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COURSE DETAILS Course: MPS 570-750: RESEARCH METHODS IN PUBLIC SERVICE Focus on Appreciative Inquiry (AI)
COURSE DETAILS Course: MPS 570-750: RESEARCH METHODS IN PUBLIC SERVICE Focus on Appreciative Inquiry (AI)

COURSE DETAILS

Course:

MPS 570-750: RESEARCH METHODS IN PUBLIC SERVICE Focus on Appreciative Inquiry (AI) methods for Participatory Poverty Assessments (PPAs) and Participatory Action Research (PAR)

Credit Hours:

4 CREDIT HOURS. Additional credit could be obtained with appropriately approved and specific research in relation to urban sustainability, sustainable community development, urban poverty reduction, participatory poverty assessment and Daniel H. Burnham’s Manila-Chicago connections. Please consult the instructor for an additional independent study (MPS600) or 4 or 2 credit hours, preferably to the registered in the Winter Quarter.

Quarter:

Registration in the Autumn Quarter 2010-2011. The preparatory classes will be held at the end of Fall; travel during the December Intercession and the final assignments extended in the Winter Quarter. See course calendar for details.

Instructor:

Marco Tavanti, Ph.D. Associate Professor

Office Hours:

Mondays and Wednesdays 2:00-4:00PM (email appointments preferred)

Office Location:

16 th Floor 14 E. Jackson Blvd, Office 1614

Email:

Phone:

+1.312.362.8463

DePaul University School of Public Service 14 E. Jackson | 1600 Chicago, IL 60604

312.362.8441

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ISL Coordinator:

Hotel:

312.362.5506 FAX http://las.depaul.edu/sps

Ashley Perzyna International Service Learning Coordinator, SPS-SAP Manila Program DePaul University, Office of the President 55 E. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60604

(w) 312-362-8834

(c) 708-601-5394

(f) 312-362-7577

Pearl Lane Hotel 1700 M. Orosa St., Corner Gen. Malvar St. Malate, Manila, Philippines Telephone: (632) 523-2000 Fax: (632) 524-6255 Website: www.pearllanehotel.net Email: reservations@pearllanehotel.net

Local Coordinador: Ms. Grace S. De Guzman, Adamson University 900 San Marcelino Street. Ermita, Manila 1000 Philippines Phone: +63(2) 524-2011 Mobile: 09164034900 Website: www.adamson.edu.ph Email: gracedeguzman@gmail.com

VCSR Coordinator: Fr. Afiliano Fajardo, CM (Fr. Nonong) Director, Integrated Community Extension Services, Adamson University; The Vincentian Center for Social Responsibility (VCSR) Email: nongcm@gmail.com

PROGRAM OVERVIEW:

The School of Public Service Manila-Philippines study abroad program (Manila Program) is the result of an ongoing institutional collaboration between DePaul University and Adamson University, the third largest Vincentian higher education institution in the world. In line with the Vincentian values of service learning, social responsibility and poverty reduction, the Manila Program is a unique learning experience for students interested in collaborative and applied research for poverty reduction, community development and systemic change. The program focuses on experiential learning and professional collaborations through adapted methods in Participatory Action Research (PAR), Participatory Poverty Assessments (PPA), and Appreciative Inquiry (AI) adapted to Vincentian urban poverty reduction. Given the expertise and interests of the graduate students in public service at DePaul University, the program offers opportunities to tackle poverty through social impact analysis of micro-savings and community-

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social entrepreneurship programs organized by the Vincentian Center for Social Responsibility (VCSR). The Manila Program reflects DePaul University’s commitment to educate students about international problems and to become ethically and socially responsible global leaders, as expressed in the Strategic Plan Vision Twenty12. In addition, the collaboration between our Vincentian universities contributes to DePaul University’s commitment to further institutionalize its Vincentian and Catholic identity by developing academic partnerships.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Research is an essential component in public services management, particularly for organizational development, policy design, and social change. This fundamental course is designed to introduce students to practical applications of qualitative, quantitative and other research methods applied to the organizational needs of non-profit and community based organizations engaged in urban poverty reduction. Through preparatory sessions, immersion in a cross-cultural urban poverty environment and collaborative process students will learn about research approaches, methods and tools in the field of development research. The theoretical, collaborative and experiential components of this program are designed to prepare students to develop a research project for poverty and social impact analysis. The research approaches utilized in this program include Participatory Action Research (PAR), Appreciative Inquiry Approach (AIA), and Participatory Poverty Assessment (PPA) among others. Through appropriately selected readings and research toolkits and in the collaborative processes with Adamson University’s faculty, Vincentian Center for Social Responsibility (VCSR)’s volunteers and displaced informal settlers community leaders, students learn research methods such as participant observations, intercultural focus groups, collected and semi-structured interviews and other useful techniques in (international/intercultural) public service research.

WHAT ARE RESEARCH METHODS IN PUBLIC SERVICE?

The tradition of separating scientific research methods from community intervention and organizational consultation is deeply rooted in academic culture. Many researchers build their careers on this assumption while some professionals still give more value to quantitative and basic research than to qualitative and applied research. The urgency of the world’s problems and the interconnectedness of our organizations and sectors challenges today’s managers and leaders of public service to recognize the validity of all research methods that can produce organizational development and social change. This course attempts to dissolve this long standing tension by reframing the study of research methods within the context of professional service learning and engaged collaborative and action research. In this framework, research methods, tools, theories and techniques are learned not in a vacuum but immersed in the concrete needs and challenges of organizations and leaders operating in impoverished social contexts.

WHY PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH (PAR)?

Participatory action research best describes the mission of doing research in public service research and the Vincentian values of making a difference in society. PAR is not just a method

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but a family of research methodologies which pursues collaboration (or participation), action (or change) and research (or understanding) at the same time. PAR is a collage of attitudes and innovative inquiry frameworks for social change. Although still misrepresented by many, PAR has emerged as a significant methodology widely used by university programs, development agencies and community organizations interested in making a positive change in societies around the world. PAR is a collaborative approach to inquiry that provides people the means to take systematic actions to resolve specific problems. The basic steps in participatory action research (look, think and act) reflect traditional research practices of gathering data, analyzing/theorizing, and plan, report and evaluate. This course exposes students to the theories and practices of PAR as applied to community-based action research and organizational capacity building for poverty reduction.

WHY APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY?

Developed by Dr. David Cooperrider at Case Western Reserve University, Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is an inquiry method widely used in the evaluation of organizational development strategy and implementation of organizational effectiveness tactics. Rather than fixing “problems” of an organization, the basic idea of AI is to improve organizational performance around what works. This approach attempts to produce change and engagement by acknowledging the contribution of individuals at different levels of the leadership ladder. AI is a particular method of asking questions and envisioning positive future for individuals and their organizations. AI fosters collaboration, trust and change by implementing four stages: Discover (IDENTIFYING) the organizational processes that works well; Dream (ENVISIONING) the process that would work well in the future; Design (PLANNING) the process that would work well; and Deliver (IMPLEMENTING) the proposed design. This course uses AI as a research framework to shape the questions, gather information and to communicate the findings. It also adapts the notions of AI to evaluate practice, and build evaluation capacity in community leaders in poor and marginalized social sectors.

COURSE ANDRAGOGY 1

The andragogy of the course and experiential learning connected to the Manila Program aim at engaging our students as adult learners in a real life learning experience. Five characteristics define and distinguish the adult learning process of this study abroad program and course on Research Methods in Public Services:

1) Competent: The learning of this course is centered around sound literature, techniques and contemporary approaches in research methods for development research.

1 The term “Andragogy”, meaning adult education, originally used by German educator Alexander Kapp in 1833, was developed into a theory of adult education by the American educator, Malcolm Knowles. His theory is most commonly associated with his groundbreaking book Self-Directed Learning: A Guide for Learners and Teachers, published in 1975.

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2) Experiential, the experience (including mistakes and learningby doing) are a central component of the learning process; 3) Participatory with the involvement of students, community leaders and colleagues from other institutions in the preparation, adaptation and evaluation of the collaborative nature of this program; 4) Applied as the research methods theories and techniques are crafted and usefully adapted to the social, organizational and cross-cultural needs; 5) Practical research driven by a common interest to make a positive impact in social and organizational contexts. In line with the practical, professional and adult learning mission of the School of Public Service, the content and learning goals of MPS 570 Research Methods in Public Service is designed to incorporate the practical, applied, participatory content of this study abroad course.

PREREQUISITES

For the International Public Service (IPS) Graduate Program:

MPS 500: Introduction to Public Service Management. MPS 613: Comparative Public Policy or MPS 542: Policy Design and Analysis

For the other MPS, MPS and MPA degrees:

MPS 500, MPS 501, MPS 514 (or MPS 515), MPS 542

For the MNM please consult with your advisor.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

COURSE GOALS

1. Recognizing and appreciating the benefits that applied and participatory research methods can offer to organizations engaged in alleviating urban poverty

This outcome will be measured by the student’s level of engagement and participation in the collaborative projects, research teams and in-class and Blackboard discussions.

2. Acquiring familiarity with the fundamental benefits and the ability to discern the appropriate methodologies, designing feasible research plans and effective tools for organizational evaluation.

This outcome will be measured by the preparatory assignments and final research plans students and small teams create at the end of the course.

3. Demonstrate competency in identifying contextual and organizational needs, adequately responding with conceptually sound, practically adapted and ethically prepared sustainable solutions through applied research.

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This outcome will be measured by student’s (and groups) creativity in adapting research methods and tools to the organizational needs and contextual diversity of research participants.

RESEARCH SKILLS

1)

Understanding the methodical processes of inquiry

2)

Recognizing the advantages and challenges of participatory approaches to inquiry

3)

Linking research with capacity building processes

4)

Learning the basic action research interacting spiral (look, think, act)

5)

Designing feasible, participatory and effective research plans

6)

Identifying stakeholding groups, key people and seeking consensus

7)

Gathering information through a review of literature and appreciative fieldwork

8)

Interpreting and analyzing data through interpretative questions, organizational review,

9)

concept mapping and problem analysis Appreciating potentials for planning sustainable change and development

10) Developing appropriate, simple and intercultural effective tools for gathering data 11) Analyzing an empirical study for its strengths and weaknesses in both design and execution; 12) Utilizing and assessing the appropriateness of various research methodologies; 13) Evaluating reliability, validity and applicability of research methods, findings and quality of research results 14) Presenting ethical and political issues involved in research.

COURSE READING MATERIAL

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Mikkelsen, Britha. Methods for Development Work and Research: A Guide for Practitioners. New Delhi, by Sage Publications, 1995.

Manila Program Reading Package: Program participants will receive an electronic course reading package with essential resources and readings in research methods and background resources for the Manila contexts and activities.

Applied Research Toolkit. By Marco Tavanti, DePaul University Adamson University, 2007 Available as electronic text on Blackboard.

Program Evaluation Toolkit. By Marco Tavanti, DePaul University Adamson University,

2008 Available as electronic text on Blackboard.

Development Research Toolkit. By Marco Tavanti, DePaul University Adamson University,

2009 Available as electronic text on Blackboard.

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SUPPLEMENTAL READINGS:

The instructor’s PowerPoint lectures and additional online material referenced on Blackboard draw from the following texts and online resources. The Blackboard site, under Course Material, includes several organized readings and useful resources for your research and additional understanding of specific topics. Please consult the instructor for specific readings in relation to your assignment focus and research topic. The following is a selected list of essential and useful readings integrating your learning on research methods and the topics of the Manila program:

ON RESEARCH METHODS IN PUBLIC SERVICE:

Schutt, Russell K. Investigating the Social World: The Process and Practice of Research. 6th ed. The Pine Forge Press Series in Research Methods and Statistics. Thousand Oaks, Calif.:

Pine Forge Press, 2009.

McNabb, David E. Research Methods in Public Administration and Nonprofit Management Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches. Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, 2002.

ON PARTICIPATORY POVERTY-ACTION RESEARCH:

Brock, Karen, and Rosemary McGee. Knowing Poverty : Critical Reflections on Participatory Research and Policy. London ; Sterling, VA: Earthscan Publications, 2002.

Robb, Caroline M. Can the Poor Influence Policy? : Participatory Poverty Assessments in the Developing World. Rev. ed. Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 2001.

Somekh, Bridget. Action Research: A Methodology for Change and Development. Maidenhead:

Open University Press, 2006.

ON INTERNATIONAL-ASIAN RESEARCH:

Cartwright, Susan, Cary L. Cooper, and P. Christopher Earley. The International Handbook of Organizational Culture and Climate. Chichester ; New York: Wiley, 2001.

Schak, David C., and Wayne Hudson. Civil Society in Asia. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2003.

ONLINE REFERENCES:

Action Research International, an on line journal:

Basic Business Research Methods, Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC. Copyright 1997-2007. Adapted from the Field Guide to Nonprofit Program Design,

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Marketing and Evaluation and Field Guide to Consulting and Organizational Development. http://www.managementhelp.org/research/research.htm

Survey Research Methods: on line peer reviewed journal. This journal "is the official journal of The European Survey Research Association" http://esra.sqp.nl/esra/journal/

The International Journal of Qualitative Methods: "The journal is multilingual and multidisciplinary, with a focus on qualitative research methods." http://www.ualberta.ca/~ijqm/

The Praxis Project for Public Policy and Community Research http://www.thepraxisproject.org/home.html

.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

Active participation, leadership, teamwork and collaboration will demonstrate your effective capacity in engaging in participatory research. This, along with an online training exercise, a

written assignment, a fieldwork exercise, and a final project (research design) will demonstrate progress toward achieving course objectives. Justified late assignments will be penalized by a minimum of 5 point penalty. Please consult the instructor if you need further explanation of the assignments or the criteria of evaluation. The instructor and the supervisory team at Adamson will be available to give suggestions or answer specific questions regarding your work in

progress.

1. RESEARCH ETHICS REPORT (weight 20%): This assignment requires you to complete a human subject training and critically reflect on it along a specific theme on research ethics. A) Critical Reflection: You will write a critical reflection on one specific subject related in general to the ethics of research and specifically to the social responsibility that researchers have toward a stakeholder community and human subject participants. You could, for example, focus your reflection on the challenges and responsibility of community participation in action research, or the issue of power in conducting research in an impoverished social context. The reflection should also reference and comment on the ethical values learned during the required training (see below). The critical reflection should be of a minimum of 4 pages and a maximum of 5 (Times New Roman, double spaced, one inch margin throughout) and include at least 8 in-text references (at least two should be from your required texts). You will submit your critical reflection on Blackboard Digital Drop box, with the file name beginning with your last name and the title of the course assignment. B) IRB training: You will attach to your assignment a proof of your successful completion of the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative CITI Basic Training for the protection of human participants in research (if you have already completed this training, please submit a proof of completion). Such trainings, required by the DePaul University’s Internal Review

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Board (IRB), are mandatory under the Federal Wide Assurance. They should demonstrate a basic ethical knowledge preventing inappropriate behavior while promoting protection and suitable procedures in researching social (and animal) subjects. Given the social types of subjects commonly involved in Public Service research, our IRB office suggests taking the on-line mandatory training available at http://research.depaul.edu/IRB/Mandatory%20%20Training.html The step by step instructions for how to complete the training are available in this document

%20Version%202-19-2010.doc Please make sure you keep record of the completion of this training as it will be useful to you in future research projects. Please read additional information on research classification and procedures for the human subject research protection at http://research.depaul.edu. The completion of this online training will take you approximately 3 hours and can be done in different steps. This assignment is due at the beginning of Session 2 Monday November 15, 2010 (5:45PM).

2. RESEARCH PROJECT ANALYSIS (weight 15%): You will review ONE development research project either completed during the previous Manila programs (available on Blackboard) or by another center or institution in Manila (e.g. see http://www.dlsu.edu.ph/research/centers/sdrc/projects.asp). With an internet based background research on the subjects, methods and prospected outcomes of the research you will summarize and critically analyze the project in a ONE full page (maximum two, single spaced, pages) report in which you highlight the project’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT). If available and applicable, your report should include the followings: 1) The title and contact information of the people who worked in the selected project; 2) A one-two sentences summarizing the project; 3) Divide the page into a table or four cells (two rows and two columns), summarizing your SWOT analysis. 3) At the bottom of the page, you should offer one-two sentences evaluating the project in its feasibility, applicability and utility for urban poor and marginalized sectors in Manila. You will share your analysis during Session 3 and may be asked about it during the Manila trip. This assignment is due at the beginning of Session 3 Monday November 15, 2010 (5:45PM).

3. PARTICIPATORY OBSERVATIONS NOTES (weight 15%): During the Manila program you will visit communities of relocated informal settlers. You will speak to the leaders of popular organizations and observe and learn about their needs, challenges and hopes. Your task is to be a participant observer and reflect on the things you observe and words you listed during your visit. During the community visits you will have the possibility to listen to community leaders in collective and individual informal interviews. You should make a record of your observations though field notes. Please consult the HOW-TO guide on how to write field notes in ethnographic research and participant observation research (available on Blackboard under course documents / how to). Your task is to understand the contexts with its organizational, leadership, political and economic needs as manifested

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and/or observed during your community visits. You will be asked to share your initial observations on day 3 of the Manila program and we will begin together the analysis. You will reorganize your handwritten field notes into TWO reflections on two subjects (about 500 words each) to be posted on the Program Blog http://manilaprogram.blogspot.com/. Each blog entries will include: 1) A appropriate and comprehensive title; 2) A text of 500 words minimum; 3) Hyperlinks embedded in the text for further references on the mentioned organizations and important subjects; 4) A list of additional resources at the bottom of the entry (books, organizations, reports, etc.); 5) A list of selected labels; or keywords / subject that best synthesize your post; 6) At least one photo that best illustrates your observation / reflection; 7) At the end of each blog post you should write: Text credit: Your Name and Photo Credit: You or others. Please send your two reflections to Dr. Tavanti by email to get approved for the posting. Attach also a sample page of your field-notes (scanned or transcribed). You will be receiving an invitation to become a co-blogger and post the reflections yourself, after your receive the instructor’s OK. Alternatively, you could ask for assistance from other classmates or the ISL coordinator. You will be sending this as an email with the attachments to Dr. Tavanti by December 15, 2010. Once you receive his approval, the Blogs need to be posted by December 31, 2010.

4. DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH PROJECT (weight 50%): The purpose of this assignment is to serve our partners at Adamson University and the Vincentian Center for Social Responsibilities (VCSR) by writing a publishable research paper analyzing the VCSR work in a specific subject (women leadership, multi-sector partnerships, micro-savings, community entrepreneurship, urban poverty reduction, slum upgrading, etc.). In close collaboration with the instructor and with the assistance of your assigned teamwork of Adamson faculty, VCSR volunteers and community leaders, you will be responsible for the organization of the research paper, with a good quality and specific literature review, and with the possible integration of data provided by VCSR. At Adamson University you will be receiving a printout with updated VCSR data. Please use it to make your analysis more inherent to the VCSR’s methodologies, approaches and activities. Your task is to do more than simply “describing” their work. Rather, your need to analyze their methods, outputs, outcomes and impact in relation to the existing literature on the selected topic. You will be able to integrate their data with your own observations and collective interviews based on questionnaires / instruments prepared by other students. In Manila we will do a collective exercise to prepare and adapt such questionnaire. You are invited to select the topic of your research in dialogue with the instructor before the arrival to Manila.

* Please note: Be aware that the development research project assignment may receive some adjustments or additional specifications after our immersion in Manila and we receive an updated need assessment from the Adamson-VCSR coordinators.

** Please note: In agreement with the instructor and according to the needs of our partners, some of you may fulfill this requirement with an alternative but equivalent development research project that would produce for example a toolkit in an area of development research. Please consult with the instructor for further instructions.

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The quality of your development research project will be assessed primarily on the basis of its originality, relevance, quality, depth (especially in the secondary data literature review), collaboration (when applicable and in relation to the possible integration of primary data provided by our VCSR counterpart). In line with the participatory methods, collaborative approaches and community development values of the Manila Program, you have the opportunity and responsibility to produce a high quality writing analyzing, highlighting, comparing and assessing the innovative works of VCSR.

The research paper should be of no less than 15 pages (times new roman, double spaced, 1 inch throughout) with the title page and excluding the appendices. With the appendices, the entire assignment should be no longer than 20 pages and include the following sections (the page numbers are just a suggestion on the length):

Page 1: TITLE PAGE: Project title, subtitle, team members, supervisors, stakeholders, contact information, etc. (See Blackboard for Title Page Template). You should include here your email along with the names of the people at Adamson you have been working on to develop this proposal.

Page 2: ABSTRACT: Project Abstract (about 200 words) single space.

Page 3-4: CONTEXT: You should introduce your topic in relation to your observations and the database documentation on the work of VCSR. This section should clearly and synthetically express how the topic is relevant in relation to development research and to the work of VCSR. However, you should avoid simply “describing” VCSR unless inherently related to your topic. You should look into your notes and observations in the community immersion and/or ask your Adamson partners to help you with some quotations from the Southville partners. This section should clearly frame the subject, focus, purpose and application of your research (see your Mikkelsen).

Page 5-8: LITERATURE: You will review relevant academic literature and other similar projects in the Philippines and worldwide. This is the bulk of your project as you are expected to conduct a focused, analytical and well organized literature review on your topic in relation to poverty alleviation and social impact analysis for the VCSR programs. You should review relevant studies and research-related best practices in your topic.

Page 9-10: METHODS: You will be describing the approaches and methods of the research. In particular you want to describe the participatory, appreciative, community development and poverty reduction approaches utilized in the assessment.

Page 11-12: INDICATORS: [this can be a subsection of the methods]. You will describe the indicators utilized in your analysis and relevant to your subject. An indicator is something that helps you understand where you are, which way you are going and how far you are from where you want to be. Expanding on your literature review, what are the indicators that best measure your topic? For example, some recognized indicators for international development are 1) Literacy, education, and skills; 2) Health (life expectancy, maternal and infant mortality, quality

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of life, and the levels of health care available in situations of morbidity); 3) Income and economic welfare (employment, incomes, GNP, etc); 4) Choice, democracy, and participation; 5) Technology (the capacity to develop technological innovations and to make technological choices). You are invited to utilize (and adapt) preexisting indicators and assessment instruments as prepared by your predecessors in this program or existing in the development research literature. There is not a fixed number of indicators but I expect them to be between 3 and 5.

Page 13-15: ANALYSIS OF RESULTS: You will be conducting an analysis of the pre-existing data and observations in Manila. Your quantitative analysis (and in some cases also qualitative, mixed methods, or comparative) should be conducted keeping in mind the assessments of VCSR’s outcomes and impact in the community.

Page 16: CONCLUSION: Your conclusions will include a few recommendations as emerging from the analysis of the data.

Page 17 and forward: APPENDIXES: Your appendixes should include the assessment instrument you and VCSR utilized in the research. Beside the assessment instruments elaborated by other students in the previous years, you can see other examples of questionnaires in the Empowerment Indicators for the Development Research Toolkit.

Please use Turabian in-text parenthetical references for citations and endnotes for explanatory annotations. Your project should be professionally formatted and clearly organized with sections and sub-sections. Due to the participatory and international service nature of this program, your research project will be elaborated along the following deadlines and processes:

a) Present a work plan to the instructor by January 15 (a word document attached to an email will do it).

b) You will submit your first draft to the instructor by January 30.

c) Your final paper must be submitted in the Blackboard Digital Drop Box by February 15, 2011 (Midnight).

In agreement with the instructor, you have the option of completing all the course requirements earlier by December 31, 2010. Once all the required course assignments are completed the instructor will administer a change grade from the “R” (research) grade temporarily placed at the end of the Fall quarter.

COURSE CALENDAR

The Preparatory and Post-Immersion classes are mandatory and essential for preparation and coordination in the activities and assignments associated with this program.

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TBA: September 2010

Manila Program Alumni will illustrate the nature and values of the program. They will also offer insights on the participatory research nature of this program. They will illustrate the students’ role as “research consultants” for projects carried-on and lead by Adamsonians and community leaders.

Session 1: MANILA PROGRAM & RESEARCH METHODS

Monday November 1, 2010 (5:30pm-8:30pm) | Classroom: SPS Conference Room (Loop Campus)

Themes

PPT00: INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS - BASIC CONCEPTS

PPT01: MANILA PROGRAM & RESEARCH METHODS

Introduction to practical application of research methods in the fields of public services and poverty reduction. With specific interactive PowerPoint presentations, lectures and assignments students will be introduced to the basics of research methods including: participant observations, focus groups, interviews, surveys and specific issues in participatory methods. The pedagogy behind this teaching is based on experiential learning through case study analysis. Students will learn about these research methods by submitting a draft proposal of a research design based on their own research interests and public service. Some of the themes of this session include:

The characteristics and applications of research

The research process

Formulating a research problem

Reviewing the literature

The research process

Developing research questions

The nature, challenges and applications of action research

Traditional research methods and PAR: ethical and scientific considerations

Readings

Mikkelsen, Ch. 1 and 2

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Tavanti, Applied Research Toolkit

In-class

Is participation necessary in development research?

discussion

What are the necessary steps to formulate appropriate research questions?

What ethical implications and social responsibility are there in doing research for the world’s benefit?

Session 2: PHILIPPINES CULTURE & APPROACHES TO RESEARCH

Monday November 8, 2010 (5:30pm-8:30pm) | Classroom: SPS Conference Room (Loop Campus)

Themes

PPT02: PHILIPPINES CULTURE & APPROACHES TO RESEARCH

Exploration of practical organizational analysis research methods. This class will be exploring the qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods in the context of Participatory Poverty Assessments (PPA), Participatory Action Research (PAR) and Appreciative Inquiry (AI) as applied to (non-profit/for- profit) organizational development. Students will be learning about the social, cultural and economic contexts of Manila along with the expressed organizational needs (to be identified by the instructor in dialogue with participating organizations).

Conceptualizing a research design

Constructing instruments from data collection

Participatory and action research methods (PAR)

Identifying stakeholders, building consensus and engaging partnerships

The Appreciative Inquiry (AI) Framework

Applied research methods and evaluation through appreciative inquiry

The paradigms and applications of Participatory Poverty Assessments (PPA)

Consideration of applying PPAs to urban extreme poverty settings

Readings

Mikkelsen, Ch. 3 and 4

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Tavanti, Project Evaluation Toolkit

In-class

What are the essential research tools that you (and community leaders) need to know in order to promote transformative and appreciative changes?

discussion

What is so unique and important about the participatory approach in research?

When is Participatory Action Research an appropriate method and when is it not appropriate?

Can research reduce poverty? What is PPA? How would you adapt these methods for urban settings?

Assignments

Research ethics report: This assignment is due at the beginning of Session 2 Monday November 15, 2010 (5:45PM). Be prepared to share this assignment in class.

Session 3: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & EVALUATION RESEARCH

Monday November 15, 2010 (5:30pm-8:30pm) | Classroom: SPS Conference Room (Loop Campus)

Themes

PPT03: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & EVALUATION RESEARCH

Understanding the field of evaluation research in relation to the participatory approach in development research. Overview of the field of community and international development through the Participatory Rapid Appraisal methods and the Poverty and Social Impact analysis techniques. Topics include:

Development Research: Sustainability, Empowerment, Asset Building

Asset Based Community Development (ABCD): Social Capital, Social Capital Assessment Tool (SOCAT)

Evaluation Research: Participatory, Stakeholders evaluation

Systemic Change Approach: Vincentian systemic change

Urban Poverty Research: Poverty and Social Impact Analysis (PSIA); Participatory Poverty Assessment (PPAs)

Readings

Mikkelsen, Ch. 5 and 6

Tavanti, Development Research Toolkit

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In-class

What is M&E and how can these methods help urban poverty reduction?

discussion

How can the Appreciative Inquiry Approach help to perform interviews and evaluations?

Assignments

Research Project Analysis: This assignment is due at the beginning of Session 3 Monday November 22, 2010 (5:45PM).

MANILA-PHILIPPINES STUDY ABROAD IMMERSION TRIP

Beginning of the program: Sunday early afternoon November 28, 2010

End of program: Saturday night December 4, 2010

Day 1 SUNDAY: Tour of Manila and Welcoming Dinner

Afternoon session: The program will include an overview of the most important elements of Philipino history, culture and values. Students will be able to see the Spanish and American influence and the contrast in urban landscape between Spanish urban planning, informal settlers and wealthy areas in the business districts of Makati.

Evening session: Welcoming dinner with Adamson coordinators (Greenbelt Mall, Makati)

Day 2 MONDAY: Introductions of Context and Partners.

Morning Session: Meeting and presentation by Rev. Fr. Gregg Banaga Jr., CM, president of Adamson University. Panel of presenters from Adamson University includes: Fr. Afiliano Fajardo, CM (Fr. Nonong), Director, Integrated Community Extension Services; Ms. Grace S. De Guzman, Director, Organizational Development and Training; Introduction to the socio- cultural and urban context of Metro Manila extreme situations of poverty. Selected speakers from NGOs and academic communities (to be selected by Adamson University).

Afternoon Session: Presentation of the history, needs, works and evolution of the targeted displaced informal settlers communities of Southville, Cabuyao. Community leaders and VCSR volunteers will be speaking. DePaul students will be asking questions and begin a dialogue in preparation to the first Fieldwork.

Evening Events: Welcoming Dinner and cultural dances at Adamson University (St. Vincent de Paul Plaza).

Day 3: TUESDAY: Fieldwork I: Participatory Observation / Focus Groups

Morning Session: Travel to the Squatter Relocation Settlement of Southville in Cabuyao. Meeting with community leaders. DePaul students will be accompanied by VCSR volunteers and Adamson faculty. They will be welcomed by and introduced to the community group and

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popular organizations (POs) in the area.

Afternoon Session: Focus group among Southville community leaders. The focus of the analysis and guiding questionnaire for the focus group discussion will be assessing the organizational development and leadership development needs. The discussion will be coordinated (and translated) by VCSR volunteers. Student will have the opportunity to observe, ask questions in the focus group / collective interviews.

Day 4: WEDNESDAY: Community Learning and Capacity Assessment

Morning Session: Fieldwork debriefing and small group guided exercises for community capacity assessments. Small group activities analyzing organizational needs and other research needs emerged during the fieldwork activities.

Afternoon Session: Special session facilitated by the instructor. PPT04: METRO MANILA ANALYSIS & PARTICIPATORY OBSERVATIONS (in reference to the Development Research Toolkit). Program participants, VCSR volunteers and Adamson University faculty will conduct small group activities to prepare a questionnaire for semi-structured and thematic interviews to be conducted during Fieldwork II.

Day 5: THURSDAY: Fieldwork II: Thematic Panels and Semi-structured Interviews.

Morning session: Accompanied by the VCSR volunteers, DePaul students and Adamson faculty will be able to ask questions to a panel of community leaders. They will be selecting THREE questions among those indicators and questions prepared during the previous day following the provided template.

Afternoon Session: Students will go back to their respective blocks and engage community participants in thematic semi-structured interviews.

Day 6: FRIDAY: Community Engagement Action Plan and Conference Day

Morning Session: Comparative analysis on university-community engagement. Personal/professional reflections on (international) public service / community engagement.

Afternoon Session: Presentations from leaders of the Relocated Communities Federations and from Government officials from the National Housing Authority. Discussion on the relocation plans.

Evening Activities: Final dinner and celebratory cultural events at Adamson University (St. Vincent de Paul Plaza).

Day 7: SATURDAY: Visit to communities and POs along the dumpsite of Payatas, Quezon City. Visit to the ECO park in Quezon City.

Session 4: DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH REPORTS

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Wednesday December 15, 2010 (5:30pm-8:30pm) | In-class face to face (F2F) participation in the SPS Conference Room (Loop Campus) with the optional WIMBA ONLINE PARTICIPATION (in case you are travelling). The session will be recorded. Please see assignments deadlines.

Themes

We will be debriefing the Manila experience and conduct an action plans for the final projects. Students will share about their evaluations of the program (see special evaluation form). The class will be held online through Wimba. An optional in-class session will be held in the SPS conference room. The session will be devoted to reviewing the experiential learning of research methods and approaches in light of the development research framework and participatory poverty assessments. We will review effective methods and best practices in development research reporting. Some of the research methods contents that will also be reviewed in this session are:

Interpreting and analyzing

Fundamentals of qualitative data analysis

Developing a framework of analysis: conceptualization and documentation

Editing data collected through unstructured interviews

Managing and analyzing data collected through surveys

Coding descriptive / qualitative data

Authenticating and validating instruments

Research Evaluation and Reporting

Research writing and report sharing

Publications and peer-reviews in publications

Writing outlines and referencing properly

The action research report

The intervention-development-evaluation process

The appreciative approach on evaluations

Readings

Mikkelsen, Ch. 7 and 8

Discussion

What have we learned about applied research methods?

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Themes

What have we learned about participatory methods?

What have we learned about appreciative inquiry?

What is next?

Assignments

PARTICIPATORY OBSERVATIONS NOTES

You will be sending this as an email with the attachments to Dr. Tavanti by December 15, 2010. Once you receive his approval, the Blogs need to be posted by December 31, 2010.

DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH PROJECT

JANUARY 15: Present a work plan to the instructor by January 15 (a word document attached to an email will do it).

JANUARY 30: You will submit your first draft to the instructor by January

30.

FEBRUARY 15: Your final paper must be submitted in the Blackboard Digital Drop Box by February 15, 2011 (Midnight).

* You have the option of completing the final project for this class by the end of December. Please contact the instructor for this option.

Final celebratory dinner: TBA, optional during the week end of January 12-14, 2011)

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EVALUATION CRITERIA

The student’s responsibility is to prepare adequately through the assigned readings, course assignments and in-class individual and group exercises. The instructor will not assess your performance in relation to your value but in the successful completion of the requirement. Respectful, coherent but critical reflections (even when conflicting with the majority or the instructor’s views) are very welcome in this course and are indicative of the student’s capacity to think critically, independently and toward moral decision making. The course assignments are designed to stimulate your moral intelligence and capacity to comprehend and synthesize ethical principles into the complexity of (international) public service and human nature. Your performance in the course assignments will be weighed in the following manner:

RESEARCH ETHICS REPORT

20%

RESEARCH PROJECT ANALYSIS

15%

PARTICIPATORY OBSERVATIONS NOTES

15%

DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH PROJECT

50%

COURSE GRADE

100%

The instructor will give additional explanation on the expectations for the course assignments in class and on Blackboard. It is your right and duty to ask explanations on the requirements. Remember that the syllabus is your contract. Therefore, both students and instructor should refer to the syllabus as the contractual explanation of what the requirements and expectations are for this course. Please keep track of your progress through Blackboard’s Grade book. If you are concerned about your performance or have questions about your evaluation, feel free to contact the instructor. Please remember that just fulfilling all the assignment does not qualify you for an “A” grade level which is reserved for excellent performances that clearly exceeds expectations. Fulfilling all the requirements in a good manner simply satisfy the “B” level. Please refer to the following grading scale for score details on each grade level for this course:

Exceeds Expectations [Excellent]

A

94-100

A-

90-93

 

Meets Expectations [Good]

B+

87-89

B

84-86

B -

80-83

Below Expectations [Satisfactory]

C+

78-79

C

76-77

C-

73-75

Misses Expectations [Barely Pass or Fail]

D

70-72

D-

67-69

F

0-66

I grade written assignments both on content and good writing.

Written work. To help students meet graduate-level and SPS standards, we pay more-than-usual attention to writing as an academic and managerial skill. We judge papers on the understanding they reflect as well as on their organization, clarity and use of language. We value clarity and an

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economy of words. If you need help on this matter, please ask for it. If you do come for assistance, be sure to read Murphy’s “On Writing and Thinking” (available on Blackboard) first. We also recommend an old standard, Strunk and White, Elements of Style available online:

http://www.bartelby.net/141/ . Also, you may consider getting help from the DePaul University Writing Centers (available in person at Loop and Lincoln Park Campuses and on line).

We include written assignment instructions elsewhere. Double-space all papers; Use one inch margins; Use Times New Roman or Arial font; Use 11 or 12 point; Paginate in the upper right hand corner.

Please note the due dates. Anticipate all possible contingencies (computer failure, family illness, heartbreak or heartburn). Papers received after the due date will receive grades no greater than the lowest grade given to papers received on time. All assignments should include the class name and number, the assignment name or number, student name, and the date the assignment is due. The only exception to this is when we specify a format for a particular assignment.

Unless notified otherwise, send all assignments to Blackboard via the digital drop box. All assignments are due by the start of class on the day assigned.

This course includes diverse assignments designed to develop your personal and professional moral intelligence. The instructor will not judge or base his performance evaluation on your moral character or personal values. Please see assignment descriptions for specific evaluation criteria. Please use the reflections, readings and discussion emerging from this course as reflection tools for your ethical leadership development. The evaluation of your academic performance has not much to do with your real understanding and practice of ethics, morals and values. The written assignments and presentations will be evaluated not on the character or values but on the actual fulfillment of course assignments, the appropriateness of the selections, and their alignment with the topics of ethical leadership. The following explanation of the level of performances for written assignments may be helpful to understand the general criteria that the instructor will use in the evaluation of your work.

An A (above average) level performance paper is unique, original, engaging, and full. It will have virtually no grammatical, usage, punctuation, or spelling errors. It is a unique and original contribution and speaks with authority and clarity. It is rich in detail, showing a clear understanding of differences in levels of specificity; it provides justification or support for all general assertions. It addresses all the assignment with all the specific requirements and excels in writing structure, clarity, focus, style, analytical systematization, critical analysis and creativity.

The B (meets expectations) level paper falls short of an A paper usually in style and analytical development. It has some errors in grammar, usage, punctuation, or spelling, but usually very few; or it has some awkward phrases--but in neither case enough to impede the reading of the paper. Its development is consistently strong, with detail and support present in most, but

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perhaps not every, instance. Its sense of audience is clear. The B paper addresses the assignment directly and satisfies almost all of its requirements.

The C (below expectations) level paper addresses the assignment relatively clearly but without significant depth or clarity. Stylistic errors may be noticeably present, but not in such quantity as to impede the reading in a significant way. A C paper generally provides some support for assertions, but not enough to give the impression of complete thoroughness. The tone and voice of a C paper usually lack a sense of individuality of author or sense of authority. A C paper often has an "anonymous" quality to it, restating standard opinion or assertions without going into significant depth.

A D level grade is assigned when students avoid assignments or completely miss the specific requirements. An F grade demonstrates a combination of basic incomprehension of the assigned topics and an insufficient effort to overcome these problems.

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY POLICIES

1. Policy on Grade of IN (Incomplete)

According to DePaul University’s incomplete policy, the “IN” grade is a temporary grade indicating the student has a satisfactory record of work completed, but for unusual or unforeseeable circumstances not encountered by other students, and acceptable to the instructor, the student cannot complete course requirements on time. The student must formally request the incomplete grade and the instructor must approve it. At the end of the term following the term in which the instructor assigned the incomplete grade, the IN grade automatically convert to “F” grades. Students requesting the IN grade should present a plan and schedule to complete the course along with the formal request for the IN grade. Students should work out the plan with the instructor, usually scheduling completion within a few weeks of the end of the term in which the IN grade occurs.

2. Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is an essential component in the development of ethical leaders and professionals. Plagiarism is defined as a major form of academic dishonesty involving the presentation of the work, ideas, etc. of another as one’s own. Integrity is expected of every student in all academic work. The guiding principle of academic integrity is that a student’s submitted work must be the student’s own. Students engaging in academic dishonesty diminish their education and bring discredit to the academic community. Students who study together should be especially careful to avoid plagiarizing each other.

Students in this course, and in all courses where independent research and writing play a vital role in the requirements, must be aware of the strong sanctions carried out as a result of plagiarism, as stated in the DePaul University’s Code of Student Responsibility

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Instructors are able to check each paper with Turn-It-In: Plagiarism Detection Software. If proven, a charge of plagiarism could result in an automatic “F” in the course and possible expulsion. If you have any questions or doubts about what plagiarism entails or how to properly acknowledge source materials, be sure to consult the instructor. Please check Blackboard’s link to Academic Integrity for details. Please check Blackboard’s link to Academic Integrity for details.

Violations of Academic Integrity: Violations of academic integrity include but are not limited to the following categories: cheating; plagiarism; fabrication; falsification or sabotage of research data; destruction or misuse of the university's academic resources-- alteration or falsification of academic records; academic misconduct; and complicity. This policy applies to all courses, programs, and learning contexts in which academic credit is offered, including experiential and service-learning courses, study abroad programs internships, student teaching and the like. If an instructor finds that a student has violated the Academic Integrity Policy, the appropriate initial sanction is at the instructor's discretion (cf. Section Q). Actions taken by the instructor do not preclude the college or the university from taking further action, including dismissal from the university Conduct that is punishable under the Academic Integrity Policy could result in criminal or civil prosecution.

Cheating: Cheating is any action that violates University norms or instructor's guidelines for the preparation and submission of assignments. This includes but is not limited to unauthorized access to examination materials prior to the examination itself, use or possession of unauthorized materials during the examination or quiz; having someone take an examination in one's place-copying from another student; unauthorized assistance to another student; or acceptance of such assistance.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a major form of academic dishonesty involving the presentation of the work of another as one's own. Plagiarism includes but is not limited to the following:

The direct copying of any source, such as written and oral material, computer files, audio disks, video programs or musical scores, whether published or unpublished, in whole or part, without proper acknowledgement that it is someone else's.

Copying of any source in whole or part with only minor changes in wording or syntax, even with acknowledgement.

Submitting as one's own work a report, examination paper, computer file, lab report or other assignment that has been prepared by someone else. This includes research papers purchased from any other person or agency.

The paraphrasing of another's work or ideas without proper acknowledgement.

3. Attendance Policy

Class attendance is mandatory. Students who must miss class for personal or professional reasons should inform the instructor via written communication. We may require students who

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must miss a class session write a three-page paper on the topic of the class missed. Students who miss more than 30 percent of the course are likely to fail and should drop the course.

4. Universal Design for Learning

SPS is committed to helping students achieve to their full potential by removing barriers to learning and making reasonable accommodation when appropriate. Please help us by identifying barriers and suggesting ways we can diminish or remove them.

Students with special learning needs or who are in circumstances which necessitate special consideration, must contact the instructor at the beginning of the course or earlier. Students with a documented disability who wish to discuss academic accommodations should contact the instructor as soon as possible and immediately contact the DePaul University’s Office of Students with Disability at http://studentaffairs.depaul.edu/studentswithdisabilities/

5. Human Subject Research

DePaul University is committed to guarantee the protection of human subjects that may be involved in your research. The applied research activities relative to your applied capstone project (not a thesis option) fall under the Non-Reviewable Activities of students conducting research for class and training purposes. These conditions, reviewed by the Local Review Board (LRB) of the School of Public Service, do not apply if you have the intentions of communicating your data through publications, public presentations, or if you target protected human subjects categories. In those cases you should probably obtain a review and approval from DePaul Institutional Review Board (IRB). Please review the information websites and the FAQ on the type of research in intend to conduct. http://research.depaul.edu/

STUDENTS RESPONSIBILITIES

Cross-cultural intelligence: The cross-cultural context of this course requires students to be particularly sensitive to cultural diversities and local customs. This is particularly needed during your fieldwork and community engagement but it also applies to your respectful, listening, emphatic and open attitudes during the entire participation in this program. Your cultural intelligence, expressed in your respectful and considerate attitude should be visible during class discussions, lectures, and presentations. Respectful and open discussions will make the classroom a privileged space for comparative and critical analysis. Cross-cultural intelligence is an important component for a successful and learning experience in this study abroad program. The emphasis of this course is therefore more on collaboration rather than competition. Students are encouraged to engage in responsible and collaborative participation welcoming the richness of a cross-cultural and comparative nature of this course.

Travel and Safety: When travelling abroad, it is the student’s responsibility to comply with laws and regulations of the host country. You are also responsible to comply with the laws and recommendations of the US Embassy in the host country. Please follow DePaul University’s Study Abroad Office’s policies and regulations for health insurance, travel itinerary disclosure and travel safety at http://studyabroad.depaul.edu/HealthSafety/ For additional information on

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country-specific travel information, warnings and recommendations consult the US Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs http://travel.state.gov/ For health information and requirements for visiting a country check the US Department for Health and Human Services Center for Disease Control and Prevention at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/

Class Discussions: Class discussions are an opportunity to work on oral communication skills. During class discussions students will talk and listen. With respect to speaking, students are responsible for contributing to overall quality of class discussions by making useful and informed comments, asking clarifying questions of fellow students or the instructor, and, helping to move the discussion along in productive ways. With respect to listening, students are responsible for listening attentively to the ideas of others, being respectful of people who hold opinions different from their own, and synthesizing for themselves the disparate ideas that class discussions may generate. Students should be prepared to use the materials from readings, assignments, and lectures to inform class discussions.

Teamwork: Professionalism requires you to develop teamwork skills, such as effective communication, cooperation, productive interaction, respectful dispute resolution, and tactful supervision skills. Each student must actively look for ways to contribute to classroom learning and to help cultivate a cooperative class culture. Group assignments require disclosing planned and resulted individual contributions by filling the Group Work Report Form (available on Blackboard) and submitting it along with the assignment to the instructor. When group assignments are not required, students are allowed the opportunity to suggest it to the instructor.

TURABIAN RECOMMENDATION

The MPS program has adopted the Turabian Style (a simplified version of the Chicago Style) as the standard citation and writing style reference. For additional information, please refer to Marco Tavanti’s Quick Reference (PDF document available on Blackboard). For additional and specific citations please consult the Turabian manual. If the simplified manual does not contain any instructions for your specific reference please consult with the instructor. See Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Thesis and Dissertations (6 th Edition). The general guidelines for Turabian Bibliographical references (this apply to your annotated bibliography assignment) is:

Author last name, Author first name. Title. Location of Press: Press Name, Year Published.

Sample of book bibliographical citation in Turabian Style:

Greenleaf, Robert K., and Larry C. Spears. Servant Leadership : A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness. 25th anniversary ed. New York: Paulist Press, 2002.

Sample of Article bibliographical citation in Turabian Style:

Putnam, Robert. D. "Bowling Alone: America’s Declining Social Capital." Journal of Democracy 6, no. 1 (1995): 65-78.

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Please note that many disciplines are abandoning the citation system using footnotes with a corresponding bibliography in favor of the parenthetical references and reference list (or works cited). Generally your explanations should be included in your text. Footnotes and endnotes (preferred by most journals) are used to cite authority for statements made in the text and to amplify, qualify, or comment on material in the text that would break up the flow of the text if included there.

The general guidelines for parenthetical and reference citations (this applies to your literature review, papers, thesis, etc.) would be:

(Author last name Year Published, page number)

Under REFERENCES at the end of your paper, there will be (note the different position of the date).

Author last name, Author first name. Year Published. Title (with only first word capitalized). Location of Press: Press Name.

PARENTHETICAL REFERENCE (Preferably placed at the end of your sentence in your paper note that the comma is only after the year and in the case of a page citation):

(Putnam 1995, 68-69)

REFERENCE LIST (at the end of your paper, note the difference in capitalization and the disappearance of the Number of the journal):

Putnam, Robert. D. 1995. "Bowling alone: America’s declining social capital." Journal of Democracy 6: 65-78.

With the proper tools and information everyone is a researcher

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE

TAVANTI SYLLABUS MPS 570 AUTUMN QUARTER 2010-2011