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In the initial article concerning survival kits we really just skimmed the surfa

ce of uses, necessity, and contents. To provide a better basis for what a perso
n might want to include in a survival kit it's important to take into account th
e following factors;
* Most likely type of disaster or emergency to prepare for
* Time of year (prevailing weather conditions)
* The immediate environment, i.e. urban, suburban, rural, #%^#!@ nowhere
* Likely companions
* Likely mode of travel
* Current health concerns
How close relative safety is can be the most important factor, outweighing all
others easily. If the nearest safe place is the local "bomb-proof" that is inv
ulnerable to everything, an evacuee won't need much more than food, water, and a
deck of cards.
If there is no relatively "safe place", or if it's too far or otherwise not imme
diately accessible, start planning NOW! You must have an idea of where to go an
d how to get there ahead of the actual emergency.
If a person has a place to go, several different ways to get there, knows how l
ong it will take to get there and the possible dangers along the way, most of th
e survival kit will be obvious and easy to assemble.
For instance, living in an area where forest fires are the primary danger, the
evacuee needs a fire-safe zone, like a lake or a large parking lot, somewhere th
e fire can't reach them.
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Hurricane shelter is much different than earthquake shelter but the provisions
would be basically the same, as would be provisions for escaping from a forest f
ire hazard.
The time of year will make a radical difference in provisions and equipment if a
person lives in Canada versus one who lives in Mexico. I personally have two s
eparate B.O.B.s, one for winter and one for summer. However, they are light en
ough to pack both (and I would!)
Your companions in a disaster situation might mean the difference between life a
nd death for the prepared individual. Hysteria, depression and shock can immobi
lize anyone if they are not prepared for a massive emergency situation. The pre
pared individual must take into account the reactions of those companions and be
prepared to deal with them in one way or another.
I am certain of one of my companions and know exactly how he would react in most
circumstances. "Bubba" my 160 lb chocolate Lab will pack his own share of grub
and then some.Bubba He won't get hysterical and won't even stop to sniff anothe
r dog unless he has permission. In a survival situation I would trust him with
my life and vice-versa I'm sure!
The immediate environment is the most important factor overall when it comes to
packing a survival kit. If the urban dweller doesn't know what to do in a disa
ster they will either be part of a howling, out-of-control mob or they'll be the
first to die. There is no room for the unprepared in the city.
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In suburban and rural areas the chances of survival for the unprepared grow bet
ter for the simple fact of less population pressure. Less people means less pro
blems with rioting and mass lawlessness.
Of course it also means less possible aid and or emergency services, but getting
even farther away from the starving, mindless hordes departing the cities is e
asier and defensive areas can be set up.
Anywhere within 100 miles or so of a major population center will put you in har
ms' way in case of a massive evacuation. Build your kit with that thought in mi
nd.
* Have at least one good, all purpose knife that won't dull if it's used to
open cans or cut wire. Two is better than one
* Have enough food for at least one other person, it will last twice as long
if you're alone
* Have a means of filtering and purifying water and something to store it in
. A person can go quite awhile without food but water is needed everyday
* A reliable fire-starting tool and tinder is necessary, don't count on aski
ng someone for a light!
* Rain gear that can double as a shelter(large poncho)will keep your bed dry
* Disposable emergency blankets work great but only once or twice so bring s
everal (they're a bitch to repack!)
* Extra socks are an absolute necessity! Take care of your feet and your fee
t will take care of you!
* Some method of signaling, lite-sticks, mirrors, highway flares are excelle
nt as they will also start a fire in the wettest circumstances
* First-aid materials and current medications in a weather-proof container
In my opinion for serious survival, you must have the ability to defend yourself
and your equipment. You must have the correct mind-set to realize the necessit
y of defense and the importance of offense when it comes to survival.
If you are in an urban environment or close-quarters with a very real possibilit
y of rioters, looters, raiders and other totally lawless people, a shotgun is a
very good device for defense. Especially for a person who can't visit the targe
t range often enough to qualify with a pistol. A 12 gauge is the most persuasiv
e but also heavier. The ammo is heavy and bulky too, but when it comes to defen
se, you can't beat a 12 gauge shotgun!
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A pistol would be an excellent back-up to the shotgun and easier by far to pack
in a Bug-Out-Bag ahead of time along with ammunition and a cleaning kit. For th
e average person I would suggest a .357 Magnum for it's shear stopping power and
because of the ability to chamber .38 rounds too. The .38's are good to practi
ce with and still have pretty good stopping power, are lighter thus easier to pa
ck.
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Remember this when you're shopping for weapons; The only reason for the weapons
in an urban or suburban environment is for protection from PEOPLE! You are not
hunting deer, you are protecting yourself from the most dangerous animal on the
planet; HUMANS!
Get something that you are comfortable with, know how to use and know how to mai
ntain. Get something that will knock down a grown person and hopefully keep the
m down! This will be no politically-correct situation, it will be life or death
!
That cute little .22 caliber belly-gun is just that, a gun that you jam in someo
ne's stomach and pull the trigger, no aiming involved. Chances are good for NOT
hitting something only 10 feet away, so forget those small caliber handguns unl
ess you want to wrestle too.
Don't count on anyone else to help, if you don't have the mind-set to do what yo
u must do to protect your loved ones, you are lost before you start. All the eq
uipment in the world won't help you survive if you're not strong enough to use i
t. or you let someone take it from you.