To jump directly to a chapter simply click on a chapter title within the index. 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.

8 New Features of Alcoa Sag10 for Windows Version 3.0 ......................................................3 Features of Alcoa Sag10 for Windows Version 2.0 ..............................................................4 Features of Alcoa Sag10 for Windows Version 1.1...............................................................5 Differences Between SAG10 for Windows and SAG10 for DOS..........................................6 Features of Current & Previous Versions..............................................................................7 History ...................................................................................................................................8 License Agreement Information ............................................................................................8 Installation .............................................................................................................................9 1.8.1 Minimum Equipment Required:.............................................................................9 1.8.2 Installation - Single User .......................................................................................9 1.8.3 Installing and Using SAG10 On a Network ...........................................................9 1.8.4 Installation of SAG10 on a Network Server...........................................................9 1.8.5 Installation of SAG10 on a Workstation ................................................................9 1.8.6 Using SAG10 on a Network ..................................................................................10 1.8.7 Printing over a Network .........................................................................................10 1.9 Getting Started with SAG10 ..................................................................................................10 2.1 Entry Screen..........................................................................................................................11 2.2 Main Menu.............................................................................................................................12 2.3 Create/Edit Problem File .......................................................................................................12 2.3.1 Headings ...............................................................................................................12 2.3.2 Conductor Selection..............................................................................................13 2.3.2.1 ADSS Cable ..........................................................................................13 2.3.2.2 OPGW...................................................................................................14 2.3.2.3 ACSS Conductors .................................................................................14 2.3.2.4 Pre-stressing ACSS Conductors...........................................................14 2.3.2.5 Copper Conductors ...............................................................................15 2.3.2.6 Conductor Lookup List ..........................................................................15 2.3.2.8 User Bookmarks ...................................................................................16 2.3.2.9 Add New Conductor to Database..........................................................16 2.3.2.10 View Existing Stress-Strain Chart in Sag10.Pgm Database ...............16 2.3.2.11 Add New Stress-Strain Chart to Sag10.Pgm Database......................16 2.3.2.12 Delete User Added Stress-Strain Chart from Sag10.Pgm Database .17 2.3.3 Loadings Table......................................................................................................17 2.3.4 Ruling Spans .........................................................................................................21 2.3.5 Output Redirection ................................................................................................21 3.1 File Commands (Main Menu)................................................................................................22 3.1.1 File New (Main Menu) ...........................................................................................22 3.1.2 File Open (Main Menu) .........................................................................................22 3.1.3 File Save (Main Menu) ..........................................................................................22 3.1.4 File Save As ..........................................................................................................22 3.1.5 File eXit (Main Menu) ............................................................................................22 3.2 Options ...................................................................................................................................23 3.2.1 Elevated Temperatures, Input (default = unchecked)..........................................23 3.2.2 Elevated Temperatures, Output Strain (default = unchecked).............................23 3.2.2.1 Elevated Temperature Creep................................................................23 3.2.3 Account for Aluminum Compression ....................................................................25 3.2.4 Separate AL & STL Tension .................................................................................25 3.2.5 Tensions Avg Vert (At Supports) Horiz (At Sag) .............................................25 3.2.6 Display Extra Column No % RTS H/W Horz & Vert Sag ..............................25 3.2.7 Units English English-to-Kg Kilogram Newton ..............................................25 3.2.8 NESC K New Old Old (Steel & Cu) ................................................................26 3.2.9 T-2TM Conductor ...................................................................................................26 3.2.10 Attachments to Wire No Marker Balls Cables PLP Spoiler ........................26 3.2.10.1 Marker Balls ........................................................................................26 3.2.10.2 Non-supporting spacer cable, installed after stringing ........................27 3.2.10.3 Non-supporting cable, pre-assembled or lashed ................................28 3.2.10.4 PLP Spoilers .......................................................................................29 3.2.10.5 Estimated Cast Rod Creep ...............................................................29

Chapter 1

Introduction

3.2.10.6 Creep Time at Stress ........................................................................29 3.3 Setup Commands (Main Menu) ............................................................................................29 3.3.1 Setup - Print Setup................................................................................................29 3.3.2 Setup - Page Setup...............................................................................................30 3.3.3 Setup - Fonts.........................................................................................................30 3.4 Run Commands (Main Menu) ...............................................................................................31 3.4.1 Run - Sag & Tension.............................................................................................31 3.4.2 Run - Pause between Spans ................................................................................31 3.4.3 Inclined Spans.......................................................................................................31 3.4.4 Run - Ruling Span Calc.........................................................................................32 3.4.5 Run – IEEE738 .....................................................................................................32 3.5 Help for Sag10 ......................................................................................................................32 4.1 Output Screen ........................................................................................................................33 4.1.1 Creep .....................................................................................................................33 4.2 Gallop ....................................................................................................................................34 4.3 Sag Curves ...........................................................................................................................36 4.4 Stringing Sag Tables .............................................................................................................38 4.4.1 Stringing Spans .....................................................................................................38 4.4.2 Stringing Temperatures ........................................................................................38 4.6 Ruling Span Variation............................................................................................................40 4.7 Clash .....................................................................................................................................42 4.8 Vibrec ....................................................................................................................................45 4.9 Output ...................................................................................................................................46

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Chapter 1
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Introduction

1.1 New Features of Alcoa Sag10 for Windows Version 3.0
Vibration Analysis and Damper Selection Calculations Perform your own Vibration Analysis and Select your own Dampers for ACSR, AAC, AAAC, ACAR, Alumoweld, Steel, OPGW, and ACSS cables. Clash analysis w/graphic solution for ADSS Check loaded & unloaded swing & static clearances between Conductor and ADSS supported on the same structure, for both initial and final state. Conductor suspension insulator string length is taken into consideration. The loading cases, swing angles, horizontal and vertical offsets between the two cables and conductor – ADSS clearances are presented in a Report. Graphically view the results in both Tranverse and Longitudinal Views. Graphic views may be saved to a .BMP file for emailing or viewing in other graphic software. Compiled for 32 bit operation for Win2000 Compiled to run with all of the latest Windows 2000 generation operating systems. Support of longer file names. ACSS/TW and BPA TW Conductors The Conductor Database has been expanded to include the ACSS/TW and BPA TW Cables. IEEE 738 Calculations Perform Thermal Rating analysis with IEEE738 calculations. Allow deletion of user created charts The Conductor Selection area has been improved to allow deletion of user created charts Estimated cast rod creep Sag & Tension data may be calculated for either factory Cast or Rolled aluminum rod. Calculation of Creep for varying time periods Creep can now be calculated for time periods greater or less than the 10 year time period that is currently used to calculate final sags & tensions within Sag10. Check to see if your conductor has any additional creep after 20 or 30 years, or use for confirming sag information on a conductor that has been in service for less than 10 years. Save sag curve to .BMP File & Display Catenary Constant Sag Curves can be Saved to a .BMP file, for emailing or viewing in other Graphics software. The Catenary constant is now displayed with the Sag Curve. Help Screens Help Screens have been added to Sag10 for user convenience. Root Failure message explanation When a Sag & Tension run fails due to a Root Failure, an explanation recommends possible solutions to allow proper output. User's manual on CD The entire Sag10 Manual and Appendices will be provided on CD to allow the user ready access to the Instructions. Use of command line parameters when entering Sag10 Command Line parameters may be used to preload a Problem File while initially entering Sag10. Pretensioning of ACSS Conductors A complete set of instructions are provided to allow the user to calculate conductor sags during and after an ACSS Conductor has been pre-stressed. Spoiler Loading on Cable A routine to allow calculation of the loads created by adding PLP spoilers to the cable, and their affect on the Sag & Tension output.

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Chapter 1
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Introduction

1.2 Features of Alcoa Sag10 for Windows Version 3.0
Adjustment of High Temperature Creep Optional calculations can be performed that account for the effect of aluminum compression at elevated temperature conditions. The program provides default values for ‘built in aluminum stress’, ASTM strand lay ratios and allows user entry of optional values. Adding New Conductors to the Data files The Add new conductors feature has been integrated into the Windows program, making it much easier to use. Data from other conductors may be prompted onto the screen and edited to create a new conductor, or entered as entirely new data. Adding New Stress-Strain Charts The ADD new Stress-Strain charts ( Sag10.Pgm ) feature has been integrated into the Windows program, making it much easier to use. Data from other chart #’s may be prompted onto the screen and edited to create a new chart, or entered with entirely new chart data. Conductor Selection Lookup List It is now possible to find the conductor that you are looking for by scrolling thru a pulldown list. This is especially handy if you do not remember the name and/or stranding of the conductor that you need. Custom Conductor Database A custom conductor database has been created that allows the user to add his favorite conductors to a his own custom list. The user may then use a pulldown menu to select a conductor from his own custom selection list. Copper and Copperweld Conductor Databases Hard drawn Copper and Copperweld Conductor Databases have been added to the list of available conductors. Old NESC K Factor for Copper and Steel The old NESC K factor for copper and steel calculations has been added to allow proper simulation of older NESC calculations. Graphic Display of Galloping Ellipses between 2 Different Structure Types The user may optionally enter different attachment points and insulator types and/or lengths for structures at either end of a galloping span and generate resulting ellipses. Gallop Button for Load Table A Gallop command button has been added to the Load Table area to ensure the Load Table includes the appropriate Load conditions required for calculation of graphic Galloping Ellipses. Medium Ice Load added The new NESC Medium loading condition of 32 Deg F, .25-inch ice, no wind has been added to the Medium Loading Default conditions. Quantity of Conductors Displayed in the Galloping Ellipses The quantity of conductors graphically displayed in the Galloping Ellipses may be varied between 1 and 4 conductors. Ruling Span Calculation Spans within a ruling span can now be entered into a table. The spans within the table can then be calculated for ruling span, saved as a file for future recall and editing, and transferred to the stringing sag tables. Calculation of Total Conductor Length When a list of spans are provided for Stringing Sag Tables, the Total Conductor Catenary Length is calculated for those spans over level ground and for the range of selected stringing temperatures and corresponding horizontal tension (one length for each temperature and tension). The calculated ruling span for those spans may also be displayed. Year 2000 Compliant Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 4

Chapter 1

Introduction

The output files are dated with a 4 digit year that will allow dated output for the year 2000 and beyond. ADSS Cable - Variable Coefficient of Thermal Expansion The Calculations for ADSS cables now allow the user to enter the Cofficient of Thermal Expansion as a variable rather than as a fixed value. ADSS Cable - Three Moduli of Elasticity: Initial, Final, 10 Years Creep The Calculations for ADSS cables now allow the user to enter three moduli of elasticity, that will exactly characterize the stress-strain chart for each individual AFL-ADSS cable. Grid Lines for Sag Curves Grid lines may optionally be added to the Sag Curve Graphic output, to allow easier alignment of the curve with the users background grid. Printing of Inclined Spans The Inclined Span output may now be printed via a print command in the Inclined Span Calculation area. Stringing Sag Table Output in Inches The Stringing Sag Table output may be shown in Inches only, rather than Feet & Inches. Calculation of Ruling Span Variations Each span within a ruling span has a variation from the ruling span sag & tension caused by change in span length. Ruling Span Variation calculates the amount of that variation.

1.3 Features of Alcoa Sag10 for Windows Version 1.1
ADSS, OPGW, & ACSS Cable calculations Calculates Sag & Tension, Stringing Sag Tables, Clipping Offsets, Catenary Curve and Galloping Ellipses for Alcoa Fujikura Ltd.’s (AFL) All Dieletric Self Supporting Cables (ADSS), Optical Ground Wire & Aluminum Conductor Steel Supported. New Options for Formatting of the Output Horizontal and Vertical Sag may optionally be displayed as separate columns in lieu of Resultant Sag. This allows calculation of horizontal conductor blowout and actual ground clearance sag under wind load conditions. Adjustment of Rime Ice density Allows the calculated Rime Ice density to be selected by the user rather than always using a preset rime ice density of 37 lb/ft^3. Spacer Cable Calculations Input and output for spacer cable were modified for greater conformity with Hendrix Wire & Cable calculation methods. NESC K Factor may be applied to all cables or only the messenger cable at the users discretion. New Metric Features Galloping calculations and graphic display of the galloping ellipses is now available for metric calculations. The Marker Ball and Spacer calculations have been improved for metric calculations. British Sag Demo A Demo version of Sag10 is available with the British conductors of Centipede and Zebra. SAG10 is a reg. TM of Alcoa Fujikura Ltd. Windows is a reg. TM of Microsoft Corp.

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Chapter 1
™ ™

Introduction

1.4 Differences Between SAG10 for Windows and SAG10 for DOS
1-Create File is replaced with selecting each of the 4 command buttons on the Main Menu. 2-Retrieve File has been replaced by File - Open (Main Menu) 3-Modify Menu is replaced with selecting each of the 4 command buttons on the Main Menu. 4-Default Parameters is divided into several areas: Options (Main Menu) contains the majority of the previous defaults. Setup - Page Setup (Main Menu) contains the options for output display of headings, with many other choices added. Output to Screen, Printer or File is now located on the Main Menu for convenience, and always defaults to screen output. Run - Sag & Tension (Main Menu) contains a menu selection for Stringing Sag Tables. This selection is now made after viewing the sag & tension output. 5-Save Problem File has been replaced by File - Save or File - Save As (Main Menu) 6-Process Problem File has been replaced by Run - Sag & Tension (Main Menu) 7-Other Calculations, Inclined Spans has been replaced by Run - Inclined Spans (Main Menu) 7-Other Calculations, Offset Clipping has been replaced by Offset Clipping accessed from the Output Screen ( Run - Sag & Tension ) 8-Quit has been replaced by File - eXit (Main Menu) Printing and plotting of the Galloping Ellipses and Sag Curves is now done from within SAG10 or by switching between applications to another graphics program of choice, rather than exiting to SagPlot. This is supplemented by the DXF file option. For individual data entry boxes, the TAB key is used to move from entry box to entry box, rather than the ENTER key used previously. Each box is entered in the type over mode as a highlighted cell. If an ARROW, HOME or END key are pressed, the entry box switches to the edit mode. For data tables, standard spreadsheet table commands are used. The TAB, ENTER, or ARROW keys are used to move from cell to cell. Each cell is entered in the type over mode. The F2 key will highlight the cell and initiate editing of the cell. A row is inserted with Insert, a row is deleted with Delete. The Table is cleared with Clear. Selecting a conductor is now an interactive process, where a conductor may be selected and reviewed as many times as the user wishes prior to leaving the conductor selection area. After picking the Conductor Selection (Main Menu) command, enter the conductor type, and codeword or other required data such as size and stranding. Pressing the Lookup Wire Data command will search the database for the required data and display it on the form. The Lookup Wire Data command will then become disabled until a modification is made in the conductor request. If Main Menu or OK is picked and the requested entry data has been modified, the program will lookup the new request prior to exiting the form. The data output is displayed in a sizable window with scrolling capabilities. If Run - Pause between Spans (Main Menu) is checked, the spans will display one at a time, to allow for reviewing Galloping, Sag Curves, Stringing Sag Tables, and/or Clipping Offsets. If Run - Pause between Spans (Main Menu) is unchecked, all of the requested spans will calculate and display in the sizable window at one time.

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Chapter 1 1.5 Features of Current & Previous Versions

Introduction

Alcoa's SAG10TM Computer Program* designed for use with the IBM PC contains: • Alcoa Graphic Method • Sag and Tension with Creep • Elevated Temperature Creep • Inclined Span Calculation • Stringing Sag Tables • Offset Clipping Processing Highlights include: • User Friendly • Menu Driven • Screen Oriented Editing • Use of enhanced video and keyboard function Problem features are: • Create, Save, and Open Problem File • Built-in Temperature and Loadings • Choice of Bare Wire Limits • Modify Defaults and Problem File • Automatic Creep Check • Single Entry Increments Temperature-Spans • Automatic Conductor Data • Automatic Stress-Strain Chart Selection • Problem Output Designates Inputs • Graphic Output Galloping Ellipses and Sag Curves • Calculation of Marker Ball and Non-supporting Cable additions The processing and problem features work together to make an easy to use self-prompting software package. Data furnished includes: • Stress-Strain Coefficients • Conductor Data Base (Area, Dia., Wgt., RTS, SS Chart No.) ACSR's: Standard & British /AW /TW /SD AAC ......British AAAC .....British ACAR AW-Alumoweld ST-Steel Multiplex Wires Covered Line Wires T-2 Conductors ADSS cable OPGW cable ACSS ACSS / AW CopperWeld CopperWeld - Copper Hard drawn Copper User Bookmarks * Copyright 1986 Aluminum Company of America

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Chapter 1 1.6 History

Introduction

The Alcoa Graphic Method of sag-tension calculations was developed in 1926 by H. H. Rodee. Analysis of the stress-strain behavior of the complete conductor and its component parts form the basis for the method. It is applicable for composite conductors (ACSR's, OPGW's) or those consisting of one metal - aluminum, copper, or steel. SAG10 is an enhancement of the mainframe Alcoa SAGTEN program available since 1963. The enhancements include conductor data bases, for accurate and up-to-date data retrieval of most cataloged conductors and overhead ground wires; elevated temperature creep, an important consideration today when electrical demand taxes old designs; inclined span calculations, at times a perplexing mathematical problem; offset clipping, a solution to a stringing problem; and use of screen editing and keyboard functions inherent to the IBM-PC. In 1992, SAG10 Version 5 and SAGPLOT Version 1 were released. In 1994, SAG10 for Windows was released. In 1997, Windows was updated with Version 1.1. In 1998, Windows was updated with Version 2.0. In 2001, Windows was updated with Version 3.0. The new features are listed on page 1 of this manual.

1.7 License Agreement Information
The software program is furnished to the original purchaser under the license agreement written. The software may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of the agreement. It is against the law to copy the software on any medium except as specifically allowed in the license agreement. The only warranty on this software is on the CD-ROM, which Alcoa warrants to be free from defects in materials and workmanship. If within 90 days from date of purchase the defective CD-ROM is returned, a replacement will be made at no charge. Also within 90 days of purchase technical questions regarding operation of the programs will be answered by calling Tech Support at 1-800-866-7385. Definitions as they apply to SAG10 licensing: SITE-a physical location, a headquarters building where many users conduct every day business. A SITE is not various divisions within a city, operating district, or company wide operation with multiple subsidiaries. Up to 25 user’s is permitted. LAN-local area network which is specific to a site. It is not a network covering a company’s operating divisions within a geographic area. A minimum of three concurrent SAG10 users is required. Concurrent User-software is available that monitors and controls the number of users of software at any one time. CLIENT SERVER-a hardware/software host centrally located to serve multiple locations. Mergers of utilities to form huge companies has fostered the client server operation as a means of sharing expensive software. A minimum of six concurrent SAG10 users is required. To purchase or upgrade SAG10 contact customer service at 1-800-925-4815. Technical Support is offered for the lifetime of the current version and can be obtained at the 3 locations listed below. For the most prompt responses, it is recommended that you email directly or email from the Website with a complete explanation of the problem or information required. Email: Support @ Sag10.com Website: www.Sag10.com/support.htm Phone: 800-866-7385

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Chapter 1 1.8 Installation
SAG10 Package Contents: 1. Installation Guide and License Agreement 2. Installation CD-ROM 3. Registration User ID and Password Card

Introduction

1.8.1 Minimum Equipment Required:
1. IBM compatible Pentium 90 or greater with at least 16 MB of RAM memory. 2. Microsoft Windows 95 or higher. 3. CD-Rom drive 4. Hard disk with at least 20 MB of free space (5 MB used by program for file storage). 5. VGA or better monitor

1.8.2 Installation - Single User
1.Uninstall all previous versions of SAG10. 2.Close any open applications running in Windows. 3. Insert SAG10 CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive. 4.If the Startup Menu does not launch automatically locate the file “StartUpMenu.exe” on the CD-ROM and open the file. 5.From the Sag10 Startup Menu, pick “Install Sag10 3.0”. 6.Make sure all other programs are not running, then click “OK”. 7.When setup is complete, choose the “OK” button to return to “Startup Menu”. 8.If the user is upgrading SAG10, and has previously modified any of the conductor data files, copy the required data files from the previous SAG10 directory to the new Sag10w directory using Windows Explorer. If a previous user has used ADD.EXE to modify the conductor charts, then copy the stress-strain chart file from the previous SAG10 directory to the default “Sag10w” directory, or your custom SAG10v 3.0 directory location, using Windows Explorer. If the user has NOT modified these files, then do NOT copy them. 9. Any additional instructions that were too late to put in this manual will be stored in a file named README.1ST. The instructions may be viewed from the CD-Rom Menu, Windows Notepad, or any text editor or word processor. 10. Continue on to "Getting Started with SAG10" below.

1.8.3 Installing and Using SAG10 On a Network
On a network, many users can share the SAG10 program and data files. Once SAG10 is set up on the network, the program can be run from the network server, or it can be installed onto the hard disks of individual workstations. This document assumes that you know how to use network software to connect to network drives and how to find files stored on network computers. Note: Every SAG10 user must either have a SAG10 Single User License, or the user's company must have a LAN/Client Server license or a Site License. Before you set up SAG10 The network must be operational, and you must have read-write access to the network directory in which you want to install SAG10. For more information, see your network software documentation. Setting up SAG10 on a network is a two-step process. You first install SAG10 on the network server. Then you set up the workstations, either by setting up the workstations to run SAG10 from the server or by installing SAG10 on each workstation's hard disk. Note: Each workstation should have at least 16 MB of RAM in order to run the SAG10 program.

1.8.4 Installation of SAG10 on a Network Server
1. Follow steps 1 thru 5 for 1.8.2 Installation - Single User, with the exception that the drive is likely to some letter higher than C:, such as R:\Sag10Net3\. Although the SAG10 program directory on the server (the directory containing Sag10w3.EXE) can be either readwrite or read-only, you should make it read-only after installing SAG10 to prevent users from unintentionally overwriting files. For more information, see your operating system documentation.

1.8.5 Installation of SAG10 on a Workstation
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Chapter 1

Introduction

You can install SAG10 onto local workstations so that users run the program from the network server, or you can install so that users run the program from their local workstation's hard drive. You perform the following procedures from the local workstation on which you are installing SAG10. 1. Follow steps 1 thru 5 for 1.8.2 Installation - Single User at each workstation licensed to use SAG10. This will place the appropriate files in the \Windows\System directories for each workstation. 2a. If the intention of the user is to access SAG10 from his own hard disk, and use the network only for printing and plotting and perhaps sharing common problem files, then the installation is complete. -or2b. If the intention of the user is to access SAG10 from the network drive, then perform the steps below. 3. In Windows Explorer, Pick Start, Programs and highlight Sag10 from the list. 4. Click on the right mouse button, select Properties, Shortcut. 5. Change the Target: from the name of the local drive to the name of the server drive, such as from C:\Program Files\Sag10w3\Sag10w3.EXE to R:\SAG10Net\Sag10w3.EXE if C is the local drive and R is the server drive. 6. Change the Start In: from the name of the local drive to the name of the server drive, such as from C:\Program Files\Sag10w3 to R:\Sag10Net (or similar). 7. Select OK to close the Properties form. 8. Use Windows Explorer to delete the SAG10 files in the local drive, such as DELETE C:\Program Files\Sag10w3\*.*.

1.8.6 Using SAG10 on a Network
Using SAG10 on a network is essentially the same as using SAG10 from a hard disk on an individual computer. On the network, you can make a data file available to other users and allow them to make changes to the file, or you can protect the file from changes. You can use the network server to store and exchange data files between users, and many people can use a printer attached to the network server.

1.8.7 Printing over a Network
For information on setting up printers, see your Windows documentation. The procedures for printing over a network generally are the same as printing procedures for an individual computer. You use the Windows Setup program to set up all printers available to you. Then you choose the Page Setup command on the Setup menu in SAG10 and choose the Printer Setup button to select a printer for use with SAG10 and to change the settings for the active printer. If you have installed more than one printer, when you start SAG10 for the first time, make sure you select the printer you will be using for your documents. If you select one printer when you format a document and a different printer when you print the document, some fonts, point sizes, and other character formatting options may not be available when you print. Note: Your network software may require you to issue a system command to make a network printer available to your computer. For specific procedures for your network, see your network software documentation. Special Note for Bates TLCADD users: Refer to Appendix, “Notes for Bates Spotting Program" for installation and additional information.
TM

1.9 Getting Started with SAG10
1. To begin using SAG10, click on the Alcoa SAG10 icon: 2. The SAG10 Entry Screen appears with information on licensing of SAG10. Read the information. If you have met the terms of the agreement, press OK to continue to the SAG10 Main Menu 3. Refer to Chapter 2 for more information on each Command and Menu option. TLCADD is a registered trademark of LineSoft

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Chapter 2

Introduction 2.1 Entry Screen
Double clicking on the SAG10 icon loads the program and the entry screen shown in Fig. 2-1 appears. The user has 30 days in which to register the program by going online to the Alcoa website: www.sag10.com/ register.htm. The user is asked to complete the registration form for company information and will then receive an email with his registration number to enter into Sag10. If an error message appears, refer to the Appendix on Error Messages".

Fig. 2-1

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Chapter 2

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus 2.2 Main Menu
After selecting OK at the Entry Screen, the following menu in Fig. 2-2 appears. New Problem Files are created, or existing Problem Files are edited, directly from the Main Menu. The 4 command buttons are used to access the required data entry areas discussed below.

2.3 Create/Edit Problem File
To create a new or edit an existing Problem file, select each of the command buttons: Headings, Conductor Selection, Loadings Table and Ruling SPans from the Main Menu. Each of the commands is discussed separately below.

2.3.1 Headings
The first step is to select the Headings command. You will be prompted to enter two lines of heading. Each line of the heading may be up to 72 characters. These 2 lines will appear at the top of the first page of the sag & tension output, and optionally, at the top of each additional page and for Stringing Sag Tables and Clipping Offsets.

Fig.2-2

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Chapter 2

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus
2.3.2 Conductor Selection
Selecting the Conductor Selection (Main Menu) command displays the form shown in Fig. 2-3. The conductor selections are broken down into 24 categories. Select the appropriate category for your conductor type. If none of these have the conductor needed, select 15- Other. After a conductor type is selected, the user will be prompted for additional information, which will vary, depending on which conductor type is picked. In most cases, the user may just enter the Codeword, and the rest of the necessary conductor data will be automatically searched and entered from the SAG10 database. If Select by: Size/Strand option is picked, a different prompt will appear in lieu of the Codeword prompt. For 2- ACSR British, 13Multiplex and 14- Covered Line Wire, the only valid option is to enter the correct codeword.

Fig.2-3

When the Lookup Wire Data command is picked, the program will search the data base for the conductor characteristics and stress-strain Chart #, and display the values for Area, Diameter, Weight, Rated Tensile Strength (RTS), and stress-strain Chart #. The User may then optionally modify either the Weight or Chart #. A listing of charts commonly used is shown in Appendix, “List of Stress - Strain Charts". If it is necessary to use the 15- Other option, it is possible to enter that information permanently into the SAG10 conductor database by using the Add to Database command. Conductor data may also be viewed thru this utility. Refer to the Section on User Bookmarks for more information.

2.3.2.1 ADSS Cable
Sag10 calculations now include AFL’s All Dielectric Self Supporting (ADSS) cable. AFL (Alcoa Fujikura Ltd) does not recommend attempting to use Sag10 to calculate data for dielectric cable from other manufacturers. In order to perform ADSS calculations, first choose Conductor Selection from the Main Menu. After selecting 16- ADSS, the displayed form will appear as shown in Fig. 2-4. Type in the proper values requested on the form. These values may be obtained from AFL for your particular cable. The MRCL stands for Maximum Rated Conductor Limit and RTS stand for Rated Tensile Strength, or Rated Breaking Strength. It is important that both MRCL and RTS values be accurate in order to allow stringing the cable to the proper design tensions. Sag10 obtains the allowed Fig. 2-4 percentage of RTS by dividing the MRCL by the RTS. This percentage is often 50%, but may range from 45% to 63+%, depending on the particular cable. The allowable percentage is increasing as new designs are developed. It is important that Conductor Selection be set to ADSS prior to entering the Load Table data, in order to initiate the proper Load Table limits. The ADSS input now prompts for the Thermal Coefficient of Expansion and for 3 Moduli: Initial, 10 Years Creep, Final, so the Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 13

Chapter 2

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

program can simulate the exact stress-strain chart for that particular design. The proper values for these parameters can also be obtained from your AFL representative.

2.3.2.2 OPGW
Sag10 calculations now include AFL’s Optical Ground Wire cables. AFL does not recommend attempting to use Sag10 to calculate data for OPGW cable from other manufacturers. Selecting 17- OPGW will display the form shown in Fig. 2-5 or 2-6. Selecting by: Catalog #: allows the user to type in AFL’s catalog #, such as GW0815. Selecting by: Size/Strand allows the user to enter data by cable designation. If the cable does not have alloy stranding, enter the single leading value into the first entry cell as shown in Fig. 2-6.

Fig. 2-5

2.3.2.3 ACSS Conductors
The selection of conductor databases now include Aluminum Conductor, Steel Supported (ACSS). This is the conductor formerly called SSAC by Reynolds Metal Co. Both ACSS/AW and ACSS/TW cables are also included.

2.3.2.4 Pre-stressing ACSS Conductors
Alcoa has been asked to provide some guidance for the pretensioning of ACSS conductors. These instructions were put together for that purpose. Be sure to also read the note below instructions (1)-(20): 1) Create or Open a Problem File. Only one ruling span may be run at a time. 2) Pick Load Table from the Main Menu 3) Pick a Load Zone from one of the 5 available at the bottom of the form, or enter your own values. 4) Enter an additional row with a stringing temperature in the 1st column. 5) Tab over and enter an increased weight in the 3rd column for wind as a Negative number, generally about 4 times that of the conductor weight. 6) Tab over and enter a 1 in the 5th column for Code. 7) Pick OK to return to the Main menu. 8) Pick Run, Sag & tension calcs from the Main Menu. 9) Note the initial tension for the common point in the Sag & Tension output and return to the Loading Table and adjust the negative value in the Wind column 3 if more or less pretension is desired. Repeat steps (5), (7), (8) & (9) until the desired Pretension is achieved in the Sag & Tension output. 10) From the Sag & Tension Data Menu, pick Stringing 11) Enter spans and Pick OK to continue. 12) Pick Final Condition. 13) For the Starting Temperature, enter the same temperature that was used in (4) above. Leave Increment and Ending Temperature as 0. Pick OK to continue. 14) Record the single temperature Stringing Sag data. 15) Return to the Load Table and replace the stringing temperature with another stringing temperature. 16) Tab over to the 3rd column for wind and adjust the value to a smaller negative number for a higher stringing temperature or to a larger negative number for a lower stringing temperature. 17) Pick OK to return to the Main menu. 18) Pick Run, Sag & tension calcs from the Main Menu.

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19) Note the Sag & tension output and Return to the Loading Table, adjusting the negative value in the Wind column 3 until the initial and final values for all of the conditions, other than the stringing temperature common point, match those of the output in step (9) above. 20) Repeat steps (15) thru (19) and steps (10) thru (14) for each stringing temperature. Note: If the user intends to pretension an ACSS conductor, it is important that he consider the following items : a) The structure design engineer must be informed of the additional loads created by pre-stressing so that he can review the entire line for those loads. b) The design engineer needs to review in particular the additional horizontal and vertical loads applied to the structures adjacent to the tensioner and puller during the stringing process. The engineer should design and specify the temporary guy attachment locations for these structures, and specify minimum level ground distances allowed between the puller and tensioner and the adjacent structures. c) The line crew manager needs to be informed of the additional loads as it may be necessary to use larger pullers and tensioners than would be used otherwise. Cable pulling may require different pulling clamps than normally used. Additional time may be required during stringing, and will require throwing lines over the conductor to pull the conductor back into a uniform sag. The line crew may need to budget for these additional costs.

2.3.2.5 Copper Conductors
The selection of conductor databases now include separate databases for Copperweld cables, Copperweld-Copper cables and Hard Drawn (HD) Copper.

2.3.2.6 Conductor Lookup List
It is now possible to scroll thru a list of available conductors for each conductor type, and thereby select the appropriate conductor without having to type the name or remember the exact spelling. In order to select a conductor from the lookup list, first select the proper conductor type from the left column. Then click the arrow on the right side of the dropdown box to display a list of cables as shown in Fig. 27. Select the applicable conductor by highlighting and <Enter> or by doubleclicking the conductor. Then press Lookup Wire Data to fill in the conductor data boxes. In order to save the time of scrolling thru the conductor list for future lookups, refer to Section 2.3.2.7 in order to add the conductor to set a bookmark for the conductor. 2.3.2.7 Sort Selection List Fig. 2-7 A check box has been provided just below the Optional Conductor Selection List box. Checking the box will sort the conductor databases in alphabetical order for conductor types 1 to 9, 13, 14, 18, and 19. This is helpful if you wish to lookup the conductor by ordered by conductor name, rather than the normal order by conductor size.

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2.3.2.8 User Bookmarks
You can now use bookmarks to store a list of the most common conductors used. The list of favorite conductors are then available for quick recall when setting up future problem files. The steps to do this are: 1. Select a conductor and then press Lookup Wire Data to fill in the conductor data boxes. 2. Press the Add to Database button to display the red form shown in Fig. 2-8. 3. Press the Add Bookmark button. The conductor is added to the User Bookmarks. 4. Press the EXit button to return to the Conductor Selection area.

2.3.2.9 Add New Conductor to Database
This replaces the previous DOS based ADD.EXE program, simplifying the process of adding new conductors to the existing databases. In order to add a new conductor, follow the steps below: 1. If the conductor is similar to an existing conductor, select that conductor and then press Lookup Wire Data to fill in the conductor data boxes. Otherwise, proceed to step 2. 2. Press the Edit Data checkbox. This allows the user to enter new data or edit existing data in the data boxes provided. 3. Press the Add to Database button shown in Fig. 2-7 to display the red form shown in Fig. 2-8. 4. Press the Add to Type N button, where N equals the conductor type requested. The conductor is added to the database for that conductor type. 5. You may also bookmark the new conductor at this time by pressing the Add Bookmark button. The conductor is added to the User Bookmarks. 6. Press the EXit button to return to the Conductor Selection area. Fig. 2-8

2.3.2.10 View Existing StressStrain Chart in Sag10.Pgm Database
This replaces the previous DOS based ADD.EXE program, simplifying the process of viewing existing stress-strain charts in the Sag10.Pgm database. In order to view an existing chart, follow the steps below: 1. Press the New S-S Chart button shown in Fig. 2-7. This will display the Form shown in Fig. 2-9. 2. Click on the Chart # lookup box to present a list of existing chart #’s. Select a Chart #. 3. Press the View Chart button. The

Fig. 2-9 stress-strain data for that chart will fill in the data boxes.

2.3.2.11 Add New Stress-Strain Chart to Sag10.Pgm Database
This replaces the previous DOS based ADD.EXE program, simplifying the process of adding new stress-strain charts to the existing Sag10.Pgm database. In order to add a new chart, follow the steps below: 1. Press the New S-S Chart button shown in Fig. 2-7. This will display the Form shown in Fig. 2-9. 2. Fill in all of the data boxes provided in the form. The required data may be obtained thru your AFL representative. Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 16

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3. Press the Add Chart button. The data will be added to the Sag10.Pgm database. Warning: If the chart already exists in Sag10.Pgm, the earlier data will be retrieved rather than the most recent entry.

2.3.2.12 Delete User Added Stress-Strain Chart from Sag10.Pgm Database
This new feature allows the user to remove any Stress-Strain Charts from Sag10.Pgm that he has added in himself and would now like to remove for various reasons. In order to delete a chart, follow the steps below: 1. Click on the Chart # lookup box to present a list of existing chart #’s. Select a Chart #. 2. Press the View Chart button. The stress-strain data for that chart will fill in the data boxes. 3. Press the Delete Chart button. The data will be removed from the Sag10.Pgm database. If the chart is an core AFL chart, the Delete Chart button will show as disabled.

2.3.3 Loadings Table
Selecting the Loadings Table command displays the form shown in Fig. 2-10. The table is ready for individual inputs or automatic loadings. An initial record entry of 60 F, 0, 0, 0, 2 is automatically generated. This is the standard check for creep. Any entry with a zero value for the tension entry and a 2 for code entry, will allow the program to check for creep. If all such entries are removed, creep will not be checked, and incorrect data may result. In such a case, the output also will read “Creep is NOT Considered”. If the final sag is controlled by creep, the output will read “Creep IS a Factor.” If the final sag is controlled by the ice and wind from one of the load cases, the output will read “Creep is NOT a Factor.” Fig. 2-10 shows a typical Fig. 2-10 load case after additional loads have been added. If metric units have been selected in the Options section, units will appear as Deg C, mm Ice, 2 2 Kg/M or N/M wind, Kg or N tension. The command buttons at the bottom left of the form will generate various standard load conditions. Selecting any of them will generate the Design Limits form shown in Fig. 2-11 & Fig. 2-12. The following pages list the load conditions generated for each of the standard Loadings and Design Limit options possible. The load condition limits differ for ADSS in that both Alcoa and NESC limits generate a maximum limit of 50% of RTS. Clear Loads will clear all loads from the table and generate a creep condition of 60 F, 0, 0, 0, 2. Insert Row will insert one row at the current cursor location. Delete Row will delete one row at the current cursor location. Auto Temp Incr. prompts for a Temperature to increment. When the down arrow is used in the 1st column, any blank rows will be incremented by the entered amount. Save Load File allows you to store your loadings, and reuse them for creating or editing other problem files. You will be prompted for a file name. Enter a file name, using .LOD as the extension. Open Load File allows you to then retrieve any previously saved load files. You will be prompted for a file name. Selecting OK will clear out any previous entries and retrieve the loadings in the .LOD file. Additional entries may be made in any order up to a total of 50. A sorting process will organize the problem file into proper temperature/load order. Temperature (Deg F or C), radial thickness of ice (in. or mm. or negative value for 2 2 Rime ice or wet Snow), horizontal wind load (Psf, Kg/M , or N/M ), tension limit (Lb, Kg, or N) or % RTS or negative value for sag, and limit code values are placed within fields.

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Glaze ice is based on a density of 57 Lbs/ft3. Rime ice or wet Snow is assigned a default value of 37 Lbs/ft3. One of the new features for Sag10 is the ability to adjust the density of the Rime ice by selecting the Rime Ice Density command button or press <Alt>-R. Type in the new value and press <Tab> to return to the Load Table. Tensions may be inserted as % of RTS (Ex: .5 for 50% RTS) or in Lbs. Limit Code 1,2 or 3 is used in the far right column. 1 is used for initial, 2 for final. Limit entries may be tensions or sags. Sags are entered as negative numbers. Code 3 designates elevated temperature. Bare weights are supplied and loaded weights are calculated based on data from conductor files (or user input) and are displayed in report printout. Negative wind values may not be used in problem files with Marker Balls or Cables added. Pressing the GalloP Loads button will insert the loads required to calculate the Galloping Ellipses. These load conditions are normally only inserted if NESC Heavy Loads are selected. Refer to section 4.2 Gallop for more information on galloping calculations. There are 2 recommended methods for printing the Loadings Table. In either case, select the Loadings Table form, with the desired load conditions in the table. Method A) Press <Alt>-<Print Screen> from the Loadings Table form. Then, activate a graphic word processor, such as MS Wordpad or Word, and press <Cntrl>-V. The Loadings Table form will paste into the word processor. Print from the word processor. Method B) Press "Save Load File" in the Loadings Table form. Enter a file name, such as MYLOADS.LOD and press OK. The extension for load files are .LOD. Activate a word processor, such as MS Wordpad or Word. Open the MYLOADS.LOD file. Highlight the text and select a fixed pitch font such as Courier New. If you want the table headings, you will have to type them in manually. Print from the word processor. Selecting one of the Loading commands at the left bottom area of the form will generate NESC Heavy, Medium, and Light Loading, respectively, as shown in the loadings that follow. These function keys will erase any data previously entered. Tension limits shown are % RTS. However, % RTS, Lbs. tension or amount of Sag may be used. NESC Limits indicate maximum tensions allowed by code. Alcoa Limits are more conservative and are recommended for maximum wire and line durability. Selection of one these Function keys prompts the user with the form shown in Fig. 2-11 :

Fig. 2-11

NESC Heavy Load Alcoa Limits
TEMP ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

NESC Medium Load Alcoa Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

NESC Light Load Alcoa Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE

Deg F 0 32 -20 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 167 212

Inch .5 .5

Lb/Ft2 4

% or Lb .5

1

.333 .25

1 2

2

Deg F 15 32 0 15 15 15 30 60 90 120 167 212

Inch .25 .25

Lb/Ft2 4

% or Lb .5

1

1 2

2

Deg F 30 30 30 30 60 90 120 167 212

Inch

Lb/Ft2 9

% or Lb .5 .333 .25

1 1 2 2

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Chapter 2
NESC Heavy Load NESC Limits
TEMP ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP ICE

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus
NESC Medium Load NESC Limits
WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

NESC Light Load NESC Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE

Deg F 0 32 -20 0 30 60 60 60 90 120 167 212

Inch .5 .5

Lb/Ft2 4

% or Lb .6

1

.35 .25

1 2 2

Deg F 15 32 0 15 30 60 60 60 90 120 167 212

Inch .25 .25

Lb/Ft2 4

% or Lb .6

1

.35 .25

1 2 2

Deg F 30 30 60 60 60 90 120 167 212

Inch

Lb/Ft2 9

% or Lb .6 .35 .25

1 1 2 2

NESC Heavy Load No Limits
TEMP ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

NESC Medium Load No Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

NESC Light Load No Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE

Deg F Inch Lb/Ft2 % or Lb Deg F Inch 0 .5 4 .5 1 15 .25 32 .5 32 .25 -20 0 0 15 30 30 60 2 60 90 90 120 120 167 167 212 212 * NESC Limits are reduced to .50 (50%) for ADSS cables

Lb/Ft2 4

% or Lb .5

1

2

Deg F 30 30 60 90 120 167 212

Inch

Lb/Ft2 9

% or Lb .5

1 2

Pressing the GalloP Loads button will insert the 2 loads below into the current load case, in order to allow calculation of the Lissajous ellipses. This is required for all load cases except NESC Heavy, which already include these 2 load conditions.
GalloP Loads
TEMP ICE WIND TENSION CODE

Deg F 32.0 30.0

Inch .50

Lb/Ft2

% or Lb

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Selecting the Calif. HeaVy or Calif. LiGht commands generate California Heavy Loading and California Light Loading, respectively, as shown in the loadings that follow. These commands will erase any data previously entered. Tension limits shown are % RTS. However, % RTS, Lbs. tension or amount of Sag may be used. NESC Limits indicate maximum tensions allowed by the California GO 95 code limits. Alcoa Limits are more conservative and are recommended for maximum wire and line durability. Selection of one these commands prompts the user with the Design Limits form. Selection of one these Function keys prompts the user with the form shown in Fig. 2-12 : Fig. 2-12
California Heavy Load Alcoa Limits
TEMP ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

California Light Load Alcoa Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE

Deg F 0 32 -20 0 0 0 30 60 90 120 130 167 212

Inch .5 .5

Lb/Ft2 6

% or Lb .5

1

.333 .25

1 2

2

Deg F 25 25 25 25 60 90 120 167 212

Inch

Lb/Ft2 8

% or Lb .5 .333 .25

1 1 2 2

California Heavy Load NESC Limits
TEMP ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

California Light Load NESC Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE

Deg F 0 32 -20 0 30 60 60 60 90 120 130 167 212

Inch .5 .5

Lb/Ft2 6

% or Lb .6

1

.35 .25

1 2 2

Deg F 25 25 60 60 60 90 120 167 212

Inch

Lb/Ft2 8

% or Lb .6 .25 .25

1 1 2 2

California Heavy Load No Limits
TEMP ICE WIND TENSION CODE TEMP

California Light Load No Limits
ICE WIND TENSION CODE

Deg F 0 32 -20 0 30 60 90 120 130 167 212

Inch .5 .5

Lb/Ft2 6

% or Lb .5

1

2

Deg F 25 25 60 90 120 167 212

Inch

Lb/Ft2 8

% or Lb .5

1 2

NESC Limits are reduced to .50 (50%) for ADSS cables

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2.3.4 Ruling Spans
Selecting the Run, Ruling SPans command from the Main Menu displays the form shown in Fig. 2-13. Up to 50 spans may be entered. Spans may be generated singly, or in increments. Units are Feet or Meters, depending on option selected. The common editing keys are similar to typical Windows spreadsheets. Keystrokes specific for the Span table are explained below: Main Menu or OK ends the current span entry/edit session and returns to the Main Menu. Insert Span will insert one span Delete Span will delete one span Clear Span will clear all of the spans in the table <F2> will switch from type over mode to edit cell mode Series of Spans command prompts for the input shown in Fig. 2-14 below and then generates the requested values for the span table.

Fig. 2-13

Fig. 2-14

2.3.5 Output Redirection
The data output option box previously on the Main Menu screen has now been replaced with Print options on the Sag & Tension data menu bar. Refer to Section 4.9 Output for details.

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Chapter 3 3.1 File Commands (Main Menu)

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

Selecting File (Main Menu) displays the sub menu shown in Fig. 3-1.

3.1.1 File New (Main Menu)
is selected to clear all previous file problem data.

3.1.2 File Open (Main Menu)
is selected to open a problem file. The standard Windows file opening form is displayed as shown in Fig. 3-1. A sample file named SAMPLE.PRF has been included and may be opened for practice. It is recommended that all problem files be given a .PRF extension.

Fig 3-1

3.1.3 File Save (Main Menu)
is selected to save a new or an existing problem file. If the problem has not yet been assigned a name, a standard Windows file saving form similar to Fig. 3-2 will display. It is recommended that all problem files be given a .PRF extension.

3.1.4 File Save As
is selected from the Main Menu to save a problem file under a new name. The standard Windows file saving form is used, similar to Fig. Fig. 3-2 3-2. It is recommended that all problem files be given a .PRF extension.

3.1.5 File eXit (Main Menu)
is selected to close SAG10 and return to Windows.

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Main Menu - Pulldown Menus 3.2 Options
Selecting Options will display the form shown in Fig. 3-3. This is similar to the 'Defaults' area in the DOS versions of SAG10. The format has been rearranged, however, for convenience and to better meet the standard Windows format. The following options have been moved to other areas: 1. The Stringing Sag options have been moved to the Sag & Tension Output Screen. It is no longer necessary to decide ahead of time whether or not to view the Stringing Sag Tables. See Section 4.4. 2. Headings for 2nd page have been moved to Setup - Page Setup. See Section 3.3.2. For the current Options area, the default values or the last selected option is displayed. Use the Tab key to move through the optional groups. The alternate choices may be selected by using the right or left ARROW keys. Check boxes may be toggled with the spacebar. Main Menu or OK returns to Main Menu. The Options set by the user are saved as part of the problem file.

Fig. 3-3 Below is a detailed explanation of each default selection.

3.2.1 Elevated Temperatures, Input (default = unchecked)
When Elevated Temperature Input box is checked, the message shown below appears on the Options form. This message is a reminder that it is still necessary to indicate what temperatures to check, and for what time intervals. Refer to Elevated Temperature Creep below for complete information on elevated temperature entry. Fig. 3-5 also appears. Note: Elevated Temperature Points Require Code = 3 in Loading Table ** Modify Load Table before running **

3.2.2 Elevated Temperatures, Output Strain (default = unchecked)
This default is only considered if the Elevated Temperature Input Default shown above in Section 3.2.1 equals "Yes". If so, then the output will include a line of data at the first elevated temp creep point, indicating normal (EC) and elevated temperature creep (ECRP). This is shown in Fig. 3-4 below, followed by 60 Deg F temperature w/creep output. Refer to Section 3.2.2.1 for complete information on elevated temperature entry.

Ec = 468.26 Ecrp = 1159.04 60.# .00 .00 .00 1.075 28.31 4766. Fig. 3-4 Creep is a function of time and temperature. The time/temperature that will cause the maximum micro strain increase in elongation is selected and converted to a temperature differential.

3.2.2.1 Elevated Temperature Creep
The following steps are required to generate elevated temperature calculations. If any of the steps are left out, the output will not reflect the proper output: 1. Select Options (Main Menu). 2. Under Elevated Temperatures, mark the Input checkbox. Optionally, mark the Output Strain check box. Refer to Section 3.2.2 for explanation of Output Strain.

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3. The Elevated Temperature Creep form shown in Fig. 3-5 will appear. Enter the length of time at which the conductor is expected to experience elevated temperatures over the life of the line is required. Entries are in hours and Deg C. Typical entries might be: 4. Select RoLLed or CAst Rod from the option box as shown in Fig. 3-5. Creep characteristics between rolled and cast rod are different. Cast rod exhibits less creep than rolled rod. Conductors manufactured prior to the early 1970’s are likely to have been made with rolled rod. 5. If the conductor selected is all-aluminum (AAC, AAAC, ACAR) or an ACSR with strands of 84/19, 84/7, 45/7, 20/7, 18/1, 42/7, 76/19, 72/7, and 36/1 (ACSR's with less than 71/2% steel by area), the values entered into the table shown in Fig. 3-5 will be used in the elevated temperature calculations. (The actual times and temperatures shown in table are entered by user). Elevated temperature creep of ACSR's with more than 7-1/2% steel by area is less than room temperature creep and can be ignored.1 If the user has chosen an ACSR with more than 7 1/2% steel, the program will issue a warning message, toggle the Elevated Temp Input Default to "No", and the Elevated Temp Table will be bypassed. 6. Select Loadings Table from the Main Menu. Select a standard load from the 5 command buttons and the proper entries will be automatically generated. An additional record (row) will be generated for each temperature at or above 60 Deg F. (16 Deg C.), and assigned a code value of 3. The temperatures from the Elevated Temperature Table in Fig. 3-5 will be converted to Deg F, and included in the Loadings Table also, with a code value of 3. If temperatures less than 16 Deg C. were added, SAG10 will ignore them as they are not affected by elevated temperature. If the user is entering a non-standard loading, it is then necessary to enter the Elevated Temperatures manually. All temperature values in the table at or above 60 Deg F should have a 2nd entry with a code value of 3. Each of the temperatures in the Elevated Temperature Table in Fig. 3-5 should be converted to Deg F, and included in the Loadings Table also, with a code value of 3. As an example, if the Elevated Temperature Table has a temperature of 125 Deg C included, then the Loadings Table should have an equivalent entry of 257 Deg F, with and without a code value of 3. This is shown below in Fig. 3-6. This creates in the output the comparison of sag at 257 Deg F. with and without elevated temperature creep. In the Sag & Tension Output, the elevated temperature creep line is identified by a # sign. Creep is a function of time and temperature. The time/temperature that will cause the maximum micro strain increase in elongation is selected and converted to a temperature differential. A printout of normal creep (EC) and elevated temperature creep (ECRP) is available by requesting Output Strain in the Options menu area. The program ETCR.EXE on your SAG10 diskette is based on the papers described below and will provide the temperature differential used by SAG10 in determining Fig. 3-6 elevated temperature sag values. For background on elevated temperature creep the following papers may be researched:
l. J. R. Harvey, R. E. Larson - Use of Elevated Temperature Creep Data in Sag-Tension Calculations, IEEE Paper 69 TP 674-PWR. 2. J. R. Harvey, R. E. Larson - Creep Equations of Conductors for Sag-Tension Calculations, IEEE Paper C 72 190-2. 3. J. R. Harvey, R. E. Larson - Technique to Include Elevated Temperature Creep in Sag-tension Calculations, IEEE T&D Conference and Exposition April 1-9, 1979. 4. W. B. Zollars - Aluminum Conductor Elevated Temperature Considerations, Seminar sponsored by Georgia Power Co., the Aluminum Association, and EPRI on the Effects of Elevated Temperature Operation on Overhead Conductors and Accessories - May 20, 1986, Atlanta Georgia.

Fig. 3-5

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Chapter 3
3.2.3 Account for Aluminum Compression

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

SAG10 Vers. 2.0 corrects an error in the previous version relating to effects of creep at elevated temperatures. The error caused the increases in sag at elevated temperatures to be overestimated. It occurred only under conditions where the aluminum in ACSR was slack. This error arose from the method used in previous versions for representing effects of creep at elevated temperatures. The elevated temperature increment in creep was simulated by a fictitious increment in conductor temperature. The method in effect assigned a significant part of the creep increment to the steel core, actually one part creep strain to the steel for each two parts assigned to the aluminum. In actuality, there is little or no creep of the steel. The method is accurate for conditions where the aluminum in ACSR is not slack. However, it leads to an estimate of the so-called “kneepoint temperature” that is too high, and that leads to overestimates of increases in sags. In Vers. 2.0, all of the elevated creep strain increment is assigned to the aluminum, so that sags are correct even when the aluminum is slack. Refer to Appendix, “Theory of Compressive Stress in Aluminum of ACSR” and Appendix, “Some Effects of Mill Practice on the Stress Strain Behavior of ACSR”.

3.2.4 Separate AL & STL Tension
The basis for the Alcoa Graphic-Method of sag and tension is stress- strain testing. When stress-strain tests are performed on ACSR, composite data (aluminum combined with steel) and single data (that of the steel only) are possible. The Graphic Method, when dealing with ACSR derives the stress-strain data of the aluminum portion by subtracting the available steel data from that of the composite. Whenever different temperatures are considered in a sag and tension problem, transposition of the steel and aluminum portion by use of coefficient of linear expansion is used. At each temperature, therefore, the components are added vectorially to form the composite. Since the separate aluminum and steel tensions are always available, the default option of separate aluminum and steel tensions is offered. Separate tensions can be a valuable tool when evaluating operation of ACSR's at high temperatures. ACSR's with large percentage steel will exhibit zero tension on the aluminum strands at high temperatures. This means added sag will be attributable only to the elongation of the steel - a lower value since the coefficient of expansion of steel is half that of aluminum.

3.2.5 Tensions Avg Vert (At Supports) Horiz (At Sag)
The default used for tension is the average value. This is the tension the conductor "sees". Options for tension components at the support or at the "belly" of the sag are available. The support value (vertical) includes the weight of wire whereas the sag value (horizontal) subtracts out the weight of the wire. Tension at support is used in tower design calculations. Horizontal tension is used in offset clipping and inclined span options. Formulas used for leveled spans are as follows: T = P + WD/2 H = P - WD/2 Where: T = Tension at support, Lbs. H = Horizontal tension at center of span, Lbs. P = Average tension, Lbs. W = Conductor weight, Lbs./ft. D = Sag, ft. For the incline span case formulas are presented in Appendix () “Inclined Span Sag Example”.

3.2.6 Display Extra Column No % RTS H/W Horz & Vert Sag
This option adds columns to the Sag & Tension Output for Final & Initial tension as either % RTS refers to Percentage of Rated Tensile Strength or H / W is the Horizontal Tension divided by Weight. This is often referred to as the "Catenary Constant" or "C" value or Horz & Vert Sag displays the resultant sag as horizontal and vertical components. An example is shown in "Appendix G13, Percent RTS, H / W or Horz & Vert Sag Example ".

3.2.7 Units English English-to-Kg Kilogram Newton
There are four options available for Units: English - English Input and Output in Pounds, Feet or Inches, and Deg. Fahrenheit. English-to-Kg - English Input and Metric Output in Kilograms, Meters or Millimeters, and Deg. Centigrade. Kilogram - Both Input and Output are in Kilograms, Meters or Millimeters, and Deg. Centigrade. Newtons - Both Input and Output are in Newtons, Meters, & Deg. Centigrade. Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 25

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The Sag Curves and Galloping Ellipses are now displayed and printed in both English and Metric Units. Refer to Appendix, “Notes for Metric Users' for more information.

3.2.8 NESC K New Old Old (Steel & Cu)
Occasionally it is necessary to distinguish between NESC 5th or 6th Edition and the rounded-off K factor of the NESC 7th Edition. The Old designates 5th or 6th. The Old (Steel & Cu) should be used as required to match calculations for steel or copper cable for the older NESC manuals.

3.2.9 T-2TM Conductor
Any of the ACSR, AAC, AAAC, or ACAR may be calculated as T-2 conductor, also referred to as TTwo. The weight, strength, and area of the wire are doubled, the diameter is considered to be 1.637 times as large as the single wire for wind resistance calculations. If the T-2 selection is made, the conductor description will indicate use of T-2. This option is not available for Line Wire or Multiplex, attempting to run such a combination will reset TTwo to unchecked. The TTwo option may also be set in the Conductor Selection area. When radial ice is applied to T-2 conductors, the ice layer is calculated as a uniform layer of the radial thickness requested over both diameters for the area exposed to the air. Since the 2 conductors are touching, no ice is applied to the interface area between the 2 conductors.

3.2.10 Attachments to Wire No Marker Balls Cables PLP Spoiler
An attempt has been made to cover many of the common situations that may occur as a result of adding marker balls or cables to a supporting conductor or messenger. However, it is not expected that all possible situations will be covered by the methods included in this program. If a situation arises that does not fit the options available, it may be necessary to calculate manually, or to use an approximate result. For situations that are covered by the Marker Ball or Cable Default option, see "Appendix G9, Marker Ball Example" and "Appendix G10, NonSupporting Cable Example". The weight of a Marker Ball (or Cable) is multiplied by the quantity of Balls (or Cables) and added to the Total Additional Weight. This total weight is evenly distributed over the span length. Radial ice is applied as a uniform layer over the Balls (or Cables), as well as over the conductor. Wind pressure is applied over the cross sectional area of the Balls and conductor (or Cable and messenger). Radial ice will increase all diameters, and resulting wind areas, by twice the radial ice thickness.

3.2.10.1 Marker Balls
Marker Ball Selection will generate the prompt screen shown in Fig. 3-7. Span Options If Marker Balls are to be placed on one single span, deadended on both sides, then select Attachments to Wire, Marker Balls from the Options Settings. When Run - Sag & Tension (Main Menu) is selected, fill out the data requested in the prompt screen shown in Fig. 3-7. If Marker Balls are placed on all spans within a ruling span, and the weight is evenly distributed among all spans, then the results may also be obtained directly. Fig. 3-7 Sum up all of the span lengths, quantities, and additional weights. Fill in the prompt screen shown in Fig. 3-7, using the calculated sums for span length, quantity, and additional weight. The diameter and weight for one ball is used. If the span with Marker Balls is a single span within the ruling span, such that it is not deadended on either side, then additional calculations must be performed to determine the sag & tension information within that span. Refer to "Appendix G11A & B, Determining Data on One Span" for an example problem.

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Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

Design Condition Applied Before or After If the span is being designed for marker ball attachment, and the user would like to keep the loadings within specific design limits, then the user should select After Attachment. This will ensure that the design conditions are met under the worst load case, after installation of balls and additional weights. If the span was strung at some previous date, and marker balls are being added as an afterthought, then the user should select Before Attachment. This allows the original design conditions, prior to marker ball addition, to control. When this option is selected, special attention should be paid to the resulting data. It is possible for the data, with balls attached, to exceed design limits. If this situation occurs, it may be necessary to restring the span, or to reconsider the plan of adding balls to the span. Refer to Appendix G9, Marker Ball Example". When the Marker Ball option has been selected, the following data appears in the middle of the sag & tension run, serving as a break between the sag & tension data before and after the balls are installed. The 2nd line indicates the quantity of balls, span, diameter and weight of one ball, and the additional weight (such as total weight of the vibration dampers) as the last item. Above: Initial Data Prior to Marker Ball Installation Below: 10. Marker Balls in 2000. Feet, Dia= 24.0 IN , Wt= 16.0 Lb + 64 Lb

If STringing Sags are requested from the Output Screen, the following data will be created: Initial Initial data prior to adding balls. Final Final data with balls attached. Final W/Load Final loaded data with balls attached.

3.2.10.2 Non-supporting spacer cable, installed after stringing
Cables selection from the Options Settings will generate the prompt screen shown in Fig. 3-8. One or more cables may be added to a conductor or messenger by selecting Attachments to Wire, Cable in Options. When Run - Sag & Tension is selected, the prompt screen in Fig. 3-8 will appear. Several cables may be hung in a non-supporting fashion from a single supporting cable. Each of the nonsupporting cables must be of equal diameter and weight. The weight of additional items, such as hangers, must be calculated by the user as an evenly distributed weight and entered in Lb/Ft (Kg/M or N/M for metric). This should be done by manually summing the total weight of additional attachments, and dividing by the total span length. This is the most convenient method for most users, where the additional weights are spacers placed at regular intervals. Two new items have been added to the form to accommodate the method used by Hendrix Wire & Cable for calculating loads on messenger cable. Hanger Ice Load Factor for .5” Ice is assigned a value of 1.8. This adds an ice loading weight to the cable spacers. Another option has been added to Apply the NESC K Factor to: Only the Messenger or to Each of the Cables and Messenger Wire. The NESC manual does not clearly define when the K factor should be applied, so both options have been offered to allow for the users own discretion. For more information on Hendrix calculation methods, contact Hendrix Wire & Cable. Fig. 3-8 Cable Options Situations that ARE covered by the Cable Option in SAG10 1. Spacer Cable installed after stringing. Situations that are NOT covered by the Cable Option in SAG10. These situations are better covered by the method explained in section 3.2.10.3 below. Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 27

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Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

1. Any non-supporting cable in direct contact with the messenger, such as figure-8 cable or lashed cable. 2. Any pre-assembled non-supporting cable that is strung at the same time as the messenger, such as figure-8 cable. Design Condition Applied Before or After If the span is being designed for cable attachment, and the user would like to keep the loadings within specific design limits, then the user should select After Attachment. This will ensure that the design conditions are met under the worst load case, after installation of cables and additional weights. If the span was strung at some previous date, and cables are being added as an afterthought, then the user should select Before Attachment. This allows the original design conditions, prior to cable design, to control. When this option is selected, special attention should be paid to the resulting data. It is possible for the data, with cable attached, to exceed design limits. If this situation occurs, it may be necessary to restring the span, or to reconsider the plan of adding cables to the span. Refer to "Appendix G10, Non-Supporting Cable Example". When the Cable option has been selected, the following data appears in the middle of the sag & tension run, serving as a break between the sag & tension data before and after cables are installed. The 2nd line indicates the quantity of cables, diameter and weight of one cable, and the additional weight, such as total weight of the hangers as the last item. Above: Initial Data Prior to Cable Installation Below: 3. Non-Supporting Cable(s) Added,Dia=1.123 In ,Wt=1.456 Lb/F + .210 Lb/F If STringing Sags are requested from the Output Screen, the following data will be created: Initial Initial data prior to adding Cables. Final Final data with Cables attached. Final W/Load Final loaded data with Cables attached.

3.2.10.3 Non-supporting cable, pre-assembled or lashed
If calculations are needed for non-supporting cables pre-assembled to a messenger prior to stringing, the Cable option in the Default area should not be used. Instead, use the method described below. 1. Determine basic information on the messenger cable, such as area, diameter, weight, RTS and chart #. Determine the diameter and weight of the hung cable. 2. Select 15- Other from the conductor selections listed in Fig. 2.3. When prompted, enter the area of the messenger and weight of the cables plus messenger. For diameter, select the combined diameter exposed to the wind. Enter the RTS of the messenger cable. 3. Select the chart # for the messenger cable. 4. If the cables are in direct contact, such as with lashed cable, the actual amount of combined ice build-up will vary depending on the configuration of cable quantities and diameters. As a result, all calculations assume the most conservative situation, that each cable will be covered with a uniform layer of the radial ice specified in the loadings table. If this is too conservative, it is up to the user to calculate an appropriate reduction of ice, and then reduce the radial ice indicated in the loadings table accordingly.

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3.2.10.4 PLP Spoilers

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

Calculations have been added to account for the horizontal and vertical loading created by PLP Spoilers. Selecting PLP Spoilers will create the prompt screen shown. Fill in the requested data and pick Continue. The output will show the following data and the conductor weight for each load condition will reflect the additional loads created by the spoilers. “Added: 4 Spoilers on 1000 Ft span weighing 14 Lb increasing wind load by 5%”

3.2.10.5 Estimated Cast Rod Creep

Fig. 3-9 It is now possible to calculate Sag & tension data for either Cast or Rolled aluminum rod. Previously all calculations, other than the elevated temperature option, were calculated with Rolled rod. The Cast rod generates less overall creep than Rolled rod. In order to switch the calculations to Cast Rod, pick Cast Rod from the Options Screen. The output screen will then show the line below. Creep IS a Factor Cast Rod

3.2.10.6 Creep Time at Stress
Final Sag & Tension data is calculated assuming 10 years of conductor creep. It is now possible to calculate the Final creep that would result from a longer or shorter time period. A shorter time period may be helpful in evaluating conductors that have been in air for any time period less than 10 years. A longer time period may be helpful to see if any additional creep may occur if a conductor has been in the air for 20 or 30 years. Enter the time period in days, with 3650 days equal to 10 years.

3.3 Setup Commands (Main Menu)
Setup displays the sub menu shown below in Fig. 3-9.

Fig. 3-9

3.3.1 Setup - Print Setup
displays the standard Windows form shown in Fig. 3-10. Refer to the MS Windows User's Guide for details on use of Print Setup.

Fig. 3-10

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3.3.2 Setup - Page Setup

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

displays the form shown in Fig. 3-11. The left margin affects the printed output. The top and bottom margins affect the formatting of headings and page breaks for screen, printer, and file output. There are 2 Header Options for the first page and 4 Header Options for all other Sag & Tension pages, as well as the STringing Sag Tables and the Offset Clipping. The default settings are no headers or margins.

Fig. 3-11

3.3.3 Setup - Fonts
displays the form shown below in Fig. 3-12. Only Fixed Pitch Fonts may be selected. SAG10 requires that the Courier New font be loaded into Windows. If the proper fonts are not currently installed on your computer, refer to the Windows Control Panel, Fonts for information on loading addition fonts.

Fig. 3-12

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Chapter 3 3.4 Run Commands (Main Menu)

Main Menu - Pulldown Menus

3.4.1 Run - Sag & Tension
Run displays the sub menu shown in Fig. 3-13.This selection performs the sag & tension calculations and should be executed only after all other options have been set, such as those under Options and Setup. Examples of sag and tension printouts are found in "Appendix G, Example Printouts". Fig. 3-13 See Chapter 4 for details of the Sag & Tension Output Screen. Explanation of Error Messages that might occur due to failure of the calculations are found in the Appendix.

3.4.2 Run - Pause between Spans
will allow all of the selected spans to run consecutively without pausing for such options as Galloping, Sag Curves, STringing Sags or Offset Clipping. If there is only one span to run, then this option does not affect the output. If Marker Balls or Cables have been selected and Pause between Spans is unchecked, there will be no query for changing quantities of Marker Balls or Cables. If a large number of spans are selected and a Warning Message is received during calculation that indicates "Out of Memory" or "Output Exceeds Buffer Size", then it may be necessary to either use the Pause between Spans option, or to reduce the number of spans by breaking the spans into two separate Problem Files. When these messages are received, the Print to File output will not be affected, but the screen output will be incomplete.

3.4.3 Inclined Spans
Run - Inclined Spans will display the form shown in Fig. 314. There are times when the combination of long span and difference in elevation creates difficulties in sagging conductor. Stringing sags generated by the graphic-method are for level ground spans and are based on the average tension (Pav) of the conductor. Depending on the span length and difference in elevation the low point of sag may fall beyond the lower support, as shown in Fig. S1 of Appendix, “Inclined Span Sag Fig. 3-14 Example". If this occurs, the equivalent span, normally arrived at by calculating the chord span, must be found by an iteration process which pinpoints the D2 sag and S1, distance from the lower support to the belly of the sag at D2. The inclined span computer program calculates the proper inclined Span length (SL) and average tension (Pav) which would be used in SAG10. Use of these values produce an accurate value of D sag to use in sagging. The D1 sag is provided in the output of the program. D1 and D sags resulting from use of the SL and Pav generated by the program apply only to the original horizontal tension input, i.e., a 60 Deg F. initial horizontal tension would Yield D1 and D sags at 60 Deg F. initial. A sample problem is available as Appendix, “Inclined Span Sag Example". The Print Output button will send the results to the printer, using the margins and 2nd page headings indicated in Setup, Page Setup and the Fonts selected in Setup, Fonts

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Main Menu - Pulldown Menus
3.4.4 Run - Ruling Span Calc
calculates a ruling span from a list of spans. To use, enter a list of spans within a ruling span into the table shown in Fig. 3-15. Press CalculaTe when the list is complete. The resulting ruling span calculation shows in the box above the CalculaTe button. Pressing the Append button will append the calculated ruling span to the bottom of the existing ruling span list. Pressing the Replace button will remove any existing ruling spans from the list and replace them with the calculated ruling span. To Save the span list for future use, press the Save Span File button. To retrieve an existing span file, press the Open Span File button. In order to use the span list in the Stringing Sag Tables, refer to Section 4.4.1.

3.4.5 Run – IEEE738
will run the TVG RateKit version of the IEEE738 calculations for Steady State and Transient electrical loads. The documentation for both data entry and output are included in the RateKit.Hlp file. This file can be opened from Windows, or by pressing F1 within the IEEE738 RateKit portion of the program.

3.5 Help for Sag10
Picking Help, Search for… from the Sag10 Main Menu will bring up Sag10 Help search index. All of the material within this manual is available in the Sag10 Help. Fig. 3-15

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Chapter 4 4.1 Output Screen

Output Screen

When Run - Sag & Tension (Main Menu) is picked, the program calculates the results and the screen shown in Fig. 4-1 appears. The scroll bars can be used to scroll thru the results. If Pause between Spans was checked, the menu will contain the Next Span option in the Menu until the last span is displayed. The user may select any of the items listed in the Menu to pursue additional calculations, and/or view the graphic outputs. If output is redirected to Printer or File (see Section 2.3.5), the output of the menu items, Gallop, Sag Curves, Stringing, Offset Clip and RS Variation are also redirected to Printer or File. Refer to Section 3,3 for output format options. Each of the Menu items is discussed below.

Fig. 4-1

4.1.1 Creep
Just below Span=, the output screen will indicate Creep is a Factor, Creep is Not a Factor, or Creep is Not Considered. If your output indicates that Creep is a Factor, it means that final sag & tension are controlled by the elongation caused by the long term creep of the cable at 60 deg F (or other controlling temperature). If your output indicates that Creep is Not a Factor, it means that final sag & tension are controlled by the elongation caused by one of the loaded temperature conditions. If your output indicates that Creep is Not Considered, it means that the user has bypassed the normal creep check by leaving out the 60 deg F, condition 2 load case from the Loading Table and that the output is therefore probably incorrect. For hotter climates, the normal creep check condition of 60-0-0-0-2 may be changed to a higher temperature, such as 70-0-0-0-2. Likewise, for a colder climate, the normal creep check condition may be changed to a lower temperature, such as 50-0-0-0-2. The 10 year creep load will be applied at the highest temperature in the loading table with a no load, no tension control and code = 2 exists. In technical terms, the critical tension (Tcr) is the tension corresponding to the intersection between final modulus curve and 10 years creep curve in the conductor stress-strain chart. If T>Tcr, then the 10 year creep curve strain>final modulus curve strain, the Final sag & tension will be based on the 10 year creep curve. The output screen message will read: Creep is a Factor. If T<Tcr, then the 10 year creep curve strain<final modulus curve strain, the Final sag & tension will be based on the final modulus curve. The output screen message will read: Creep is Not a Factor.

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Chapter 4

Output Screen 4.2 Gallop
Picking Gallop will begin a series of Galloping calculations, displayed on 3 consecutive text screens and a graphic view screen. Galloping is calculated by 3 methods, the common methods of Davison and Toye, and calculations by C.B.Rawlins, based upon his IEEE paper. The first screen, shown in Fig. 4-2, displays current conductor information, applicable sag & tension calculation results, and prompts for additional information. Horizontal Span: The displayed value defaults to the current ruling span. This may be made larger or smaller, to match specific span lengths within the ruling span. Fig. 4-2

Suspension Insulator Length: If this value is greater than zero, the Rawlins calculations will create a Ymax (peak to peak amplitude) result for suspension structures, and an insulator length will be shown in the graphical display. Structure Spring Constant: This value is used in calculating the Ymax value in the Rawlins calculations. Refer to Appendix, "Rawlins IEEE Paper" & Appendix, "ACPC Technical Note No. 26" for more details. The Structure Spring Constant Value is an example and will vary from 21900 and should be determined specifically for your structures from this paper. The Davison and Toye formulas give ellipse dimensions recommended for use in design, based on observations available at the time they were published. These dimensions have been widely applied in designing clearances for galloping. A more recent, larger collection of field observations provides the basis for the Ymax values given in SAG10. Refer to Appendix, “ACPC Technical Note No. 26". Designers are cautioned that this larger collection also indicates that a wide variety of ellipse orientations and eccentricies occurs in practice, and may wish to refer to Fig. 4-6 of EPRI's Transmission Line Reference Book, "Wind Induced Conductor Motion" for information on the ranges of variation that are indicated. When Continue or OK is picked at the screen shown in Fig. 4-2, the screen in Fig. 4-3 is displayed. This shows the results of the Davison, Toye and Rawlins galloping calculations. If suspension insulator length prompted for above equals zero, the Rawlins results for suspension insulators will show N/A. If M` has a value, but Ymax indicates N/A, it means that the value for Ymax is outside of the range of test data available in the galloping study in Rawlins IEEE paper. Refer to Appendix for a detailed explanation of the Ymax values for the Rawlins calculations. No input is required at this screen. Fig. 4-3

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Output Screen

When Continue or OK is picked at the screen in Fig. 4-3, the screen shown in Fig. 4-4 is displayed. In order to display a graphical layout of the galloping ellipses, it is necessary to enter the information requested. Click on the arrow to the right of the Qty of Locations: box to select a display of 1 to 4 conductors. An equal number of pairs of attachment point boxes will be displayed, (X1,Y1) thru (X4,Y4). Refer to Appendix, “Galloping Attachment Locations" for details on how to generate attachment point coordinates. Galloping loops may be graphed as either Single loop (Davison) or Double loop (Toye). Refer to Appendix, “Toye and Davison Galloping" for more information. DXF File will display a form similar to that in Fig.3-2 and prompt for a filename. Picking OK will then generate a DXF file that can be imported into most CAD programs. A typical use for this would be to overlay the Galloping Ellipses from more than one conductor with the image of a powerline structure. Refer to Appendix, “Galloping Attachment Locations" for details.

Fig. 4-4

If the user has 2 dissimilar structures, such as a suspension tangent and a deadend structure, or a horizontal phase layout that rolls into a vertical layout, and wants to determine the midspan galloping performance, select the Span Between 2 Dissimilar Structures box. This will display the form shown in Fig. 4-4a, and allow entry of data for the second structure. In the example shown, the first structure is horizontal suspension and the second is a vertical deadend structure. The resulting graphic output is equivalent Fig. 4-4a to 2 structures with attachment points that are an average of the X and Y coordinates of the 2 structures, and an average of the attachment point suspension lengths. When View Graph is picked, the screen image shown in Fig. 4-5 appears. The image may be printed or plotted directly, or transferred to a graphics program for further customizing, such as adding to or removing part of the image, setting margins, and/or rescaling before printing/plotting. Print SCale displays the window shown in Fig. 4-6, showing the smallest ratio that will fit on the currently selected printer/plotter paper. Since a larger number creates a smaller image, it would be recommended to use a scale such as 80:1 for Portrait and 60:1 for Landscape mode for the example shown in Fig. 4-6. Print Setup displays a form the standard Print Setup similar to the form shown in Fig. 3-10. The print/plot direction may be toggled between Portrait and Landscape. Warning: When returning to the Sag & Tension Data Screen, the output will continue to print in the direction that was most recently set. Be sure to reset the print direction prior to leaving this area to whatever direction may be required for the next print operation. Print/Plot will send the graphic image to the default Windows printer/plotter. To Transfer the image to a graphics program: 1. Press Print Screen or Alt+Print Screen from the keyboard while the form shown in Fig. 4-5 is visible. 2. For Win 3.1, press Alt+TAB to select Program Manager. For Win 95/ 98, click Start, Programs on the taskbar. 3. For Win 3.1, from Program Manager, click on the Paintbrush icon from the Windows Accessories Group For Win 95/ 98, select Accessories, Paintbrush. (or any other Windows graphic program). 4. With the graphics program open to the image create/edit screen, press Ctrl+V (or Edit - Paste). The image will appear in the graphics program. BMP will generate a .BMP file of the graphic screen. This graphic image may then be stored on disk and/or emailed or otherwise shared as a permanent object.

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Chapter 4

Output Screen

Fig. 4-5

Fig. 4-6

4.3 Sag Curves
Picking Sag Curves in Fig. 4-1 will display the screen shown in Fig. 4-7, which allows a variety of options for the type of sag curve generated. The prompt is initially at Conductor Data. Any of the current Temp/Ice/Wind sag & tension conditions may be selected for graphic display by using the DOWN ARROW to scroll thru the choices available. Using the TAB key will move the cursor on to the other options. Sag may be Initial or Final. The curve may be Catenary or Parabolic in shape. A Ground Clearance curve may also be generated or, if zero is used, no clearance curve will be shown. The Horizontal and Vertical Scale may be adjusted to any Foot/Inch value. The sag curve may also be Offset to Left side, to allow better viewing of flatter sag curves. Checking the Show Gridlines box will Fig. 4-7 cause a set of gridlines to show for the screen, printed and DXF output. This may aid in alignment of the sag curves with the user’s own grid system. Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 36

Chapter 4

Output Screen

DXF File will display a form similar to that in Fig.3-2 and prompt for a filename. Picking OK will then generate a DXF file that can be imported into most CAD programs. A typical use for this would be to generate a sag template overlaid with other conductors, or to import the sag curve into a drawing containing some ground profile for structure spotting. When View Graph is picked, the screen image shown in Fig. 4-8 appears. The image may be printed or plotted directly, or transferred to a graphics program for further customizing, such as adding to or removing part of the image, setting margins, and/or rescaling before printing/plotting. Print Setup displays a form the standard Print Setup form shown in Fig. 3-10. The print/plot direction may be toggled between Portrait and Landscape. Warning: When returning to the Sag & Tension Data Screen, the output will continue to print in the direction that was most recently set. Reset the print direction prior to leaving this area to whatever direction may be required for the next print operation. Print/Plot will send the graphic image to the default Windows printer/plotter. To Transfer the image to a graphics program: 1. Press Print Screen or Alt+Print Screen from the keyboard while the form shown in Fig. 4-8 is visible. 2. For Win 3.1, press Alt+TAB to select Program Manager. For Win 95/ 98, click Start, Programs on the taskbar. 3. For Win 3.1, from Program Manager, click on the Paintbrush icon from the Windows Accessories Group For Win 95/ 98, select Accessories, Paintbrush. (or any other Windows graphic program). 4. With the graphics program open to the image create/edit screen, press Ctrl+V (or Edit - Paste). The image will appear in the graphics program. BMP will generate a .BMP file of the graphic screen. This graphic image may then be stored on disk and/or emailed or otherwise shared as a permanent object.

Fig. 4-8

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Chapter 4

Output Screen 4.4 Stringing Sag Tables
4.4.1 Stringing Spans
Picking STringing from the Output Screen will generate the form shown in Fig. 4-9. The user will be prompted for table entry of stringing spans. The user may increment multiple spans within the ruling span, or select up to 40 individual spans. The number of spans times the number of temperatures may not exceed a total of 1880. The user may also retrieve a span list from a *.spn file created and saved within the Ruling Span Calculation form (Refer to Section 3.4.4). If the Calculate Ruling Span from Span List box is checked, a ruling span will be calculated for the list of spans used. For the equations used to calculate stringing sags, refer to Appendix, “Stringing Sag Calculations".

Fig. 4-9

4.4.2 Stringing Temperatures
Picking String Table or OK in Fig. 4-9 will show the form in Fig. 4-10. Initial or Final String Sag will prompt for temperatures as shown in Fig. 4-10. The temperatures selected may be independent of those selected for the normal sag & tension run. Therefore, the only unloaded temperatures required in the sag & tension run are temperatures with controlling conditions, such as 60-0-0-2 (creep check), checking cold temperature for NESC or Alcoa tension limits, and/or high temperature sag. Up to 30 stringing temperatures may be used. Prompted values will be retained for the entire SAG10 session, and are saved with the problem file. If the Sum Cable Lengths box is checked, the output will sum up the level ground catenary lengths for all of the spans listed and for the range of selected stringing temperatures and corresponding horizontal tensions (one length for each temperature and tension). For an example, refer to Appendix G1A. If Marker Balls or Cables are chosen from the Options Menu, Initial will calculate without Balls or Cables, and Final will calculate with Balls or Cables attached. This will allow the user to string the bare wire prior to attachment, and to check the final sag after attachment. Final W/Load will calculate with balls attached. Fig. 4-10 If the user is stringing wire with pre-assembled aerial cable, it is recommended that the data be entered without Balls or Cables, and a conductor type 15 be used. This will allow the Stringing Sag Table to be output as Initial Sag with the attached cable load. Refer to section 3.2.10.3 for more information, and to "Appendix G1A & G1B, Stringing Sag Example" for several examples. The B=Both option from DOS Version 5.0 is no longer used as STringing may be picked as many times as needed for any ruling span before proceeding to the next span. Final W/Load selection will generate Stringing Sag Tables using all of the temperatures with ice or wind loading. Horizontal tensions are by definition the same in all spans within a ruling span section. SAG10 calculates and stores the horizontal tension for each temperature needed in constructing a stringing chart. Stringing sag tables are not available when running elevated temperature creep.

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Chapter 4

Output Screen

The default stringing sag output is Ft-In for English Units. Ft-In allows the output to be shown in feet and inches. Inches shows the output in inches only. Either of these output format may be preferred by field crews. The setting will default to Decimal for Metric Units. Decimal units are feet for English and meters for Metric. 3rd and 5th Return Wave will generate stringing sag output as the time in seconds when sagging is done by stopwatch. This output format may be preferred by field crews. Refer to "Appendix G1A & G1B, Stringing Sag Example" for several examples.

4.5 Offset Clipping
Insulator offsets and sag corrections are sometimes needed in rough terrain when conductor, strung over "frictionless" sheaves, tends to run downhill, i.e. the conductor will come to equilibrium with more than chart sag in the lower spans and less in the upper spans. The stringing sheaves usually swing toward the uphill spans. The SAG10 offset clipping program uses techniques presented in AIEE Paper 59-900, "Sag-Tension Computations and Field Measurements of Bonneville Power Administration" by Paul F. Winkelman. The following factors - ruling span, horizontal stringing tension, stringing temperature, maximum design tension, loading-ice, wind, temperature, bare weight, area and modulus are required. Many of these factors are already part of SAG10. The program asks for elevation, station and structure number. The printout produces positive or negative insulator offsets and sag corrections by structure number. The user must create a file with elevation, station back, station ahead, and structure identification for each structure on a separate line. The information must be listed in the order shown above and separated by commas. If there is no equation station, then the station ahead should be zero. The structure identification must be enclosed in single quotation marks. The file may be created with any text editor or word processor that has an ASCII file output, such as Notepad. The direction of pull must be known. An example of a file called SAMPLE.CLP is shown in Fig. 4-11. The example shows the pull from Structure 1-1 to 1-12. Structure 1-6 is a sample of an equation station. The output from the SAMPLE.CLP file is shown in "Appendix G12, Offset Clipping Example". Use of offsets is described in Appendix, “Sketch - Use of Offsets" 1951,107253,0,'Str # 1-1' 1851,107353,0,'Str # 1-2' 1941,107453,0,'Str # 1-3' 1851,107553,0,'Str # 1-4' 1051,107653,0,'Str # 1-5' 1921,107753,107783,'Str # 1-6' 1971,107853,0,'Str # 1-7' 1981,107953,0,'Str # 1-8' 1955,108053,0,'Str # 1-9' 2051,108153,0,'Str # 1-10' 1651,108253,0,'Str # 1-11' 1451,108353,0,'Str # 1-12'

COLUMN 1 = Elevation COLUMN 2 = Station Back COLUMN 3 = Station Ahead ( Only >0 if equation station) COLUMN 4 = Structure No.

Fig. 4-11

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Chapter 4
The routine for Offset Clipping is as follows : 1. Create a file as described above and shown in Fig. 4-11. Use the .CLP filename extension. 2. Create and process a sag & tension run for the ruling span in which the offset clipping will be used. 3. Select Offset Clipping from the Output Screen Menu. 4. A standard Open File form will appear as shown in Fig. 4-12. Select the name of the file created in step #1.

Output Screen

Fig. 4-12

Fig. 4-13 Screen.

5. When OK is picked in Fig. 4-12, the screen displayed shown in Fig. 4-13 prompts for additional input. The most recently calculated Ruling Span is offered as the first input. If that Ruling Span is chosen, and a stringing temperature from the most recent sag & tension run is chosen, then the correct Horizontal Tension will be offered as the third input. 6. When OK is picked, Offsets are displayed on the Output

4.6 Ruling Span Variation
This feature allows the user to calculate the variation in sags and tensions that occur due to large temperature excursions, from that of the normal Sag & Tension output, between different span lengths within the ruling span. This supports the IEEE technical paper presented in Appendix. Between deadend structures, there are typically a variety of different span lengths. The ruling span is a mathematical number that represents a best approximation of the average characteristics that will occur within each of those spans. At initial stringing temperature, the horizontal tension is the same for all of the spans, assuming the wire is pulled in evenly across the various spans. However, the further the temperature deviates from the stringing temperature, and the further a spanlength varies from the ruling span, the greater the variation in sags and tensions. These variations are normally small enough to fall within the safety margin allowed in line design. However, at elevated or cold temperatures and large span variations, these values may be important to observe and consider during line design. This section allows the user to become aware that certain spans may have more sag and other spans to have more tension than was calculated by the ruling span Sag & Tension data and to quantify those differences. These calculations apply only for suspension insulator systems, where the insulators are free to swing, limited only by gravity. Fixed insulators, such as post insulators, would have less change in sag & tension and are not calculated here. Calculating the exact stiffness of the support structure would be required, numbers that would be difficult to obtain.

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Chapter 4
To use this feature, select RS Variation from the Output Screen. 1. A standard Open File form will appear as shown in Fig. 4-12. Select either a *.SPN file created in Ruling Span Calculations or a *.CLP file from clipping offset calculations.

Output Screen

Fig. 4-14 2. When OK is picked in Fig. 4-14, the screen display shown in Fig. 4-15 prompts for additional input. Select the correct stringing temperature from the first drop box. Select the Temperature to compare with in the second drop box. The user may view the extreme variations by selecting an elevated temperature, a cold temperature, or an ice load condition for comparison. The comparison condition may be set to Initial (for cold temp or ice load comparison) or to final (for elevated temp comparison). The length and weight of the entire string of suspension insulators must also be entered, to allow proper calculation. 3. When OK is picked, the Variations in Ruling Span calculations are displayed on the Output Screen shown in Fig. 4-16.

Fig. 4-15

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Chapter 4

Output Screen

Fig. 4-16 The input data is indicated in the data heading. Each of the span lengths from the *.SPN or *.CLP file are listed in the first column. The actual tension that occurs at the comparison temperature for each span is listed in the second column. The amount this tension varies from that calculated in Sag & Tension is listed in the third column. The amount of sag for each span, as calculated by Run, Sag & Tension, are listed in the fourth column. The actual sag that occurs at the comparison temperature is listed in the fifth column. The difference between these sags in listed in the sixth column. As indicated in the output footnote, where ‘Tension Varies’ is greater than zero, the actual tension in that span is greater than RS calculations. The user should make note of this additional tension for possible consideration at those structures. Where ‘Sag Varies’ is greater than zero, the actual sag in that span is greater than RS calculations. These spans may require additional ground clearance compared to the normal sag template used for these spans. Refer to Appendix, “Effects of Tangent Support Stiffness on Sags at High Temperature” and Appendix, “Limitations of The Ruling Span Method for Overhead Line Conductors at High Operating Temperatures”

4.7 Clash
Clash Analysis refers to the loaded & unloaded swing & static clearances between Conductor and ADSS supported on the same structure, for both initial and final state. Conductor suspension insulator string length is taken in consideration. The steps required are: 1) Create or Open a Problem file for the conductor with all the appropriate loads and ruling span. 2) It is recommended that you pick File, Save to Save the Problem file at this time. 3) Pick Run, Sag & Tension from the Main Menu. 4) Pick Clash from the Sag & Tension data screen. 5) The Clash Analysis Parameters screen will appear indicating that your data has been recorded and to return to the Main Menu to enter the ADSS data. 6) At the Main Menu, pick Conductor Selection. Change the conductor to the applicable ADSS. 7) Change the Load Limits (tension or sag) in the Loadings Table if applicable, but leave the temperature, ice & wind or wind alone conditions exactly the same. nd 8) It is recommended that you pick File, Save As and Save the 2 Problem file under a different name. 9) Pick Run, Sag & Tension from the Main Menu. nd 10) Pick Clash a 2 time from the Sag & Tension data screen. The screen shown below will appear. Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 42

Chapter 4

Output Screen

11) Adjust the parameters shown on the screen. Be sure to fill in Insulator length if suspension, and the horizontal and vertical offsets between the two cables 12) Select Report to view the loading cases, cable swing angles, offsets, and conductor – ADSS clearances or pick Graphic to view the Transverse and Longitudinal clearances.

View, Long No Load displays a longitudinal view of the conductors under no load conditions. View, Long W/ Load displays a longitudinal view of the conductors with ice & wind load conditions. View, Tranverse displays a transverse view of the conductors under both loaded and unloaded conditions. View, Scale allows the user to rescale the graphic image to an exact scale. The default is Best Fit, which is the largest size that will conveniently fit on the screen. The Longitudinal and Transverse Views are scaled separately. BMP will generate a .BMP file of the graphic screen. This graphic image may then be stored on disk and/or emailed or otherwise shared as a permanent object. Output, Print/Plot will send the image to the Printer or Plotter. Output, Print Setup brings up the Printer Dialog box allows the image to be rotated to Portrait or Landscape. Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 43

Chapter 4

Output Screen

Output, Scale allows the scale to be adjusted independently for printed output.

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Chapter 4 4.8 Vibrec

Output Screen

Vibration analysis and damper selection can now be performed with Sag10 for ACSR, AAC, AAAC, ACAR, ACSS, Alumoweld, Steel and OPGW cables. To do so: 1) Create or Open a Problem File with the applicable data. 2) From the Main Menu, pick Options, Vibration DamPer Calculations. 3) If there are more than one Ruling Span, pick Run, Pause between Spans. 4) Pick Run, Sag & tension. 5) Fill in the Average Annual Minimum Temperature and the Average Annual Temperature at the prompt screen that appears. 6) From the Sag & Tension Data screen, pick Vibrec. The Vibrec Menu option will only show up after all spans have been run. 7) Enter Max steady wind speed and the Attachment Support type or None as required. 8) Enter the maximum span for a ruling span, or leave blank for a Deadend span. 9) Pick Continue. 10) The output screen will show recommendations for either or both Ruling Span and Deadend spans. 11) For OPGW information on the hardware used please see appendix “OPGW Vibration Recommendation: Suspension Hardware Type and Size vs. OPGW Diameter”.

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Chapter 4

Output Screen

4.9 Output
Picking Output from Fig. 4.1 will offer the choice on output to Printer or to File. Picking Printer brings up the standard Printer box. Even with output directed to the screen, the Copy to Clipboard option makes it easy to redirect the screen output to a text editor for printing or saving as a file. Refer to Edit - Copy from the output screen for more information. If the output is directed to Printer or File, all of the settings made in Section 3.3 Setup Commands apply to the output. The output redirection applies not only to the Sag & Tension output, but also the output from all of the menu items at the top of the form, Gallop, Sag Curves, Stringing, Offset Clip and RS Variation. Refer to the 3 menu options under Setup menu selection at the Main Menu for additional printer format options. File will send the data to a report file. The default report filename extension is .REP. With this option set to File, selecting Run - Sag & Tension will display the file selection form as shown in Fig. 2-15. The report file may be further processed by loading it as an ASCII file into any word processor or text editor such as Notepad or Write. For such purposes, the user should be aware that the file is not closed until the user returns to the Main Menu, and therefore should not Fig. 2-15 attempt to use the active file until returning to the Main Menu. Also, running a second sag & tension run may either a overwrite the previous run, or append to it. Refer to Options - Send to File, Overwrite or Append for information on starting and ending a file. Alcoa SAG10™ Manual Page 46

Chapter 4 White Papers
(Formerly Appendix)
SAG10v 3.0 White Papers are now available online at: Click here to find the white papers on-line at www.SAG10.com

Output Screen

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Additional Information

SAG10 v3 Updates

SAG10 v3 Updates
Version 3.9.3
1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Various cosmetic changes (color scheme) Moved Vibrec checkbox from options to main screen Enabled default output to screen/printer or file option Enabled file append option Re-arranged layout for most used screens to aid user. Added buttons in sag run screen for exit, save & print. Extended Limits for calculation preventing previous errors. Wind speed input for OPTGW is used for spacing Removed RateKit module Landscape printing for text/graphics Page breaks will NOT occur within calc output anymore. Font selection for text output New option in Vibrec allows custom tension information for vibration calculations. Button for Vibrec module in sag run screen Span Save/Load Loadings Save/Load Disabled Vibrec for T-2 conductors AAMT input when user clicks option for Vibrec calculations. Version visible on title bar and in about box Small cosmetic changes. Blended backgrounds and new icon. Ruling Span calculated appends spans correctly Minimization button added to main screen. Extended Root Find limits further to reduce errors. Full Form resizing for output screen. Default File names for text out One button transfer output to notepad Aluminum Compression Update (per. Chuck Rawlings) Vibrec: Wind speed selection a combo box with descriptions. Inclined Span Module, Rewrite it. Graphics + Clearance output. Fixed Main screen loading label when applied combo loadings. nd Fixed omission of 2 to last entry in stringing table. Option for always showing damper spacing regardless of tension limits.

Version 3.9.4

Version 3.9.5

Alcoa SAG10 Manual

Vibration Protection Recommendations
Alcoa B Series 1700 Dampers "The Protector"
Notes:
1. TANGENT SPANS - PHASE CONDUCTOR AND OVERHEAD GROUND WIRE: “One damper per conductor” means one damper at one end of the span only. “Two dampers per conductor” means one damper at each end of the span. TANGENT SPANS - DEADENDED AT ONE END - PHASE CONDUCTOR: In spans deadended at one end only, and requiring only one damper per conductor, the damper should be placed at the tangent structure, spaced in accordance with Dimension A or B. If the span requires three dampers per conductor, then one damper should be placed at the tangent structure, spaced in accordance with Dimension A or B, and two dampers should be placed at the deadended structure, spaced in accordance with Dimensions C and D. Normally, two dampers are recommended at conductor deadends with insulator strings, as it is impossible to accurately predict the location of vibration node points relative to the conductor deadend. With just one damper at a deadend, the damper could, under certain wind conditions, be at a node point. The effectiveness of two dampers, spaced as recommended, assures that at least one of the two dampers will be effective at all times. TANGENT SPANS - DEADENDED AT ONE END - OVERHEAD GROUND WIRE: In spans deadended at one end only, and requiring only one damper per wire, the damper should be placed at the tangent structure, spaced in accordance with Dimension A or B. If the span requires two dampers per wire, then one damper should be placed at the tangent structure, in accordance with Dimension A or B, and one damper should be placed at the deadend, spaced in accordance with Dimension C. SPANS DEADENDED AT BOTH ENDS - PHASE CONDUCTOR: “Two dampers per conductor” means two dampers at one end of the span only, spaced in accordance with Dimensions C and D. “Four dampers per conductor” means two dampers at each end of the span, spaced in accordance with Dimensions C and D. Normally, two dampers are recommended at conductor deadends with insulator strings, as it is impossible to accurately predict the location of vibration node points relative to the conductor deadend. With just one damper at a deadend, the damper could, under certain wind conditions, be at a node point. The effectiveness of a damper on a node is significantly reduced. The use of two dampers, spaced as recommended, assures that at least one of the two dampers will be effective at all times. SPANS DEADENDED AT BOTH ENDS - OVERHEAD GROUND WIRE: “One damper per conductor” means one damper at one end of the span, spaced in accordance with Dimension C. “Two dampers per conductor” means one damper located at each end of the span, spaced in accordance with Dimension C. SPANS DEADENDED AT BOTH ENDS, OR TANGENT SPANS OF DEADENDED-AT-ONE-END, FOR OHGW, UTILIZING A FORMED GUY GRIP DEADEND: We do not recommend the installation of damper clamps over formed-guy-grip type deadends. Therefore, where vibration protection is required for spans using the formed type deadends, two dampers will be required at each deadend location, with the first damper spaced at the end of the rods and the second damper located in accordance with Dimension D. DAMPERS OVER ARMOR RODS: Dampers with the clamps placed over armor rods are not as effective as dampers with the clamp placed directly on the conductor. Therefore, if armor rods are used, the rods should be short enough as to permit installation of the damper clamp over the bare conductor, using the recommended Dimension B spacing. The Dimension B is used whenever armor rods, line guards or AGS units are specified. In the event the rod lengths are too long to permit installation directly on the conductor, the damper clamp must be selected to fit over the installed rods. SELECTIVE DAMPING: In general, when the average span in a line requires damping, it is advisable to damp all spans. If selective damping is to be used, care must be taken to assure proper functioning of the dampers in the spans requiring damping. The effectiveness of a damper can be reduced through vibration in adjacent undamped spans even though the vibration in the undamped spans is not at a damaging level. Therefore, spans adjacent to a span requiring dampers should also be damped. If there are any questions with respect to the damper recommendations or placement, contact your local Alcoa representative.

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Alcoa Conductor Accessories
Division of Alcoa Fujikura, Ltd. 260 Parkway East Hillside Industrial Park Duncan, South Carolina 29334

ALCOA CONDUCTOR ACCESSORIES
Division of Alcoa Fujikura Ltd. The data, opinions, or recommendations set forth herein or given by Alcoa field representatives are intended as a general guide only. Each installation of overhead electrical conductor involves special conditions, creating problems that require individual solution. Therefore, Alcoa cannot assume any liability in connection with such information.