains the circuitry for two sets of three phase AC
voltage (PT) and AC current (CT) inputs, as well as a speed bias output, a
voltage bias output, and a LON communications port.

Features
On-board processor for automatic calibration of the I/O channels
PT and CT inputs provide fundamental as well as harmonic information
PT and CT inputs are updated after 3 cycles, which is 50 ms at 60 Hz
PT and CT inputs and bias outputs have 12 bit resolution
PT inputs are software configurable for 70 V, 120 V, or 240 V ranges
Each set of PT and CT inputs is isolated from the rest of the board and
chassis
5 ms update rate for speed and voltage bias outputs
Speed bias output is software configurable for 420 mA, 05 V, PWM, or 3
V output
Speed Bias output is isolated from the rest of the board
Voltage Bias output is software configurable for 420 mA, 1 V, 3 V, and
9 V
Voltage bias output is isolated from the rest of the board
The LON port is isolated from the rest of the board

Physical
The Atlas-II PowerSense board connects to the CPU board through the PC/104
bus. It connects to the power supply, through the Atlas-II power bus. It requires a
SmartCore CPU A5200 board or a Pentium CPU board as a master controller. The
master controller is responsible for all application level tasks such as protective
relaying, load share, and controlling the voltage and speed bias outputs.

Hazardous Live
The following circuits are classified as Hazardous Live because they carry potential
shock hazardous voltages during normal operation or under single fault conditions:
potential transformer (PT) inputs
current transformer (CT) inputs
voltage bias outputs

HIGH VOLTAGEDo not contact the above inputs and outputs


during system operation when such circuits are live. Possible
serious personal injury or death could result.

HIGH VOLTAGEBefore disconnecting the secondary terminals of


the current transformer or the connections of the current transformer
at the control, ensure that the transformer is short-circuited.

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HIGH VOLTAGETo prevent risk of electric shock, make sure that


the terminal block covers are installed on the above inputs before
operation (see Figure 6-1).

Terminal Block

Figure 6-1. Terminal Block Covers

These inputs and outputs are provided with 500 V of dielectric isolation from
chassis ground. In addition, these inputs/outputs are isolated from safety extra-
low voltage (SELV) circuits (such as serial communication, PC/104 circuits) by
optoisolators or transformers provided with double insulation and 3 kVac of
dielectric isolation.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Figure 6-2. PowerSense Board Connections

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PC/104 Interface PC/104 Interface Dualport RAM LON MIP/DPS LON


LON Channel 1
Signals and decode logic memory Interface Transceiver

Board Address
Dip Switches

Dualport RAM
memory
BDM Port

Zero-phase
crossing 5 MHz
dectectors Crystal
MC68332 Microcontroller
Isolated Watchdog
Optocouplers

Flash Memory
12-bit
Generator AC Sample & 8-channel Isolation
Inputs(6) Hold Serial A/D circuits EEPROM non-
converter volatile
memory

12-bit
Bus Sample & 8-channel Isolation Isolation
AC Inputs(3) Serial A/D circuits circuits
Hold
converter

Speed bias
Speed bias Output
circuitry

Voltage bias Voltage Bias


Circuitry Output
VIS-002
01-4-26

Figure 6-3. PowerSense Board Block Diagram

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Specifications
Utility and Generator PT Voltage Inputs
Input Voltage (Typical) 77, 120, 240/277 Vac, transducers externally
powered.
Max. Input Voltage 300 Vac
Input Current 3 mA maximum
Input Frequency 4570 Hz
Common Mode Voltage 450 Vdc minimum
Common Mode Rejection Ratio 63 dB minimum
Measurement Category CAT III

PT Temp Drift
(Vrange =
70/120/240 Vrms) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.4 % of Vrange < 0.3% of Vrange
0.28V, 70V scale 0.21V, 70V scale
0.48V, 120V scale 0.36V, 120V scale
0.96V, 240V scale 0.72V, 240V scale
Max (3): < 1.2 % of Vrange < 0.8% of Vrange
0.84V, 70V scale 0.56V, 70V scale
1.44V, 120V scale 0.96V, 120V scale
2.88V, 240V scale 1.92V, 240V scale

Input Impedance 400 k or greater


Isolation see HAZARDOUS LIVE section above

Utility and Generator CT Current Inputs


Input Current 5 A rms full scale
Max Transient Input Current 7.07 A rms
Input Frequency 4570 Hz
Common Mode Voltage 250 Vdc minimum
Common Mode Rejection Ratio 63 dB minimum
Measurement Category CAT III
Accuracy see PT/CT Accuracy Table

CT Temp Drift
(FullScale = 5 Arms) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.4% or 20.0 mA < 0.3% or 15.0 mA
Max (3): < 1.2% or 60.0 mA < 0.8% or 40.0 mA

Input Impedance 0.030


Isolation see HAZARDOUS LIVE section above

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Speed Bias Output


Number of channels 1
Current output option 420 mA selected by software switch and wiring
Max current output 25mA 5%
Voltage output options 05 V (5 V max 5%), 3 V (3V limit 5%), 500 Hz
PWM, selected by software switch and wiring
Isolation 500 Vac
Max load resistance 300 at 24 mA for 420 mA output, infinite for V
outputs
Min load resistance 0 for current output, 450 for 3 V output, 1k for
05 V output, PWM output.
Resolution 11 bits, except for PWM output
Accuracy less than 0.1% of full scale @ 25 C or
0.006 V for 3 V output
0.005 V for 05 V output
0.025 mA for 420 mA output

TempDrift
(420 mA, FS = 25 mA) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.5% or 0.125 mA < 0.3% or 0.075 mA
Max (3): < 1.2% or 0.30 mA < 0.8% or 0.20 mA

Temp Drift
(3V range) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.3% or 18.0 mV < 0.2% or 12.0 mV
Max (3): < 0.7% or 42.0 mV < 0.5% or 30.0 mV

TempDrift
(05 V range and PWM) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.1% or 5.0 mV < 0.1% or 5.0 mV
Max (3): < 0.2% or 10.0 mV < 0.2% or 10.0 mV

Options: 420 mA, 05 V, 3V, PWM- 5V- 500 Hz. Both the GAP block field and the
wiring must be changed to switch between current and voltage outputs. Only the
GAP block field must be changed to switch between the voltage outputs.

Voltage Bias Output


Number of channels 1
Current output option 420 mA selected by software switch and wiring
Max current 25mA 5%
Voltage output options 1, 3, 9 V selected by software switch and wiring
Max Voltage 9V 5%
Isolation see HAZARDOUS LIVE section above
Max load resistance 300 at 24 mA for 420 mA output, infinite for V
output
Min load resistance 7k for 9V output, 0 for 420 mA output
Resolution 11 bits for 9V, >9 bits for 3V, >7 bits for 1V
Accuracy less than 0.1% of full scale @ 25 C or
0.018V for 1V, 3V, 9V output
0.025 mA for 420 mA output

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
TempDrift
(420 mA, FS = 25 mA) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.5% or 0.125 mA < 0.3% or 0.075 mA
Max (3): < 1.2% or 0.30 mA < 0.8% or 0.20 mA

Temp Drift
(9V range) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.3% or 54.0 mV < 0.3% or 54.0 mV
Max (3): < 0.6% or 108.0 mV < 0.5% or 90.0 mV

Temp Drift
(3V range) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 0.9% or 54.0 mV < 0.9% or 54.0 mV
Max (3): < 1.8% or 108.0 mV < 1.5% or 90.0 mV

TempDrift
(1V range) 40 to +85 C Any 40 C change
Typical (1): < 2.7% or 54.0 mV < 2.7 % or 54.0 mV
Max (3): < 5.4% or 108.0 mV < 4.5% or 90.0 mV

options: 420 mA, 1V, 3V, 9V; software and wiring selectable. Both the GAP
block field and the wiring must be changed to switch between current and voltage
outputs. Only the GAP block field must be changed to switch between the voltage
outputs.

PT/CT Accuracy Table


Accuracy with Default Filter
Metering Item
Values of 0.67
0.25% or 0.175 V, 70 Vac scale
Voltage 0.25% or 0.3 V, 120 Vac scale
0.25% or 0.6 V 240 Vac scale
Current 0.25% or 12.5 mA
0.5% or 1.75 VA, 70 V scale
Power 0.5% or 3.0 VA, 120 V scale
0.5% or 6.0 VA, 240 V scale
0.003 PF
Power Factor Across entire range of 0.5 lead to
0.5 lag
Frequency 0.08% of 60 Hz or 0.048 Hz
Synchronizing 0.25% or 0.00157 rad or 0.9
1% or 50 mA for current
1% or 0.7 V, 70 Vac scale
Harmonics 2-7
1% or 1.2 V, 120 Vac scale
1% or 2.4 V, 240 Vac scale
2% or 100 mA for current
2% or 1.4 V, 70 Vac scale
Harmonics 9, 11, 13
2% or 2.4 V, 120 Vac scale
2% or 4.8 V, 240 Vac scale
0.5% or 25 mA for current
Negative Phase
0.5% or 0.35 V, 70 Vac scale
Sequence Voltage or
0.5% or 0.6 V, 120 Vac scale
Current
0.5% or 1.2 V, 240 Vac scale
Typical Temperature <0.4% of Vrange for any 40 C
Drift for voltage inputs change
Typical Temperature <0.4% or 20.0 mA for any 40 C
Drift for current inputs change
* Accuracy values at 25 C with no harmonics

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

PowerSense Board Operation


This board includes no potentiometers and requires no field calibration.

A PowerSense board may be replaced with another board of the same part
number without any physical adjustment.

When the PowerSense card is used for synchronizing, the GAP


application must be configured so that the timing is correct for the
characteristics of the PTCT_ATL and SYNCHRO blocks.
1) The rate group for both blocks must be set to "10".
2) Disable the synchronizer and verify that the
SYNCHRO.SYNC_DIS is <TRUE>.
3) Enable the PTCT_ATL.SMPL_TYPE by tuning to <TRUE>.
4) Delay 200 ms.
5) After the 200 ms delay, tune the SYNCHRO.SYNC_DIS to
<FALSE>.
Please see the GAP help for further details on the remaining
functionality of these blocks.

PT Voltage Inputs
The PT inputs are designed to sense three phase voltage. All features of the
three phase voltage for the generator are exactly duplicated for the mains inputs.
The A phase voltage inputs of each set (generator and mains) are used for
frequency measurement and synchronizing. The fundamental magnitude and
phase information is calculated, in addition to the magnitude and phase of each
harmonic. All harmonics are calculated, up to the 7th harmonic, as well as the
9th, 11th, and 13th harmonics. In addition the PT voltage inputs are used in
conjunction with the CT current inputs for power calculation purposes. All voltage
calculations are performed using algorithms in accordance with IEEE 1459-2000.

Individual fundamental and harmonic voltage inputs are provided. A negative


phase sequence voltage input, and a THD voltage input are also provided.

Three hardware ranges are provided and are selected by the application
software. The nominal inputs for these ranges are 70 V, 120 V, and 240 V. Using
the 70 V range, the lowest voltage that will be sensed it 26.67 V, using the 120 V
range the lowest voltage is 40 V, and using the 240 V range the lowest voltage is
80 V.

PT ratio and gain inputs are provided, to allow field configuration of the PT
scaling. The PT ratio will scale all three PT inputs by the same ratio. There is a
separate gain input provided for each PT input (3 for the generator and 3 for the
mains) that is provided to allow for compensation of potential transformer turns
ratio inaccuracies.

The PT inputs, have adjustable software filters. All PT inputs are updated every 3
cycles. With an input of 60 Hz, this equates to 50 ms.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
The hardware does not require three phases for voltage calculations, the
application can configure the module for single phase, and all functionality will be
modified accordingly. The single phase input that must be provided is the A
phase. The application can also configure the module for a Y or delta line
configuration, and the calculations will compensate appropriately. If the physical
connections are to a wye connected generator or load, the input to PowerSense
should also be wye connected (line-to-neutral). If the physical connections are to
a Delta connected generator or load (no neutral present), the input to
PowerSense should also be Delta connected (line-to-line). ). The Y or delta
configuration applies to the entire set of PT and CTs, it is not possible to
configure the PTs for Y, and the CTs for delta, or vice versa. However, the
configuration may differ between PT/CT 1 and PT/CT 2 (or gen and mains in a
typical configuration).

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figures 6-4 through 6-8 for PT wiring.
When using the 3 different PT ranges, 70 V, 120 V, and 240 V, the physical
input must be the correct voltage AND the application software must
configure the PT/CT block for the correct voltage range.
When using a single phase input, the PT input used must be phase A, and
the application software must configure the PT/CT block for single phase
operation.
The application software must configure the PT/CT block for the correct
system frequency 50Hz or 60 Hz, as well as for the correct rotation,
clockwise or counterclockwise.
See the GAP help, for information on application software configuration
variables.
The terminal block screws should be torqued to 8 10 lb-in (0.9038782 -
1.129848 Nm).
Marine Type Approval installations require cabling to be shielded if it leaves
the cabinet. PT wires may be shielded as a single group and the shield may
be conduit or similar.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

AtlasPC
B
31 C
1A
PH A

32

33
1A
PH B

34

35
1A
PH C

36

Load Bus

7
1A
PH A

9
1A
PH B

10

11
1A
PH C

12
VIS-152a
01-4-26

Figure 6-4. Wiring ExampleWye Connected System


(PT Interface wired L-N to the PowerSense Board)

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

AtlasPC
B
31 C
1A
PH A

32

33
1A
PH B

34

35
1A
PH C

36

Load Bus

7
1A
PH A

9
1A
PH B

10

11
1A
PH C

12

VIS-152b
01-4-26

Figure 6-5. Wiring ExampleWye Connected System


(wired L-N to PowerSense with potential transformers used to step the voltage
down to a level within the capability of the PowerSense inputs)

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

AtlasPC
B
31 C

1A
PH A

32

33
1A
PH B

34

35
1A
PH C

36

Load Bus

7
1A
PH A

9
1A
PH B

10

11 1A

PH C

12

VIS-152c
01-4-26

Figure 6-6. Example WiringWye Connected System


(wired L-L to PowerSense with potential transformers used to step the voltage
down to a level within the capability of the PowerSense inputs; the ground on the
b-phase input is optional.)

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

AtlasPC
B C

31
1A
PH A

32

33
1A
PH B

34

35
1A
PH C

36

Load Bus

7
1A
PH A

9
1A
PH B

10

11
1A
PH C

12 VIS-152d
01-4-26

Figure 6-7. Wiring ExampleDelta Connected System


(PT Interface wired L-L to the PowerSense Board)

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

AtlasPC
B C

31
1A
PH A

32

33
1A
PH B

34

35
1A
PH C

36

Load Bus

7
1A
PH A

9
1A
PH B

10

11 1A

PH C
VIS-152-e
12 01-4-26

Figure 6-8. Wiring ExampleDelta Connected System


(wired L-L to PowerSense with potential transformers used to step the voltage
down to a level within the capability of the PowerSense inputs; the ground on the
B-phase input is optional.)

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Generator Current Inputs


The CT inputs are designed to sense three phase current inputs. The A phase
current inputs of each set are used for phase calculations. The fundamental
magnitude and phase information is calculated, in addition to the magnitude and
phase of each harmonic. All harmonics are calculated, up to the 7th harmonic, as
well as the 9th, 11th, and 13th harmonics. In addition the CT current inputs are
used in conjunction with the PT voltage inputs for load calculation purposes. All
current calculations implement algorithms in accordance with IEEE 1459-2000.

Individual fundamental and harmonic CT inputs are provided. A negative phase


sequence current input and a THD current input are also provided.

The CT inputs are rated at 5A and function down to 50 mA. For optimum
accuracy in the usable range, it is recommended to use 5 A secondary CTs with
PowerSense (not 1A secondary CTs). Take care to avoid secondary currents
greater than 7 Arms, as this will cause damage.

CT ratio and gain inputs are provided, to allow field configuration of the CT
scaling. The CT ratio will scale all three CT inputs by the same ratio. There is a
separate gain input provided for each CT input (3 for the generator and 3 for the
mains) that is provided to allow for compensation of current transformer turns
ratio inaccuracies.

The CT inputs have adjustable software filters. All CT inputs are updated every 3
cycles. With an input of 60 Hz, this equates to 50 ms.

The hardware does not require three phases for current calculations, the
application can configure the module for single phase, and all functionality will be
modified accordingly. The single phase input that must be provided is the A
phase. The application can also configure the module for a Y or delta line
configuration, and the calculations will compensate appropriately. If the physical
connections are to a wye connected generator or load, the input to PowerSense
should also be wye connected (line-to-neutral). If the physical connections are to
a Delta connected generator or load (no neutral present), the input to
PowerSense should also be Delta connected (line-to-line). ). The Y or delta
configuration applies to the entire set of PT and CTs, it is not possible to
configure the PTs for Y, and the CTs for delta, or vice versa. However, the
configuration (line type and single or three-phase) may differ between PT/CT 1
and PT/CT 2 (gen and mains in most systems).

HIGH VOLTAGEBefore disconnecting the secondary terminals of


the current transformer or the connections of the current transformer
at the control, ensure that the transformer is short-circuited.

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figures 6-9 and 6-10 for CT wiring.
When using only one CT, rather than 3, the CT must be phase A, and the
application software must configure the PT/CT block for single phase operation.
The application software must configure the PT/CT block for the correct
system frequency 50 Hz, or 60 Hz, as well as for the correct rotation,
clockwise or counterclockwise.
See the GAP help, for information on application software configuration variables.
The terminal block screws should be torqued to 810 lb-in (0.91.1 Nm).
Marine Type Approval installations require cabling to be shielded if it leaves
the cabinet. CT wires may be shielded as a group and the shield may be
conduit or similar.

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Power Calculations
Individual and total watts, VARs, VA, and power factor inputs. A negative phase
sequence voltage input and a THD voltage input are also provided.

All power calculations implement algorithms in accordance with IEEE 1459-2000.

The power inputs have adjustable software filters. All power inputs are updated
every 3 cycles. With an input of 60 Hz, this equates to 50 ms.

The hardware does not require three phases for load calculations, the application
can configure the module for single phase, and all functionality will be modified
accordingly. The single phase input that must be provided is the A phase. The
application can also configure the module for a Y or delta line configuration,
and the calculations will compensate appropriately. If the physical connections
are to a wye connected generator or load, the input to PowerSense should also
be wye connected (line-to-neutral). If the physical connections are to a Delta
connected generator or load (no neutral present), the input to PowerSense
should also be Delta connected (line-to-line). The Y or delta configuration
applies to the entire set of PT and CTs, it is not possible to configure the PTs for
Y, and the CTs for delta, or vice versa.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

AtlasPC
B
C
25

PH A

26

27

PH B

28

29

PH C

30

Load Bus

PH A

PH B

PH C

VIS-152f
01-4-26

CT grounds optional

Figure 6-9. Wiring ExampleCT Interface to the PowerSense Board

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AtlasPC
B C

25

PH A

26

27

PH B

28

29

PH C

30

Load Bus

PH A

PH B

PH C

VIS-152g
01-4-26

CT grounds optional

Figure 6-10. Wiring ExampleCT Interface to the PowerSense Board

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Speed Bias Output


The Speed Bias output is configurable for 420 mA with a full scale range of 0
24 mA, or as a 3 V, 05 V, or PWM voltage output. When used as a PWM
output, the PWM frequency is 500 Hz. Configuring the output requires wiring and
application software configuration. This output is isolated from the rest of the
control system, to prevent ground loops when connecting the PowerSense board
to other controls.

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figures 6-11 and 6-12 for Speed Bias Output wiring. Wires must be
shielded.
The Speed Bias output must be configured for the correct type, 420 mA or
the voltage type in the application software.
See the specifications section for the maximum output load.
The output does not contain fault detection. If it is necessary to detect
failures, then the device that is driven by the analog output, for example an
actuator driver, must contain reference failure detection.
The output cannot be used as a voltage output and a current output at the
same time.

Atlas
19

+15 Vdc
(isol) 20

21 +
SC
4-20 mA
interface to
22
speed control

23

24

GND
(isol)

Figure 6-11. Wiring ExampleSpeed Bias Output Interface


(to the PowerSense Board configured for 420 mA)

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Atlas
19

20

21

22

23 +
SC
3, 0-5, PWM
interface to
24
speed control
GND
(isol)

Figure 6-12. Wiring ExampleSpeed Bias Output Interface


(to the PowerSense Board configured for 3 V, 05 V, or PWM)

Voltage Bias Output


The Voltage Bias output is configurable for 4 - 20 mA with a full scale range of 0 -
24 mA, or as a 1, 3V, or 9V voltage output. Configuring the output requires
wiring and application software configuration. This output is isolated from the rest
of the control system to prevent ground loops when connecting the PowerSense
board to other controls. The voltage outputs are configured in the software,
therefore the 9V output has about 3 times better accuracy and resolution than
the 3V output, which has about 3 times better accuracy and resolution than the
1V output.

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figures 6-13 and 6-14 for Voltage Bias Output wiring. Wires must
be shielded.
The Voltage Bias output must be configured for the correct type, 420 mA or
the voltage type, in the application software.
See the specifications section for the maximum output load.
The output does not contain fault detection. If it is necessary to detect
failures, then the device that is driven by the analog output, for example an
actuator driver, must contain reference failure detection.
The output cannot be used as a voltage output and a current output, at the
same time.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Atlas
+15 Vdc
(isol)

13 +
VR
4-20 mA
interface to
14
voltage regulator

15

16

GND
17
(isol)

18

Figure 6-13. Wiring ExampleVoltage Bias Output Interface


(to the PowerSense Board configured for 420 mA)

Atlas
13

14

15 +
VR
1, 3, 9,
16 interface to
voltage regulator
GND
(isol)
17

18

Figure 6-14. Wiring ExampleVoltage Bias Output Interface


(to the PowerSense Board configured for 1 V, 3 V, or 9 V)

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LON Channel
The PowerSense board has one LON channel.

Figure 6-15. Wiring ExampleLON Interface to the PowerSense Board

Configuration Notes
Refer to Figure 6-15 for LON channel wiring. Wire must be shielded.
The LON network must be terminated with load terminating resistors.
The LON channel is DSLC/MSLC and EGCP-3 compatible. It may only be
used with specified Woodward equipment.

Fault Detection (Board Hardware)


Each PowerSense board has a red fault LED that is turned on when the system
is reset. During initialization of a board, which occurs after every CPU reset, the
CPU turns the Fault LED on. The CPU then tests the board using diagnostic
routines built into the software. If the diagnostic test is not passed, the LED
remains on or blinks. Table 6-1 below explains what a blinking LED indicates.
The LED will blink the appropriate number of times, rest for one second, then
blink again in repetition. If the test is successful, the LED goes off. If the fault
LED on a board is illuminated after the diagnostics and initialization have been
completed, the PowerSense board may be faulty or may have the address DIP
switches configured incorrectly. The DIP switch setting must match the module
address set in the GAP application program. It cannot be the same address used
by any other card on the PC/104 bus. These are factory set at the time the
system is built.

Number of LED Flashes Failure


Off No failure, system OK
Solid Module in initialization mode
1 Hardware watchdog, CPU clock failure, reset fail
2 Unexpected Exception Error
3 RAM test failure
5 EEPROM failure
7 Kernel Watchdog Timeout
10 System Error
11 Board Identification Error
12 TPU RAM failure
13 Dual Port RAM test failure
14 QSM or ADC Initialization failure
15 Self test status failure
20 Invalid A/D converter selected
21 QSPI timeout
24 ADC auto calibration time-out

Table 6-1. PowerSense Failure Codes

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
Fault Detection (I/O)In addition to detecting board hardware faults, the
application program may detect I/O faults, by comparing values against each
other at specific operating points. For example, if phases A and C are reading
correctly, and phase B is significantly different, the application could annunciate a
problem with phase B.

Microcontroller FaultsThe system monitors a software watchdog, a hardware


watchdog, and a software watchdog on the PC/104 bus communications. All
outputs are shutdown in the event of a microcontroller fault or watchdog
detection.

Troubleshooting Guide
PT Inputs
If a PT input is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Measure the voltage and frequency on the terminal block, to ensure that
they are correct.
Check the wiring. Look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and for
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Check the PT range configuration in the application software, to ensure that
it corresponds to the rated voltage at the input.
Check the system frequency configuration in the application software, to
ensure that 50Hz or 60 Hz is selected, as appropriate.
Check the 3 phase configuration in the application software. In single
phase mode, phases B and C will be set to 0.
Check the A phase signal. B and C phase PTs will not read correctly without
the A phase PT. If the A phase frequency is unstable, B and C readings will
be unstable.
Verify the settings to the PT/CT block in the application software.
Verify the settings for wye or delta (L-N or L-L) match the actual wiring
Verify proper grounding. Incorrect grounding practices may cause
inaccurate voltage readings.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

CT Inputs
If a CT input is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Measure the current and frequency on the terminal block, to ensure that
they are correct.
Check the wiring. If the input is reading 0, look for a shorted connection at
the terminal blocks and for misconnected cables.
Check the system frequency configuration in the application software, to
ensure that 50Hz or 60 Hz is selected, as appropriate.
Check the 3 phase configuration in the application software, in single
phase mode phases B and C will be set to 0.
Check the A phase PT signal, CT phases A, B, and C will not read correctly
without the A phase PT. If the A phase PT frequency is unstable the CT
readings will be unstable.
Verify the settings to the PT/CT block, in the application software.
Verify the settings for wye or delta (L-N or L-L) match the actual wiring
If the CT common is not grounded, try grounding it to eliminate offsets in the
readings. Be sure to ground it in the same location as the other system
grounds following good, accepted grounding practices.

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After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

HIGH VOLTAGEBefore disconnecting the secondary terminals of


the current transformer or the connections of the current transformer
at the control, ensure that the transformer is short-circuited.

Speed and Voltage Bias Outputs


If a speed or voltage output is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check to make sure that the output is wired to the correct terminals, 420
mA connections are different from voltage output connections.
Check that the cable is shielded and the shield is properly grounded per the
shields and grounding section in Chapter 2.
Check the load resistance, ensure that it is less than the specification limit
for the output current.
Check the wiring, look for a loose connection at the terminal blocks and
disconnected or misconnected cables.
Disconnect the field wiring and connect a resistor across the output. If the
output is correct across the resistor, there is a problem with the field wiring.
Check the software configuration to ensure that the output is configured
properly.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

LON Channel
If the LON channel is not functioning properly, verify the following:
Check the network wiring, it should be low capacitance cable.
The cable length should not exceed the maximum allowed cable length.
Check to make sure that termination networks are installed on the ends of
the network.
Check the software configuration.

After verifying all of the above, the Atlas-II should be returned for service.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Chapter 7.
12-Channel Relay Module

General Information

Figure 7-1. 12-Channel Relay Module

The Atlas system has 12 relay drivers on the power supply board. For customers
that do not wish to wire their own discrete relays, Woodward can provide an
integrated 12-channel relay module with cable harness that is certified for use in
ordinary, hazardous, and marine locations.

The module is DIN rail mounted. Approximate dimensions are 254 mm long, 76
mm wide, and 64 mm tall (10 inches long, 3 inches wide, and 2.5 inches tall).

Relay Module, Item Number 5441-699


Cable, Item Number 5417-747

This equipment has been evaluated as EEx nC IIC T3 equipment under DEMKO
Certificate No. 03 ATEX 0328750 U. Each device is suitable for use in Zone 2
explosive atmospheres. Device must be installed in a minimum IP54 enclosure
as defined in IEC60529 and EN60529. This certification applies only to products
bearing the DEMKO identification and the marking:

II 3G.

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Relay Information
Each relay has one set of normally open contacts and one set of normally closed
contacts. The relay contact ratings are:
5 A at 28 Vdc resistive
0.1 A at 125 Vdc resistive
3 A at 120 Vac resistive
2 A at 120 Vac inductive
0.241 hp120 Vac motor
0.112 hp28 Vdc motor
0.5 A at 120 Vac tungsten

Shielding
There is a terminal on the module labeled SHLD. A wire should be connected
between this terminal and a good local system ground. Alternatively, a ground
wire can be crimped to the bare shield wire at the Atlas end of the cable and then
tied to the chassis ground stud of the Atlas. If this shield wire is not used at the
Atlas end of the cable, it should be trimmed back to the insulation jacket of the
cable.

Board Status Lights


The module is equipped with twelve yellow LEDs to indicate when each relay has
been energized, and one green LED to indicate that there is external power to
the module. For proper operation, the green LED must be lit any time the Atlas
system is being used.

Wiring
The relay module requires an external 18 to 32 Vdc power supply and a wiring
harness. One end of this cable has been stripped back several inches, and
individual wires are labeled with the terminal numbers of the appropriate
terminals used on the Atlas power supply board. Refer to the following plant
wiring diagram and the power supply chapter of this manual for more details.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Figure 7-2. 12-Channel Relay Module Wiring Diagram

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Chapter 8.
DLE Serial Communication Board

General Information
The Atlas system can be provided with a DLE serial communications board. The
DLE board has six portsthree RS-422 ports for communication with Honeywell
pressure transducer modules, and three RS-485 ports for use with Woodward LQ
series and EM series drivers. All ports are special purpose and are not designed
for general communication functions.

Refer to manuals 85555 (Smart Pressure Transducer) and 26159 (EM/LQ Digital
Driver) for more information about the transducer and driver modules used with
the board.

For proper operation the end user will need a properly shielded cable, network
terminations, and a program that has been written for their application.

TOP BOTTOM

855-766
02-8-20

Figure 8-1. DLE Connections

Connectors
The connectors used with the DLE board come as part of a connector kit that
ships with each Atlas control. If you are missing the connector kit, contact your
sales representative.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

RS-485 Cables
There are two options for cabling used with the RS-485 ports depending on the
length of the cable run required:
Standard shielded, twisted-pair for cables up to 30 m (100 ft)
0.3 mm (22 AWG) low capacitance (36 pF/m or 11 pF/ft) cable for cables
up to 120 m (400 ft)

The characteristic impedance of any cable selected should be near 120 for
best performance. Refer to your cable manufacturer for more information on
characteristic impedance of cables.

The wiring must be one continuous cable between nodes, and must meet the
requirements of EIA RS-485 for 500 kbps except that Woodward recommends
that the maximum cable lengths be cut in half because typical prime mover
installations have high levels of electrical interference.

RS-422 Cables
Use 20 AWG low capacitance cable such as Belden 89207A up to 150 m (500
ft). The characteristic impedance of any cable selected should be near 120 .

Many customers are used to thinking of RS-422 and RS-485 as two-


wire networks with shield, but the transceivers used on this board
require a third signal common wire to ensure best performance in
noisy environments. Please be sure to allow for this when ordering
cable.

Termination
To achieve best performance with serial communication networks, it is necessary
to terminate the network to prevent interference caused by signal reflections. For
this reason, all ports on the DLE board are equipped with built-in network
termination resistors.

Customers using the pressure transducer ports (RS-422) and the driver ports
(RS-485) will be communicating with a single device, so the termination resistors
will always need to be installed on each operating port.

Figure 8-2. Terminator Locations

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
The termination resistors are connected by inserting jumper wires on the external
plug in connectors. Jumper the following pins to connect the termination resistors
as needed on the ports that you are using.

Comm Port # Connect Pins


1 7 to 8 and 9 to 10
2 17 to 18 and 19 to 20
3 27 to 28 and 29 to 30
4 52 to 54 and 51 to 53
5 42 to 44 and 41 to 43
6 32 to 34 and 31 to 33

Shielding
Shielded cable is required between the Atlas-II and any other devices.
Unshielded cables and improperly shielded cables will very likely lead to
communication problems and unreliable control operation.

The shield must always be AC-coupled (connected through a capacitor) at one


end and connected directly to earth on the opposite end for proper operation.
The DLE board has been constructed so that the Shield/Drain connection can be
either AC-coupled or directly connected to the Atlas chassis ground which must
be tied to earth. Devices connected to the opposite end of the cable must provide
for the opposite shield connection. For instance, if the AC-coupled connection is
used on the DLE, the other end of the shield must be connected directly to earth.

Board Status Lights


The board is equipped with two LEDs labeled H and D to provide feedback from
the board. The LED labeled H indicates operation of the Honeywell portion of the
board, and LED labeled D indicates operation of the driver side of the board.
During normal operation, the LEDs will light as soon as power is applied and will
eventually turn off as the application starts running. This can take up to four
minutes, depending upon the size of the application. If the board fails its own self
test or failures are detected during normal operation, the LEDs will flash in
particular coded patterns which will repeat periodically.

LED and
Number of
Flashes Failure
H1 RAM test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
H2 exception error
H3 dual port test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
H4 watchdog timeout
H7 kernel watchdog timeout
D1 RAM test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
D2 exception error
D3 dual port test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
D3 module watchdog timeout
D7 kernel watchdog timeout

Table 8-1. DLE Failure Codes

Some users may not use both the RS-422 and RS-485 ports in their
application. In this case, one LED will stay on all the time. This only
signifies that one side of the board is not being used. It is not a
failure unless a flash code appears.

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Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Application Developer Information

Many end users will be purchasing pre-programmed Atlas units and


will not need the information in this section. The information below is
aimed at programmers using the GAP programming tool provided by
Woodward.

Application developers must use version 3.04 or later of the GAP


programming tool when using a DLE board.

DLE Address Configuration


The DLE serial communications board is always configured to use address 10 in
Atlas systems. This is done because this board is a 16-bit board (versus 8-bit for
everything else) and it consumes two address spaces in the stack. To simplify
things, the board is factory-configured to be at address 10 to avoid address
conflicts with other boards, and there are warnings enabled in the coder in the
event that someone accidentally sets it incorrectly.

Driver Limitations
Each driver port (RS-485) can support only a single driver. The LM and EQ
series drivers have been built so that they can complete a communications
transaction in 5 milliseconds.

Woodward 99
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Chapter 9.
PC104 Profibus Interface

Introduction
This chapter has been divided into two sections, Hardware for End Users, and
Software for Application Developers. The hardware section is aimed at
customers that are applying the Atlas-II in a permanent installation. The
software section is for customers that are developing software for the Atlas-II
control.

Profibus Software and Hardware Requirements


Atlas-II with Profibus Module
Profibus Master Configuration Tool
Profibus Diagnostic Utilities
Profibus slave device GSD file(s)
GAP Programming Tool 4.04 or later
Profibus Cables and Connectors
Slave Interface and Modules
Device Memory Maps and Scaling (Manuals)
Woodward Interface Tools

Hardware for End Users


Profibus Module
The Profibus hardware module used on the Atlas-II control system is a PC/104
form factor ApplicomIO PC104-DPIO board, equipped with one Profibus port,
capable of handling Profibus-DP (Distributed Peripherals) protocol in both Master
(Class1, Class2) and Slave modes up to 12Mbps. This module operates on the
PC104 bus and has a PC104 pass through connector to allow use with multiple
PC104 modules depending on the Atlas configuration.

Electrical and Technical Specifications


Processor: Intel 80386EX, 24 MHz
Memory: 4 Mbyte DRAM, 512 K flash memory
Network Speeds Supported: 9600 kbps to 12 Mbps
Interface: RS-485 with 500 Vdc galvanic isolation
Interface Connector: Isolated DB9F I/O connector
Power: 4.0 W max (3.75 W typical)

100 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Interface Cables and Connectors


The Profibus network is a balanced transmission line corresponding to the
standard EIA RS-485, terminated at both ends. The Profibus standard EN50170
defines two variations of the bus cable for Profibus-FMS and Profibus-DP.
Profibus Type A cable is preferred and recommended for all uses.
Type Arecommended for high transmission speeds (> 500 kBaud) and
permits doubling of the network distance in comparison to Type B.
Type Bshould only be used at low baud rates and low requirements on
the network distances.

Impedance: 135 up to 165 at a frequency of 3 to 20 MHz


Cable capacitance: < 30 pF/m
Core diameter: > 0.34 mm, corresponds to 22 AWG
Cable type: twisted pair cable. 1x2 or 2x2 or 1x4 lines
Resistance: < 110 /km
Signal attenuation: max. 9 dB over total length of line section
Shielding: CU shielding braid or shielding braid and foil

Table 9-1. ProfibusType A Cable

Impedance: 135 up to 165 at a frequency of > 100 kHz


Cable capacitance: typ. < 60 pF/m
Core diameter: > 0.22 mm, corresponds to 24 AWG
Cable type: twisted pair cable. 1x2 or 2x2 or 1x4 lines
Signal attenuation: max. 9 dB over total length of line section
Shielding: CU shielding braid or shielding braid and foil

Table 9-2. ProfibusType B Cable

Recommended Bulk Cable


Cable manufacturer Belden is widely available in North America, and Siemens is
available in Europe. These manufacturers are listed in the table below. Neither
manufacturer has any exclusive rights to Profibus cable, and other suitable
alternatives are available from other manufacturers. Both cables below are rated
as suitable for Profibus cabling and may also be used for drop cabling.
Alternative cables may not use the same color coding on the individual
conductors.

Manufacturer Part Number Website


Belden 3079A Profibus Cable www.belden.com
Siemens Profibus-DP, STD, 6XV1830- www.ad.siemens.de/simatic
0EH10

Woodward 101
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
The cable specification below is provided for convenience and is typical for the
Profibus industry.

Belden 3079A Profibus


Cable

Weight: 57 lbs/1,000 ft (~85 kg/1000 m)


Ratings: NEC PLTC CL2 CMG CEC CMG
Conductor: #22 AWG solid high conductivity Cu (~0.3 mm)
Insulation: Cellular Polyethylene
Tested: 300 MHz
Nom. O.D.: 0.315" (8.00 mm)

Shield: Beldfoil , 100% coverage
Jacket: Purple or Gray, PVC, optional blue intrinsically safe
Impedance: 150
Velocity Of Prop. : 78% (nom.)
Mutual Capacitance: 9.0pF/ft (nom.) (~30 pF/m)
Attenuation: 0.27 dB/100 ft @ 0.2 MHz (~0.89 dB/100 m)
0.67 dB/100 ft @ 4.0 MHz (~2.20 dB/100 m)
1.37 dB/100 ft @ 16.0 MHz (~4.49 dB/100 m)
3.75 dB/100 ft @ 100 MHz (~12.30 dB/100 m)
6.52 dB/100 ft @ 300 MHz (~21.39 dB/100 m)
Standard Lengths: 1000, 2000, and 3600 ft (~305, 610, and 1097 m)

Table 9-3. Belden Profibus Cable

Profibus Cable Connectors


The typical Profibus cable connector is a sub-D 9-pin male connector. The
following products are provided for reference.

Recommended Connector
Manufacturer Part Number Website
Siemens Bus Connector 6ES7 972-0BA11-0XA0 www.ad.siemens.de/simatic

Alternate Connectors
Manufacturer Part Number Website
ERNI Erbic PROFIBUS Connectors www.erni.com
Siemens Bus Connector 6GK1500-0EA02 www.ad.siemens.de/simatic
Phoenix Contact SUBCON Profibus Connector2744348 www.phoenixcon.com

Profibus Connector Specifications


The following connectors are typical for Profibus and are provided for reference.

Name: Bus Connector www.ad.siemens.de/simatic


Mfr: Siemens
P/N: 6ES7 972-0BA11-0XA0
Connector: DB9M
Transmission Rate: 12 Mbits/s
Shielding: Plastic case with internal shld clamp
Bus Termination: Terminating resistor slide switch
Cable Ports: (2) for daisy chain use, 90 exit
Cable Connection: 4 Internal screw terminal blocks
Dim (WxHxD): 15.8 mm x 54 mm x 34 mm

Table 9-4. ProfibusSiemens RS-485 Bus Connector / Plastic

102 Woodward
Manual 26
6415 Atlas-II Digital
D Contro
ol
Name: Bus Connecttor ww
ww.ad.siemens..de/simatic
Mfr: Siemens
P/N: 6GK1500-0EA A02
Connector: DB9M
Transmission Rate: 12 Mbits/s
Shielding: Metal case witth internal shldd clamp
Bus Termination: Terminating re esistor slide sw
witch
Cable
C Ports: (2) for daisy chain use
Cable Connection:
C ew terminal blo
4 Internal scre ocks
Dim
m (WxHxD): 15 mm x 57 mm m x 39 mm

Table
e 9-5. ProfibusSiemens RS-485
R Bus Connector
C / Metal
M

Prrofibus Conn
nector Pinout

Connec
ctor Signal Mnemonic
M
DB
B9F Shielded
d DB9 female receptacle
r

1 --
2 --
3 RxD/TxDDP
4 --
5 GND
6 +5 V
7 --
8 RxD/TxDDN
9 --
Shell / Shield Chassis / Earth Ground
d

Tab
ble 9-6. I/O Co
onnector Pino
out

Prrofibus Ne
etwork Con
nstruction
Prrofibus networks, in some installations,
i onstructed over large
have been co
dis
stances and may
m even go between two or more build dings. The Prrofibus
ne
etwork is speccified/intended
d to have a lo
ow impedancee galvanic connnection of
ca
able shield gro
ounds at each h device and across the ne
etwork, counter to this.

Duue to the galvvanic shield coonnection, if the


t Profibus network
n is dessigned longerr
tha
an 30 m (99 feet),
f there may be substantial potentiall differences between
b the
gro
ound referencce connection ns at each ennd. This affectt is especiallyy apparent
du
uring lightningg strikes to ea
arth near one end of a longg network, beccause shieldss
are
e referenced to earth ground.

Woodward
d 10
03
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
Isolators must be used if the network is NOT a local, relatively short (>30 m)
network shields connected to the same reference by low impedance galvanic
connections. Isolators must be placed between sections of the network further
than 30 m apart. Isolators must provide galvanic isolation to the signals, shield,
and reference connections. This prevents potentially substantial equalizing
currents from flowing in the cable shields and reference signal wires. Equalizing
currents can (and will) disrupt communications or in extreme cases cause
equipment damage. (All though isolated, cable shields should be connected
across the isolator via an AC connection (capacitor) to maintain RF shielding
effectiveness. Typically 0.001 to 0.1 F capacitors rated at 500 2000 V, may be
used depending on the application and these capacitors are often built into the
isolator.)

Profibus Slave Hardware


The Atlas-II control system can control Profibus slave modules from many
different manufacturers. With the exception of Woodward-manufactured devices,
Woodward makes no expressed or implied statement of suitability of these
devices. It is the users responsibility to ensure EMC compliance of their system,
if necessary, by using distributed modules that are CE compliant. The following
Profibus slave hardware has been tested with the Atlas-II control to confirm
functionality only.

1) All Woodward devices designed for Profibus

2) Allen-Bradley Flex I/O

Part Number Description


3170-PDP I/O Network Interface for Profibus (Slave) (ProSoft Technologies)
1794-IB16 Discrete Input (Sink)
1794-OV16 Discrete Output (Sink)
1794-OW8 Discrete Output (Relay)
1794-IE8/B Analog Input (Current)
1794-OE4/B Analog Output (Current)
1794-IT8 Thermocouple Input
1794-CJC2 Cold Junction
1794-IR8 RTD Input
1794-TB3S Terminal Base
1794-TB3TS Terminal Base

104 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
3) Automation Direct Terminator I/O

Part Number Description


T1K-01AC Power Supply
T1K-01DC Power Supply
T1H-PBC Profibus Interface
T1K-08ND3 Discrete Input (Sink)
T1K-16ND3 Discrete Input (Sink)
T1K-16TD1 Discrete Output
T1K-08TRS Discrete Output (Relay)
T1F-16AD-1 Analog Input (Current)
T1F-16DA-1 Analog Output (Current)
T1F-14THM Thermocouple Input
T1K-08B-1 Terminal Base
T1K-16B-1 Terminal Base

Software for Application Developers

It is possible to disrupt an existing Profibus network by attaching an


improperly configured device. To prevent problems on your existing
Profibus network, read this chapter before connecting the Atlas-II
Profibus port to a network.

Many end users will be purchasing pre-programmed Atlas-II units


and will not need the information in this section. The information
below is aimed at programmers using the GAP programming tool
provided by Woodward. The information provided here covers the
basics. For more detail, refer to Woodward software manual 26336,
Woodward VxWorks Real Time Operating System.

The information in this section is intended for customers that create their own
GAP programs for the Atlas-II platform and who are using a Profibus network.

Programmers will need the following:


ApplicomIO configuration software CD-ROM (supplied with the Atlas-II
control)
GSD file(s) for slave module(s)
Device memory maps and scaling (manuals)
GAP Programming Tool 4.04 or later to create the application (This can
be downloaded from our website: www.woodward.com/software)
For more information on these and additional software tools mentioned in
this chapter, see Woodward software manual 26336 (VxWorks RTOS).

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Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415
The Atlas-II control is configured to communicate with a Profibus network by
performing the following steps:

1. Verify that the Atlas contains a Profibus module.


2. Determine slave and I/O modules to be used.
3. Determine order of I/O modules.
4. Obtain GSD file(s).
5. Create Profibus Configuration using the Profibus Configuration Tool.
6. Review the Profibus slave manuals and understand the hardware
addressing.
7. Create GAP application that reads and writes to the Profibus I/O.
8. Transfer Configuration files and GAP application to Atlas-II control.
9. Start GAP application.

Profibus Software Configuration (Configuration)


The Profibus network is configured using a Profibus Configuration Tool provided
on CD-ROM with the Atlas-II control (ApplicomIO 2.2 Console). This tool
supports defining the Atlas-II Profibus board as a master or slave device. For
master operation, the slave devices are defined and configured by importing their
GSD files and assigning network addresses. Once the Profibus I/O configuration
is completed, it must be downloaded to the Atlas-II control and stored with the
GAP application.

106 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Chapter 10.
Service Options

Product Service Options


If you are experiencing problems with the installation, or unsatisfactory
performance of a Woodward product, the following options are available:
Consult the troubleshooting guide in the manual.
Contact the manufacturer or packager of your system.
Contact the Woodward Full Service Distributor serving your area.
Contact Woodward technical assistance (see How to Contact Woodward
later in this chapter) and discuss your problem. In many cases, your
problem can be resolved over the phone. If not, you can select which course
of action to pursue based on the available services listed in this chapter.

OEM and Packager Support: Many Woodward controls and control devices are
installed into the equipment system and programmed by an Original Equipment
Manufacturer (OEM) or Equipment Packager at their factory. In some cases, the
programming is password-protected by the OEM or packager, and they are the best
source for product service and support. Warranty service for Woodward products
shipped with an equipment system should also be handled through the OEM or
Packager. Please review your equipment system documentation for details.

Woodward Business Partner Support: Woodward works with and supports a


global network of independent business partners whose mission is to serve the
users of Woodward controls, as described here:
A Full Service Distributor has the primary responsibility for sales, service,
system integration solutions, technical desk support, and aftermarket
marketing of standard Woodward products within a specific geographic area
and market segment.
An Authorized Independent Service Facility (AISF) provides authorized
service that includes repairs, repair parts, and warranty service on Woodward's
behalf. Service (not new unit sales) is an AISF's primary mission.
A Recognized Engine Retrofitter (RER) is an independent company that
does retrofits and upgrades on reciprocating gas engines and dual-fuel
conversions, and can provide the full line of Woodward systems and
components for the retrofits and overhauls, emission compliance upgrades,
long term service contracts, emergency repairs, etc.
A Recognized Turbine Retrofitter (RTR) is an independent company that
does both steam and gas turbine control retrofits and upgrades globally, and
can provide the full line of Woodward systems and components for the
retrofits and overhauls, long term service contracts, emergency repairs, etc.

A current list of Woodward Business Partners is available at


www.woodward.com/support/directory.cfm.

Woodward 107
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Woodward Factory Servicing Options


The following factory options for servicing Woodward products are available
through your local Full-Service Distributor or the OEM or Packager of the
equipment system, based on the standard Woodward Product and Service
Warranty (5-01-1205) that is in effect at the time the product is originally shipped
from Woodward or a service is performed:
Replacement/Exchange (24-hour service)
Flat Rate Repair
Flat Rate Remanufacture

Replacement/Exchange: Replacement/Exchange is a premium program


designed for the user who is in need of immediate service. It allows you to
request and receive a like-new replacement unit in minimum time (usually within
24 hours of the request), providing a suitable unit is available at the time of the
request, thereby minimizing costly downtime. This is a flat-rate program and
includes the full standard Woodward product warranty (Woodward Product and
Service Warranty 5-01-1205).

This option allows you to call your Full-Service Distributor in the event of an
unexpected outage, or in advance of a scheduled outage, to request a
replacement control unit. If the unit is available at the time of the call, it can
usually be shipped out within 24 hours. You replace your field control unit with
the like-new replacement and return the field unit to the Full-Service Distributor.

Charges for the Replacement/Exchange service are based on a flat rate plus
shipping expenses. You are invoiced the flat rate replacement/exchange charge
plus a core charge at the time the replacement unit is shipped. If the core (field
unit) is returned within 60 days, a credit for the core charge will be issued.

Flat Rate Repair: Flat Rate Repair is available for the majority of standard
products in the field. This program offers you repair service for your products with
the advantage of knowing in advance what the cost will be. All repair work carries
the standard Woodward service warranty (Woodward Product and Service
Warranty 5-01-1205) on replaced parts and labor.

Flat Rate Remanufacture: Flat Rate Remanufacture is very similar to the Flat
Rate Repair option with the exception that the unit will be returned to you in like-
new condition and carry with it the full standard Woodward product warranty
(Woodward Product and Service Warranty 5-01-1205). This option is applicable
to mechanical products only.

Returning Equipment for Repair


If a control (or any part of an electronic control) is to be returned for repair,
please contact your Full-Service Distributor in advance to obtain Return
Authorization and shipping instructions.

When shipping the item(s), attach a tag with the following information:
return authorization number;
name and location where the control is installed;
name and phone number of contact person;
complete Woodward part number(s) and serial number(s);
description of the problem;
instructions describing the desired type of repair.

108 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Packing a Control
Use the following materials when returning a complete control:
protective caps on any connectors;
antistatic protective bags on all electronic modules;
packing materials that will not damage the surface of the unit;
at least 100 mm (4 inches) of tightly packed, industry-approved packing
material;
a packing carton with double walls;
a strong tape around the outside of the carton for increased strength.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper


handling, read and observe the precautions in Woodward manual
82715, Guide for Handling and Protection of Electronic Controls,
Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

Replacement Parts
When ordering replacement parts for controls, include the following information:
the part number(s) (XXXX-XXXX) that is on the enclosure nameplate;
the unit serial number, which is also on the nameplate.

Engineering Services
Woodward offers various Engineering Services for our products. For these services,
you can contact us by telephone, by email, or through the Woodward website.
Technical Support
Product Training
Field Service

Technical Support is available from your equipment system supplier, your local Full-
Service Distributor, or from many of Woodwards worldwide locations, depending
upon the product and application. This service can assist you with technical
questions or problem solving during the normal business hours of the Woodward
location you contact. Emergency assistance is also available during non-business
hours by phoning Woodward and stating the urgency of your problem.

Product Training is available as standard classes at many of our worldwide


locations. We also offer customized classes, which can be tailored to your needs
and can be held at one of our locations or at your site. This training, conducted
by experienced personnel, will assure that you will be able to maintain system
reliability and availability.

Field Service engineering on-site support is available, depending on the product


and location, from many of our worldwide locations or from one of our Full-
Service Distributors. The field engineers are experienced both on Woodward
products as well as on much of the non-Woodward equipment with which our
products interface.

For information on these services, please contact us via telephone, email us, or
use our website: www.woodward.com/support.

Woodward 109
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

How to Contact Woodward


For assistance, call one of the following Woodward facilities to obtain the address
and phone number of the facility nearest your location where you will be able to
get information and service.

Electrical Power Systems Engine Systems Turbine Systems


Facility---------------- Phone Number Facility---------------- Phone Number Facility---------------- Phone Number
Brazil ------------- +55 (19) 3708 4800 Brazil ------------- +55 (19) 3708 4800 Brazil ------------- +55 (19) 3708 4800
China ----------- +86 (512) 6762 6727 China ----------- +86 (512) 6762 6727 China ----------- +86 (512) 6762 6727
Germany: Germany: India --------------- +91 (129) 4097100
Kempen ---- +49 (0) 21 52 14 51 Stuttgart----- +49 (711) 78954-0 Japan -------------- +81 (43) 213-2191
Stuttgart----- +49 (711) 78954-0 India --------------- +91 (129) 4097100 Korea -------------- +82 (51) 636-7080
India --------------- +91 (129) 4097100 Japan -------------- +81 (43) 213-2191 The Netherlands - +31 (23) 5661111
Japan -------------- +81 (43) 213-2191 Korea -------------- +82 (51) 636-7080 Poland--------------- +48 12 295 13 00
Korea -------------- +82 (51) 636-7080 The Netherlands - +31 (23) 5661111 United States ---- +1 (970) 482-5811
Poland--------------- +48 12 295 13 00 United States ---- +1 (970) 482-5811
United States ---- +1 (970) 482-5811

You can also contact the Woodward Customer Service Department or consult our
worldwide directory (www.woodward.com/support/directory.cfm) for the name
of your nearest Woodward distributor or service facility.

Technical Assistance
If you need to telephone for technical assistance, you will need to provide the following information.
Please write it down here before phoning:

Your Name
Site Location
Phone Number
Fax Number
Engine/Turbine Model Number
Manufacturer
Number of Cylinders (if applicable)
Type of Fuel (gas, gaseous, steam, etc)
Rating
Application
Control/Governor #1
Woodward Part Number & Rev. Letter
Control Description or Governor Type
Serial Number
Control/Governor #2
Woodward Part Number & Rev. Letter
Control Description or Governor Type
Serial Number
Control/Governor #3
Woodward Part Number & Rev. Letter
Control Description or Governor Type
Serial Number

If you have an electronic or programmable control, please have the adjustment setting positions or
the menu settings written down and with you at the time of the call.

110 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Appendix A.
Acronyms and Glossary of Terms

Acronyms
ADC Analog-to-Digital Converter
AWG American Wire Gauge (metric equivalent is mm)
CE The CE marking is a European proof of conformity and is also
described as "passport" that allows manufacturers and exporters
to circulate products freely within the EU. The letters "CE"
(French for "Conformit Europenne") indicate that the
manufacturer has satisfied all assessment procedures specified
by law for its product.
CPU Central Processing Unit. Executes the GAP application program.
CT Current Transformer. Used to measure the generator or bus
current.
dc Direct Current
EEPROM Electrically Erasable and Programmable Read Only Memory
EMC Electromagnetic Conformity
EMI Electromagnetic Interference
GAP Graphical Application Program
I/O Input/Output
LED Light Emitting Diode
LON Local Operating Network
MFT Minor Frame Timer. Used by the CPU for scheduling execution
of the software.
MPU Magnetic Pick-Up
MTBF Mean Time Between Failures
PC Personal Computer
PCB Printed Circuit Board
PT Potential Transformer. Used to measure the generator or bus
voltage.
PWM Pulse Width Modulated
RAM Random Access Memory
RG Rate Group. Defines how often software is executed.
RTD Resistance Temperature Device
RXD Receive Data Line
SRAM Static Random Access Memory
SSTP Shielded-Shielded Twisted Pair (or Double Shielded Ethernet
Cables)
THD Total Harmonic Distortion
TXD Transmit Data Line
V/I Voltage-to-Current converter

Woodward 111
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Glossary of Terms
Analog InputA 420 mA or 05 V input on the SmartCore CPU A5200 board,
and a thermocouple, RTD or 420 mA input on the Analog Combo board.
Analog OutputA 420 mA output, usually the full range is 024 mA.
Atlas-II Analog Combo boardAn Atlas-II board with an analog format that
connects to the Atlas-II SmartCore CPU A5200 board or PowerNet board,
through the PC/104 interface. It contains 15 analog inputs, 2 speed sensor
inputs, and 2 Analog outputs.
Atlas-II ChassisA combination of pieces required to hold the boards together,
and may optionally include a keyboard and display.
Atlas-II Pentium CPU boardAn Atlas-II board with a Pentium processor, for
applications with a single Ethernet connection.
Atlas-II PlatformThe combination of boards, a power supply, and a chassis,
that can be combined to compose a variety of controls for a variety of
applications. The boards must have either a PC/104 connection, or a
proprietary power bus connection, and meet certain packaging constraints.
Atlas-II Power Supply boardAn Atlas-II board with primary power supply and
12 discrete outputs.
Atlas-II SmartCore CPU A5200 boardAn Atlas-II board with 6 analog inputs,
4 analog outputs, 2 actuator outs, 2 speed sensor inputs, 24 discrete inputs,
4 ethernet, 2 can, and 2 serial communication ports. This board includes
both the PC/104 and the power bus connections, allowing it to function as a
backplane.
BackplaneA board that ties other boards together electrically. Atlas-II needs
either the SmartCore CPU A5200 board, or the PowerNet board, to connect
the power bus voltages to the PC/104 bus.
Discrete InputAn input used for switches or other contacts, that registers only
two states, open or closed.
Discrete OutputOutput drivers used for driving relays that register only two
states, high or low.
Serial PortA connection for RS-232, RS-422, or RS-485.
Speed Sensor InputAn MPU or proximity probe input on the SmartCore CPU
A5200 board, and a MPU only input on the Analog Combo board.

112 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Appendix B.
Wiring Diagrams

Figure B-1. SmartCore CPU A5200 board Connections

Woodward 113
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

855-740
02-2-22

Figure B-2. Analog Combo Board Connections

114 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

Figure B-3. PowerSense Board Connections

Woodward 115
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Figure B-4. 12-Channel Relay Module Connections

116 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control

TOP BOTTOM

855-766
02-8-20

Figure B-5. DLE Connections

Woodward 117
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Appendix C.
Flash Codes

Failure Flash Code


RAM Test Failure 1, 4
Real Time Clock Test Failure 2, 2
Floating Point Unit Test Failure 2, 3
Flash Test Failure 2, 4
HD1 Flash Test Failure 2, 5
I2C Bus Test Failure 2, 6
Module Installed in wrong slot 2, 7
Main Chassis CPU switch must be set to 0 3,5
Remote RTN Rate Group 5 Slip 3, 7
Remote RTN Rate Group 10 Slip 3, 8
Remote RTN Rate Group 20 Slip 3, 9
Remote RTN Rate Group 40 Slip 3, 10
Remote RTN Rate Group 80 Slip 3, 11
Remote RTN Rate Group 160 Slip 3, 12

Table C-1. SmartCore CPU A5200 Failure Codes

Number of LED Flashes Failure


1 Microprocessor failure
2 Bus, address, any unexpected exception error
5 Failure during EE test or erasing
7 Kernel software Watchdog count error
12 Failure during CPU Internal RAM test
13 Dual port RAM error

Table C-2 Analog Combo Failure Codes

Number of LED Flashes Failure


Off No failure, system OK
Solid Module in initialization mode
1 Hardware watchdog, CPU clock failure, reset fail
2 Unexpected Exception Error
3 RAM test failure
5 EEPROM failure
7 Kernel Watchdog Timeout
10 System Error
11 Board Identification Error
12 TPU RAM failure
13 Dual Port RAM test failure
14 QSM or ADC Initialization failure
15 Self test status failure
20 Invalid A/D converter selected
21 QSPI timeout
24 ADC auto calibration time-out

Table C-3. PowerSense Failure Codes

118 Woodward
Manual 26415 Atlas-II Digital Control
LED and
Number of
Flashes Failure
H1 RAM test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
H2 exception error
H3 dual port test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
H4 watchdog timeout
H7 kernel watchdog timeout
D1 RAM test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
D2 exception error
D3 dual port test fail (this test is done only at boot and application start)
D3 module watchdog timeout
D7 kernel watchdog timeout

Table C-4. DLE Failure Codes

Woodward 119
Atlas-II Digital Control Manual 26415

Appendix D.
Board Addresses

Board address numbers are necessary in GAP to identify the location of each
board. Below are the possible combinations.

Figure D-1. Board Address Numbers

* NOTES

All board addresses are factory configured.

When a DLE board is used, its address will always be 10.

Up to (2) Profibus modules may be used. Profibus communication


board(s) are configured differently and do not have the same type of
board number.

120 Woodward
Declarations
We appreciate your comments about the content of our publications.
Send comments to: icinfo@woodward.com

Please reference publication 26415E.

PO Box 1519, Fort Collins CO 80522-1519, USA


1000 East Drake Road, Fort Collins CO 80525, USA
Phone +1 (970) 482-5811 Fax +1 (970) 498-3058

Email and Websitewww.woodward.com

Woodward has company-owned plants, subsidiaries, and branches,


as well as authorized distributors and other authorized service and sales facilities throughout the world.
Complete address / phone / fax / email information for all locations is available on our website.

2010/12/Colorado
Installation Manual

ECM3
Electronic Fuel Injection Control

Manual 26348 (Revision B)


This is the safety alert symbol. It is used to alert you to potential personal
injury hazards. Obey all safety messages that follow this symbol to avoid
possible injury or death.
DANGERIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death
or serious injury.
DEFINITIONS WARNINGIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
death or serious injury.
CAUTIONIndicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in
minor or moderate injury.
NOTICEIndicates a hazard that could result in property damage only (including
damage to the control).
IMPORTANTDesignates an operating tip or maintenance suggestion.

The engine, turbine, or other type of prime mover should be equipped with an
overspeed shutdown device to protect against runaway or damage to the prime
mover with possible personal injury, loss of life, or property damage.
The overspeed shutdown device must be totally independent of the prime mover
control system. An overtemperature or overpressure shutdown device may also
be needed for safety, as appropriate.

Read this entire manual and all other publications pertaining to the work to be performed before
installing, operating, or servicing this equipment. Practice all plant and safety instructions and
precautions. Failure to follow instructions can cause personal injury and/or property damage.

This publication may have been revised or updated since this copy was produced. To verify that
you have the latest revision, be sure to check the Woodward website:
www.woodward.com/pubs/current.pdf
The revision level is shown at the bottom of the front cover after the publication number. The latest
version of most publications is available at:
www.woodward.com/publications
If your publication is not there, please contact your customer service representative to get the
latest copy.

Any unauthorized modifications to or use of this equipment outside its specified mechanical,
electrical, or other operating limits may cause personal injury and/or property damage, including
damage to the equipment. Any such unauthorized modifications: (i) constitute "misuse" and/or
"negligence" within the meaning of the product warranty thereby excluding warranty coverage
for any resulting damage, and (ii) invalidate product certifications or listings.

To prevent damage to a control system that uses an alternator or battery-charging


device, make sure the charging device is turned off before disconnecting the battery
from the system.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper handling, read


and observe the precautions in Woodward manual 82715, Guide for Handling and
Protection of Electronic Controls, Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

RevisionsText changes are indicated by a black line alongside the text.

Woodward Governor Company reserves the right to update any portion of this publication at any time. Information
provided by Woodward Governor Company is believed to be correct and reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed
by Woodward Governor Company unless otherwise expressly undertaken.
Woodward 2006
All Rights Reserved
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

Contents

REGULATORY COMPLIANCE ........................................................................ V


ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE AWARENESS ................................................ VIII
CHAPTER 1. GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................... 1
Introduction .............................................................................................................1
Input/Output Arrangement ......................................................................................1
Control Specifications .............................................................................................2
CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION.......................................................................... 5
Introduction .............................................................................................................5
Unpacking the Shipping Carton ..............................................................................5
General Installation Notes and Warnings ...............................................................5
On-Engine Mounting...............................................................................................6
Temperature Specifications ....................................................................................7
Electrical Connections ............................................................................................8
Grounding for Protection against Electrical Shock ...............................................10
Grounding for Protection against Electrical Noise ................................................10
ECM3 Wiring Diagrams ........................................................................................13
Input Power ..........................................................................................................17
MPU and Proximity Sensor Inputs .......................................................................20
General Purpose Analog Inputs ...........................................................................25
Engine Sensor Analog Inputs ...............................................................................28
Temperature Sensor Analog Inputs .....................................................................31
Boolean and PWM Inputs .....................................................................................32
Boolean Inputs ......................................................................................................35
Boolean and PWM Outputs ..................................................................................37
Fuel Injection Outputs...........................................................................................41
Serial Communication Ports .................................................................................44
CAN Communication Ports...................................................................................49
CHAPTER 3. SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS ..................................................... 57
Modbus Communication .......................................................................................57
Port Adjustments ..................................................................................................59
CHAPTER 4. PROGRAMMING AND SERVICE TOOLS ..................................... 60
Introduction ...........................................................................................................60
Connecting the ECM3 to a PC .............................................................................61
Loading Woodward Software Tools on the PC ....................................................61
Applying Power to the ECM3 ...............................................................................61
Toolkit Software Instructions ................................................................................61
Watch Window Software Instructions ...................................................................66
Using Watch Window ...........................................................................................71
CHAPTER 5. SPEED AND POSITION SENSING .............................................. 72
Speed Sensing for Fuel Injection .........................................................................72
CHAPTER 6. SERVICE OPTIONS ................................................................. 80
Product Service Options .......................................................................................80
Woodward Factory Servicing Options ..................................................................81
Returning Equipment for Repair ...........................................................................82
Replacement Parts ...............................................................................................82
Engineering Services............................................................................................83
How to Contact Woodward ...................................................................................83
Technical Assistance ............................................................................................84

Woodward i
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

Contents

APPENDIX A. CONNECTOR INFORMATION ...................................................85


Recommended Wire Size and Types ...................................................................86
Wire GaugeAWG to Metric Comparison ...........................................................87
APPENDIX B. COMMISSIONING PROCEDURE ...............................................88
Control I/O Commissioning...................................................................................88
EFI Valve Commissioning ....................................................................................88
APPENDIX C. PROXIMITY SENSORS ............................................................89
Metric Proximity Sensor ........................................................................................90
SAE Proximity Sensor ..........................................................................................90
ECM3 CONTROL SPECIFICATIONS .............................................................92
DECLARATIONS .........................................................................................93

Illustrations and Tables

Figure 1-1. ECM3 Outline Drawing.........................................................................4


Figure 2-1. Vibration Isolator Installation ................................................................6
Figure 2-2. Mounting Hole Layout ..........................................................................8
Figure 2-3. I/O Isolation ........................................................................................12
Figure 2-4. J1 Pinout ............................................................................................14
Figure 2-5. J2 Pinout ............................................................................................15
Figure 2-6. J3 Pinout ............................................................................................16
Figure 2-7. J4 Pinout ............................................................................................16
Figure 2-8. Input Power Wiring Diagram ..............................................................19
Figure 2-9. Duty Cycle ..........................................................................................21
Figure 2-10. MPU Wiring Diagram .......................................................................22
Figure 2-11. MPU Signal Arm and Trigger ...........................................................23
Figure 2-12. MPU Wired Correctly .......................................................................23
Figure 2-13. MPU Wired Incorrectly .....................................................................23
Figure 2-14. Proximity Sensor Wiring Diagram ....................................................24
Figure 2-15. Current Input Wiring Diagram; Loop Powered .................................26
Figure 2-16. Current Input Wiring Diagram; Self-Powered ..................................26
Figure 2-17. Voltage Input Wiring Diagram; Self-Powered ..................................28
Figure 2-18. Engine Sensor Analog Input Wiring Diagram ..................................29
Figure 2-19. Temperature Sensor Analog Input Wiring Diagram .........................32
Figure 2-20. Boolean Usage.................................................................................33
Figure 2-21. PWM Usage .....................................................................................33
Figure 2-22. PWM Input Wiring Diagram .............................................................34
Figure 2-23. Boolean Input Wiring Diagram .........................................................35
Figure 2-24. Sourcing Input Wiring Diagram ........................................................36
Figure 2-25. Sinking Input Wiring Diagram ..........................................................36
Figure 2-26. PWM Output Wiring Diagram for L-series, FCV, Flo-Tech ..............39
Figure 2-27. PWM Output Wiring Diagram for ProAct Digital Plus ......................39
Figure 2-28. PWM Output Wiring Diagram for General Application .....................39
Figure 2-29. PWM Output Wiring Diagram for Linear Actuator ............................40
Figure 2-30. Boolean Output Wiring Diagram ......................................................40
Figure 2-31. Fuel Injection Group Design ............................................................42

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Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

Illustrations and Tables

Figure 2-32. Fuel Injection Output Wiring Diagram ..............................................44


Figure 2-33. RS-232 Wiring Diagram ...................................................................46
Figure 2-34. RS-485 Wiring Diagram ...................................................................49
Figure 2-35. CAN cable cross-section..................................................................51
Figure 2-36. CAN System Wiring Example ..........................................................52
Figure 2-37a. CAN-1 Wiring Diagram ..................................................................54
Figure 2-37b. CAN-1 Wiring DiagramOn and Off Engine .................................55
Figure 2-38a. CAN-2 and CAN-3 Wiring Diagram ...............................................55
Figure 2-38b. CAN-2 and CAN-3 On Engine Enhanced Wiring Diagram ............56
Figure 3-1. ASCII/RTU Representation of 3 .........................................................57
Figure 3-2. Modbus Frame Definition ...................................................................58
Figure 4-1. Connecting the ECM3 to a PC ...........................................................61
Figure 5-1. Sensor Symbol Key ...........................................................................72
Figure 5-2. Pattern 1.............................................................................................73
Figure 5-3. Pattern 4.............................................................................................73
Figure 5-4. Pattern 2.............................................................................................75
Figure 5-5. Pattern 8.............................................................................................76
Figure 5-6. Pattern 3.............................................................................................77
Figure 5-7. Pattern 6.............................................................................................77
Figure 5-8. Pattern 7.............................................................................................78
Figure 5-9. Pattern 9.............................................................................................78
Figure 5-10. Pattern 5...........................................................................................79
Figure C-1. Prox Sensor Schematic .....................................................................89
Figure C-2. Metric Proximity Sensor ....................................................................90
Figure C-3. SAE Proximity Sensor .......................................................................90

Table 1-1. Input/Output Arrangement.....................................................................2


Table 2-1. Wiring Types .........................................................................................9
Table 2-2. Power Input Specifications ..................................................................17
Table 2-3. Input Power Monitor Specifications .....................................................19
Table 2-4. Speed Input Specification ...................................................................20
Table 2-5. Speed Sensor Connections ................................................................22
Table 2-6. Proximity Power Specifications ...........................................................24
Table 2-7. Proximity Probe Power Monitor Specifications ...................................24
Table 2-8. Current Input Specification ..................................................................25
Table 2-9. Current Input Connections ..................................................................27
Table 2-10. Voltage Input Specification................................................................27
Table 2-11. Voltage Input Connections ................................................................28
Table 2-12. Engine Sensor Analog Input Specification ........................................28
Table 2-13. Engine Sensor Analog Input Impedance ..........................................29
Table 2-14. Engine Sensor Analog Input Connections ........................................30
Table 2-15. Transducer Power Specifications......................................................30
Table 2-16. Transducer Power Monitor Specifications ........................................30
Table 2-17. Temperature Input Specification .......................................................31
Table 2-18. Temperature Sensor Analog Input Impedance .................................31
Table 2-19. Temperature Sensor Analog Input Connections ...............................32
Table 2-20. Discrete and PWM Input Specification ..............................................33
Table 2-21. Discrete and PWM Input Connections ..............................................34
Table 2-22. Sourcing Input Specification..............................................................35
Table 2-23. Sinking Input Specification ................................................................36
Table 2-24. Discrete Input Connections ...............................................................37
Table 2-25. Boolean and PWM Outputs Specification .........................................37
Table 2-26. PWM Outputs ....................................................................................38
Table 2-27. PWM Output Connections.................................................................40

Woodward iii
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

Illustrations and Tables

Table 2-28. Discrete Output Connections ............................................................41


Table 2-29. Fuel Injection Outputs Specification ..................................................41
Table 2-30. Fuel Injection Connections ................................................................43
Table 2-31. Boost Supply Monitor Specifications .................................................43
Table 2-32. RS-232 Specification .........................................................................45
Table 2-33. RS-485 Specification .........................................................................47
Table 2-34. Serial Cable Requirements ...............................................................48
Table 2-35. CAN Specification .............................................................................50
Table 2-36. Cable Specification............................................................................51
Table 2-37. CAN-1 Wiring Limitations ..................................................................54
Table 2-38. Engine CAN Connections .................................................................56
Table 3-1. ASCII vs. RTU Modbus .......................................................................57
Table 3-2. Modbus Function Codes .....................................................................58
Table 3-3. Modbus Error Codes ...........................................................................59
Table 3-4. Modbus Communication Port Adjustments .........................................59
Table 5-1. 2-Cycle Sensor Application Options....................................................72
Table 5-2. 4-Cycle Sensor Application Options....................................................74
Table A-1. Wire Sizes ...........................................................................................86
Table A-2. Wire Gauge Comparison ....................................................................87

iv Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

Regulatory Compliance
European Compliance for CE Marking
These listings are limited only to those units bearing the CE Marking.

EMC Directive: Declared to 89/336/EEC COUNCIL DIRECTIVE of 03


May 1989 (with amending directives) on the
approximation of the laws of the Member States relating
to electromagnetic compatibility.

ATEX Potentially Declared to 94/9/EEC COUNCIL DIRECTIVE of 23


March
Explosive 1994 on the approximation of the laws of the Member
Atmospheres States concerning equipment and protective systems
Directive: intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres.
Zone 2, Category 3, Group II G, EEx nA II T4 X

North American Compliance


These listings are limited only to those units bearing the CSA agency
identification.

CSA: CSA Certified for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C &


D, T4 with application-defined temperature limits. For
use in Canada and the United States.
Certificate 1525170

Marine: Lloyds Register of Shipping: LR Type Approval Test


Specification No. 1, 2002 for Environmental Categories
ENV1, ENV2, ENV3, and ENV4

The ECM3 control is certified to the following standards. A compliance mark is


applied to each unit.

Agency Standard Name Mark


Canadian UL508 Industrial Control Equipment
Standards UL1604 Electrical Equipment for Use in Class I, Division 2 CSAUS
Association Hazardous Locations
(CSA) CSA C22.2 No. 142-M1987 Process Control Equipment
CSA C22.2 No. 213-M1987 Non-Incendive Electrical Equipment for Use in Class I, CSAUS
Division 2 Hazardous Locations
ATEX EN 60079-15 Electrical Apparatus for Potentially Explosive CE
AtmospheresType of Protection n
EEC EMC Directive 89/336/EEC
CE
ATEX Directive 94/9/EEC
Marine LR LR Type Approval System Test Specification No. 12002
DNV Standard for Certification No. 2.4Environmental Test
Specification for Instrumentation and Automation
Equipment, 2001

This product is certified as a component for use in other equipment. The final
combination is subject to acceptance by CSA International or local inspection.

The ECM3 is suitable for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D per CSA
for Canada and US or non-hazardous locations only.

The ECM3 is suitable for use in European Zone 2, Group II environments per
self-declaration to EN 60079-15.

Woodward v
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348
Wiring must be in accordance with North American Class I, Division 2 and
European Zone 2 wiring methods as applicable, and in accordance with the
authority having jurisdiction.

Field Wiring must be suitable for at least 105 C. Grounding is required to the
input PE terminal.

Product listings are limited only to those units bearing the CSA or CE logos.

The 8-pin power connector should be used with a PVC boot (Deutsch part
number DT8S-BT) when exposed to direct sunlight.

Special conditions for safe use


The IP rating depends on the proper use of the mating connector. Use this
manual to determine the power and maximum ambient temperature for the
specific application.

The installer of the ECM3 must take responsibility for meeting Sub-Clause
26.3.3.1 of EN60079-15:2003 regarding impact testing. The connectors on the
ECM3 by themselves do meet this requirement and therefore must be sufficiently
protected when installed.

EXPLOSION HAZARDDo not remove covers or connect/disconnect


electrical connectors unless power has been switched off or the area
is known to be non-hazardous.
Substitution of components may impair suitability for Class I,
Division 2.
Do not use any test points on the power supply or control boards
unless the work area these will be used in is known to be a non-
hazardous location.

RISQUE DEXPLOSIONNe pas enlever les couvercles, ni


raccorder / dbrancher les prises lectriques, sans vous en
assurez auparavant que le systme a bien t mis hors
tension; ou que vous vous situez bien dans une zone non
explosive.
Le remplacement de composants peut rendre ce matriel
inacceptable pour des applications de Classe I, Division 2.
Ne pas utiliser aucun points-test de l'alimentation ou des
cartes de controle moins que l'atmosphere soit non
dangereuse.

HIGH VOLTAGEBefore doing any maintenance, always disconnect


power and any hazardous voltages that may be connected, and
follow all appropriate lockout/lockdown procedures.

vi Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

ELECTRIC SHOCKTo reduce the risk of electric shock, Protective


Earth (PE) must be connected to the termination point on the top of
the unit next to the label with the symbol.
The conductor providing the connection must have a properly sized
ring lug and wire gauge larger than or equal to 4 mm (12 AWG). The
ring lug should be placed between the nut and star washer.
The calibration and checkout procedure should only be performed by
authorized personnel. To be authorized personnel, personnel must
be knowledgeable of the risks posed by live electrical equipment.

This unit is not qualified for use in residential installations due to


EMC compliance. It is only allowed in non-residential applications.

Woodward vii
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

Electrostatic Discharge Awareness


All electronic equipment is static-sensitive, some components more than others.
To protect these components from static damage, you must take special
precautions to minimize or eliminate electrostatic discharges.

Follow these precautions when working with or near the control.

1. Before doing maintenance on the electronic control, discharge the static


electricity on your body to ground by touching and holding a grounded metal
object (pipes, cabinets, equipment, etc.).

2. Avoid the build-up of static electricity on your body by not wearing clothing
made of synthetic materials. Wear cotton or cotton-blend materials as much
as possible because these do not store static electric charges as much as
synthetics.

3. Keep plastic, vinyl, and Styrofoam materials (such as plastic or Styrofoam


cups, cup holders, cigarette packages, cellophane wrappers, vinyl books or
folders, plastic bottles, and plastic ash trays) away from the control, the
modules, and the work area as much as possible.

4. Do not remove the printed circuit board (PCB) from the control cabinet
unless absolutely necessary. If you must remove the PCB from the control
cabinet, follow these precautions:

Do not touch any part of the PCB except the edges.

Do not touch the electrical conductors, the connectors, or the


components with conductive devices or with your hands.

When replacing a PCB, keep the new PCB in the plastic antistatic
protective bag it comes in until you are ready to install it. Immediately
after removing the old PCB from the control cabinet, place it in the
antistatic protective bag.

To prevent damage to electronic components caused by improper


handling, read and observe the precautions in Woodward manual
82715, Guide for Handling and Protection of Electronic Controls,
Printed Circuit Boards, and Modules.

viii Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

Chapter 1.
General Information

Introduction

A gas engine should be equipped with equipment to detect and


protect against engine detonation (knocking) to prevent damage to
the prime mover with possible personal injury, loss of life, or
property damage.

This manual describes the installation procedures for the Woodward ECM3
Electronic Fuel Injection Control. The ECM3 provides control of electronic fuel
injection systems for gas, diesel, and dual fuel reciprocating engines.

The ECM3 (depending on GAP program) can perform a number of functions in


addition to fuel injection, but its primary purpose is fuel injection.

Via the use of expanded I/O on the CAN networks, many additional engine
monitoring and protection functions can be provided. Multiple ECM3 units can be
used, networked via CAN, for engines with more than 24 injection outputs to
control.

The ECM3 is designed to be installed directly on the engine. On engine mounting


minimizes wiring cost by minimizing wiring length and the number of junctions.

Input/Output Arrangement
The standard I/O (input/output) for this product is:

Type of Input Quantity Options/Details


DC Power Input
Low Voltage dc input 1 1832 Vdc, protected from reverse polarity

Analog Inputs
Function Configurable Inputs 3 Current (420 mA) or Voltage (05 Vdc)
Sensor Inputs 13 51.1 k Pull Down resistor
Thermistor Inputs 12 1 k Pull Up resistor
MPU / Proximity Speed Sensor 2 1010000 Hz (general purpose use)
106000 Hz (when used as fuel injection
speed input)
Proximity Speed Sensor 1 52000 Hz (when used as fuel injection
TDC or Phase input)

Fuel Injection Outputs


EFI outputs 24 Up to 11 A pull-in current

Discrete Inputs
Configurable Switch or PWM inputs 2 Differential input
Switch or Contact inputs 14 Switch to return pins to activate
Key switch input 1 Switch to B+ to enable operation

Discrete Outputs
Configurable Relay Driver or PWM Outputs 2 Low side drivers, 3 A
Configurable Relay Driver or PWM Outputs 2 Low side drivers, 500 mA
Relay Driver Outputs 8 Low side drivers, 500 mA

Woodward 1
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348
Type of Input Quantity Options/Details

Communication Ports
Serial Ports 2 (1)RS-232, (1)RS-485
CAN Ports 3 (1)Isolated, (2)On-Engine use

Table 1-1. Input/Output Arrangement

Control Specifications
The ECM3 I/O accuracies and environmental specifications are listed inside the
back cover of this installation manual.

Control CPU
The ECM3 control uses a GAP programmable processing core that provides all
the necessary functions in a single CPU. The below listed specifications give
some insight to the processor capability relative to other Woodward controls.

Processor type Motorola MPC565


Clock frequency 56 MHz
Math support Floating point CPU
Real time clock Built into CPU
RTC accuracy 1 Minute / month
Flash memory 1 Mbyte
RAM 512 Kbytes
EEPROM 32 Kbytes

The Real Time Clock (RTC) is a part of the CPU. It is not a software clock, but it
does not have battery backup. The RTC clock will function as long as power is
applied to the ECM3 power input.

A temperature monitor is also provided inside the control housing on the circuit
board. It provides the internal control temperature to the application with 2 C
accuracy. The GAP application engineer is encouraged to use this temperature
to warn operators of conditions above the control rating. Such conditions can
occur when long injection durations are used for extended periods of time,
ambient temperature is higher than normal, and/or injection currents are higher
than normal due to mechanical reasons in the injector. A temperature limit of
100 C or lower should be used as the warning temperature.

Applications and Functions


The ECM3 control is a microprocessor-based, electronic fuel injection control. It
is designed for use with the following fuel systems: Gas Admission Valve,
Electronic Unit Injector (EUI), Electronic Unit Pump (EUP), and Common Rail
(CR).

The primary purpose of the ECM3 is to control the timing and duration of up to 24
fuel injection devices on a group 3 reciprocating engine. Group 3 engines
include all reciprocating gas and diesel engines producing more than 500 kW per
engine but less than 100 kW per cylinder. Typical engine speeds are greater than
1200 rpm. The speed and angular position of the engine are determined using
Magnetic Pickup (MPU) sensors or active Proximity sensors located on the
crankshaft flywheel and/or camshaft gear wheel.

2 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control
Using the Controller Area Network (CAN) communication ports, it is possible to
increase functionality by measuring additional sensors and controlling additional
actuators, valves, ignition equipment, and system components. Using the CAN
communication links to expand functionality and control creates a networked
engine with less wiring, thereby increasing reliability.

The ECM3 uses a patented automatic calibration procedure for all fuel injectors
that it controls. The automatic calibration procedure runs continuously while the
control is operational to compensate for electrical resistance changes over
temperature and valve movement differences caused by pressure and wear out
effects. This feature eliminates the need for detailed injector configuration that
would require using manufacturer proprietary information about the injector
electrical and mechanical characteristics. It also ensures repeatable performance
throughout the life of the injectors.

Woodward 3
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

Figure 1-1. ECM3 Outline Drawing


(Dimensions are shown in inches)

4 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

Chapter 2.
Installation

Introduction
This chapter provides the general information for selecting a mounting location,
installation, and wiring of the ECM3 control. Information, on hardware dimensions for
mounting, electrical ratings, and application requirements, is given in this section.

Unpacking the Shipping Carton


Before unpacking the control, refer to the inside front cover and pages v through
vii of this manual for WARNINGS and CAUTIONS, including the Electrostatic
Discharge Awareness procedures, before handling the ECM3 Control.

Be careful when unpacking the control. Check for signs of damage such as bent
or dented panels, scratches, bent connector pins and loose or broken parts. If
any damage is found, immediately notify the shipper.

The ECM3 was shipped from the factory in an anti-static, foam-lined, carton. This
carton should always be used for transport of the ECM3 when it is not installed.

Check for and remove all manuals, connectors, mounting screws, and other
items before discarding (storing) the shipping box.

General Installation Notes and Warnings


When selecting a location for mounting the ECM3 control, consider the following:
Protect the unit from direct exposure to exhaust manifolds. Mount low on the
engine.
The operating range of the ECM3 control is 40 to +85 C or less depending
on injector current output.
Do not install near high-voltage or high-current devices.
Allow adequate space around the unit for servicing.
Ground the chassis for proper safety and EMI shielding.
When installing on the engine, provide vibration isolation.
Mount the unit to a solid metal mounting plate grounded to the engine
structure so the rear facing side does not have access.

The installer of the ECM3 must take responsibility for meeting Sub-Clause
26.3.3.1 of EN60079-15:2003 regarding impact testing. The connectors on the
ECM3 by themselves do not meet this requirement and therefore must be
sufficiently protected when installed. According to EN60079-15, the
protection must be such that a 1 kg mass fitted with an impact head in the
form of a hemisphere of 25 mm diameter, can be dropped vertically from a
height of 0.7 meter, and not cause significant damage to the connectors.

The ECM3 is an integrated control package. All control hardware is contained in


one compact enclosure. All field wiring connects to the ECM3 through sealed
connectors located on the top face of the control. Installation placement of the
ECM3 must allow sufficient room for wiring access and harness strain relief.

Woodward 5
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348
The ECM3 weighs approximately 5.8 kg (12.8 lb).

On-Engine Mounting
Vibration isolators should be used when mounting the ECM3. For example, when
mounting to a plate directly on a side or end of the engine, the vibration isolators
are used between the ECM3 and the mounting plate.

To install the ECM3 using the vibration isolators, first install the isolators onto the
ECM3. Then install the ECM3 with isolators onto the mounting plate. Attach a
ground strap as described in the GROUNDING sections following.

Vibration isolator components include:


(12) M6 snubbing washers
(4) M6 locking nuts
(4) sleeves
(4) M6 x 45 mm bolts
(4) isolation mount pairs

When installing the vibration isolators, use 8.5 Nm (75 lb-in) torque to install the
nut onto the bolt.

Figure 2-1. Vibration Isolator Installation


6 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control
Vibration isolators should be inspected at 3 years after installation. If any visual
damage, drying (cracking), or wear is observed, replace with a new kit of 4
isolators. If new isolators are not needed, recheck every year thereafter.

The ECM3 should be mounted vertically with the connectors facing away from
the engine to prevent moisture entry. Horizontal orientations are not
recommended due to internal heat flow that causes temperature increases within
the control and to avoid water puddles on the connectors.

A minimum clearance of 15 cm (6 inches) in all directions except to the mounting


plate should be left free around the control to allow a free airflow and heat
dissipation.

Wiring harnesses should have strain relief no further than 30 cm (12 inches) from
the control. The ECM3 must be located so that no wire or cable (except those
noted later) in the ECM3 harness exceeds 10 meters in total length.

The ECM3 is shipped from Woodward with a clear chromate finish to protect it
from corrosion. Further painting of the control is anticipated. If the control is to be
painted (such as during engine painting), take care to minimize paint thickness
and to mask all labels so they are readable after painting. Thick layers of paint
will inhibit the thermal transfer and can cause overheating of the control.

To prevent damage to the ECM3, do not use any electrostatic


painting process.

The ECM3 was designed for on-engine installation. It is suitably protected


against water and dust entry, thermal cycles, and exposure to oils, coolant, and
fuels. The mating wiring harnesses must be installed to complete the moisture
seal. Pressure washing of the engine will not harm the ECM3 but take care to
avoid long-term exposure to high pressure water at the connector interface.

Figure 1-1 shows a physical outline drawing with dimensions of the ECM3 for
reference during the construction of mounting panels, etc. The enclosure size is
305 mm high x 400 mm wide x 96 mm deep (12 inches H x 15.7 inches W x
inches 3.8 D).

Figure 2-2 below shows the mounting hold pattern and dimensions for use when
designing a mounting plate.

Temperature Specifications
The temperature rating of the ECM3 is generally listed as 40 to +85 C. However,
the actual temperature rating depends on many factors which influence the amount
of heat dissipated inside the enclosure. These factors include engine rpm (injection
frequency), injection duration, use of pre or post injection, the number of injection
outputs used, and the level of current used for each injection event.

Consider the below cases to determine the proper ambient temperature


application for the ECM3. If your application does not fit one of the cases below,
contact Woodward for assistance.

Woodward 7
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

Figure 2-2. Mounting Hole Layout

Case 1Rated for use in ambient temperatures up to 85 C


A 12-cylinder engine using 24 injection outputs where pairs are operated
simultaneously but no pre or post injection is used. The engine is a 4-cycle
diesel with rated speed of 1800 rpm and maximum injection duration of 50
degrees crank angle at rated speed. The injectors use a pull-in current of 11
A and hold-in current of 4 A with CPD achieved in 1.2 ms.

Case 2Rated for use in ambient temperatures up to 85 C


A 12-cylinder engine using 12 injection outputs and up to one pre-injection
event. The engine is a 4-cycle diesel with rated speed of 1800 rpm and
maximum injection duration of 50 degrees crank angle at rated speed plus
another 10 degrees for the optional pre-injection event. The injectors use a
pull-in current of 11 A and hold-in current of 4 A with CPD achieved in 1.2 ms.

Electrical Connections
The ECM3 is not shipped with mating connectors because many applications
may have a standard wiring harness or it is desirable to have the mating
connectors in advance to use when wiring. However, for service and
convenience, Woodward also carries ECM3 connector kits containing all of the
mating terminal blocks used on the ECM3. See Appendix A for mating connector
usage instructions.

The sealed connectors on the ECM3 are not designed for removal by hand. After
input power is disconnected, the connectors can be removed using a 4 mm Allen
head driver. Individual wires can be removed using an extraction tool (included in
connector kit). See Appendix A for instructions. When replacing the connectors,
use 6.0 0.1 Nm of force on the jackscrew. Too little force will allow the
connector to leak, and too much force may damage the connector.

8 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control
A hand crimp tool is necessary for use with the hand crimp sockets included in
the connector kit. The tool can be purchased from Woodward or directly from
Deutsch. See Appendix A for part numbers.

Noise interactions can affect the accuracy of the control. To facilitate noise
confinement, it is recommend that:
All low-current wires should be separated from all high-current wires when
routing from the ECM3 to the engine components.
Injector cables should be routed away from all other types of cables.
Communications, analog, and speed signals should be routed separately
from the injector wiring.
Discrete wiring (such as relay outputs or Boolean inputs) may be routed
separately or with the analog wiring.

Table 2-1 shows the wiring types for each signal type:

Signal type Wiring type Comment


Differential analog Shielded, twisted pair Use 1.0mm2 (18 AWG) or 1.5mm2 (16 AWG)
input
2 2
Sensor analog input No requirement Use 1.0mm (18 AWG) or 1.5mm (16 AWG)
PWM input Shielded, twisted pair Use 1.0mm2 (18 AWG) or 1.5mm2 (16 AWG)
PWM output Twisted pair Use 1.0mm2 (18 AWG) or 1.5mm2 (16 AWG)
Discrete input No requirement Use appropriate return pin do NOT return to B-
Discrete output No requirement Use appropriate return pin do NOT return to B-
MPU or Proximity Shielded, twisted pair Use 1.0mm2 (18 AWG) or 1.5mm2 (16 AWG)
input
Injector output Shielded, twisted pair Use 1.0mm2 (18 AWG) or 1.5mm2 (16 AWG)
RS232 or RS485 Shielded, twisted pair Must use serial cable
CAN Shielded, twisted pair Must use CAN cable (See CAN section for details)
Battery input Twisted pairs Use 2.0 mm2 (14 AWG)

Table 2-1. Wiring Types

Splicing
Individual returns are not provided for each signal. Some signals share a
common return pin. In these cases, harness splicing will be necessary.

Regardless of how the splicing is accomplished, signal routing is still very


important. A signal should always be routed together with its return. Signals
using twisted pair must have wires in close proximity and separations through the
splice should be minimized to the greatest extent possible.

Wiring for discrete signals must be done so that the signal wire and the return are
always in the same cable bundle. They should never take different paths
between the ECM3 and the sensor. This requirement is for signal integrity and
EMI/EMC purposes.

Harness splicing should always be done using hot solder-crimp splices. The
solder is necessary for good signal conductivity at all frequencies. The crimp is
necessary for strength and protection in the on-engine environment. Cold crimp
joints alone are not sufficient signal joints and are unreliable in a high vibration
environment.

Splicing of shielded, twisted pair wiring is not recommended. These signals


should have a single origin and destination. Breaking the signal path or shield is
not desirable as it provides an opportunity for EMI or EMC interference and
reduced signal integrity.

Woodward 9
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

Grounding for Protection against Electrical Shock


Protective Earth (PE) must be connected to the termination point on the side of

the unit next to the label with the symbol to reduce the risk of electric
shock. The conductor providing the connection must have a properly sized ring
lug and wire larger than or equal to 4 mm (12 AWG). It is acceptable to use the
EMI ground strap for this purpose. See Grounding for Protection Against
Electrical Noise following this paragraph for details.

Recommended Grounding Practices


Providing a proper ground for the ECM3 is important. Improper connection of the
ECM3 chassis to the ground plane may affect accuracy of I/O and immunity to
noise. Differences in potential between the chassis and the ground reference
result in an equalizing current flow. The current flow produces unacceptably high
common mode noise voltages.

Common mode voltages may result in improper readings for analog and speed
inputs or even damage to the ECM3 in extreme cases. To minimize this problem,
it is necessary to provide a low resistance (impedance) path between ground and
the chassis of the ECM3. Typically a single ground point is designated for the
engine and all related equipment.

Grounding for Protection against Electrical Noise


A proper ground strap must be connected to the chassis termination point to
provide a low impedance path for EMI. The strap providing the connection must
have a properly sized ring lug and be constructed of inch wide, flat, hollow
braid no more than 12 inches long or any strap that is equivalent at DC-to-RF
frequencies. (Example braid: International Wire, Continental Cordage Corp. P/N
233/2, Woodward P/N 2008-957) This strap may be used in place of the PE
grounding conductor if desired. In such cases, this strap becomes both the EMI
ground strap AND the protective earth connection.

Shields and Grounding


Signals that require shielding include speed inputs, some analog inputs, PWM
inputs, communications links, and injector wiring. Relay outputs, contact inputs,
high current PWM outputs, and power supply wiring does not normally require
shielding but can be shielded if desired. All shielded cable must be a twisted
conductor pair. Do not attempt to tin (solder) the braided shield prior to crimping it
into the socket or splice. The solder will affect the crimp strength and create
vibration susceptibility.

Shield terminations are provided through the ECM3 connectors for each of the
signals requiring shielding.

It is important that only the shield pin designated for a specific type
of signal be used. Do not substitute shield pin connections between
different groups. Not all shields are connected the same way within
the ECM3 control.

10 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control
Signal lines are shielded to prevent picking up stray signals from adjacent
equipment. Injector wiring is shielded to suppress emissions that can affect other
wiring and equipment. Wire exposed beyond the shield should be as short as
possible, not exceeding 50 mm (2 inches). In most cases, one end of the shields
must be left open and insulated from any other conductor. Typically the shield at
the end opposite of the control is un-terminated, but not always. The sections of
this manual describing wiring for each I/O point will indicate the best shielding
methods for the given signal type.

The ECM3 is designed for shield termination to only the designated shield
connections on the ECM3. If intervening terminal blocks are used in routing a
signal, the shield should be continued through the terminal block without a local
ground connection.

If a shield grounding point is desired at the terminal block, it should be ac


coupled to earth via a capacitor. A 500 V rated 1000 pF capacitor is usually
sufficient. The intent of ac coupling is to provide a low impedance path to earth
for the shield at frequencies of 150 kHz and up. Multiple, direct or capacitive,
connections of a shield to earth increases the risk of high levels of current to flow
within the shield below 150 kHz so take care in choosing ground schemes.

It may be beneficial for all additional shield terminations, except at the ECM3, to
be ac coupled to earth through a capacitor or not connect to earth at all.

Where shielded cable and shield termination is required, cut the cable to the
desired length and prepare the cable as instructed below.
1. Strip outer insulation, exposing the braided or spiral wrapped shield. Do not
cut the shield or nick the wire inside the shield.
2. Using a sharply pointed tool carefully spread the strands of the braided
shield.
3. Pull inner conductor(s) out of the shield. If the shield is the braided type,
twist it to prevent fraying.
4. Remove 6 mm (1/4 inch) of insulation from the inner conductors.
5. Connect wiring and shield as shown in plant wiring diagram.
6. If a shield connection is not required or desired, fold back and secure or
remove the excess shield as needed.

For noise suppression reasons, it is recommend that:


All low-current wires should be separated from all high-current wires.
The input power ground terminal should also be wired to earth ground at a
single point near the power source.

Installations with severe electromagnetic interference (EMI) may require


additional shielding precautions, such as wire run in conduit or double shielding.
Contact Woodward for more information.

Shields, with the exception of injector cable shields, can be directly grounded at
both ends (ECM3 and load) if the cable length is sufficiently short to prevent
ground loop current in the shield. Cables remaining within the same cabinet as
the control is an example of this.

Shields, with the exception of injector cable shields, can also be ac grounded at
one end and hard grounded at the opposite end to improve shielding
effectiveness.

Shield grounding can be a determinative process, specific applications and RF


environments require different shield grounding schemes be followed. See
Woodward application note 50532, Interference Control in Electronic Governing
Systems, for more complete information.

Woodward 11
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

Isolation
Figure 2-3 shows how the I/O is isolated with regard the input power supply and
other I/O types. Each wiring diagram also shows how an input or output type is
isolated in more detail.

This isolation diagram is shown so that the power and return wiring can be
properly grouped and so that ground loops can be avoided. Isolation is not a
substitution for proper grounding techniques. Each input and output section
contains information regarding proper shielding and grounding for the specific I/O
type. These guidelines must be followed in order to maintain compliance with the
marked or certified standards as well as to provide high operating reliability. Do
not defeat isolation by connecting returns of different isolation groups together.

Isolation Discrete / PWM


Group 1 Outputs

Isolation
CAN 1
Group 2 (SELV)

CAN 2

Isolation
CAN 3
Group 3

Isolation
RS232
Group 4 (SELV)

RS485

Discrete / PWM Injector


Inputs Outputs

Speed Prox Power Supply


Inputs Output
Not Isolated
(all circuits common)
Analog
Inputs

Discrete
Inputs

Power
Input
ECM-3

Figure 2-3. I/O Isolation

12 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

ECM3 Wiring Diagrams


Terminal Locations
All connections are located on the top face of the ECM3. Signals are separated
logically so that left and right banks of a Vee engine can be supplied by
dedicated connectors thus simplifying the harness design. Power and I/O
suitable for off-engine connection is provided on separate connectors.

See Figure 1-1 for reference of connector location.

Wiring Pinout
Fuel Injection Drivers

Injector 2 (+) J1-14 Injector 14 (+) J1-20


Injector 2 () J1-15 Injector 14 () J1-21
Injector 2 shield J1-32 Injector 14 shield J1-37

Injector 4 (+) J1-16 Injector 16 (+) J1-23


Injector 4 () J1-17 Injector 16 () J1-22
Injector 4 shield J1-34 Injector 16 shield J1-39

Injector 6 (+) J1-10 Injector 18 (+) J1-27


Injector 6 () J1-9 Injector 18 () J1-26
Injector 6 shield J1-8 Injector 18 shield J1-35

Injector 8 (+) J1-30 Injector 20 (+) J1-4


Injector 8 () J1-31 Injector 20 () J1-5
Injector 8 shield J1-38 Injector 20 shield J1-6

Injector 10 (+) J1-25 Injector 22 (+) J1-12


Injector 10 () J1-24 Injector 22 () J1-11
Injector 10 shield J1-33 Injector 22 shield J1-13

Injector 12 (+) J1-2 Injector 24 (+) J1-28


Injector 12 () J1-3 Injector 24 () J1-29
Injector 12 shield J1-1 Injector 24 shield J1-36

Speed Inputs

MPU/Proximity 1 (+) J1-62 MPU/Proximity 2 (+) J1-49


MPU/Proximity 1 () J1-61 MPU/Proximity 2 () J1-41
MPU/Proximity 1 shield J1-60 MPU/Proximity 2 shield J1-59

Proximity 3 (+) J1-40


Proximity 3 () J1-48
Proximity 3 shield J1-58

Woodward 13
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348
Analog Inputs

Analog Input 4 J1-70 Analog Input 13 J1-44


Analog Input 5 J1-69 Analog Input 23 J1-68
Analog Input 6 J1-53 Analog Input 24 J1-67
Analog Input 10 J1-55 Analog Input 25 J1-66
Analog Input 11 J1-54 Analog Input 26 J1-65
Analog Input 12 J1-45 Analog Input 27 J1-64
Analog Input 28 J1-63

Power Outputs

Proximity Power (+) J1-43, 50 Transducer Power (+) J1-56, 57


Proximity Power () J1-42, 51, 52 Transducer Power () J1-46, 47

Figure 2-4. J1 Pinout

Fuel Injection Drivers

Injector 1 (+) J2-41 Injector 13 (+) J2-55


Injector 1 () J2-40 Injector 13 () J2-54
Injector 1 shield J2-33 Injector 13 shield J2-37

Injector 3 (+) J2-59 Injector 15 (+) J2-46


Injector 3 () J2-60 Injector 15 () J2-47
Injector 3 shield J2-58 Injector 15 shield J2-38

Injector 5 (+) J2-69 Injector 17 (+) J2-48


Injector 5 () J2-68 Injector 17 () J2-49
Injector 5 shield J2-70 Injector 17 shield J2-32

Injector 7 (+) J2-57 Injector 19 (+) J2-61


Injector 7 () J2-56 Injector 19 () J2-62
Injector 7 shield J2-39 Injector 19 shield J2-63

Injector 9 (+) J2-43 Injector 21 (+) J2-67


Injector 9 () J2-42 Injector 21 () J2-66
Injector 9 shield J2-35 Injector 21 shield J2-65

Injector 11 (+) J2-50 Injector 23 (+) J2-45


Injector 11 () J2-51 Injector 23 () J2-44
Injector 11 shield J2-34 Injector 23 shield J2-36

Analog Inputs

Analog Input 1 J2-1 Analog Input 17 J2-16


Analog Input 2 J2-2 Analog Input 18 J2-26
Analog Input 3 J2-3 Analog Input 19 J2-4
Analog Input 7 J2-5 Analog Input 20 J2-17
Analog Input 8 J2-6 Analog Input 21 J2-27
Analog Input 9 J2-7 Analog Input 22 J2-18

14 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control
Power Outputs

Transducer Power (+) J2-14, 15


Transducer Power () J2-24, 25

Digital Outputs

Digital Output 7 J2-31 Digital / PWM Output 11 J2-13


Digital Output 8 J2-30 Digital / PWM Output 12 J2-23
Digital Output 9 J2-29 Digital / PWM Output J2-22
Return
Digital Output Return J2-28

CAN Communications

CAN 2 High J2-10 CAN 3 High J2-9


CAN 2 Low J2-20 CAN 3 Low J2-8
CAN 2 Common J2-21 CAN 3 Common J2-19
CAN 2 shield J2-12 CAN 3 shield J2-11

Figure 2-5. J2 Pinout

Analog Inputs

Analog Input 14 (+) J3-34 Analog Input 15 (+) J3-17


Analog Input 14 () J3-33 Analog Input 15 () J3-35
Analog Input 14 shield J3-24 Analog Input 15 shield J3-18
Current use jumper (in) J3-26 Current use jumper (in) J3-4
Current use jumper (out) J3-25 Current use jumper (out) J3-27

Analog Input 16 (+) J3-15


Analog Input 16 () J3-2
Analog Input 16 shield J3-1
Current use jumper (in) J3-16
Current use jumper (out) J3-3

Digital Inputs

Digital Input 1 (sourcing) J3-60 Digital Input 8 J3-49


Digital Input 2 J3-61 Digital Input 9 J3-48
Digital Input 3 J3-62 Digital Input 10 J3-40
Digital Input 4 J3-63 Digital Input 11 J3-41
Digital Input 5 J3-52 Digital Input 12 J3-42
Digital Input 6 J3-51 Digital Input 13 J3-43
Digital Input 7 J3-50 Digital Input 14 J3-32
Digital Input Returns J3-58, 59

Digital / PWM Input 15 (+) J3-8 Digital / PWM Input 16 (+) J3-6
Digital / PWM Input 15 () J3-9 Digital / PWM Input 16 () J3-7
PWM Input 15 shield J3-19 PWM Input 16 shield J3-5

Key Switch Input

Key Input (+) J3-64

Woodward 15
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348
Digital Outputs

Digital Output 1 J3-70 Digital / PWM Output 5 J3-55


Digital Output 2 J3-69 Digital / PWM Output 5 Return J3-45
Digital Output 3 J3-68 Digital / PWM Output 6 J3-56
Digital Output 4 J3-67 Digital / PWM Output 6 Return J3-46
Digital Output 10 J3-57
Digital Output Returns J3-44, 47

CAN Communications

CAN 1 High J3-10


CAN 1 Low J3-12
CAN 1 Common J3-11
CAN 1 shield J3-13

RS-485 Communications

RS-485 (+) J3-22


RS-485 () J3-21
RS-485 Common J3-20
RS-485 shield J3-23
Termination jumper (+) in J3-29
Termination jumper (+) out J3-28
Termination jumper () in J3-30
Termination jumper () out J3-31

RS-232 Communications

RS-232 TX J3-38
RS-232 RX J3-37
RS-232 Common J3-36
RS-232 shield J3-39

Figure 2-6. J3 Pinout

Power Input

Battery (+) J4-1, 2, 3, 4


Battery () J4-5, 6, 7, 8

Figure 2-7. J4 Pinout

The Driver outputs are labeled as injection commands and are


sequentially numbered from 1 through 24. Take great care to make
sure that the correct firing order for the engine is obtained by wiring
each injection command to the correct cylinder solenoid valve. The
injection command 1 should be connected to the reference (No. 1)
cylinder.

16 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control

Input Power
The input to the power supply must be from large batteries such as used for
engine cranking. An alternator or other battery-charging device is necessary to
maintain a stable supply voltage.

Input power must be applied to the ECM3 control up to 5 seconds


prior to expected use. The control must have time to run its power-up
diagnostics to become operational. Failure of the diagnostics will
disable control function.

The ECM3 must have all power removed before installing or


removing any connectors or wiring.
This equipment is suitable for use in Class 1, Division 2, Groups A,
B, C, and D, or non-hazardous locations only.
The ECM3 is suitable for use in European Zone 2, Group II
environments per self-declaration to EN 60079-15.
Wiring must be in accordance with Class I, Division 2 and European
Zone 2 wiring methods and in accordance with the authority having
jurisdiction.
Do not connect more than one power source to any one fuse or
circuit breaker.

Input Power Ratings


These ratings are based on using an engine with the following parameters:
24 outputs
4-cycle engine
1800 rpm
50 degree injection duration
11 A pull-in / 4 A hold-in current profile with CPD in 1.2 ms
A full 10 meter 16 AWG wire length to injectors

Voltage Range 1832 Vdc


Maximum Voltage 36 Vdc
Input Current 20 Arms @ 24 Vdc
16 Arms @ 32 Vdc
25 Arms @ 18 Vdc
Maximum Input Power 1300 W (during injector pull-in)
Average Input Power 260 W @ 24 Vdc
Reverse Polarity Protection 32 Vdc
Hold up Voltage 0 Vdc for 1 ms , 6 Vdc for 99 ms
Cranking Voltage 9 Vdc for 15 s
Input Wiring Constraints The ECM3 must be wired such that no other device
receives power from the wiring between the ECM3 and the
power supply source.
Input Wire Size 14 AWG (2.0 mm)
Input Fuse Rating 30 Arms continuous at 85 C
40 Arms for 30 seconds
Time delay type with melting It 5 A sec),
> 48 V capable

Table 2-2. Power Input Specifications


Woodward 17
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348
Significant inrush currents are possible when current is applied to the ECM3
control. The magnitude of the inrush current depends on the power source
impedance, so Woodward cannot specify the maximum inrush current. Time-
delay fuses or circuit breakers must be used to avoid nuisance trips.

Power Supply Grounding


The following guidelines must be observed for the ECM3 power source
connections.

The 24 V power supply negative lead should be bonded to protective Earth


(PE) at only one point.
This bond strap should be relatively short compared to the total length of the
power leads, 1 m (39.4 in).
The power supply should be bonded to the same PE structure as the
control.
The negative leads should not be bonded to PE at the control.
The negative leads on the power supply should be bonded to PE relatively
close to the supply or at the point the supply voltages arrive at the PE
structure used for the control.
Note: Since the control has shielded wiring that requires grounding, care
must be taken to provide proper installation. Specific requirements for this
control are listed in the individual sections, i.e. proximity sensor, CAN, etc.
Grounding and shield termination is application specific; see Woodward
grounding document application note number 51204, Grounding and
Shielding Termination. Application note 51204 gives a general overview to
help apply sound techniques to specific installations.

Input Power Wiring


It is required that the installation of this equipment includes over current
protection between the power source and the ECM3. This over current protection
may be accomplished by series connection of properly rated fuses or circuit
breakers. Branch circuit protection of no more than 250% of the maximum ECM3
power supply input current rating must be provided. Maximum fuse rating must
meet the 250% UL listing requirements. The use of properly sized UL class CC,
J, T, G, RK1, or RK5 fuses is required to meet the requirements for branch circuit
protection. Do not connect more than one ECM3 to any one fuse. Use the largest
wire size possible for the chosen connectors that also meets local code
requirements. Time delay fuses should be used to prevent nuisance trips.
Maximum protection against damage to the control includes fusing on both the
B+ wiring and the B wiring.

The largest wire size that can be connected to the control power
input connector is 2.0 mm (14 AWG).

Due to the relatively small wires size available for the main power input and the
large currents drawn by the fuel injection, a large voltage drop is possible. Short
wire lengths are recommended. To minimize the voltage drop, it is required to
use the largest wire size possible which is 2.0 mm2 (14 AWG) and four wire pairs
to split the current.

18 Woodward
Manual 26348 ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control
The ECM3 input power wiring must be routed separately from all other wiring.
Due to the large injection currents, these wires carry large amounts of noise that
can interfere with sensitive equipment. If the wires must be routed together with
other wires, shielding is recommended. The source + and return - wires
between the power supply and the ECM3 should be bundled together and routed
away from injector output wires. Twisting each of the four source and return wire
pairs is an added measure to reduce unbalanced currents but is not required.

The controls power supplies are not equipped with input power
switches. For this reason, some means of disconnecting input power
to each main power supply must be provided for installation and
servicing.

ECM-3

Keyswitch Monitor

J3-64
key
+B
Battery Monitor
J4-1

J4-2 24V

J4-3

J4-4

J4-5

J4-6

J4-7

J4-8

DGND

Figure 2-8. Input Power Wiring Diagram

Power Supply Monitoring Circuit


The input voltage level is monitored for the purpose of application diagnostics. In
GAP, this value is found in the ECM3_STS block as MON_24.

Maximum voltage measured 34 Vdc


Resolution in volts 55 mVdc (10-bits)
Accuracy 1% of full scale typical steady-state
Temperature Drift 1% of full scale typical (0.34 V)
2.4% of full scale worst case (1.33 V)
Filter constant 1 pole at 0.6 ms

Table 2-3. Input Power Monitor Specifications


Woodward 19
ECM3 Electronic Fuel Injection Control Manual 26348

MPU and Proximity Sensor Inputs

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