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WORLD SCOUT

ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME
ACTIVITIES & FACTSHEETS

Youth Programme
WSB Inc. / Els Bosmans
Principle writers: Rodney Abson and Lucy Mace

Contributors: Farouk Bouraoui, Jnos Divnyi, Zsolt Ecsedi, Ursina El Sammra, Filomena
Grasso, Lorena Gudino, Euloge Ishimwe, Yuhei Kageyama, Melanie Kesteven, Mark
Knippenberg, Ella Maesepp, Mark Shepheard, Tomoko Umemoto, Anne Whiteford and Paul
Whiteld

Principle sponsor organisation: The Alcoa Foundation

Supporting organisations: Clean Up the World, Jane Goodall Institute, United Nations
Environment Programme (UNEP), Volvo Adventure, Web of Hope and WWF

Acknowledgement: This publication is with thanks to many volunteers in Scouting


throughout the world and staff of the World Scout Bureau who supported the development
and testing of the content of the World Scout Environment Programme.

World Scout Bureau


Education, Research and Development
November 2009

World Scout Bureau


Rue du Pr-Jrme 5
PO Box 91
CH 1211 Geneva 4 Plainpalais
Switzerland

Tel.: (+ 41 22) 705 10 10


Fax: (+ 41 22) 705 10 20

worldbureau@scout.org
scout.org

Reproduction is authorized to
National Scout Organizations and
Associations which are members of the
World Organization of the Scout Movement.
Credit for the source must be given.
ACTIVITIES & FACTSHEETS

NATURE STUDY IS THE KEY ACTIVITY


IN SCOUTING AND GUIDING.

BADEN POWELL

3
CONTENTS SECTION 1

INTRODUCTION 5
Framework for environment education in Scouting
and the World Scout Environment Badge 6
The process for earning the
World Scout Environment Badge 8

PROGRAMME ACTIVITY RESOURCE


Sticky Leaves 9
Water Exploring 13
Life of a River 15
Sense Nature 17
Nature Art 21
Creatures Conference 23
Catch the Carbon Dioxide 25
Food Chains and Chemicals 27
My Carbon Footprint 31
What have I done today? 35
Garbage Bag Challenge 37
Quick Energy Debate 39
What Disaster am I? 43
Prepare for Disaster! 45
A Natural Disaster Story 49

CONTENTS SECTION 2
FACTSHEETS 54

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WSB Inc. / Bangladesh Scouts

Introduction
The World Scout Environment Programme offers tools, resources and initiatives
to help Scouts all around the world work together for the good of the local and
global environment. This World Scout Environment Programme resource book
contains Programme Activity Resources in Section 1 and Factsheets in Section 2
to help implement the programme in Scouting throughout the world.
The following two-pages presents the Framework for environment education in
Scouting and the World Scout Environment Badge. This is a useful reference to
see the overview of the key environmental challenges facing the planet and how
this relates to the Scouting youth programme in three broad age ranges (under
11, 11 to 14 and 15+). This framework can be applied in each National Scout
Organization in a way appropriate to their Youth Programme.

The fteen Programme Activity Resources relate to each of the ve aims for
environment education in Scouting and three broad age ranges. A symbol has
been used to help illustrate which of the aims the activity is focusing on. These
activities are presented to you as examples for how the framework could be
implemented amongst local level Scout Groups, though there are many ways to
present activities for the World Scout Environment Badge. Wherever possible
the programme should be presented outdoors, allowing the Scouts to explore for
themselves and discover the natural world.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 5
FRAMEWORK

Framework for environment education in Scouting and

Stage
Under 11
A. EXPLORE and REFLECT Complete activities based on each of the ve aims

Explore the sources of clean water and clean


1. People and natural systems have clean air in the local environment.
water and clean air Understand the ways water and air are
naturally cleaned.

Explore a local natural area.

2. Sufcient natural habitat exists Discover some of the local native species of
plants and animals and their habitat needs.
to support native species
Demonstrate knowledge of some contrasting
natural habitats.

Be aware of harmful substances in the local


3. The risk of harmful substances to
environment.
people and the environment are
Explain ways to reduce the risk of harmful
minimised
substances to people, plants and animals.

4. The most suitable environmental Show awareness of how our actions affect
the environment and alternative ways to
practices are used make a smaller impact.

Be able to recognise different types of


5. People are prepared to respond to
environmental hazards and natural disasters.
environmental hazards and natural
Demonstrate how to be prepared and react to
disasters
environmental hazards and natural disasters
in the local area.

B. TAKE ACTION Do an environmental project

Participate in a local environmental project.

Environmental project that relates to the Understand the benets to the local
environment of the project.
previous learning and to the local environment
Be aware of the local to global link of the
ICONS WSB Inc. project.

6 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
the World Scout Environment Badge

Educational objectives per age group


Activity guidelines
11 to 14 15+

Explore the sources of clean water and clean Explore the sources of clean water and clean air in the
air in the local environment. local environment.
Identify threats to clean water and clean air Demonstrate the relationship of personal actions to the
in the local and global environment and be availability of clean water and clean air in the local and
able to suggest solutions. global environment.

Explore a local natural area.


Explore a local natural area. Understand the ecosystem connections of native species
Understand the ecosystem connections of of plants and animals and their habitat needs.
native species of plants and animals and their Demonstrate the relationship between personal actions
habitat needs. and the availability of sufcient natural habitat to
Be aware of global conservation issues support native species.
affecting biodiversity. Be aware of global conservation issues affecting Outdoor activities that are fun, allow
biodiversity. unstructured exploration, encourage
inquisitiveness and generate
awareness.

Experience based activities that


Be aware of harmful substances in the local Explain the local impact of harmful substances to people promote environmental learning.
environment and identify their source. and the broader environment and what can be done by These could be practical, physical or
Demonstrate what personal action can individuals, groups and the community to reduce the achievement based activities.
be taken to reduce the risk of harmful risk.
substances to people and the broader Understand the global impact of harmful substances and
environment. how local actions can change the global environment. Experience based activities that
encourage critical thinking about
environmental issues and lead to
shared awareness and deepened
understanding of the individual
Recognise how we are connected with the responsibility for the environment.
Explain how our choice of action and responsibility as an
environment and how we can make informed
individual, group, community and country can affect the
choices about our actions that can minimise
environment.
the impact on the environment. Where possible activities should
Understand how we can change our actions to improve encourage thinking about how the
Identify potentially better environmental
our impact on the environment. ve aims connect with each other.
practices for your local area.
Demonstrate how local solutions can impact global
Demonstrate how local solutions can impact
issues.
global issues.

Be able to recognise different types of environmental


Be able to recognise different types of hazards and natural disasters and explain why they
environmental hazards and natural disasters occur.
and explain why they occur.
Demonstrate how to help other people to be prepared to
Demonstrate how to help other people to respond to environmental hazards and natural disasters
be prepared to respond to environmental in the local area.
hazards and natural disasters in the local
area. Explain how changes to the environment can inuence
environmental hazards and natural disasters.

Identify local environmental issues and potential Review learning experiences.


Identify local environmental issues and solutions.
potential solutions. Identify local environmental issue
Plan and execute an environmental project. and understand local to global link.
Plan and execute an environmental project.
Understand the local to global connections of the project. Plan and implement project.
Understand the local to global connection of
the project. Evaluate the results of the project for the Scouts, the Monitor, evaluate and identify future
community and the environment. actions.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 7
The programme focuses on the environment in a broad sense and encourages
the Scouts to have a holistic awareness of the natural world and how their day-
to-day actions can impact upon this, progressively building a sense of personal
responsibility for the environment. The process for earning the World Scout
Environment Badge is presented in the diagram below. Please note that National
Scout Organizations may have specic requirements for a Scout to full in order
to earn the World Scout Environment Badge.

The process for earning the


World Scout Environment Badge:

1. Explore and Reect: Complete activities based on each of the ve aims for
environment education in Scouting:

Scouts are working towards a world where:

1. People and natural systems have clean water and clean air.
2. Sufcient natural habitat exists to support native species.
3. The risk of harmful substances to people and the environment are
minimised.
4. The most suitable environmental practices are used.
5. People are prepared to respond to environmental hazards and natural
disasters.

2. Take Action: Do an environmental project that relates to the previous


learning and to the local environment.

3. The World Scout Environment Badge is presented to the Scout in


recognition of their learning and commitment to the environment.

The Factsheets in Section 2 offer further information with quotes from Baden-
Powell on Scouting and the environment, more background on the World Scout
Environment Programme and the World Scout Environment Badge, Scout
Centres of Excellence for Nature and Environment (SCENES), Scouts of the
World Award and partnerships that can support Scouting and the environment.
A Frequently Asked Questions section helps to answer other outstanding
questions about how to implement the World Scout Environment Programme.

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WSB Inc. / The Scout Association of Australia

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Sticky Leaves

Aim 1 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explore the sources of clean water and A fun, outdoor activity that
a world where people and clean air in the local environment. investigates air and makes air pollution
natural systems have clean visible.
Understand the ways water and air are
water and clean air. naturally cleaned.
Aim
Age range To learn about air pollution and
investigate local air quality.
Under 11

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 9
STICKY LEAVES

Equipment Background
Clear sticky tape, maps, white An air pollutant is any unwanted
paper substance or chemical that
contaminates the air that we
Preparation breathe resulting in a decline
in air quality. Air pollutants
Find a suitable place to run the include smoke, carbon monoxide,
activity nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide,
particulates and ozone.
Duration Air pollutants have sources that
are both natural and human.
One hour
Natural sources include volcanoes,
wildres, airborne dust, cattle
Setting digesting grass and natural
radioactive decay. Although some
An outdoor setting with trees and pollution comes from natural
shrubs. The activity can be done sources, most pollution is the
at more than one location. If this result of human activity. The
is the case, choose areas that biggest causes are the operation
differ in their proximity to roads, of fossil fuel-burning power plants
factories, or other sources of air and automobiles that combust fuel.
pollution. The areas will need trees
or bushes in leaf but the leaves Most of the main air pollutants can
should not be near the ground. be harmful to human health. Air
One important point to note is pollution is frequently associated
that smooth surfaced leaves give with respiratory problems. It can
better results than hairy leaves. make people sick or cause long-
term illness, particularly in those
most sensitive to pollution, such as
children and the elderly.

There are three ways in which


animals can be affected by air
pollution. They can breathe in
gases or small particles, eat
particles in food or water or
absorb gases through the skin.
Soft-bodied invertebrates, such
as earthworms, or animals with
thin, moist skin such as frogs, are
particularly affected by absorbing
pollution.

Sources of air pollution and dust


often leave residues on the top of
exposed leaves. The sticky leaves
activity collects these residues.
This makes air pollution visible
and easier to understand. The air
pollution in different areas can
be compared and related to the
source of the pollution

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STICKY LEAVES

Step by step guide


to activity
1. Give the Scouts ve minutes to 4. Introduce the sticky leaves activity.
explore their surroundings. They Our air contains 21% oxygen, 72%
can explore in small groups or nitrogen, approximately 7% carbon
individually. Ask them to discover dioxide and approximately 1%
all the different things that make up other gases including pollutants.
the environment around them. The majority of the gases and
particles that make up our air,
2. Gather the group together and
including the oxygen, nitrogen and
discuss their discoveries. They
carbon dioxide, are colourless,
should have noticed living things
odourless and tasteless. However,
such as trees, plants and animals
some of the pollutants are in
as well as inanimate objects like
particles big enough to be visible
soil, rocks and water. Ask the
to the naked eye. The sticky leaves
Scouts how are these things all
activity enables these particles to
connected? Who eats who? Where
be collected.
do the animals live? What do the
trees and plants need to survive? 5. Ask the Scouts where they think air
They should discover that the pollutants might come from (some
environment is all linked together. sources are cars, fossil fuel-burning
Ask them if there is anything else power plants, volcanoes, res,
that is vital to this environment dust). Ask the Scouts about their
that we cant see. The answer is air. current location. What sources of
air pollution are nearby?
3. Sit the Scouts down and ask them
to spend one or two minutes 6. Split the Scouts into small groups
breathing in the air and thinking and give each group some white
about it. They should take really paper, scissors and some sticky
deep breaths and try to ll their tape. Depending on the size or
lungs. At the end of the allotted other characteristics of your natural
time ask them to describe the area and the size of your group,
air around them. Does it taste you can allocate each group their
of anything? Does it smell of own area or vegetation type or
anything? Can they see it? What is you can allow them to decide
in air? themselves where they sample.
7. The Scouts cut a piece of sticky
tape and press it rmly, sticky
side down, onto a leaf. They
then carefully remove the tape
and stick it onto a piece of white
paper. Each group should do this
at least ten times in order to get
a representative sample and write
down or draw the location where
they took the sample
WSB Inc. / Rod Abson

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 11
STICKY LEAVES

WSB Inc. / Scouts Australia


Evaluation Further activities
1. Gather the Scouts together and 1. There are other ways that air
compare the results. If you have pollution can be seen. Investigate
access to a magnifying glass buildings made of stone in your
or microscope, look closely at local area. These can show
the samples. Rank the different evidence of air pollution, in
samples in order of how dirty particular from vehicles on adjacent
they are. Where were the dirtiest roads. Look out for natural stone
samples taken from? Where were that looks dirty. Graveyards are
the cleanest samples taken from? also good places for seeing the
Is there a pattern, if so why? Where effect of air pollution on stone.
is the pollution coming from? Find out how scientists measure air
quality.
2. If you have sampled in more than
one area then transfer your results 2. Think about how our actions affect
to a map and discuss. Is there a air pollution. How they contribute
reason why certain areas show to it and what we can do to reduce
more pollution than others? Where air pollution.
is the pollution coming from?
3. Make a poster showing all the
3. Think about the damage the different things in your local area
pollution in the air might be doing. that contribute to air pollution.

How might it affect the plants?


How might it affect human health?
How might it affect animals?
Bear in mind that this is only the
pollution that is visible. A lot of
pollution is not visible to the naked
eye.

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WSB Inc. / Rod Abson

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Water Exploring

Aim 1 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explore the sources of clean water and A practical activity to explore your
a world where people and clean air in the local environment. local area and discover where water is
natural systems have clean found, what it is used for and why it is
Identify threats to clean water and necessary.
water and clean air.
clean air in the local and global
environment and be able to suggest
solutions.
Aim
To create awareness of water in our
Age range surroundings and the relationship
between water and human life.
11 to 14

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WATER EXPLORING

Equipment Evaluation
Map, paper, pens,camera (optional) 1. Once all the groups have returned
ask each group to present what
they found and discuss the ndings.
Preparation Use the questions below to help the
discussion.
Find a suitable route around
the local area
Were the Scouts surprised by the
Duration quantity of water they discovered?
How does the water they found t
One to two hours
into the water cycle?

Setting How does the water help us?


How does the water help plants and
Local area animals?
Did anyone mention the water that
is in the air as water vapour?
Did anyone mention the water in
the soil and underground?
Step by step guide
Background to activity
Water is vital for life and in many 1. Split the Scouts into small groups 2. If you have taken photographs,
parts of the world can be found all and give each group a map, paper, create a display of the water in
around us in a variety of different pen and a camera (optional). A your neighbourhood.
places. In some parts of the world route can be marked on the map,
clean, safe water is not freely or you can give them co-ordinates 3. Did the groups identify water
available. This activity encourages to follow, or they can decide on hidden within buildings? Ask them
us to explore our local environment their own route within a marked to think about what we use water
and discover our water, where it is, area. for in our homes and how that
what it is needed for and what it water gets there. What happens
looks like. Once we understand our 2. Before the groups set off, have a to that water before it enters our
water and why it is important to us quick discussion about where they homes? Where does it go after
we can begin to learn about water think they might nd water. For it leaves our homes and what
in a global context example, stream or river, public happens to it then?
toilets, puddle, water fountain etc.
3. The groups walk around the route
looking for water. When they nd
some they should think about the
following questions. Where is the
water? What is it used for? How
much water is there? Is it there
every day? What colour is it? Does
it smell, is it discoloured? Can
humans drink it? Can animals drink Further activities
it? If they have a camera they can
1. Visit a water facility in your local
take a photograph of the water.
area and learn about where the
water in your home comes from,
how it is cleaned and where it goes
to after you have used it.
2. Build a model or make a poster
showing the water cycle.
3. If you found any water pollution
problems in your local area,
investigate these more thoroughly.
Find out what is causing the
pollution and take some action to
resolve it.
4. Look into ways we can be more
efcient with our use of water in
our day-to-day lives.

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WSB Inc. / Scouts of China

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Life of a River

Aim 1 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explore the sources of clean water and An exploration of how a river or stream
a world where people and clean air in the local environment. can change as it moves through the
natural systems have clean landscape.
Demonstrate the relationship of
water and clean air. personal actions to the availability of
clean water and clean air in the local
Aim
and global environment. To explore a river or stream in the
local environment and investigate
Age range how it changes naturally and through
interaction with people.
15+

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 15
LIFE OF A RIVER

Equipment Background Evaluation


Glass jars, paper and pens, camera Rivers and streams come in many 1. Have the Scouts present their
(optional), canoeing or rafting sizes and are very important observations as they followed the
equipment (optional) ecologically and for people that use life of the river. This could include
them for many reasons. A river showing their photographs or
sketches, water samples or stories
Preparation may have a catchment area (the
in the order they were collected.
total land area that collects and
Identify a suitable stretch of a river funnels water towards the river) 2. Discuss the results and the activity.
or stream accessible in the local many times greater than the river, Use the following questions to help
environment that can be followed stretching potentially hundreds the discussion.
for a length downstream and or thousands of kilometres away
observe the changes. If conducting from the river. The land uses in
activities on the water, ensure the catchment can affect the river
What were the natural observations
suitable safety procedures and from its point source (the place
of the Scouts?
experience of participants. furthest away from the river in
its catchment), to its end point Did the environment change
(such as where it reaches a lake or as they moved through the
Duration ocean). catchment?
Variable, up to one day Rivers naturally change as they Were the changes natural or
move through the landscape, with inuenced by people?
Setting different plants and animals taking How were people interacting with
advantage of the area surrounding the river?
In the local area alongside the a river. People also make use
river or on the river with suitable of the waters from rivers, the Was clean water available for
boating equipment. plants and animals, and the land people and natural systems?
that surrounds them, which are
Did the water quality change in the
often very fertile. Many human
built environment?
settlements started along rivers
and have progressively grown into How could the catchment be better
town or even cities. These changes managed if there were activities
in the built environment also affect that were impacting badly on the
the river in different ways. health of the environment and the
water?
Where would the point source and
end source of the river be?
Step by Step guide Do people need to share access
to the river? Could this cause
1. The aim of this activity is to explore
challenges?
the life of a river as it changes
throughout its catchment. Explore
maps of the river system to learn
more about the geography of
the area, specially features or
different habitats and where human
settlements occur that need the
river or could affect it. Start at
an accessible part of the river or
further up its catchment, such as a
drainage area or smaller stream.
2. Follow the river downstream and
record how it changes. What does
Further activities
the environment look like? How are 1. Have the Scouts consider what the
people interacting with the river? river might look like in the future
Is the water clean? Take samples of and how they can help ensure that
the water in glass jars as you travel people and natural systems have
along the river and record where clean water and clean air.
each sample was taken.
2. Share their experience and results
3. Include a section of the river with other people in the community
where it passes through a built and identify if there are ways the
environment, such as a town or city health of the river can be protected.
What happens to the water here
and after it has passed by the built
environment?

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WSB Inc. / Scouts of China

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Sense Nature

Aim 2 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explore a local natural area. An outdoor activity where the Scouts
a world where sufcient use their ve senses to explore and
Discover some of the local native connect with nature.
natural habitat exists to
species of plants and animals and their
support native species.
habitat needs.
Aim
Demonstrate knowledge of some
To experience and connect with
contrasting natural habitats.
nature using all of the senses (seeing,
hearing, tasting, smelling, touching)
Age range and understand how the information
Under 11 from our senses combine to create our
awareness of the natural world.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 17
SENSE NATURE

Activity 1
Scavenger Hunt
Equipment Background Sense: Sight
Blindfolds, paper, pens Nature can be appreciated using all 1. Split the Scouts into teams and
of our senses. The sense we use ask them to nd ten objects that
have something in common. For
Preparation the most often to understand our
environment is sight but in actual example, ten natural objects that
fact we are using our other senses are soft. Other ideas are objects
Find a suitable place to visit.
at the same time to help build up that are hard, green, brown, dead,
the picture of what is around us. man made etc.
Duration By concentrating individually on 2. Each group could have the same
each of our senses we can gain category or one group could have
One hour a better awareness of our local to nd soft objects and the other
environment. group hard objects.
Setting
3. The Scouts should take care not to
A local natural area, for example, harm or disturb living creatures.
forest, beach, mountain or park.
4. Once they have found their objects
they present them to the rest of the
group.

Step by step guide to 5. Have a discussion about what


they have found. Some ideas for
activity questions are given below.
1. Find a suitable local natural area 6. After the discussion put the natural
and take the group there. objects back appropriately. If a
group has collected man made
2. Ask the group to name the ve objects, make sure these are taken
senses and discuss how we use away with you and disposed of
these in our daily lives. How do our correctly.
senses help us to understand our
surroundings?
How many different natural objects
3. Explain to the group that they have they found overall?
are going to explore the natural
environment around them using Are the group surprised by the
each of the senses individually. number of different things they
Which senses do they use the have found?
most? Which senses do they think
will tell them the most and the What is the most surprising thing
least? collected?

4. Do the following activities. Each How much man made material was
activity will identify different found?
features of the natural environment Where did they look for the
you are exploring. Write down objects?
these features as the activities
progress. The nal activity ends How well do these objects
by summing up how our senses represent what is living in the
have painted a picture of the local natural area?
environment. Was this activity easy?
It depended on our sense of sight.
How useful is our sight?
How important is sight to our
awareness and understanding of
nature?

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SENSE NATURE

Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4


Barefoot Walk Find Your Tree What do you hear?
Sense: Touch Sense: Touch Sense: Hearing
1. Split the group into pairs and 1. Introduce this activity by looking 1. Ask each Scout to nd a
choose one of the pair to go rst. at and discussing the trees in your comfortable place to sit.
surroundings. Ask the Scouts what
2. The Scout going rst takes off their the distinctive features of the trees 2. The group must sit quietly for ve
shoes and socks and puts on a are and visit several trees to see minutes and listen to the sounds
blindfold. their differences and similarities. around them. When they hear a
sound, they must think about what
3. The blindfolded Scout is then led 2. Split the group into pairs and has made it and remember it.
over a course by their partner. blindfold one of the pair.
3. After ve minutes, ask the group
4. As they walk the blindfolded Scout 3. The blindfolded Scout is spun what they heard and discuss the
must concentrate on what their around and then guided carefully to sounds. Some ideas for questions
feet can feel. They must describe a tree. This is best done in silence. are given below.
to their partner what the ground
feels like on their feet and try to 4. They must touch the tree to
identify what they are walking over. discover its size, shape and texture.
The path should be safe from sharp They need to learn enough about What sounds did they hear? Were
or dangerous objects and should the tree to be able to identify it they natural or man made sounds?
include different textures and without their blindfold on. Good Were they surprised at how much/
surfaces. things to feel for are distinctive how little noise there was? Did they
patterns in the bark, branches hear any sounds they had never
5. The pair then swaps roles and coming from the trunk, roots or
repeats the activity. heard before, if so, what?
plants at the base of the tree. An
6. Gather the group together and excellent way to identify your tree How did the sounds help them to
discuss the activity. Some ideas for is to know its diameter. Get the understand what is surrounding
discussion are given below: Scouts to wrap their arms around them?
the tree to work this out.
5. They are then taken away from the
What did the ground feel like? tree, spun around again and their
Was it soft, hard, warm, cold, wet, blindfold taken off. They must use
dry etc? Try thinking of really their memory of what the tree felt
imaginative words to describe how like to nd it.
the ground felt.
6. The pair then swaps over and
What were you walking over? repeats the activity.
How sensitive are your feet? Are 7. Gather the group together and
they more, the same, or less discuss the activity. Some ideas for
sensitive than your hands? discussion are given below:
Did you use your sense of hearing
to help you identify what you were
walking on? (for example, if walking How easy was it to nd your tree?
through leaves or through mud or What features of your tree helped
water) you to nd it?
How did being blindfolded make As you touched the tree, how easy
you feel? was it to imagine what it looked
like?
How sensitive are your ngers?
What features of the tree could
they feel (for example, different
textures, different temperatures,
dampness, dryness)?
If you have done the barefoot walk
activity, are your ngers more
sensitive than your feet?
How does touching the tree
compare with just looking at the
tree?
What did you learn about the tree
from touching it that you wouldnt
learn from looking at it?

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 19
SENSE NATURE

Activity 5 Activity 6
Nature Smells Natures Larder
Sense: Smell Sense: Taste Evaluation
1. Sit the group down and ask them 1. Save this activity until the end. 1. Gather the group together and
to shut their eyes and sit quietly for discuss their experiences exploring
a few minutes and concentrate on 2. Ask the group to name all the
nature using each of their senses.
what they can smell around them. different things that make up the
Some ideas for questions are given
natural environment surrounding
below.
2. After a few minutes have a group them. Which of these things could
discussion on the different smells in they eat? What would the different
their surroundings. The results of tastes be? What does something
this discussion are very dependent taste like that is bad for us? Which Which sense gives you the
on the natural area, the time of other senses could we use to help most information about your
year, the weather and even the us decide not to eat something? surroundings?
time of day. Ask the Scouts to Which sense gives you the least?
identify any smells. Where are 3. If there are any edible plants in
they coming from? Do they like the your local natural environment that How do the senses work together
smells? How do the smells make can be picked without harming to give you information?
them feel? the local ecosystem then allow the
Scouts to taste these. What natural things have you
3. Ask the Scouts to explore the discovered today?
natural area and smell as many 4. Ask each Scout to choose an
animal that lives in the surrounding How do the living things in this
natural things as possible to nd environment use their different
their favourite smell. Explain that environment. They must tell the
rest of the group what that animal senses?
they can rub things with their
ngers to generate a smell. The eats. Do they think animals have What is your favourite thing in this
smell might then be passed onto taste buds? How do animals use natural environment?
their ngers. their sense of taste? How does their
animal decide what is good to eat
4. Once they have found their and what is bad to eat?
favourite smell, ask each Scout to
present their object and its smell to
the whole group. Have a discussion
about the natural smells. Some
ideas for questions are given below.

Can they describe why they like


their favourite smell?
Does their favourite smell remind
them of anything? Further activities
Did they nd any smells they didnt 1. Create a poster or display showing
like? all the different features of your
Were the smells of the natural local natural environment
place what they expected? 2. Learn about the difference between
Does nature have its own smell? native and non native species and
nd out about them in your local
How do they think the animals that area.
live here use the smells around
them? 3. Explore different natural habitats
in your local area and other
If they couldnt see, how would places or learn about them from
their sense of smell help them to local experts, books, lms or the
picture their surroundings? internet.
4. Encourage the Scouts to practice
their sensory skills simultaneously
by themselves in their own time.
5. Encourage Scouts to keep their
own nature journal where they
can record their observations with
different senses.

20 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Rod Abson

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Nature Art

Aim 2 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explore a local natural area. An outdoor activity where the Scouts
a world where sufcient have the opportunity to be creative in
Understand the ecosystem connections nature and with nature.
natural habitat exists to
of native species of plants and animals
support native species.
and their habitat needs.
Aim
Be aware of global conservation issues
To gain an appreciation of the variety,
affecting biodiversity.
form and beauty of nature through
creative activities.
Age range
11 to 14

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 21
NATURE ART

Step by step guide


Equipment to activity Evaluation
Paper and pens 1. Find a suitable local natural area 1. Find out what the Scouts learnt
and take the group there. about the natural environment they
visited. What animals and plants
Preparation 2. Ask each Scout to nd a did they see? Did they discover
comfortable space in the natural things in the natural environment
Find a suitable place to visit. environment and spend a few that they hadnt seen before?
minutes looking around them at the How do the different natural
Duration local nature. elements work together to create
3. Gather the group together and talk the environment? Discuss how the
Up to one hour about what they noticed in their ecosystem works.
surroundings. 2. Find out how much the Scouts
Setting 4. Ask each Scout to choose one thing enjoy being in the natural
in the environment and draw a environment. Did the activity help
A local natural area, for example,
picture of it. Hand out paper and them to connect with nature?
forest, beach, mountain or park.
pens. Once they have nished they
present their picture to the rest of
the group.
5. Ask the Scouts to form into small
groups (of between three and ve).
They are going to use the natural
objects around them to create
some art - a picture or a sculpture.
Make sure they respect the natural
objects and do not harm any living
creatures. They can use leaves,
branches, stones, soil, trees, shrubs
Background etc. If you want you can give them
a theme for their art work.
The natural world is full of 6. Once they have nished gather the
variety and beauty. One way to whole group together and go on a
become aware of this and begin tour of the art work. Each group
to understand and appreciate it should explain their work.
is through art. Being creative in
nature and with nature is a fun
way to connect with, observe and
work with the natural world.

Further activities
1. Carry out a proper investigation of
the local natural environment. Use
survey techniques to record the
plants and wildlife, make plaster
casts of tracks, collect animal
droppings and so on to build up a
picture of the creatures that live
there.
2. Encourage Scouts to keep their
own nature journal where they
can record their observations with
different senses.
3. Learn about the native species and
non native species in your local
area. Do the non native species
cause a problem for the native
species? Find out how the non
native species were introduced.

22 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Rod Abson

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Creatures Conference

Aim 2 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explore a local natural area. A discussion activity to explore how
a world where sufcient local ecosystems work and how they
Understand the ecosystem connections might react to different environmental
natural habitat exists to
of native species of plants and animals conditions.
support native species.
and their habitat needs.
Demonstrate the relationship between Aim
personal actions and the availability
To explore the local ecosystem from
of sufcient natural habitat to support
the point of view of the animals and
native species.
plants that live there.
Be aware of global conservation issues
affecting biodiversity.

Age range
15+

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 23
CREATURES CONFERENCE

Step by step guide


Equipment to activity Evaluation
Cards of local living creatures (for 1. Sit the participants down in a circle. 1. After the conference, discuss the
example, man, plants, insects, Ask everybody to pick a card. On effect of human beings on the
birds, animals etc). Cards with each card is a different creature from habitat. Use the following questions
scenarios and problems to be within the local ecosystem. Make to generate a discussion.
solved by the group. sure that one participant is a human
being. Give the group a few minutes
How have human actions affected
Preparation to think about their creature.
the habitat?
2. Choose one leader to be the
Prepare the cards and some Are humans aware of how their
chairperson of the group. They are
problems to ask the group. actions affect the creatures living
the guardian of the Earth and must
around them?
lead the discussion.
Duration 3. Each participant then introduces
If we considered how our actions
affect the environment, would we
themselves. They must tell the
Thirty minutes come to different decisions?
group what creature they are,
where they live, how they live,
Setting what they eat and so on.

Scout meeting place 4. The chairperson presents the rst


question. The questions should
be suitable for the age of the
participants and also for the habitat
being considered. Think about
problems that the habitat could
face or is facing. Think about actual
problems that have affected your
Background local environment. Some example
questions are:
Within a habitat there are many
different animals and plants
existing in co-operation with one The summer has been very dry and
another and with the environment. the grass has not grown as much
This activity imagines that all the as usual. There is not enough for
creatures within a habitat have everyone. What shall we do?
a say in how that community A new family of (choose a suitable
operates. This is very similar predatory animal) is wanting to
to how human society is
managed. Human beings are
move into the habitat. What do the Further activities
group think about that?
part of the natural community 1. Explore the local natural
but do we always give it enough The lake has been polluted by human environment to see how human
consideration? beings. Who has been affected? actions are affecting it. If the
environment is being harmed
This activity enables us to explore Winter is approaching. Is everyone
investigate how and why and nd
what could happen if everything prepared?
out what can be done to solve the
within the natural community was problem.
equal and able to have its say.
5. Each participant comments. They 2. Have the Scouts do further
must think about how the question investigations into their creature to
affects them in their creature role. learn more about this animal in the
Encourage the Scouts to stand up local habitat. What are this animals
for their creature and if they want habitat needs and any threats to
the community to take action on this species.
something then they must tell the
group. For each question the group 3. Visit a wildlife shelter or
need to decide what they can do to rehabilitation centre that helps
make the environment good for the native species.
all the creatures.
6. Prepare some additional cards for
certain creatures. These should
contain a scenario and a question to
ask the group. These problems need
to be sorted out by the whole group.
7. Bring the conference to a close by
thanking all the creatures for their
participation.

24 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Victor C. Ortega

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Catch the Carbon Dioxide

Aim 3 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Be aware of harmful substances in the A fun activity to introduce climate
a world where the risk local environment. change
of harmful substances to
people and the environment
Explain ways to reduce the risk of
harmful substances to people, plants
Aim
are minimised.
and animals. To learn the basic science behind
climate change.
Age range
Under 11

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 25
CATCH THE CARBON DIOXIDE

Step by step guide


Equipment to activity Evaluation
Blindfolds 1. Split the group into two teams. One 1. Discuss the game afterwards using
team are trees and one team are the ideas below.
Preparation carbon dioxide molecules. There
should be more carbon dioxide
molecules than trees. In the game, what effect does
None the number of trees have on
2. Ask the trees to nd a place to the number of carbon dioxide
Duration grow with plenty of space in molecules?
between each tree. Once the tree
Fifteen to thirty minutes has chosen its place to grow it Does this also happen in real life?
cannot move, only its branches Halfway through the game humans
Setting (arms). As they are growing the
trees need to catch carbon dioxide.
came along and chopped down lots
of the trees. What effects did this
Scout meeting place They do this with their branches have (think about immediate and
and leaves. Ask the trees to long term)?
practice catching carbon dioxide
(they should wave their arms What effect did the planting of trees
around). by the Scouts have on the carbon
dioxide molecules?
3. The carbon dioxide molecules are
found oating around in the air. Why does it matter how much
They can move very quickly but carbon dioxide there is in the
Background they cant see where they are atmosphere? Explain the
going (put blindfolds on the carbon greenhouse effect.
Our planet is surrounded by a
dioxide molecules). The carbon
blanket of gases. This is our How can we reduce the amount of
dioxide molecules have to move
atmosphere. As the sun shines on carbon dioxide in the atmosphere?
from one side of the playing area to
the earth it sends us heat. Some
the other without getting caught.
of this is absorbed by the earths
The trees have to try and catch
surface and some of it bounces
them with their branches. A carbon
back into the atmosphere. The
dioxide molecule is caught if a tree
reected heat is trapped by the
touches it and the molecule then
atmosphere and this keeps our
becomes a tree.
planet warm. This is known as the
greenhouse effect. 4. Continue the game until nearly all
the carbon dioxide is gone then
The blanket of gases is getting stop and announce that humans
thicker as we release greenhouse have discovered this forest and
gases by burning fossil fuels want to chop down the trees so
for energy and as we cut down they can grow crops on the soil.
forests for timber and agriculture. The trees get burnt and the carbon
Greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide is released. Choose three
dioxide (CO2), methane and quarters of the trees and turn them
nitrous oxide. As the blanket gets into carbon dioxide molecules. After
Further activities
thicker, the temperature rises. a while the land becomes useless 1. Ask the Scouts to think about
As a result of this, our climate is for growing crops so they decide how their daily actions might
starting to change. to build a town there instead. In affect climate change. What can
the town there are lots of cars and they do to reduce the amount of
factories. These burn fuel which greenhouse gases they produce?
releases more carbon dioxide into
the atmosphere. Choose half of the
remaining trees and turn them into
carbon dioxide molecules.
5. The scenario can then be changed
so that Scouts come along and
plant more trees (turn some of
the carbon dioxide molecules into
trees).

26 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / South Africa Scout Association

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Food Chains and Chemicals

Aim 3 Educational Objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Be aware of harmful substances in the A run around game to show how
a world where the risk local environment and identify their agricultural chemicals build up within
of harmful substances to source. the food chain.
people and the environment
are minimised.
Demonstrate what personal action can
be taken to reduce the risk of harmful
Aim
substances to people and the broader To show how chemicals from
environment. agriculture are passed through
ecological systems and why this is
Age Range harmful to the environment.
11 to 14

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 27
FOOD CHAINS AND CHEMICALS

Equipment Background
Cards showing different items in a Life on earth depends on the sun. The organisms at the beginning
common food chain (for example, The sun provides energy that of a food chain are usually very
grass, rabbit, fox etc.). There plants use to grow and then also numerous while the animals at the
should be many more cards for provide food for other organisms. end of the chain are often large and
the items lower in the food chain One important way in which few in number. It is rare for high
and only one or two for the higher organisms depend on each other end predators to eat other high end
levels. Some type of coloured tags is for their food. Many animals predators. Food chains are normally
(one per person at the bottom of feed only on plants (herbivores), more complicated than a simple chain
the food chain). lots of animals eat only other as most animals eat more than one
animals (carnivores) and some type of food. For example, a fox will
Preparation animals eat both plants and eat rabbits, mice and beetles. In
reality the food chain becomes a food
animals (omnivores). Despite
Make up the food chain cards. these differences in diet, actually web.
Choose a food chain that would be all animals depend on plants for A food chain can be upset by human
affected by agricultural pesticides their food through a relationship actions. This activity focuses on the
and if possible that is relevant to between plants and animals called impact of agricultural chemicals on
your local area. Some ideas are a food chain. food chains. Agricultural crops are
supplied in the resources section. commonly sprayed with chemicals
The cards should be able to be Foxes eat rabbits, rabbits feed
called pesticides. These destroy
worn by the Scout, for example, on grass. A hawk eats a lizard,
insects, fungi and plants that might
they could be pinned or stuck onto the lizard eats a grasshopper
damage or compete with the crop.
jumpers or worn around the neck and a grasshopper eats grass.
on string. In the ocean, sh eat small Pesticides disrupt the food chain in
crustaceans (e.g., shrimps), two main ways. Firstly, by removing
who eat microscopic organisms organisms from it. The majority of
Duration called plankton. Plankton are very these pesticides kill the harmless or
Thirty minutes small organisms that live in the benecial organisms as well as the
ocean and are classied as either harmful ones. If a plant or animal is
Setting phytoplankton or zooplankton. removed from a food chain then the
Scout meeting place Phytoplankton use the energy animals higher up the food chain will
from sunlight to create food via a be affected.
process called photosynthesis.
Secondly, by introducing persistent,
poisonous chemicals into the food
chain. Some of these chemicals take
a long time to break down. Once
eaten, the chemical remains in the
body of the animal and when that
animal is eaten the chemical moves
Example food chains:
into the body of the next animal. The
concentration of the chemical within
Grass > Grasshopper > Lizard > Hawk each animal increases as it moves
up the food chain. The chemical may
Phytoplankton > Zooplankton > Shrimp > Fish > Shark be harmless to larger animals in low
Cactus > Insects > Lizard > Snake > Hawk concentrations but as a result of being
passed through the food chain its
Trees > Insects > Monkey > Leopard concentration might have increased
sufciently to cause disease or death.

28 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
FOOD CHAINS AND CHEMICALS

WSB Inc. / The National Scout Organization of Thailand

Step by step guide


to activity
1. Introduce the subject of food 3. The next activity is food chain tag.
chains. Ask the Scouts some The aim of the game is to catch
questions to nd out what they your prey. Start by letting the
know about food chains. What food plants run around the room and
chains exist in the local natural get warmed up. Set the herbivores
environment? What food chains do (plant eaters) off to catch the
they know about from other natural plants. When they catch a plant
environments? Choose a variety of the herbivore receives one point
examples, such as, the ocean, a and the plant must sit on the
tropical rain forest, the desert. ground. After a few minutes let the
carnivores (animal eaters) start to
2. Give each Scout several long pieces play. When they catch a herbivore
of string and a food chain card. they automatically take their
They must wear the card so it is points. The winner at the end of
visible to the other Scouts. Explain the game is the carnivore with the
the activity. They are going to most points. This might seem unfair
create a food chain. The cards show on the plants and the herbivores
all the different organisms within but the situation will be changed in
a food chain. They must look at the next game when chemicals are
the different plants and animals introduced into the food chain.
on the cards and think about what
their creature would eat and what 4. Repeat the game but this time hand
would eat them. When they nd out a coloured tag to all the players
something that they eat they must who represent the lowest rung in
connect themselves to that creature the food chain (the green plants).
with a piece of string. They should They have been sprayed with a
lie the string on the oor. They will pesticide and the coloured tag
end up with a food chain which represents the chemical. When they
shows a clear progression from are caught they have to hand over
several plants at the base of the their tag and lie down. At the end
food chain to one top predator of the game, ask each carnivore to
at the top but with some animals count up the number of coloured
that are connected to more than tags they have collected.
one other creature. Ask the Scouts
to explain their chain. Is it a food
chain or a food web? This activity
will actually produce a food web
which is a more realistic picture of
what really happens in nature.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 29
FOOD CHAINS AND CHEMICALS

Evaluation
1. The coloured tags represent 2. Encourage the Scouts to think 3. How aware are the Scouts
pesticides that have been sprayed about why the pesticides were used of pesticides in their local
onto the plants to ensure that the and what alternatives to pesticides environment? Use the following
farmers crops are successful. The are available. Use the following questions to help discuss this.
farmer does not want diseases, questions to help your discussion.
insects or other plants to affect his
crops. Discuss how the farmers
actions have affected the natural
environment. Use the following
questions to help your discussion.

Which animals have ended up with Do you think the farmer would stop What crops are grown in your local
the most coloured tags? using pesticides if he knew about environment, region, country?
the damage they cause further up
If the tags are harmful chemicals Do you know if pesticides are used
the food chain?
then is having lots of them good or locally, regionally, nationally?
bad? How could the farmer protect his
Has anyone heard of any local
crops from pests, disease and
What might the chemicals do to the problems from pesticide use?
other plants without using harmful
different animals? pesticides? Do you think problems from
How has the food chain pesticides are well publicised?
system helped to increase the
How could human beings be
concentration of chemicals?
affected by pesticides?
What properties of the chemicals
What can individuals do to reduce
have enabled this to happen?
the risk of pesticides to the
environment?

Further activities
1. Explore how food is grown
locally. Can you nd examples
of organically grown foods?
Are there places growing food
with chemicals? Which ones are
used and why? Find out about
alternatives to pesticides.
2. Find out which animals in your local
area are top end predators. Do
you think they may be affected by
chemicals in the landscape?
3. Grow some of your own food using
organic methods.

30 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Lucy Mace

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

My Carbon Footprint

Aim 3 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explain the local impact of harmful A simple activity to start the group
a world where the risk substances to people and the broader thinking about their personal daily
of harmful substances to environment and what can be done by energy use and how this affects the
people and the environment individuals, groups and the community environment.
are minimised. to reduce the risk.
Understand the global impact of
Aim
harmful substances and how local To raise awareness of how we
actions can change the global contribute to climate change in our
environment. daily lives by understanding how our
everyday actions are associated with
Age range releasing greenhouse gases into the
atmosphere.
15+

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 31
MY CARBON FOOTPRINT

WSB Inc. / World Scouting


Equipment
Question cards, green, orange
and red answer cards. The answer
cards should be in three different
sizes. The red cards must be the
biggest and the green cards the
smallest.

Preparation
Prepare question cards and answer
cards. Use the questions provided
and if appropriate prepare
additional questions that are
relevant to your local environment.

Duration
Thirty minutes
Step by step guide
Background
Setting to activity
Our planet is surrounded by a
Scout meeting place 1. Set the question cards out in a
blanket of gases. This is our
circle and place the answer cards in
atmosphere. As the sun shines on
the middle in three piles (a green
the earth it sends us heat. Some
pile, an orange pile and a red pile).
of this is absorbed by the earths
surface and some of it bounces 2. Each question has three answers
back into the atmosphere. The a green answer, an orange answer
reected heat is trapped by the and a red answer. When making
atmosphere and this keeps our the answer cards, think about the
planet warm. This is known as the number of participants and what
greenhouse effect. their likely answers will be to the
questions. This will determine how
The blanket of gases is getting many answer cards of each colour
thicker as we release greenhouse are made. The answer cards can
gases by burning fossil fuels be made smaller if necessary. The
for energy and as we cut down important point is that the red
forests for timber and agriculture. cards are the largest and the green
Greenhouse gases are carbon cards are the smallest.
dioxide (CO2), methane and
nitrous oxide. As the blanket gets 3. Explain the activity. Each
thicker, the temperature rises. participant moves around the
As a result of this, our climate is circle answering the questions and
starting to change. taking the correct coloured answer
card at each question. Once they
This activity explores how we have answered all the questions
contribute to climate change in they nd a space and lay out their
our daily lives by understanding answer cards on the oor to make
how our everyday actions a patterned mat.
are associated with releasing
4. Once the Scouts have laid out
greenhouse gases into the
their mat explain what it means.
atmosphere.
The mat demonstrates their day
to day energy use, which actually
represents their day to day carbon
footprint. It will vary between
participants. The greater your
energy use the bigger and redder
the mat will be and the less your
energy use the smaller and greener
your mat will be.

32 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
MY CARBON FOOTPRINT

Evaluation
1. Once everyone has nished their
mat have a discussion using the
ideas below.

WSB Inc. / Asociacin de Scouts de Mxico

Who has the smallest, greenest mat


and who has the biggest reddest
mat?
How do they feel about it?
How green are the group in
general?
Are there big differences between
the participants or does everyone
have a similar energy use?
Ask the group how the questions
relate to energy. Some of the
questions have obvious, direct
connections to energy, for example,
do you switch off the lights when
you leave a room? Further activities
Other questions need some thought 1. Learn about renewable energy.
to connect them to energy, for
example, how often do you buy 2. Visit a renewable energy facility in
new things? your local area.

How relevant were the questions to 3 Ask the Scouts to think about how
their daily life? they would do their daily actions if
they had no energy. Run a weekly
What can they do to reduce their meeting using no energy.
carbon footprint?
4. Ask the Scouts to write a list of
What would be easy to do and what
ten things they can do to reduce
would be hard to do?
their carbon footprint. They should
What are the group doing already think about things that are easy to
to help the environment? achieve and things that are more
challenging. After a few weeks,
Are they doing this on purpose or
nd out whether they have reduced
by accident?
their carbon footprint.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 33
MY CARBON FOOTPRINT

How do you get to school/work?


By car Red Card
By bus or train Orange Card
By bike or on foot Green Card

Do you switch off the lights when you leave a room?


Always Green Card
Sometimes Orange Card
Never Red Card

Do you leave your television on standby/in sleep mode?


Always Red Card
Sometimes Orange Card
Never Green Card

Do you recycle?
Never Red Card
Sometimes Orange Card
My Carbon As much as possible Green Card
Footprint
Questions
Do you buy locally produced food?
As often as possible Green Card
Sometimes Orange Card
No/Dont know Red Card

How often do you buy new things?


(for example, clothes, cds, computer games etc)
More than once a week Red Card
Once a week Orange Card
Once a month or less Green Card

Do you use renewable energy?


Yes, a lot Green Card
Yes, but not often Orange Card
No/Dont know Red Card

Have you ever planted a tree?


Yes, several trees Green Card
Yes, one tree Orange Card
No Red Card

34 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Jean-Pierre Pouteau

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

What have I done today?

Aim 4 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Show awareness of how our actions A fun and easy game to start the
a world where the most affect the environment and alternative Scouts thinking about how their
suitable environmental ways to make a smaller impact. actions affect the environment.
practices are used.
Age range Aim
Under 11 To understand that our daily actions
have an impact on the environment.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 35
WHAT I HAVE DONE TODAY?

Evaluation

WSB Inc. / The Singapore Scout Association


Equipment
1. After everyone has had a go, have
Ball a quick discussion with the group
using the ideas below.
Preparation
None Was it easier to think of things that
were good or things that were bad?

Duration When you do everyday things do


you think about how it affects the
Ten to twenty minutes environment?
Do you think it is important to
Setting consider the environment?
Scout meeting place What differences are there within
the group? Why is this?

2. Have each Scout choose one


thing they do that is good for the
environment and one thing they
Step by step guide could improve upon.
Background
to activity 3. Make a group picture showing
Every day we do things that one half of things they do which
1. Gather the group in a circle and are good for the environment and
impact on the environment. Some
hand the ball to one person. the other half the things they can
things we do are good for the
environment and some things we 2. The person with the ball starts by improve
do are bad for the environment. telling the group one thing they
Very often we do things without have done today that is good for
even being aware of how it affects the environment. They should
the environment.This game explain why their actions were good
encourages the Scouts to think for the environment. If they nd
about how our daily actions affect it difcult to think of something
the natural world all around us. ask them to think of one thing
they have done today and decide
if and how it was good for the
environment (have a leader keep
note of the answers given by the
Scouts throughout the activity).
3. The Scout then passes the ball onto
another participant who does the
same.
4. Once the ball has been round the
whole group, repeat the game
but with the question what have
Further activities
I done today that is bad for the 1 Ask each Scout to change their
environment? actions until the next meeting and
to share their plan with their family,
class and/or friends.
2. At the next meeting look at the rst
pictures and make a third picture
showing how their actions have
improved.
3. Use this activity as an
introduction to subjects such
as renewable energy, recycling,
water conservation and energy
conservation.

36 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Scouts Musulmans Algriens

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Garbage Bag Challenge

Aim 4 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Recognise how we are connected A fun game to think about waste and
a world where the most with the environment and how we how we can reduce it.
suitable environmental can make informed choices about our
practices are used. actions that can minimise the impact Aim
on the environment.
To encourage thinking about the waste
Identify potentially better we generate, what can be recycled
environmental practices for your local and how we can reduce what we throw
area. away.
Demonstrate how local solutions can
impact global issues.

Age Range
11 to 14

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 37
GARBAGE BAG CHALLENGE

WSB Inc. / World Scouting


Equipment
Plastic rubbish bags, selection of
waste objects (clean and safe)

Preparation
Prepare the waste objects.

Duration
Thirty minutes

Setting
Scout meeting place

Step by step guide


Background to activity Evaluation
Human society creates a lot of 1. Split the group into teams and give 1. Discuss the activity and introduce
waste. This waste might go into each team a bag of rubbish. the ve R approach to waste.
landll, it might be incinerated or it
might simply be dumped outdoors 2 Explain that the object of the game
and left to decay. Whatever is to make your bag of rubbish as What do the Scouts think about
happens to this waste it is causing small as possible in a set amount these ideas?
a problem for the environment. of time. This is done by sorting
through the rubbish and deciding What do they do already? What
We need to reduce the amount
how to dispose of things in a would be easy to do?
of waste we produce. This can
be done by following the ve R different way. Ask the group to
approach: think about what they can do to
make the bag of rubbish smaller in
Refuse for example, the rst place.
unnecessary packaging, leaets,
3. After ve minutes ask each team to
promotional material, plastic bags
explain why they removed certain
items from their bags and where
Repair clothes, electrical
they will put them if not in the
equipment etc
rubbish. They should also explain
what they would do differently
Further activities
Reduce choose products that
have less packaging, use only what they should identify that some 1. Ask the Scouts to think about
you need things could have been refused packaging and bring in items from
and that they could buy things with home that show packaging that
Reuse buy second hand items, less packaging or packaging that is is good for the environment and
donate items to second hand reusable or recyclable. that is bad for the environment.
shops, use items more than once They should think about whether
4. The team with the smallest bag of
the packaging is necessary, is
rubbish at the end is the winner.
Recycle buy products that can recyclable, is already recycled, how
be recycled and recycle them much manufacturing has gone into
it and how long it will take to decay
in a landll.
2. Set up a recycling station in your
Scout meeting place. Ask the
Scouts if they recycle at home.
3. If there are not recycling or good
waste facilities available, consider
contacting the government to
encourage these to be set up.
4. Write a waste policy for Scout
camp. Think about how you can
reduce the amount of waste
generated and how you will re-use
and recycle during camp.

38 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Jess Inostroza

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Quick Energy Debate

Aim 4 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Explain how our choice of action and A quick thinking game to test your
a world where the most responsibility as an individual, group, Scouts ability to think under pressure
suitable environmental community and country can affect the and their powers of persuasion.
practices are used. environment.
Understand how we can change our
Aim
actions to improve our impact on the To think about energy issues from all
environment. points of view.
Demonstrate how local solutions can
impact global issues.

Age range
15+

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 39
QUICK ENERGY DEBATE

WSB Inc. / Victor C. Ortega


Equipment
Stopwatch, whistle or bell

Preparation
None

Duration
Thirty minutes

Setting
Scout meeting place

Step by step guide


Background to activity
There are lots of environmental 1. This activity assumes that the 4. Repeat the game with the next two
issues associated with energy. Scouts already have some Scouts and continue until everyone
This game asks the Scouts to knowledge of issues relating to has had a go. The winners can
think about them from all points of energy production and use. It may then compete against each other
view. The participants may have to be necessary to do an introductory until there is an overall debating
argue a point that they dont agree activity to remind the Scouts of champion. If you have a lot of
with and the true skill in this game what they know. Scouts, you can split the group into
is being able to do so convincingly. two.
2. Select two Scouts to compete
in the debate and one to be the
timekeeper. The rest of the Scouts
are the judges.
3. Give each contestant one of the
topics provided. This should be
done secretly so the contestants
dont know their opponents subject.
Give the contestants 30 seconds
to think about what they are going
to say. They then get 30 seconds
each to state their argument. After
both contestants have talked for
30 seconds they then get a further
15 seconds each to respond to
what the other contestant has said.
The judges then decide who was
the most convincing and declare
them the winner. The winner of
each debate is the contestant
who has shown the greatest skill
in presenting their argument.
The judges must forget their own
opinions on the subject matter and
judge purely on the debating skill of
the contestants.

40 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
QUICK ENERGY DEBATE

Evaluation
1. At the end of the competition 2. Think about the issues that the
discuss the debates with the debates brought up. Discuss with
Scouts. Some ideas for discussion the Scouts their true feelings on
are given below. energy production and use. Some
ideas for discussion are given
below.

Which subjects were easy to debate


and which were difcult?
Where does energy
Did knowing more about the come from?
subject make it easier to present an
argument? How does energy production harm
the environment?
Was arguing against what you
believe difcult? How can energy be produced with
less impact on the environment?
Was it easier to argue for what you
believe in? What can individuals do to help
energy production have less impact
on the environment?
How do you save energy in your
daily life?
What are the Scouts already doing
and what do they want to do in the
future?
WSB Inc. / The Scout Association of Maldives

Further activities
1. Visit a renewable energy facility in
your local area.
2. Make your own renewable energy,
for example, a solar oven, a wind
turbine, a water mill.
3. Explore how energy is produced in
your country. Is it non renewable or
renewable?
4. Learn about the environmental
problems associated with using non
renewable energy, for example,
climate change, air pollution,
nuclear waste disposal, water
pollution from mining, problems
associated with offshore oil
platforms.
5. Decide how your Scout group would
nd the worlds energy. Pretend
that you have control over all the
resources of the Earth. Think about
all the different ways of creating
energy, all the different things
we need energy for and also all
the different ways we could save
energy. You can do this activity as a
debate or as a competition.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 41
QUICK ENERGY DEBATE

Debating subjects

Coal is great And for a bit of


vs light relief, try these
Coal is bad
crazy subjects...
I love solar power
vs
I hate solar power

I think wind farms are ugly


vs
I think wind farms are beautiful
Green is the best colour
vs
WSB Inc. / World Scouting

Global warming is very important Red is the best colour


vs
Global warming is not important
Bananas are the worst frui
vs
It will be good Apples are the worst fruit
if temperatures rise
vs
It will be bad if temperatures rise You should only wash once a week
vs
You should wash every day.
Solar power is the best form
of energy
vs
Wind power is the best form
of energy

We should use nuclear power


vs
We shouldnt use nuclear power

We need to reduce our energy use


vs
We dont need to reduce
our energy use

Everyone should know how to grow


vegetables and basic foods
vs
Food production should be left to the
professionals - farmers

Urbanisation is good
vs
People should be encouraged
to stay in the countryside

42 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Korea Scout Association

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

What Disaster am I?

Aim 5 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Be able to recognise different types A fun game to introduce the different
a world where people are of environmental hazards and natural types of natural disaster.
prepared to respond to disasters.
environmental hazards and
Demonstrate how to be prepared and
Aim
natural disasters.
react to environmental hazards and To encourage thinking about
natural disasters in the local area. natural disasters and their different
characteristics.
Age range
Under 11

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 43
WHAT DISASTER AM I?

WSB Inc. / Ella Maesepp


Equipment
Cards showing images of natural
disasters, safety pins.

Preparation
Print cards showing a picture of
a natural disaster and its name.
There should be enough cards for
one for each Scout.

Duration
Twenty minutes

Setting
Scout meeting place

Step by step guide


Background to activity Evaluation
Natural disasters occur all 1. Introduce the subject of natural 1. Gather the whole group together
around the world and can have disasters. Ask the Scouts to name and show them all the different
a devastating effect on the some different types of natural natural disaster images. Find out
natural environment and on disaster. Ensure that they have from the group which images they
human beings. There are lots of enough knowledge to begin the are familiar with and which images
different types of natural disaster, game and if necessary show the they are not familiar with.
for example, hurricane, tropical group some pictures and ask them
cyclone, typhoon, tornado, to describe the images.
drought, ood, volcano, landslide, 2. Pin a picture of a natural disaster
tsunami, heat wave, wildre, insect onto theback of each Scout.
plague, famine, health epidemic, Explain the object of the game.
avalanche and earthquake. It is They have to nd out what their
very important that we have an natural disaster is by moving
understanding of natural disasters. around the group and asking each
We need to be prepared to respond other questions. The question can
to them when they happen to us only be answered with a yes or Further activities
and to be able to provide support a no. For example, does my
when they happen to others. 1. Choose a few suitable examples
disaster involve wind?
of natural disasters and ask the
3. The Scouts move around the Scouts to think about how they
room, asking questions until they could prepare for them.
have worked out which natural
2. Find out about natural disasters
disaster they are. The rst Scout
in your country and prepare some
to tell the leader the correct
information about what happened,
answer wins.
why it happened and how the
4. Allow the game to continue until emergency services coped with the
everyone has worked out which situation.
natural disaster they have worked
3. Go on a visit to a local emergency
out which natural disaster they
services station, for example, the
are.
Fire Brigade or the Police Station
and nd out how they deal with
emergency situations. Discover
if they have ever helped out in a
natural disaster.
4. Practice basic rst aid skills and
how to get help in an emergency.

44 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSF / Yoshi Shimizu

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

Prepare for Disaster!

Aim 5 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Be able to recognise different types An activity to create an emergency
a world where people are of environmental hazards and natural response plan and kit in preparation
prepared to respond to disasters and explain why they occur. for natural disasters.
environmental hazards and
Demonstrate how to help other
natural disasters.
people to be prepared to respond to
Aim
environmental hazards and natural To understand why it is important
disasters in the local area. to prepare for natural disasters.

Age range
11 to 14

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 45
PREPARE
PREPARE FORFOR DISASTER
DISASTER

WSB Inc. / Jade Elliott


Equipment
Paper pens, emergency response
kit items (optional), WOSM movie`
Natural Disasters:
Will you be prepared?

Preparation
Study the emergency
equipment list provided.

Duration
Twenty minutes

Setting
Scout meeting place

Step by step guide to


Background activity:
Natural disasters occur all 1. Introduce the subject of natural
around the world and can have disasters and nd out how much
a devastating effect on the the Scouts know about the subject.
natural environment and on What natural disasters have
human beings. There are lots of affected their community or their
different types of natural disaster, country? What natural disasters
for example, hurricane, tropical have they heard about in other
cyclone, typhoon, tornado, countries? What natural disasters
drought, ood, volcano, landslide, could affect them in the future?
tsunami, heat wave, wildre, insect
plague, famine, health epidemic, 2. A short movie is available from
avalanche and earthquake. the World Scouting website (www.
scout.org) to introduce how
It is very important that we have various natural disasters affect
an understanding of natural Scouts around the world, or have
disasters. The effect of a natural information from recent natural
disaster can sometimes be disasters to share with the Scouts.
minimised with careful preparation, 3. Choose a suitable natural disaster.
awareness of warning signs (if This could be one that is relevant
appropriate) and knowledge of to the local area or one that is best
what to do once the disaster understood by the Scouts. Gather
occurs. We need to be prepared the Scouts in a group and describe
to respond to them when they the natural disaster to them.
happen to us and to be able to
provide support when they happen 4. Split the Scouts into small groups
to others. and ask each group to think about
how their lives would be affected by
the natural disaster. Give them ve
minutes to discuss this and then
ask for their thoughts.

46 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSF / Yoshi Shimizu
PREPARE FOR DISASTER

Evaluation
1. Ask the Scouts if they have ever
thought about how they would cope
in a natural disaster before. Do any
of the Scouts have an emergency
response kit or plan at home
already? Will any of the Scouts
go home and help their family to
create a kit or plan?
2. Note to Leaders: Natural disasters
can be devastating experiences
and impact on the environment,
infrastructure and people long after
the initial event. It is important to
provide ongoing support for young
people to assist their recovery
following a natural disaster.

5. Ask the Scouts how their survival 7. As a group, decide on the contents
would be affected if they were for your emergency response kit.
prepared for the disaster. Write If you have any of these items with
down their ideas. you hand them out to the Scouts to
look at.
6. One way to increase your potential
for survival during a natural 8. Using all the ideas generated so
disaster is to have an emergency far, create an Emergency Response
response kit. This kit will be kept in Plan. This could incorporate ideas
a box or a bag that is transportable, for assessing the severity of a
in an accessible and known location natural disaster (if appropriate)
and will contain items that have a before it happens, the emergency
clear survival purpose. Give each response kit, actions to take to
group a list of items that might go respond in the immediate instance
into an emergency response kit. to the disaster and actions to
Use the list provided and add extra take in the event of the situation
items or adjust to suit available lasting a certain length of time.
local resources as relevant to the An example plan is provided.
type of natural disaster being This focuses on how to maintain
discussed. An alternative option communication throughout a
is to also put in some items that natural disaster. Further activities
are not suitable. Ask each group 1. Having a knowledge of rst aid is
to choose the most relevant items very important when placed in an
from the list. You can ask them to emergency situation. Organise a
choose a certain number of items rst aid course for the Scouts.
or you can ask them to list them
in order of importance. When each 2. Visit a local emergency services
group has nished ask the Scouts facility, for example, the Fire
to present their lists to the whole Brigade or the Police Station. Find
group and explain their choices. out about their procedures for
dealing with emergency situations
and if they have had to deal with a
natural disaster.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 47
PREPARE FOR DISASTER

Example Family Family Emergency


WSB Inc. / Pakistan Boy Scouts Association

Emergency Response Kit Response Plan

CONTENTS
ICE In Case of Emergency
Water 9 Litres per person (3 Litres
number programmed into mobile
per person for 3 days) for drinking and
phone and carried on a card in
cleaning.
your wallet or school bag.
Food Non perishable, for a minimum
Family meeting point somewhere
of 3 days. Can opener if food is in a
clear of the home, that the entire
can.
family can re-unite at. A local park or
Blankets and warm clothing. Tent other open area is a good location. At
or other shelter if required. least two known routes to get there, in
case one is cut off.
Communications Radio (and
batteries) to listen for updates on Out of Town Family Contact a
disaster, mobile telephone (Note: grandparent, aunt, uncle or family
mobile phones may not always work friend who lives in a different city
after a disaster situation). to act as the central communication
point. All family members check in
Notepad and pen or pencil to record with this person after the disaster, and
important information. this person (away from the disaster
Light Torch with spare batteries. zone) can co-ordinate if all family
Candles and matches in a waterproof members are accounted for, and be
container can be helpful but should not the liaison with Red Cross or other
be used if there is a risk of gas leaks. relief organisations.

1st Aid Kit and any medications that This person is also notied in the
are required by family members. case of an imminent disaster, to
be informed that all of the family is
Toilet Bucket, garbage bags, together, what equipment they have
disinfectant, trowel. with them, where they are evacuating
Entertainment (especially with to and how long they expect to be out
children) pack of cards, crosswords, of contact for.
special toy or games. Local Evacuation Centre nd out
Water purication method where the evacuation centre in your
a cooker to boil water and/or water town is situated. School? Sports
purication treatment tablets. Ground? Town Hall?

Protection - Gloves, face mask, long


trousers and long sleeve shirt, hat,
waterproof jacket.
Whistle
Rope
Map of town/city and compass.
Wrench or pliers in case gas or
watermains need to be switched off.

48 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Ella Maesepp

WORLD SCOUT
ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Programme Activity Resource

A Natural Disaster Story

Aim 5 Educational objectives Summary


Scouts are working towards Be able to recognise different types A fun, drama based activity that
a world where people are of environmental hazards and natural explores how to cope when faced with
prepared to respond to disasters and explain why they occur. a natural disaster.
environmental hazards and
natural disasters.
Demonstrate how to help other
people to be prepared to respond to
Aim
environmental hazards and natural To gain an awareness of the
disasters in the local area. importance of preparation and decision
making in a natural disaster situation.
Explain how changes to the
environment can inuence
environmental hazards and natural
disasters.

Age range
15+

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 49
A NATURAL DISASTER STORY

Step by step guide to


Equipment activity Evaluation
Scenarios, paper and pens, WOSM 1. Introduce the subject of natural 1. Gather the group together to
movie Natural Disasters: Will You disasters. Ask the Scouts to name discuss the activity. Use the
Be Prepared? (optional) different types of natural disaster following questions to help the
and write their answers on a large discussion.

Preparation sheet of paper.


2. A short movie is available from
Print off the disaster scenarios What were the main differences in
the World Scouting website (www.
from the resources section, or the natural disaster scenarios?
scout.org) to introduce how
amend as appropriate for your various natural disasters affect How did the preparation for each
group. Scouts around the world, or have disaster vary?
information from recent natural
Duration disasters to share with the Scouts. Could all the disasters be prepared
for?
3. Split the Scouts into groups and
Sixty minutes
give each group a natural disaster
How important was the decision
scenario card. Use the examples
Setting provided or write your own using
making in each scenario?
natural disaster types that are more How pressured was the decision
Scout meeting place applicable for your Scouts. Ensure making in each scenario?
that the examples used show
the different timescales that are Do they think this is how it might
associated with natural disasters. happen in reality?
The card asks the group to prepare
a short play about the situation
Background described on their card. You can 2. Note to Leaders: Natural disasters
provide costumes and props if can be devastating experiences
Natural disasters occur all appropriate. Allow approximately and impact on the environment,
around the world and can have twenty minutes for preparation and infrastructure and people long after
a devastating effect on the rehearsal. the initial event. It is important to
natural environment and on provide ongoing support for young
human beings. There are lots of 4. Ask each group to present their people to assist their recovery
different types of natural disaster, play to the rest of the group. following a natural disaster
for example, hurricane, tropical
cyclone, typhoon, tornado,
drought, ood, volcano, landslide,
tsunami, heat wave, wildre, insect
plague, famine, health epidemic,
avalanche and earthquake.

It is very important that we have


an understanding of natural
disasters. The effect of a natural
disaster can sometimes be
minimised with careful preparation,
awareness of warning signs (if
appropriate) and knowledge of
what to do once the disaster Further activities
occurs. We need to be prepared 1. Make an emergency response kit
to respond to them when they with the Scouts. See Prepare for
happen to us and to be able to Disaster! activiy for example.
provide support when they happen
to others. 2. Having a knowledge of rst aid is
very important when placed in an
emergency situation. Organise a
rst aid course for the Scouts.
3. Visit an emergency response facility
in your local area, for example, the
Fire Brigade or the Police Station.
How do they cope with emergency
situations? Have they ever
responded to a natural disaster?

50 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Bangladesh Scouts
A NATURAL DISASTER STORY

Example Disaster Scenarios


SCENARIO 1 The Story
LONG TERM DROUGHT Your family live very happily on Question
a farm in the countryside near What strategies are your family going
Instructions a small town. You have cattle, a to put in place to live through this
vegetable garden and some elds drought?
Read through the following growing crops. Your water supply
story about how a long term It is now ve months into the drought.
comes from the local reservoir
drought affects a family. Only 40% of your usual rainfall has
and your own rainwater tanks.
come, and the crops havent grown so
The story is not complete. At each gap Your father regularly keeps up to your animals have little food.
in the story there is a question to help date with information about weather,
your group think about how to decide You have two options. Firstly,
livestock markets and the agricultural
what happens next. purchase some food for them. This
industry through the internet and
solution is not ideal as there is very
Make the story into a short play to newspapers.
little available due to the drought and
show the rest of the group. One evening, he asks the whole family it is very expensive. The second option
to remain at the table after dinner. is to sell some of our cattle. However,
I am afraid I have some bad news, everyone else is trying to sell their
he says. The weather reports on the animals too, and the prices your family
television are warning that we will would receive are very low.
be facing a drought this year. This
The climate predictions say this
could be very bad news for our crops
drought will last for another year.
and our cattle. We will have to start
Your Mums garden is still beautiful,
thinking about how we will cope.
but your Dad does not seem very
happy these days.
Question
What do you and your family do?

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 51
WSF / Yoshi Shimizu
A NATURAL DISASTER STORY

SCENARIO 2 The Story


HURRICANE Your family live in a house on a hill Question
APPROACHING overlooking the ocean, near the
equator. You have your own power
Does this change any of the plans your
family made?
Read through the following story about supply from a wind generator and
how a hurricane affects a family. solar panels. You live in an area that It is now 7.30 pm. The winds were
receives hurricanes and when the terribly strong this morning and
The story is not complete. At each gap hurricane season is upon you, you coming from the east pieces of
in the story there is a question to help know to be prepared. Your family has buildings and tree branches was ying
your group think about how to decide an emergency kit ready permanently everywhere, trees were being attened
what happens next. and you keep an eye on the weather and the rain kept coming down. Just
forecasts after lunch, the eye of the storm
Make the story into a short play to
crossed over you it was strangely
show the rest of the group.
For the last few days, your family has calm and the sun was shining. Then
been watching reports on the evening Bam!! The winds came howling again,
news of a low pressure system that this time from the west, and more rain
has deepened considerably, turned fell. More ying materials, and the
into a tropical cyclone and is travelling storm surge came in. Everything within
across the ocean heading your way! 1 km of the coast ooded there were
The latest prediction is that it will sh in the streets. Now the winds are
hit the coast tomorrow morning. dying down, but the rain is still falling.
Everyone is warned to be on high alert Question
and prepare for hurricane damage What damage did your home suffer?
immediately. The hurricane is expected
to bring severe wind for around 12 It is one week later and the hurricane
hours. has totally gone but the damage
to your neighbourhood and the
Question environment hasnt.
What do you and your family do to
prepare for the hurricane? Question
How did you help after the hurricane?
Its 6.30 am on the day of the
predicted hurricane. The winds are
starting to pick up and rain is falling
heavily. There are new warnings of a
major storm surge Ocean levels could
rise as much as 5 meters due to the
upward sucking of the cyclone system.

52 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / The National Organization for Scouts and Guides of Oman
A NATURAL DISASTER STORY

SCENARIO 3 The Story


EARTHQUAKE
It is a normal weekend evening and Question
Instructions your family are enjoying dinner in What does the family do?
your apartment. You live in a big city
Read through the following story about on a Pacic Island. Your pet cat all of The shaking comes to a stop. Your
how an earthquake affects a family. a sudden appears really agitated and home is a mess, your mum has burnt
then suddenly a loud rumbling sound her arm when the hot water from
The story is not complete. At each gap the stove hit her skin, and youre all
in the story there is a question to help is heard and everything starts shaking
violently. The TV goes off, things scared, but otherwise youre all okay,
your group think about how to decide including the cat. However, you know
what happens next. are falling off shelves, a light tting
crashes from the ceiling and your Mum that there could be aftershocks.
Make the story into a short play to screams earthquake! Question
show the rest of the group. What do you do now?
After a few minutes the power goes
out suddenly and you are all left in the
dark. You can smell gas coming from
the kitchen.
Question
What can you do about the gas, and
being in the dark?

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 53
CONTENTS SECTION 2
FACTSHEETS
Quotes From Baden-Powell 55
World Scout Environment Programme 57
Framework for Environment Education 59
SCENES - Scout Centres of Excellence
for Nature and Environment 61
The Scouts of the World Award 63
Partnerships for a Supportive Environment 65
Frequently Asked Questions - FAQs 67

54 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
The Scout Association / Sketch by Baden Powell

Factsheet

Quotes From Baden-Powell


Scouting and the environment

Nature study is the key activity in When a Wolf Cub hears the words
Scouting and Guiding. Nature study his rst thought is
about school collections of dried
The aim in Nature study is to develop leaves, but real Nature study means
a realisation of God the Creator, and a great deal more than this; it means
to infuse a sense of the beauty of knowing about everything that is not
Nature. made by man, but is created by God.
The study of nature brings into Nature study should not be the mere
a harmonious whole the question formal class teaching of the school,
of the innite, the historic and the but the interested pursuit of each
microscopic as part of the Great individual girl in that branch of it which
Creators work. And in these, sex and particularly appeals to her, through
reproduction play an honoured part. practical handling and dealing with it.
The wonder to me of all wonders is The man who is blind to the beauties
how some teachers have neglected of Nature has missed half the pleasure
Nature study, this easy and unfailing of life.
means of education, and have
struggled to impose Biblical instruction
as the rst step towards getting a
restless, full-spirited boy to think of
higher things.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 55
QUOTES FROM BADEN-POWELL

The Scout Association / Sketch by Baden Powell

A Lady Cubmaster was teaching a As a Scout, you are the guardian of


Cub Natural History, and asked him: the woods. A Scout never damages a
What is a rabbit covered with - is it tree by hacking it with his knife or axe.
hair, or wool, or fur, or what. The Cub It does not take long to fell a tree, but
replied: Good gracious, Akela, havent it takes many years to grow one, so
you ever seen a rabbit? a Scout cuts down a tree for a good
reason only not just for the sake of
God has given us a world to live in using his axe. For every tree felled,
that is full of beauties and wonders two should be planted.
and He has given us not only eyes to
see them but minds to understand For those who have eyes to see and
them, if we only have the sense to ears to hear, the forest is at once a
look at them in that light. laboratory, a club and a temple.
A Scout/Guide should save animals as Theres nothing like Being Prepared
far as possible from pain, and should is there, for what might seem possible,
not kill any animal unnecessarily, not even if it may not seem probable.
even the smallest of Gods creatures.
Do your best.
By continually watching animals in
their natural state one gets to like Try to leave this world a little better
them too well to shoot them. The than you found it and, when your turn
whole sport of hunting animals lies in comes to die, you can die happy in
the woodcraft of stalking them, not in feeling that at any rate you have not
the killing. wasted your time but have done your
best.
An animal has been made by God just
as you have been. He is therefore a The open-air is the real objective of
fellow-creature. He has not the power Scouting and the key to its success.
of speaking our language, but can feel The key that unlocks the spirit of the
pleasure or pain just as we can, and movement is the romance of woodcraft
he can feel grateful to anyone who is and nature lore.
kind to him.
Scouting is a school of citizenship
A Scout is always helpful to people through woodcraft.
who are crippled or blind or deaf and
dumb; so he is good also to these
dumb fellow-creatures of ours.

56 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / South Africa Scout Association

Factsheet

World Scout
Environment Programme
Nature study is the key activity in
Scouting and Guiding Baden-Powell

The environment is central to the Scouting plays an important role in


Scout Programme and a key element connecting people with the natural
of developing good citizens of the world, especially given the increasing
world. Since Scouting began, young separation of young people from the
people have been connecting with the natural environment. With nearly
outdoors, learning from nature and 50% of the worlds population living
taking positive action for their local in urban settings, it is important to
and global environment. There are incorporate the bigger picture of
many more environmental challenges the environment, which includes
today than when Scouting started, more than just plants, animals and
making it even more important to keep conservation. Helping Scouts to see
the environment central to Scouting, the relationship between their actions
to build on the momentum already in an urban setting and the natural
established and to make Scouting a world is an important element of
positive force for change. environment education.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 57
WORLD SCOUT ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME

The environment is changing all World Scout Environment Principles


around us, with a loss of habitat
and native species, reduced access Programme The environment is central to the
to clean water and clean air, more Scout Programme and a key element
The World Scout Environment
harmful substances entering our of developing good citizens of the
Programme is a collection of tools,
environment and more people being world.
resources and initiatives to support the
affected by natural disasters. Scouts
development of environment education Scouting provides opportunities to
need to understand these issues
in Scouting around the world. The experience and connect with the
and feel empowered to decide what
programme is based on a set of natural world.
are the most suitable environmental
environmental principles and aims that
practices they can apply and take Scouts actively engage in educational
provide a foundation for environment
action to improve their local area. programmes to make informed choices
education in Scouting.
The environment is a global subject about the environment, people and
and Scouting is a global movement. society - choices that reect the Scout
Through environmental education and Promise and Law.
action, Scouting can really make a The World Scout Environment
difference. Programme includes:
1. Principles and aims for environment
The importance of the environment
education in Scouting Aims
to Scouting was highlighted at the
37th World Scout Conference with 2. Framework for environment Scouts are working towards a world
resolutions on environment education education in Scouting and the where:
and sustainable development, 18/05 World Scout Environment Badge 1. People and natural systems have
and 20/05. In response to these clean water and clean air.
resolutions, the Educational Methods 3. Programme Activity Resources
Committee, through the Environment 4. SCENES Scout Centres of 2. Sufcient natural habitat exists to
Education Task Team, has developed Excellence for Nature and support native species.
the World Scout Environment Environment
Programme. This has been developed 3. The risk of harmful substances to
through a process of consultation and 5. Scouts of the World Award people and the environment are
review with environmental education minimised.
experts within Scouting, with partner 6. Partnerships
4. The most suitable environmental
organisations and local level Scout practices are used.
groups in countries around the world.
The World Scout Environment Principles and aims 5. People are prepared to respond to
environmental hazards and natural
Programme provides support for for environment disasters.
Scouts to engage in environmental
education activities, to learn about education in Scouting
nature and the environment and to The principles and aims form the
make informed choices about the foundation that underpins the
environment, people and society - approach to environment education
choices that reect the Scout Promise in Scouting. The principles reafrm
and Law. Scoutings commitment to the
environment and its place in the
broader Scout programme. The aims
identify the key environmental issues
facing the world and provide a focus
for Scouting to address these.

58 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Scouts Australia

Factsheet

Framework
A framework for environment education in
Scouting and the World Scout Environment Badge

The framework for environment The World Scout Environment Badge


education in Scouting and the is intended to replace the World
World Scout Environment Badge is Conservation Badge during the next
based on the principles and aims for triennium, with NSOs phasing out
environment education in Scouting. the use of the World Conservation
It can be used as a tool for National Badge by the 39th World Scout
Scout Organizations to review and Conference. WWF have been consulted
update their environmental education throughout this process and are
programme. aware of the intention to replace the
World Conservation Badge with the
The framework provides a clear World Scout Environment Badge.
structure for the World Scout They are supportive of this decision
Environment Badge, which is intended and have provided support for the
to refocus the attention of WOSM educational content of the World Scout
members on the challenges facing our Environment Programme.
environment from local to global level.
A copy of the framework is included on
pages 6-7.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 59
FRAMEWORK

The World Scout Scouts of the


Environment Badge World Award
The World Scout Environment 1. NSO reads principles and aims for The Scouts of the World Award is
Badge seeks to create an awareness environment education in Scouting aimed at the senior section (over 15
of personal responsibility for the and the framework for environment years old) and is focused on the areas
environment. The badge encourages education in Scouting and the of environment, development and
Scouts to connect with nature, think World Scout Environment Badge. peace. The World Scout Environment
about how we interact with the Programme can support the delivery
environment and take action to protect 2. NSO reviews current environmental of the Scouts of the World Award.
it. The environment is a global subject education programme against the The World Scout Environment Badge,
and the badge focuses on learning framework. completed by the senior section, can
about local and global issues and how 3. NSO develops suitable badge complement the educational content
taking local action can help both of requirements for their age sections of the Scouts of the World Award.
these. in accordance with the educational For more information on the Scouts
objectives for each aim. of the World Award go to: www.
The World Scout Environment Badge scoutsoftheworld.net
is based on the principles and aims for 4. NSO informs WOSM (via the World
environment education in Scouting. Scout Bureau) of intention to adopt
The badge is carried out in two stages: the World Scout Environment
Explore and Reect and Take Action.
For the rst stage each aim is explored
Badge. Supportive educational
through a variety of experiential 5. NSO informs members of the resources for
activities that enable the participant to availability of the World Scout
connect with the subject, learn about Environment Badge. environment education
it and think about how we interact 6. NSO provides leader training and in Scouting
with it. For the second stage, a need ongoing programme support and
to take action is identied and an The Environment Education Task
review for delivery of the World Team has engaged with other partner
environmental project is planned and Scout Environment Badge.
executed. This should be related to organisations and Scouts from many
the learning achieved in the exploring countries to develop supportive
stage and the local environmental educational resources that relate
conditions. to the framework and World Scout
Environment Badge. These were tested
The purpose of the badge is for between December 2007 to March
the Scouts to identify personal 2008 with local level Scout groups
responsibility for the environment. in 12 countries around the world in
This should not stop once they order to gather direct feedback on the
have nished the badge. It is hoped effectiveness and relevance of this
that achieving the World Scout framework and resources for Scout
Environment Badge is the rst step in groups. With a diversity of Scouting
awakening enthusiasm for the natural experience and external reviews,
world and creating a generation the feedback was very positive and
of Scouts who care about the the Scout groups were able to apply
environment and are prepared to take the framework and activities to their
action to protect it. environmental conditions and needs.
The framework for environment These environment programme
education in Scouting and the World activity resources are available directly
Scout Environment Badge provides on the www.scout.org website, and
educational objectives for each aim, sample resources are provided in the
based on three age ranges: under Environment Kit available at the 38th
11, 11 to 14 and 15 +. Activity World Scout Conference.
guidelines provide further supportive
content that can help with developing
and delivering the World Scout
Environment Badge. The framework
should be used by National Scout
Organizations to develop requirements
and activities for the World Scout
Environment Badge that are applicable
to their local environment, using the
following process:

60 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / Victor C. Ortega

Factsheet

SCENES - Scout Centres of


Excellence for Nature and
Environment
SCENES
As part of the World Scout Existing SCENES Centres are available
Environment Programme, there is to support the development of
a renewed emphasis on SCENES environmental education programmes
(Scout Centres of Excellence for and environmental management
Nature and Environment) and practices at Scout Centres, with
the SCENES Network to provide a the overall goal of establishing new
valuable resource to engage Scouts SCENES Centres.
in learning about and caring for our
environment. It is anticipated that
more National Scout Organizations
will look to their own Scout Centres
to identify current good examples
of campsites that provide natural
settings, offer environmental education
programmes and demonstrate good
environmental management practices.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 61
SCENES CENTRES

Current SCENES Centres


As at the 38th World Scout
Conference, there are nine SCENES
- regularly reviews and develops
the environmental learning
The SCENES Network
Centres across seven countries: experiences The SCENES Network is an open
network for all people interested
AUSTRALIA: - shares environmental practices in the development of SCENES.
Eprapah, The Charles S. Snow with guests Membership of the SCENES Network
Scout Environmental Education is a requirement for SCENES Centres
- includes engagement in the
Centre and is recommended for Scout
SCENES Network
AUSTRIA: centres working towards SCENES
- provides opportunities to learn accreditation. The SCENES Network is
Techuana Youthcamp
about other SCENES Centres supported by WOSM.The function of
CANADA: the SCENES Network is:
- provides learning opportunities
Blue Springs Scout Reserve
that can support the World - to support Scout Centres
DENMARK: Scout Environment Badge and wishing to improve their
Houens Odde Spejdercenter Scouts of the World Award environmental management
3. Environmental management practices or environmental
Naesbycentret education programmes;
is practiced which:
Stevninghus Spejdercenter - to share best practices, ideas
- is based on a well managed
SOUTH AFRICA: centre approved by NSO and experiences among
makeng Scene Center SCENES Centres;
- has an environmental policy
SWITZERLAND: that: - to support the development
Kandersteg International of environmental education
- considers the principles resources for use in SCENES
Scout Centre
and aims for environment Centres; and
USA: education in Scouting
Florida Sea Base - to distribute local environmental
- protects environmentally information through the
sensitive areas of the centre Network.
- reviews and takes action to
Key requirements to reduce the environmental The SCENES Network operates as
footprint of the centre
SCENES a virtual web based community
supported by physical meetings of
- embraces ongoing improvement
SCENES consists of three SCENES Centres representatives and
through self and peer
key requirements: other Network members on a time
assessment
scale appropriate to the Network.
1. A natural area which: - establishes appropriate links
The virtual SCENES Network provides
- has sufcient natural habitat to with local environmental
a shared space for discussions, sharing
support native species organisations and projects
of experiences, les, chat facilities
and can be accessed by registering
- provides opportunities for
through:
Scouts to experience and The SCENES Charter
connect with the natural world www.communityzero.com/scenes
The SCENES Charter is an agreement
- provides a place for that all SCENES Centres and their For more information on SCENES
unstructured play and respective National Scout Organization please see the SCENES Guidelines
exploration in nature adhere to. It provides guidance as available from the World Scout Bureau
to how SCENES Centres can actively and the World Scouting website:
2. Environment education is
contribute to protecting the natural
available which:
environment, offer environmental www.scout.org/scenes
- is based on the principles and education experiences and
aims for environment education demonstrate sound environmental
in Scouting management practices, as well as
a commitment to supporting the
- provides opportunities to learn SCENES Network. It also provides a
about the natural features of tool for ofcially recognising current
the centre and surrounding and new SCENES Centres within
natural environment the World Organization of the Scout
- as a minimum - provides Movement, when endorsed by the
unguided environmental NSO, Scout Centre and communicated
learning experiences to WOSM via the World Scout Bureau.

- optimally - provides guided


environmental learning
experiences

62 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc.

Factsheet

The Scouts of the World Award


Environment, Development and Peace

What we are aiming to achieve


The Scouts of the World Award has The Scouts of the World Award
been launched in order to encourage concerns global citizenship-preparation
a stronger involvement of Rover for young adults and emphasises
Scouts in the development of society three core-themes demanding
by making them more aware of the understanding, skills and knowledge,
present world issues. for life on a small planet: Peace,
Environment and Development.
The Scouts of the World Award is open
to everyone between the ages of 15
and 26 years, regardless of ability,
race, faith or location. This provides
a great opportunity to the NSOs to
increase their membership at local and
national level, given the possibility to
invite non-Scouts persons (in the age
cover by the Rover Scout Section 18-
22) to participate in the Rover Scout
Programme, and to encourage them,
after completing the Scouts of the
World Award, to be part of the Rover
Scout Section.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 63
SCOUTS OF THE WORLD AWARD

Why this is important Examples from


in Scouting around the world
The Scouts of the World Australia Taiwan
Award is an initiative to Scouting Tugeda in the Solomon SW Voluntary Service of Water
support the objectives of Islands. Hannah Lord is a Rover from Conservation. Taipei Rover Scouts
the Rover Scout Section. Erindale Rover Crew and Michael took the chance to set an exhibition
It attracts, empowers and engages Freeman a Venturer from Stromlo- of Protecting the Water Resources
youth in action of world importance. Forest Venturer Unit in Canberra, to promote the ideas of conserving
That action is based upon universal Australian Capital Territory (ACT). water resources. They developed three
values - freedom, tolerance, The ACT Branch is leading Australia in kinds of activities in a Conservation
equality, respect for nature, shared establishing the Scouts of the World centre, including Q&A of water
responsibility - respected in any Award, and Michael and Hannah are resources, water map of Taiwan, and
culture and enshrined in the UNs both actively involved as members bamboo relay game. These games
Millennium Declaration. Scouting of the Cottermouth Scouts of the not only let young adults have a good
has promoted those same values for World Base Committee. Michael ran time, but taught them a lot of useful
almost 100 years. the rst Australian Discovery in July knowledge about water conservation.
2006, which focused on Peace and All Rover Scouts will keep designing
It affords rare opportunities for our local Indigenous community. new activities and carrying it out
adolescents to work in multi-cultural Hannah was also the Team Leader in the coming voluntary service
international teams. It makes Scouting of the rst Australian Scouts of the opportunities.
more attractive as a mechanism for World Voluntary Service. This youth-
young people to join an international led project saw 42 people travel to the
network and make a difference in their Solomon Islands in October 2006 to France
communities at the local, national and complete two weeks service with the
international level. local Scouting community and the Red A SW Base in Provence. Every summer
Cross School for the Disabled. At a Venture-Scout and Rover camps are
The Scouts of the World Award helps organised in the most threatened
time when the political and diplomatic
the NSOs to develop partnerships areas. Scouts receive a special training
relations between Australia and the
with other NSOs willing to help in order to be able to camp without
Solomon Islands were at an all-time
each other in implementing the SW threatening the environment. Part of
low, Scout teams were walking along
Award, sharing human resources and their activities is focused on preventing
the main street, Mendana Avenue in
knowledge (trainers, documents, etc). forest res. Equipped with binoculars,
Honiara, wearing bright green t-shirts
that read Scouting Tugeda; Solomon radio-transmitters and compasses,
Islands & Australia on the back. The they take their turn in watching towers
team members were proud to be in order to detect smokes and give
Resources available Scouts, and it showed everyone how their precise location to the remen.
Scouting is such a powerful social force They have the responsibility to make
A book called Guidelines of the
in both of communities. a Canadair plane take off and drop
Scouts of the World Award can be
water on the starting re. Also they
downloaded from the website of the
patrol in the forest with mountain-
SW Award: www.scoutsoftheworld.
bikes and inform the tourists on the
net . This document gives guidelines
risks of forest re. The base of the
on how National Scout Organizations
project is one of the rst Scouts of
can implement the Scouts of the World
the World base. The training courses,
Award, as an element of their Rover
which are organised for Rover Scouts,
Scout Section programme, and open it
will become Scouts of the World
to all young people, members or not of
Discoveries.
the Scout Movement.
Different elements have been
created to support National Scout
Organizations on implementing the SW
Award, such as: the SW Passport, SW
Identity Guidelines, SW Promotional
materials and visual aids.
For more information
www.scoutsoftheworld.net

64 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
The Scout Association

Factsheet

Partnerships for
a Supportive Environment
Scouts are encouraged at all levels Alcoa Foundation has invested in local
to identify suitable partners that can community projects to be a source
support the development and delivery of positive community change and
of environment education in Scouting. enhancement, with over US$465
WOSM has been working with several million invested since 1952.
partner organisations and co-operating
with NSOs to develop the World Scout Alcoa Foundation and WOSM have
Environment Programme. These developed a partnership focused
partnerships have included working on environment and sustainability
with: education in Scouting. A two-year
$US205,000 grant has supported
the Environment Education Task
Team in developing the World Scout
Environment Programme. This grant
also assisted environmental education
activities at major events such as the
Alcoa Foundation World Scout Jamboree. In addition,
(www.alcoa.com/foundation) ve European countries (Germany,
Alcoa Foundation is a nonprot U.S. Hungary, Italy, Switzerland and the
corporate foundation with assets of United Kingdom) are supported in
approximately US$542 million. Its further developing their environmental
mission is to actively invest in the programmes.
quality of life in Alcoa communities
worldwide. Throughout its history,

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 65
PARTNERSHIP FOR A SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENT

Clean Up the World The Web of Hope Volvo Adventure


(www.cleanuptheworld.org) (www.thewebofhope.com) (www.volvoadventure.org)

Clean Up the World is a not-for- The Web of Hope are a nonprot The Volvo Adventure focuses on
prot, non-government, apolitical organisation that has provided technical practical projects undertaken by
organisation that unites communities and academic input into the development young people to improve their local
with a common focus to clean up the of the World Scout Environment environment. This UNEP sponsored
world Scout groups in any city, town Programme. They are assessing the event is open to young people around
or village can get involved in Clean carbon footprint of the World Scout the world aged between 13 and 16
Up the World by simply having their Youth Forum and Conference and years. Teams must be between two
National Scout Organization register. offering recommendations to reduce the to ve young people with one adult as
Scouts have been actively involved in environmental impact of large Scout supervisor. Scouts have previously
this UNEP sponsored programme since events. been amongst the top 15 nalists,
its beginning in 1993 and Scouts are who come together in Gteborg in
further encouraged to be involved, Sweden to present their project to a
with the primary focus over the Clean panel of judges. The top three teams
Up the World weekend annually held in are awarded prizes of $US10,000,
the third weekend in September. $US6,000 and $US4,000 to further
support their project.

United Nations
Environment
Jane Goodall Programme (UNEP)
Institute (JGI) (www.unep.org)
(www.janegoodall.org)
Through the partnership with
the United Nations Environment
WWF (World Wide Fund
Founded by world renowned
primatologist Jane Goodall, JGI is a global Programme (UNEP) we have received for Nature, formerly
nonprot organisation whose mission support to major Scouting events such
as the World Scout Jamboree; opened
World Wildlife Fund)
is to inspire and empower individuals
to take informed, compassionate and opportunities for Scouts to enter (www.panda.org)
effective action to make the world a environmental competitions; Scouts
WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature)
better place for all living things. Jane have engaged in worldwide campaigns
is one of the largest environmental
Goodall has supported the World Scout such as the Billion Trees Campaign
organisations in the world with
Jamboree and the development of the and World Environment Day; Scouts
more than 2000 WWF conservation
World Scout Environment Programme. contribution to the environment
projects currently underway around
Roots & Shoots is the JGI worldwide have been highlighted through UNEP
the world. The vast majority of
environmental and humanitarian publications; Scouts attended UNEP
these focus on local issues. They
education programme, supporting young International Youth and Childrens
range from school nature gardens
people of all ages in projects that benet Conferences within the Tunza Youth
in Zambia, to initiatives that appear
people, animals and the environment Programme; as well as having
on the packaging in supermarkets,
encouraging students to analyse representation at UNEP Governing
from the restoration of orangutan
problems in their communities and then Council meetings and receiving expert
habitats to the establishment of giant
take action to address those problems advice in developing the World Scout
panda reserves. WWF have a long-
Environment Programme.
standing relationship with WOSM and
are happy to provide ongoing support
for developing environment and
sustainability programmes in Scouting.

66 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
WSB Inc. / The Danish Guide and Scout Association

Factsheet

Frequently Asked Questions - FAQs


What do the World Scout Environment Programme
logo and World Scout Environment Badge mean?

At the centre of the World Scout In the World Scout Environment


Environment Programme logo is Programme logo, the world is
Antarctica - the only collectively supported by three leaves to symbolise
managed continent in the world and water, air and plants which are all
one of the most at risk from climate important environmental elements to
change. The other landforms create support life. The World Scout Emblem
a world image - not showing any shows that it is an ofcial programme
one particular continent or country, of the World Organization of the
as Scouts are encouraged to look Scout Movement and its inclusion as
beyond their own borders and think of a registered trademark gives the logo
the world. The colours of blue, green legal protection. The words World
and white are commonly associated Scout Environment Programme are
with nature and the purple of World written with the graphic image and can
Scouting is blended with these. The be translated into other languages.
Sun which brings life to our world is
reected in the water.

W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s 67
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS - FAQs

The World Scout Environment Badge What happens to the World Scout
has the same world image as used in Conservation Badge (Panda
the logo, encompassed by a circle of badge)?
rope which reminds us that we are all
connected on this one world. There are The 38th World Scout Conference
three colours of rope, incorporating passed the Resolution 22/08 which
colours used within the world image, to recommends the World Conservation
show the progression made by Scouts Badge be phased out during
as they move through the sections the next triennium by National
and advance their appreciation of the Scout Organizations which use it.
environment. The rope colours are National Scout Organizations were
blue for Cub Scouts, green for Scouts encouraged to adopt the framework
and purple for Rover Scouts. Please do for environment education in Scouting
not make modications to the image of and incorporate the ideas through
the World Scout Environment Badge or a regular review of their youth
World Scout Environment Programme programme and by offering the World
logo. Scout Environment Badge. This helps
to bring the environment education
WORLD SCOUT ENVIRONMENT BADGE dimension of the youth programme
up to date with the situation of today.
BLUE IS FOR CUB SCOUTS Where can I get the World WWF have been fully supportive of
Scout Environment Badges and this transition to the World Scout
Certicates from? Environment Badge.
The World Scout Environment Badges
and Certicates are made available to
the ofcial representative of a National How can we show the progressive
Scout Association/Organization that stages for our youth members to
has been appointed in the World Scout earn the World Scout Environment
Environment Programme Agreement. Badge when they move up to the
The Agreement is available from the next age section?
World Scout Bureau and online at
www.scout.org/environment with In response to feedback received from
two options: Pack 1 (non-commercial several National Scout Organizations
use) or Pack 2 (commercial use). The to show progress of youth members
World Scout Environment Badges and earning the World Scout Environment
Certicates can then be purchased Badge and to encourage them to earn
from the Scoutstore, the Ofcial the badge in their next age section,
WORLD SCOUT ENVIRONMENT BADGE World Scout Shop for distribution two further variations to the World
within the National Scout Association/ Scout Environment Badge have been
GREEN IS FOR SCOUTS
Organization. The World Scout developed. The three stages now
Environment Badges and Certicates consist of the same central world
are not available for purchase by image, surrounded by a blue rope
individuals so as to help ensure the (Cub Scouts), green rope (Scouts)
badges remain as a recognisable and purple rope (Rover Scouts). The
symbol of a Scouts exploration of the rope colours correspond to the colours
environment and an achievement by used in other parts of the World Scout
our youth members. Environment Badge to link it with the
environment and World Scouting
themes, and to keep the production
costs of the badge consistent.
Can we make the World Scout
Environment Badges ourselves?
For consistency of production, Where does the World Scout
efciency of delivery, monitoring Environment Badge go on the
and evaluation purposes, National uniform?
Scout Associations/Organizations are
requested not to make the World The placement of the World Scout
WORLD SCOUT ENVIRONMENT BADGE
Scout Environment Badges, but to Environment Badge on a Scouts
PURPLE IS FOR ROVER SCOUTS uniform is the decision of the National
order them from the Scoutstore. This
provides a central contact point for Scout Association/Organization, in
delivery to any country in the world. accordance with its existing policies
The Badges are priced at near-cost about how badges should be worn on
price to reduce expenses for Scouts the uniform.
earning the World Scout Environment
Badge.

68 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS - FAQs

How can I earn the World Scout Can we develop new programme Can we reproduce the content
Environment Badge? activity resources? of the World Scout Environment
Programme Kits ourselves?
When a National Scout Association/ Yes, you are encouraged to develop
Organization has signed the new programme activity resources and The content of the kit can be
Agreement, the Scouts are use existing resources that t with the reproduced by National Scout
welcome to earn the World Scout framework for environment education Associations/Organizations that
Environment Badge, in accordance in Scouting. A template is available sign the World Scout Environment
with the programme advice given for download from the World Scouting Programme Agreement Pack 1 (non-
by their National Scout Association/ website and you are encouraged commercial) or Pack 2 (commercial
Organization. to send these to the World Scout use). To support consistent use and
Bureau to help share good programme presentation of the World Scout
The World Scout Environment Badge resources with Scouts around the Environment Programme logo and
is based on the framework for world. documentation an Identity Guide is
environment education in Scouting available to clearly explain how the
and the World Scout Environment logos and document templates can be
Badge which is available online or used.
in the World Scout Environment Where can I get the World Scout
Programme Kit. The framework is Environment Programme Kits
based on the principles and aims for from?
environment education in Scouting Can we make other merchandise
World Scout Environment Programme with the World Scout Environment
and encourages a progressive learning Kits can be downloaded from the
process as Scouts develop a greater Programme logo?
World Scouting Website at: www.
awareness and understanding about scout.org/environment They can also National Scout Associations/
the environment and the world around be purchased in hard copy from the Organizations that sign the Agreement
them. Scoutstore: www.worldscoutshop.org are welcome to produce other
For a Scout to earn the World Scout or www.scout-store.com The kits have merchandise that supports the
Environment Badge, they should been designed to help National Scout implementation of the World Scout
rst explore and reect on each of Associations/Organizations to easily Environment Programme. Please
the ve aims covering: 1. Air and reproduce the kits and disseminate consider the environmental impacts
Water; 2. Habitats and Species; 3. them to their members. of any products that use the World
Harmful Substances; 4. Environmental Scout Environment Programme logo
Practices; and 5. Environmental and inform the World Scout Bureau
Hazards and Natural Disasters. They Can we translate the content of to support the dissemination of useful
should then consider how they can the environment kit to our own materials to other Scouts.
take action based on their learning language? Promotional use: If you intend on
experiences and undertake an Yes, National Scout Associations/ producing merchandise for promotional
environmental project. This approach Organizations are encouraged reasons and without prot, the
encourages a holistic exploration of the to translate the content of the appropriate agreement is the Pack 1.
environment and provides exibility environment kits into their own local
of its application for National and local For commercial use or for fundraising:
language to assist in the content being If you intend to produce and sell
levels of Scouting. of use to their Scouts. Please inform merchandise for fundraising to support
National Scout Associations/ the World Scout Bureau if you intend the implementation of the World Scout
Organizations should consider to translate the contents to verify that Environment Programme or for any
the framework in the process of the kit has not already been translated commercial use, the agreement you
reviewing their youth programme, into your language, as well as to help need is the Pack 2.
applying it with consideration of the ensure consistency of content and to
environmental conditions and needs support other Scouts who may have Please contact the World Scout Bureau
of their country. They may wish to an interest in the resources in another for additional details.
apply the framework in a way which language. The contents of the kit are
connects with similar dimensions of already being translated into additional
their existing programmes and expand languages and will be made available
on other areas that could be improved. online from the World Scouting
The National Scout Association/ Website when they are complete.
Organization may feel it appropriate to
establish more specic requirements
to support their youth members
exploration of the environment,
respecting the intention of the
principles and aims for environment
education in Scouting and framework.

69
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS - FAQs

How can we work with the How can we determine if our Scout Who can I contact for more
partners that have supported the Centre is eligible to be a SCENES information about the World Scout
development of the World Scout Centre? Environment Programme?
Environment Programme?
The process for assessing and If you have further questions or
The partners that have supported determining whether a Scout Centre require more information about the
the development of the World Scout can be eligible to be a SCENES (Scout World Scout Environment Programme,
Environment Programme have a Centre of Excellence for Nature and please contact:
variety of initiatives and resources Environment) Centre is covered in the
that can help young people to SCENES Guidelines. More information
explore the environment. National is available from www.scout.org/
Scout Associations/Organizations are scenes
encouraged to consider whether there World Scout Bureau
may be opportunities for them to
connect with these partners through How do the World Scout
local, national or regional ofces. For WORLD ORGANIZATION OF THE
Environment Badge and Scouts of SCOUT MOVEMENT
more information see the partners the World Award relate to each
section of the World Scouting Website other? Rue du Pr-Jrme 5
environment section: www.scout.org/ PO Box 91
environment The Scouts of the World Award
encourages a stronger involvement CH-1211 Geneva 4 Plainpalais
of Rovers in the development of Switzerland
Is there nancial support to society, concerning global citizenship
implement the World Scout preparation of young adults and
Environment Programme? emphasises three core-themes: Peace, email: worldbureau@scout.org
Environment and Development. It
There is no specic nancial support is particularly focused on the older Tel: (+41 22) 705 10 10
to National Scout Associations/ age range, whereas the World Scout Fax: (+41 22) 705 10 20
Organizations to implement the World Environment Badge is available to
Scout Environment Programme, Scouts of all ages. The framework for
though you are encouraged to explore environment education in Scouting www.scout.org/environment
any appropriate avenues that may and the World Scout Environment
be available through local partner Badge can support the environmental
organisations, government support curriculum of a Scouts of the World
or other National Scout Associations/ Discovery, though there are additional
Organizations. skills and experiences that would be
expected of a Scout undertaking the
Scouts of the World Award that are
not covered within the World Scout
Environment Badge.

70 W o r l d S c o u t E n v i r o n m e n t P r o g r a m m e - A c t i v i t i e s & F a c t s h e e t s
World Scout Bureau
Education, Research and Development
November 2009

World Scout Bureau


Rue du Pr-Jrme 5
PO Box 91
CH 1211 Geneva 4 Plainpalais
Switzerland

Tel.: (+ 41 22) 705 10 10


Fax: (+ 41 22) 705 10 20

worldbureau@scout.org
scout.org