Sie sind auf Seite 1von 3

Uncontrolled Bridge Rectifier for R Load

In Figure 2, during positive half of the input signal, D1 becomes positive and at the same time
the D2 becomes negative. Hence D1 conducts and D2 does not conduct. The load current flows through
D1 and the voltage drop across R will be equal to the input voltage.
During the negative half cycle of the input, D1 becomes negative and D2 becomes positive.
Hence, D1 does not conduct and D2 conducts. The load current flows through D2 and the voltage drop
across R will be equal to the input voltage. It is noted that the load current flows in the both the half
cycles of ac voltage and in the same direction through the load resistance.
The waveform of the rectifier output voltage is made of positive half sine waves due to the
rectification process of the bridge.

Uncontrolled Bridge Rectifier for RL Load

As we observed, the bridge rectifier with a resistive load, the load current is identical in shape to
the load voltage. The load current shape and magnitude depend on both the load resistance R and
inductance L.

For the uncontrolled rectifier of R load, the voltage output is in phase with the current output. While for
the uncontrolled rectifier of RL load, the voltage output is not in phase with the current output. Based
on the graphs, the RMS current output, mean current output and AC current output in uncontrolled
rectifier of R load is higher than uncontrolled rectifier of RL load.

Controlled Bridge Rectifier for RL Load with =90

In Figure 5, the load is connected to the input supply through conducting D1 and D2. The output
voltage (+Vout) across the load follows the input supply voltage but due to the inductive load D1 and D2
will continue to conduct beyond 180, even though the input voltage becomes negative, D1 and D2
conduct together during time period 180 to 270. During the negative half wave cycle of input supply
voltage for 180 to 270, the D3 and D4 are forward biased. The D3 and D4 are triggered at a=270. The
output voltage (-Vout) across the load follows the input supply voltage during the 270 to 450. In the next
positive half cycle when D1 and D2 are triggered, D3 and D4 are reversed biased and they turn off.

During 90 to 180, the input voltage (Vin) and the input supply current (Iin) are both positive and
the power flows from the supply to the load and it is operates in the rectification mode during 90 to
180. During 180 to 270, the input voltage (Vin) is negative and the input supply current (I in) is positive
and there will be reverse power flow from the load circuit to input supply. The converter operates in the
inversion mode during 180 to 270 and the load energy is fed back to the input source
Controlled Bridge Rectifier for RL Load with =110

In Figure 7, due to the inductive load D1 and D2 will continue to conduct beyond 180, even
though the input voltage becomes negative, D1 and D2 conduct together during time period 180 to 290.
During the negative half wave cycle of input supply voltage for 180 to 290, the D3 and D4 are forward
biased. The D3 and D4 are triggered at 290. The output voltage (-Vout) across the load follows the input
supply voltage during the 290 to 470. In the next positive half cycle when D1 and D2 are triggered, D3
and D4 are reversed biased and they turn off.

During 110 to 180, the input voltage (Vin) and the input supply current (Iin) are both positive and
the power flows from the supply to the load and it is operates in the rectification mode during 110 to
180. During 180 to 290, the input voltage (Vin) is negative and the input supply current (Iin) is positive
and there will be reverse power flow from the load circuit to input supply. The converter operates in the
inversion mode during 180 to 290. In controlled rectifier for RL load, it is in continuous current mode
when = 80, while are in discontinuous current mode when =90 and 110. The voltage output
consists of a sudden peak.
Control Characteristics of Bridge Rectifier

We noticed from the control characteristic that by varying the angle we can vary the output
DC voltage across the load. Thus it is possible to control the DC output voltage by changing the angle
.For angle in the range of 0 to 90 degree, Vdc is positive and the average dc load current Idc is also
positive. The average or dc output power Pdc is positive, hence the circuit operates as a controlled
rectifier to convert ac supply voltage into dc output power which is fed to the load.
For angle > 90 ,cos becomes negative and as a result the average dc output voltage Vdc
becomes negative, but the load current flows in the same positive direction Idc is positive . Hence the
output power becomes negative. This means that the power flows from the load circuit to the input ac
source. During the inverter mode operation for > 90 the load energy can be fed back from the load
circuit to the input ac source.

Controlled Bridge Rectifier for R Load

For the controlled rectifier of R load, the waveform output is in discontinuous current mode and
it is independent of angle as long as the angle more than 0. In Controlled Rectifier (R Load), as
increases, the input apparent power, fundamental input apparent power, input active power, input
reactive power and input fundamental reactive power increases while the input distortion power
decreases. The input active power is negative at = 110.

Power component

For the power component, since the angle 80 to 90 to 110, hence the real power P, the rectifier
power Q and the apparent power S are decreased. The decrease of real power is implies as the power is
being generated by the load due to the inductive effect.