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Number

Section

Title

Instructor

1010

sect. 2-22 Coll Comp/Rhet

Staff

 

English 1010 is designed to prepare students for the types of writing expected at UW. At the end of the semester, students should be able to complete an expository and a research essay that reflect students' own point of view and that demonstrate thoughtful engagement with complex readings at some length. In order to do that, we will work with the types of texts common in the University and use these texts as evidence to support students' own argument. To get to this larger goal, English 1010 focuses on three smaller goals: read extended expository writings from a range of disciplines by area experts who are writing for a non-specialized audience write summaries, synthesis, and analyses of these texts use these texts as support for your own argument We will pursue these goals in all of the essays throughout the semester.

1010

23

Coll Comp/Rhet

Stewart

 

Stretch 1010: Contact Joyce Stewart (JoStewar@uwyo.edu) for information.

1040

1

Intro to Creative Writing

Watson

 

This course will cover three genres: poetry writing, creative non-fiction writing, and fiction writing. Each week will involve reading and discussion, in-class writing and out-of-class writing. Students will produce 5 original poems, short-form and a full-length creative essay, short-form and one full-length (6-8 or 10 pages) short story. There will be some imitation work to help students jump-start their exploration of the genres.

1080

1

Intro Womens Studies

Harkin

 

Crosslisted with: WMST1080 (0X)

1080

2

Intro Womens Studies

Harkin

 

Crosslisted with: WMST1080 (U7)

1080

4

Intro Womens Studies

Ramirez

Crosslisted with: WMST1080 (4C)

2005

1

Writing in Tech & Sci

Fisher

 

ENGL 2005 develops writing styles and techniques, document design and formatting skills, and audience/readership considerations that are specifically relevant to technological and scientific fields of study. This special food-themed section provides you the opportunity to expand your knowledge of food from a variety of angles, including: food production, health and nutrition, ecology and energy, community and culture, economics, and ethics. In this class, you’ll have the chance to explore paired readings, hear from experts and other guest speakers, conduct your own research, and ultimately develop the tools to become a smarter and more active participant in the food system.

2005

2

Writing in Tech & Sci

Galbreath

 

Reserved for ME or ESE students only; This course develops writing styles, writing techniques, document design and formatting strategies, and audience/readership considerations that are specifically suited to technological and scientific fields of study. The course concludes with a comprehensive, student-directed long form report. NOTE: Concurrent enrollment in a laboratory or field study course is strongly urged. NOTE: Computer classroom section. Please contact Mechanical Engineering.

2020

sect. 1-7

Intro to Literature

Staff

 

Prerequisites: WA; Sophomore Standing. This course fulfills the University Studies WB requirement. Literature shows us language in its most beautiful form, exposes us to new experiences and ideas, and teaches us to understand and question our world. In this class, we will read literature from around the world, and through discussion and writing, explore the many meanings presented. Varies by instructors.

2035

1

Writing Public Forums

Stricker

 

Prerequisite: WA

2035

2

Writing Public Forums

Heaney

 

Prerequisite: WA

2050

1

CW:Fiction

Bergstraesser

Prerequisite: WA. This course is designed to help you craft various works of short fiction. In addition to in-class writing exercises, creative assignments outside of class, and discussions, we will critique each other’s writing in a constructive workshop atmosphere—thereby developing useful feedback skills. Through lecture and discussion, we will explore the technique and devices involved in creating fiction: plot/structure, character, setting, point of view, theme, style, and several others. We will read and discuss the short fiction of many different writers, using their technique and content as a guide for our own writing.

2060

1

CW: Intro Non-Fiction

Fitch

 

This course will focus on clarifying your writing and sharpening your analyses. At the same time, we will examine a diverse group of writers’ response to a specific geographical place (New York), and I will be curious about your own experience living in and/or moving to Wyoming. We will also examine audio and video work by contemporary musicians, poets, and filmmakers, and I will ask you to respond to these non-literary works in your writing. Assignments will include in-class writing exercises, and personal essays that respond to course texts. Much of our class time will be devoted to individual presentations and small-group writing workshops. Consistency is required—both in attendance, and in your assignments. By the semester’s end, you will have been well exposed to the rigors of essay writing (and rewriting), and will have experimented with more expansive, interdisciplinary forms.

2080

1

Creative Writing Intro Poetry

Northrop

 

Analyzes forms of poetry and practice of creative writing at introductory level. Prerequisite: WA.

2360

80

Mexican American Literature

Fonseca

 

Crosslisted with: CHST 2360 SPAN 3990 (2V), Video Conf.

2410

1

Literary Genres: Fiction

Pexton

English 2410: Literary Genres has been approved for University Studies Program credit within the Humanities (CH) and as a mid-level writing course (WB). In this course students will “learn to understand and to think clearly about important human beliefs and imaginative ideas, as well as the texts that embody or examine those beliefs and ideas.” Our texts will be a range of short stories by classical and current writers. Our goal is to analyze them and the ideas they represent as fully and complexly as possible. As a WB course, English 2410 requires students to accomplish a variety of writing assignments that will develop skills incorporating research; thinking about audience; collaborating; drafting and revising; developing and supporting an argument. Our emphases will be on 1) “writing to learn” within the context of short fiction; and 2) the pleasures of reading, researching, and writing. Several people, including your peers and me, will read the writing you do for this class.

2425

1

Lit in English I

Anderson

 

Prerequisite: WA

2425

2

Lit in English I

Croft

Prerequisite: WA Students in this class will first explore the early genres of English literature that predate the popularity of the novel—allegories, epics, sonnets, satires, lais, fabliaux, and popular drama, among others. We will then end the course with one of the earliest and most controversial English novels, Samuel Richardson’s Pamela.

The emphasis in this course will be less on the iconic status of great authors and more on the literary traditions and cultures that make their works meaningful. Special attention will be given to poetic genres, not only because most pre-modern literature is poetic but also because students of English literature should acquire the skills needed to read and analyze poetry. Students will be encouraged to set aside modern assumptions about literature and enjoy the treasures of the past. They will be expected to read closely and critically, to learn some basic formal principles of early literature, to become familiar with the cultural conditions of early literary production, and to recognize a variety of genres and styles.

Requirements will include three short response essays, weekly quizzes, a final exam, regular attendance, and active participation in discussion and classroom activities.

2430

sect. 1-2

Lit in English II

Holland

 

ENGL 2430: This sophomore-level survey of literature in English, 1750-1865, examines texts produced during some of the most tumultuous, revolutionary times in Western history. The questions being hotly debated then shape the way you think today. Fundamental philosophical issues were being

 

investigated–in writing, in lives, at home, and on the battlefield.

Individuals, communities, and

nations debated: who should be a full and complete citizen and who should not? What is the proper relationship between an individual and the state? What should be the relationship between reason and religion? From where does legitimate power derive? Should a nation be held accountable to

 

certain ideals? Who had authority to speak or write–in what contexts–and who did not?

What was

the value of nature and “civilization”? A survey course moves rapidly, covering a wide swath of literary territory. We will read primarily from the anthology Transatlantic Romanticism to interpret how this literature in England and America engages with the important political, historical, and sociocultural events of its day. To facilitate your close reading, I have selected The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms. To help you write your essays, I strongly recommend that you purchase Andrea Lunsford’s The Everyday Writer.

2435

1

Lit in English III

Marks

Prerequisite: WA. Ranging from late Tennyson to early tomorrow, this survey introduces you to movements and variations in literary arts across the English speaking world over almost two centuries. These have been times of massive, varied and widespread literary production. They have been marked by shifts in aesthetics, ethics and anxieties, the multiplication of media from print to the internet, and the expansion of authorship from celebrated individuals to social groups. We will track the making and the aftermath of the twentieth century in authors as disparate as Gilbert and Sullivan, Virginia Woolf, Alfred Hitchcock and Langston Hughes, and texts as strange as verse by Emily Dickinson, abstract films by Man Ray, ghost stories by Elizabeth Bowen, skits by Monty Python, and poetry by Super Atari. (This is only a sampling.) Assignments will probably include a midterm, a two-part final (including essay), and a group presentation. In addition to gaining knowledge and understanding of the variety of literature in English, students will be introduced to twentieth and twenty-first century modes of analysis, and develop their abilities in scholarly writing and speaking.

2490

2

Studies in: Life Writing

Hartwick

 

Non-fiction genes have received significant attention recently in literary studies, and this includes life writing genres. But is life writing actually non-fiction? How can we define that thin line between “truth” and “fiction”? In this course we will analyze classic and contemporary life narratives of various genres and consider the kinds of “selves” they present. We will learn frameworks for understanding self-representation in the context of popular myths and models of identity. We will also explore how online virtual media such as Facebook and Twitter are reconfiguring “self” in private and public life. We will also scrutinize the recent wave of autobiographical “hoaxes” (think James Frey and Oprah) to try and understand why they matter to readers.

3710

1

Gender & Humanities

Pafunda

 

In this YA Literature & Youth Culture version of Gender and Humanities, we'll explore how individuals have been gendered in literature, film, television, and the like. We’ll unpack Young Adult and young- adult-voiced literature at those crucial moments when boys, girls, and gender variant children become adults and find themselves performing or rejecting those gender roles for which they’ve long been trained. We’ll read titles such as the The Hunger Games, Eleanor and Park, Romeo and Juliette, and The House on Mango Street. Crosslisted with WMST 3710-01

4000

1

21 C Iss Prof Writing

Knievel

Prerequisite of ENGL 2035 & by consent of instructor. English 4000: 21st Century Issues in Professional Writing is the capstone course in the professional writing minor and also fulfills the University Studies Program WC writing requirement. Our course this spring will blend theory and practice while taking up questions about what texts do—and how do they do it—in professional and organizational settings. Such questions will inevitably lead to our considering related questions that have animated the field since its inception—questions about professional writing’s relationship to rhetoric and ethics, about genre, and about the relationship between audiences and specialized discourse. Never far from us will be additional questions about the role of the digital and what it means to write and circulate text in a digital world. Projects in the class will be both individual and collaborative in nature and may include some combination of short- and long-form writing assignments, such as a journal or book review, a report involving primary and secondary research, a white paper, oral presentations, and a social media project to be determined.

4010

sect. 1-7

Technical Writing in Professns

Staff

 

Deals with professional writing for various audiences. Includes research methods, audience analysis, organization and developmental techniques, abstracting, types of reports and popularization. Part of the last half of the course is devoted to solution of a student-initiated problem, culminating in the writing of a long-form report. Prerequisites: WA and WB; junior standing. Varies by instructors.

 

4010

8

Technical Writing in Professns

Stebbins

 

Special section - International Students only.

Contact C. Stebbins at stebbins@uwyo.edu NOTE: Computer classroom section. NOTE: prerequisite of junior or senior standing and prior completion of WA and WB for eligibility. NOTE: Graduate students must take a writing diagnostic to determine writing skills readiness. NOTE: Graduate

 

students only may take the course for audit (S/U).

Course will cover resumes, memos, reports,

presentations, and general preparation for writing theses and dissertations. WC

 

4010

40

Technical Writing in Professns

Fisher

 

Online

4010

41

Technical Writing in Professns

Hartwick

 

Online

4010

42

Technical Writing in Professns

Hartnett

 

Online

4010

43

Technical Writing in Professns

Sorensen

 

Online

4010

44

Technical Writing in Professns

Couch

 

Online

4020

1

Publication Editing

Garner

Prerequisites: WA & WB (ENGL 2035 & 3000 recommended)

4050

1

WW: Multi-Genre

Northrop

 

Other People’s Lives: A Multi-Genre Writing Workshop

Emerson said some strange things. Here’s one: Let us be poised, and wise, and our own, today. Let us treat the men and women well; treat them as if they were real; perhaps they are.

 

In this multi-genre workshop, we will attempt to move closer, through writing, to the realness of other people. We will begin the semester with generative writing experiments; by the end of the semester, students will have produced and work-shopped a long-ish creative work (e.g. a photo essay, a series of

dramatic monologues, a novella) rooted in independent reading, exploration and research.

I assume

that topics and chosen subject matters will range widely. (See, for examples, Sandy Pool’s Undark and

 

Maggie Nelson’s Jane.) Possible reading includes: Kevin Colden’s graphic novel, Fishtown; W. G. Sebald’s novel, The Rings of Saturn; Van Jordan’s collection of poems, M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A; Sandy Pool’s Undark; Maggie Nelson’s Jane: A Murder. Students should come to this course with obsessive interests, curiosity, a willingness to explore, and a sense of wonder.

4050

2

WW: Book Arts

Hagy

Team-taught by visual artist Mark Ritchie and writer Alyson Hagy, this course introduces students to the history of the book as an object and the traditional crafts associated with book construction. A basic knowledge of technical processes pertaining to book construction (print-making, typography, binding, etc.) and a general knowledge of the history of the book will be gained through demonstrations, hands-on studio work, slide lectures, and visits to museums and archives. This course is appropriate for intrepid writers who wish to learn how to construct simple books and how to analyze books as objects of artistic expression. Collaborations among visual artists and creative writers will be encouraged, but students should note that this course is labor intensive. Prerequisite: W2 and an introductory level creative writing course. Graduate students may arrange to enroll in this class at the 5000 level, if appropriate. NOTE: Cross listed with ART 3500-01. Contact Kris Wold (kwold@uwyo.edu) for registration

4075

1

Writing for Non-Profits

Knievel

 

Prerequisites: WA and WB. Writing for Non-Profits (WC) focuses on all aspects of writing successful grants in a non-profit setting. We will work collaboratively to identify sources of funding, pursue relationships with non-profit organizations, and brainstorm, research, and design worthy projects. Using a rhetorical lens, we will learn to write grants tailored to specific audiences, with special attention to the creation of particular elements key to all grants, such as: (1) statements of need; (2) project descriptions, timelines, and outcomes; and (3) line-item budgets. In all of our work with grant writing, we will concentrate on developing expertise in the fundamentals of document design and utilizing context-appropriate style, tone, and format. In the end, this course will prepare you to propose projects and meet funding objectives in a variety of contexts, including business, non-profit organizations, government agencies, and independent work.

4075

2

Writing for Non-Profits

Quackenbush

 

Prerequisites: WA and WB. Writing for Non-Profits (WC) focuses on all aspects of writing successful grants in a non-profit setting. We will work collaboratively to identify sources of funding, pursue relationships with non-profit organizations, and brainstorm, research, and design worthy projects. Using a rhetorical lens, we will learn to write grants tailored to specific audiences, with special attention to the creation of particular elements key to all grants, such as: (1) statements of need; (2) project descriptions, timelines, and outcomes; and (3) line-item budgets. In all of our work with grant writing, we will concentrate on developing expertise in the fundamentals of document design and utilizing context-appropriate style, tone, and format. In the end, this course will prepare you to propose projects and meet funding objectives in a variety of contexts, including business, non-profit organizations, government agencies, and independent work.

4120

1

Shakespeare: Tragedy Rom

Parolin

 

Prerequisite: 6 hours 2000-level literature courses

4120

2

Shakespeare: Tragedy Rom

Croft

We will read seven of Shakespeare’s later plays in the genres of tragedy and romance. We will not only read these plays as literary or dramatic texts but also consider film adaptations of Shakespeare, some of which might be useful in the high school classroom. These films will include international adaptations of Shakespeare that touch on the unifying theme of the course: the individual’s relationship to his or her society in the midst of racial, ethnic, and national tensions. Assignments will include keeping a reading journal for each play, a group performance exercise, active participation in class discussion and exercises, and a final analytical research paper.

4180

80

Middle English Lit

Wendt

 

Video Conf.

4240

1

19th C English Lit: Romantic

Marks

4245

1

Jane Austen

Nye

 

In an age of revolution, experimentation, and dissolution of received literary forms, Jane Austen rescued the novel and demonstrated its suitability for the most comprehensive and humane literary purposes. With exquisite craftsmanship she raised the stakes for her nineteenth-century successors in the novel, and her audiences have been faithful ever since. We will examine her antecedents in the eighteenth-century, the complex cultural milieu in which she emerged, and the range of critical opinion she has evoked over the past two centuries. Why are people admitting, today more than ever, that they love Jane Austen?

4370

1

American Prose: 1865-1920

Forbes

 

This course will offer an intensive study of the fascinating, powerful, sometimes wacky, and often disturbing fiction and non-fiction written in the United States between the end of the Civil War and the end of World War I. This course will engage with the history and politics of the period, as well as deepen students’ understanding of the literary movements of realism and naturalism. We will read a broad array of works and writers, including African American and women writers.

4430

1

Modern American Fiction

Watson

Modern American Fiction: Innovative Fiction. In this course we will read a number of brief novels and story collections that bend the conventions of mainstream fiction -- some quite a bit, some in more subtle ways. Books will include novels such as William Maxwell's "So Long, See You Tomorrow" Michael Ondaatje's "The Collected Works of Billy the Kid," and works by such authors as Joy Williams, Padgett Powell, Renata Adler, Richard Brautigan, David Markson, and possibly Cormac McCarthy and William Faulkner. Requirements beyond reading will include brief weekly reports on the reading (to be used to stimulate discussion), plus two papers. Optional is to make the papers a hybrid of creative writing and critical analysis.

4455

1

Literature of Enslavement

Forbes

 

This course will engage in an in-depth study of the literature and culture that emerged from the history of enslavement in the Americas. Our dual focus will be on literature by African Americans from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and recent scholarship on African American history, culture and aesthetics. Over the course of the semester, we will tackle such questions as: How has the literature of enslavement reflected and helped to change the ways we define freedom, citizenship, nation? How has this literature shaped the question of what it means to be human, to be black, to be art? What are the legacies of slavery in the U.S. today? Authors studied will include:

Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Octavia Butler. Crosslised with AAST 4455 (3D)

4600

1

St:African Literature

Hix

 

For a host of cultural reasons, most of us in the UW English Dept., students and faculty alike, have studied British and American literature in far greater depth than we have studied other literatures. Our literary understanding of Africa, if we have any at all, is likely to have been shaped mostly by works set in Africa but written by Europeans: Heart of Darkness, say, or Out of Africa. In this course, we will attempt to alter that circumstance, by reading a number of recent works by African writers. In particular, this semester we will focus on writings from South Africa, a country with a particularly rich literary tradition, attending to the various complicated questions they pose, in regard to gender, religion, colonialism, family, love, and so on.

4600

2

Studies in: Girls Studies

Pafunda

In this course, we'll get a sense of the burgeoning field girls' studies stands and develop our own theories about girls, girlhood, gender performativity, and related concepts. We’ll read mix of girl- voiced literature, including the The Hunger Games, Dangerous Angels, Lynda Barry’s Cruddy, The House on Mango Street, and the like. We’ll also examine excerpts of popular YA and girl-voiced literature, theory, films and television shows, and music videos in order to analyze the girl in contemporary culture. There will be three written assignments, but graduate students will be welcome to substitute work (creative, critical, or hybrid) that serves their thesis interests.Crosslisted with:

WMST 4500 WMST 5000 (3F)

4600

3

Studies in: Transatlantic Lit

Hartwick

 

Body, Spirit, Text: Transatlantic Literature 1600-1800 How and why do body and spirit come together in the literature of the Transatlantic? In colonial America, Mary Rowlandson posited that the spiritual got her through the physical hardship of Native American captivity, while in seventeenth century England Samuel Pepys recorded his physical excesses in his diary and linked them to a deficit of the spirit. The literature of the Atlantic world in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was fascinated with the testing of borders and boundaries in the realms of the physical, spiritual, and often textual. In this course we will explore how those boundaries and borders were tested and crossed by authors of the period. We will read a combination of genres, including novel, spiritual autobiography, captivity narrative, periodicals, diary, and poetry and examine the relationship between the nations that border the Atlantic and their physical and spiritual representations in literature.

4600

80

Studies in: Horror

Richardson

What scares us? Terror and horror have generated lots of bestsellers from the 18th century to the present. This survey of the history of horror literature in English looks at how the form has exploited and addressed the anxieties of different times with attention to the more persistent social-political concerns of Euro-American culture. We will read famous books such as Frankenstein, Dracula, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr.Hyde as well lesser known work by Horace Walpole, “Monk” Lewis and Ann Radcliffe. We conclude with current literature and film and discuss how they reflect the culture of fear in our time. Expect reading, journal writing, papers, an exam and lots and lots of discussion.

Students describe the Dr. Bruce Richardson as a dynamic, enthusiastic and knowledgeable instructor

who gets everyone involved. Bruce has won an Ellbogen award for classroom teaching, recognized for “extraordinary merit” in teaching, and been named one of the “top ten” teachers in The College of Arts

and Sciences.

Video Conf. & Casper College

4640

1

Digital Humanities: Medievalisms

Croft

 

This course will consider how medieval “worlds” and cultural values have received a new lease on life through digital technologies, such as HD video, wikis and other websites, and online gaming. Throughout the course we will consider how these new media platforms reinterpret familiar medieval notions, such as comitatus, monstrosity, chivalry and knighthood, courtly love, religious mysticism, and the startling figure of the female warrior. Given both the coming release of a new Star Wars film in 2015 and some recent scholarly studies of the series, George Lucas’s famous franchise and its various digital iterations will serve as our test case of medievalism being digitally reimagined for contemporary times. We will also consider Spenser’s Faerie Queene as a preceding Renaissance attempt to reinterpret medieval literature for its own historical moment in a similar way (using the relatively new technology of print, as revolutionary if not more so than our own digital revolution). Assignments will include keeping a journal on both the medieval texts we read and the digital media we explore together, active participation in class discussion and exercises, and a final group video project with accompanying documentation (proposal, progress report, and completion report).

4640

2

Chicano Perspectives

Fonseca

4950

40

American Dream in Literature

Bogart

 

"The American Dream" is a term that encompasses a multitude of meanings. Although Americans often assume that the phrase is embedded in the nation's founding documents, it was actually coined by historian James T. Adams in 1931, writing that the “American dream [is a] dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for every man, with opportunity for each according to his ability or achievement.” Regardless of its origins, the concept of the American dream is deeply embedded in American culture, including American literature. Through the close reading and guided discussion of seven literary works, this course leads you on a journey through the various manifestations of the American Dream toward a deeper understanding of American culture and of ourselves.

4970

1

Writing Internship

Van Baalen-Wood

4990

1

Senior Sem in English

Obert

 

This course serves in part as an introduction to a mode of thought: we will approach critical theory less as a monolithic ‘discipline’—a set of ‘difficult’ philosophical texts to be read, summarized, and set aside at semester’s end—than as an analytical tool that we can usefully apply in an ongoing way to life and to literature. Together we will read, discuss and write thoughtfully about literary texts and cultural artefacts by placing them in dialogue with works of theory and criticism. Because this is a capstone class, students will be asked to engage rigorously with course materials, to work intensively and consistently throughout the semester, and to produce a lengthy paper of high quality at the end of the term. The weekly reading load in this course will often be relatively substantial—that is simply the nature of the class—but the texts are exciting, and I hope you will find the work well worth your while. The theme that will direct our work this semester is “Reading the Body.” We all have bodies. They make us feel comfortable and uncomfortable; they suffer pleasure and pain. They are both sinew, flesh, and bone—utterly material, seemingly natural registers of experience—and social vessels shaped by a variety of textual and cultural pressures. Bodies are often figured as receptacles of individual identity, but they are constantly subject to external “discipline.” They appear to be essentially human, and yet they can be implanted, technologized, modified, virtualized, made prosthetic. In this class, we will examine these seeming contradictions as they are elaborated in theoretical texts and represented in literature, film, photography, and other media. We will consider issues of gender, race, sexuality, and disability in relation to lived embodiment. We will interrogate the relationships of body to mind; of reason to emotion. We will investigate the fate of the body in the digital age. All told, we will try our best to understand the often inscrutable desires, sympathies, and vulnerabilities that attach, as Virginia Woolf once put it, to the “daily drama of the body.”

4990

2

Senior Sem in English

Thompson

5220

1

Studies: Medieval Lit Araby

Anderson

5280 1

Studies: 19thC Eng Lit

Nye

The nineteenth century was an epoch of revolution as much in poetry as politics. From the birth of English romanticism to the uneasy end of the century, poetry flourished, affording deep human alternatives to the increasing materialism and commercialism of the age. This seminar will explore the major expressions of poetic creativity, examining the modification and transmission of poetic forms. How, for example, is a sonnet by Wordsworth different than one by Keats, or Shelley, or Rossetti, or Meredith, or Elizabeth Barrett Browning, or Yeats? In addition to intense study of various lyric modes, we’ll look at more extended poetic forms, idylls, romances, narrative tales, ballads, even verse epics. And of course this is the most elegiac of ages, perhaps until our own. How can the elegy coexist and develop so fully with a time of increasing imperial confidence and cultural hegemony? In disarming simplicity, Coleridge said, “I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose,—words in their best order; poetry,—the best words in their best order.” Many of the best and most beautiful moments of the English language were shaped by the poets of the nineteenth century, and this seminar aims to identify and explore them.

5330

1

Stds: 20C American Lit

Russell

 

What was America, who was American, and what did it mean to be American in the 20th century? This course will examine those questions through close reading and analysis of major works of 20th century American literature—with 99.6% less Norman Mailer than similar courses. We will focus primarily on novels and poetry, but short stories and essays may stop by for a drink, and we will trace the main literary movements within 20th century American literature; of special importance will be interrogating the nexus of race, gender, and class both within the literature and within American culture at large so that we may see how the epic social movements of the 20th century derive inspiration from, and find reflection in, the major writings of the period.

Reading List Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises Fitzgerald: Tender is The Night Steinbeck: Grapes of Wrath Ellison: Invisible Man Vonnegut: Slaughter House-Five Cisneros: House on Mango Street Erdrich: Love Medicine Morrison: Beloved Rita Dove, ed. Penguin Anthology of 20th Century American Poetry

5360

1

Studies: Ethnic Lit: Irish

Obert

This course surveys Irish and Northern Irish literature (fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction, and film) and criticism from 1960- present. We will begin by exploring Ireland’s struggle for self-definition mid-

century, including its reckoning with its

engagement with its own postcoloniality, its place in relation to both

renewed relationship with the Catholic Church, and its indebtedness to/breaks from the earlier cultural nationalism of the Irish Literary Revival. We will then carry on to discuss present-day cultural

concerns in the Irish

modern Ireland, the place of the border

and the implications of the Celtic Tiger’s recent cycle of boom

significant portion of the semester dealing with ‘the Troubles’ in Northern Ireland, writers have responded to civil conflict, sectarian violence, and tentative peace.

(relatively) recent independence from the UK, its

tradition & modernity, its

Republic, including the role of the Irish language, issues of gender & sexuality in

between Ireland & Northern Ireland in the Irish imagination,

and bust. We will also spend a

examining how

5530

1

Modern Critical Theory & Practice: Global Modernisms

Baskin

 

Recent critics and theorists have moved beyond the nation-state as an organizing category for literary studies and begun to read literature in a global context. This course will study the global turn in literary studies in relation to modernism. Probably the most influential cultural movement of the twentieth- century, modernism was long seen as an exclusively European invention (even if it was later helped along by a few disaffected, and often exiled, British, Irish and American writers). However, recent critics and theorists have thoroughly complicated this familiar picture and are working to develop a concept of modernism as a truly global phenomenon. Focusing on literary texts written in English, but drawing widely on theories of modernity, imperialism, postcolonialism, cosmopolitanism, globalization, “uneven” development and capitalist world-systems, we will trace out this newly expansive understanding of modernism that has emerged from its placement in a global context. Readings may include some of the following authors, theorists and critics: Conrad, Eliot, Loy, McKay, Brathwaite, Walcott, Rhys, Naipul, Abani, O’Neill, Moretti, Casanova, Mufti, Baucom, Wallerstein, Gikandi, Esty, Williams, Jameson, Appiah, Robbins, Harvey, Fanon, Cesaire, Ngugi, Bhabha, Spivak, Glissant and Chakrabarty. In addition to reading and discussion, assignments will likely include at least one in-class presentation, a short piece of critical writing, and a seminar paper. Undergraduates may join the class with permission of the instructor only (email jbaskin@uwyo.edu if you are interested).

5560

1

WW:Poetry

Northrop

 

Only for students enrolled in the MFA Program

5560

2

WW: Non-Fiction

Fitch

5560

3

WW: Fiction

Lapcharoensap

5900

1

Prac-College Tchng

Galbreath

5900

2

Prac-College Tchng

Fisher

5900

3

Prac-College Tchng

Stewart

5900

4

Prac-College Tchng

Pexton

5900

5

Prac-College Tchng

Kirkmeyer

5900

6

Prac-College Tchng

Marks

5900

7

Prac-College Tchng

Garner