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ClearPath Enterprise Servers

System Commands

Operations Reference Manual

ClearPath MCP Release 11.0 or Later

April 2006

Printed in USA 8600 0395–514

.

ClearPath Enterprise Servers

System Commands

Operations Reference Manual

UNISYS

© 2006 Unisys Corporation. All rights reserved.

ClearPath MCP Release 11.0 or Later

April 2006

Printed in USA 8600 0395–514

NO WARRANTIES OF ANY NATURE ARE EXTENDED BY THIS DOCUMENT. Any product or related information described herein is only furnished pursuant and subject to the terms and conditions of a duly executed agreement to purchase or lease equipment or to license software. The only warranties made by Unisys, if any, with respect to the products described in this document are set forth in such agreement. Unisys cannot accept any financial or other responsibility that may be the result of your use of the information in this document or software material, including direct, special, or consequential damages.

You should be very careful to ensure that the use of this information and/or software material complies with the laws, rules, and regulations of the jurisdictions with respect to which it is used.

The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. Revisions may be issued to advise of such changes and/or additions.

Notice to U.S. Government End Users: This is commercial computer software or hardware documentation developed at private expense. Use, reproduction, or disclosure by the Government is subject to the terms of Unisys standard commercial license for the products, and where applicable, the restricted/limited rights provisions of the contract data rights clauses.

Unisys and ClearPath are registered trademarks of Unisys Corporation in the United States and other countries. All other brands and products referenced in this document are acknowledged to be the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.

Contents

Section 1

Commands

System Commands Overview A (Active Mix Entries) ........................................................ ACCOUNTING (Resource Accounting)

.............................................

1

5

.................................

11

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) AD (Access Duplicate)

............................................

...................................................... ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

.........................................

AI (Automatic Initiation)

..................................................

13

21

23

32

ARCCOPY (Copy Archive Directory)

....................................

AR (Archive Release)

.......................................................

ARCDUPLICATE (Duplicate Archive Directory)

.....................

ARCREPLACE (Replace Archive Directory)

...........................

ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor)

......................................

ASDU (ASD Usage)

.......................................................... AT (At Remote Host)

.......................................................

AT (At Remote Host): Use with Host Services

.....................

AT (At Remote Host): Use with FTAM CHANGE (FTAM File Management Command)

.................................

......................

FILES (FTAM File Management Command)

.......................... LFILES (FTAM File Management Command)

........................ MODIFY (FTAM File Management Command) REMOVE (FTAM File Management Command)

......................

......................

AUTORESTORE (Archiving AUTORESTORE Option) AX (Accept)

...............

....................................................................

BADFILE (Bad File)

..........................................................

34

35

36

37

39

42

43

44

47

48

48

48

49

51

53

54

56

BNA

...............................................................................

57

BNAVERSION

.................................................................. BR (Breakout)

................................................................. C (Completed Mix Entries)

................................................

CA (Candidate)

...............................................................

CACHE (Disk Cache)

........................................................

CC (Control Card)

............................................................ CF (Configuration File)

.....................................................

CHECKFILE (Check for Nonresident Files)

...........................

CL (Clear)

...................................................................... CLOSE (Close Pack) CM (Change MCP)

.........................................................

........................................................... CO (CONTROLLER Options)

..............................................

59

60

62

65

67

70

71

73

75

79

83

94

Contents

COMPILERTARGET (Set Default Target Value)

98

102

COPYCAT (Copy Catalog)

103

CS (Change Supervisor)

105

CU

(Core Usage)

107

DBS (Database Stack Entries) 110 ..........................................

DD (Directory Duplicate)

112

................................................. DIRECTORY ONLY 113 ...........................................................

DF (Empty Dumpdisk File) 114 ...............................................

DIR (Directory)

116

DL (Disk Location) 117 ..........................................................

DN (Dump

Name)

132

DN (Dump

Name)

132

DOWN (Down Resource)

139

DR (Date Reset) 146 .............................................................

DRC (Disk Resource Control)

149

DS (Discontinue) 152 ............................................................

DU (Disk Utilization)

156

DUMP (Dump Memory)

160

FA (File Attribute)

168

FAMILYACCESS (Directory Location)

171

FAS (Failure Analysis Summary)

173

FI (File Information)

174

FILELOCKTLIMIT (File Lock Time Limit)

177

FIND 178 .............................................................................

FM (Form Message)

188

FR

(Final Reel)

189

FS (Force Schedule)

190

FREE (Free Resource)

192

HI (Cause Exception Event)

201

HLUNIT (Specify Halt/Load Unit)

202

205

HOSTNAME (Hostname)

207

HS (Hold Schedule)

209

HU (Host

Usercode)

210

 

212

Contents

ID (Initialize Data Comm)

213

IL (Ignore Label)

 

241

INITIALIZE (Initialize Disk) 242 ..............................................

INSTALL (Install Software)

245

251

255

LABEL (LABEL ODT) 259 ........................................................

LB (Relabel Pack or Host Control Unit)

261

LC

(Log

Comment)

267

LG (Log for Mix Number) 268 .................................................

LH (Load Host–IOP Systems)

270

LH (Load Host–IOM Systems)

274

LIBS (Library Task Entries) 277 ..............................................

LIBTRACE (Library Trace)

280

LICENSESTATUS ............................................................

284

LJ (Log to Job)

285

LOADMICROCODE (Load Microcode—IOM Systems)

286

LOG (Analyze Log)

288

LOGGING (Logging Options)

289

LP (Lock Program) 292 ..........................................................

 

MAX (Maximums)

293

MCS

297

MDT (Memory Dump Type) 299 ..............................................

MEMORYCEILING (Set Memory Ceiling) 310 .............................

MIRROR (Mirror Disk)

312

ML (Mix Limit) 332 ................................................................

MM

(Memory Module)

333

MOVE (Move Job or Pack) 339 ................................................

MP (Mark Program)

342

MQ (Make or Modify Queue)

352

MSC (Message Control)

358

MSG (Display Messages)

372

MU (Make User)

375

MX

(Mix Entries)

377

NET (Network)

385

 

386

NEW SYSTEMDIRECTORY (Replace an Existing

SYSTEMDIRECTORY)

388

NF (No File)

392

NOTOK (Do Not Reactivate) 393 .............................................

Contents

 

394

NS (Next Screen) NW (Network Prefix)

395 .......................................................

NX (NETEX Software Input)

396

 

O (Overlay)

397

OF

399

OK (Reactivate)

400

OL (Display Label and Paths)

401

OP

(Options)

422

OPLOCKTIMEOUT

434

436

OU (Output Unit) 437 ............................................................

 

PARTIALSETS

440

 

441

442

PF (Print Fetch) 454 ..............................................................

 

PG (Purge)

456

 

465

PMIX (Process Mix) 466 .........................................................

POWER (Power Up/Down)

467

PQ (Purge Queue)

469

 

PR (Priority)

470

PRIMITIVE RUN 471 ..............................................................

Print System (PS) Introduction

472

PV (Print Volume) 477 ...........................................................

QF (Queue Factors)

479

QT

(Quit)

481

RA

(Register Application)

483

RB (Rebuild Access) 486 ........................................................ RC (Reconfigure Disk) 488 ..................................................... RECONFIGURE GROUP (Reconfigure System) 500 .....................

RECOVER (Recover I/O Module)

503

REMOTEDISK 505 .................................................................

REMOTESPO (Activate REMOTESPO)

506

REPLACE (Replace Pack Volume)

509

REPLACECARD (Replace Card)

517

RES (Reserve)

520

528

529

536

RM (Remove)

538

RP (Resident Program) 539 ....................................................

Contents

RSS (Reliable Session Service Prefix) 541 ................................

RW (Rewind)

546

RY (Ready)

547

550

SB (Substitute Backup)

554

556

SC (System Configuration)

558

SCAN (Scan Pack Volume) 564 ............................................... SECOPT (Security Options) 566 ..............................................

SEGARRAYSTART (Array Segmentation Start Size)

567

SEND (Send Message)

569

SF (Set Factor)

584

588

SHOW 595 ...........................................................................

SHOWOPEN (Show Open Disk Files)

605

SHOWSPARES (Show Spare Disks)

607

SL (Support Library)

 

611

SM (Send to MCS or Database)

618

SN (Serial

Number)

620

SQ

(Show

Queue)

625

 

627

SS (Send to Station)

 

629

ST (Stop)

630

STARTTIME (Start Time)

631

STORESAFE

 

632

 

640

SUPPRESS (Suppress Display)

642

SUPPRESSWARNING (Suppress Warning) 644 ..........................

SV (Save)

 

646

 

649

651

TERM (Terminal)

680

684

 

TI (Times)

685

TL (Transfer Log)

686

TR

(Time Reset)

689

TV (Type Volume)

701

 

U (Utilization)

703

Contents

UL (Unlabeled) 709 ...............................................................

UP (Up Resource)

 

710

UQ

(Unit

Queue)

715

USERLICENSE 722 ................................................................

W (Waiting Mix Entries)

726

WM (What MCP) 729 .............................................................

X25MCS (Command Prefix)

733

Y (Status Interrogate)

737

??CD (Conditional Dump)

741

??CL (Clear)

743

744

745

746

??DS (Discontinue) 748 .........................................................

??DUMP (Dump Memory)

749

??FS (Force Schedule)

750

??HS (Hold Schedule)

753

??LH (Load

Host)

754

??MARC (Transfer to Menu-Assisted Resource Control)

755

??MEMDP (Dump Memory)

758

??ODT (Return from Menu-Assisted Resource Control)

759

??OK (Reactivate)

760

??OL (Display Label and Paths)

761

??PD (Print Directory)

762

??PHL (Programmatic Halt/Load) 764 ......................................

??REMOVE (Remove File)

765

766

??RJ (Remove JOBDESC File) 767 ........................................... ??RUN (Run Code File) 768 ....................................................

??RV (Restart Volume Directory)

769

770

??ST (Stop)

772

??TRACE (Trace Table) 773 ....................................................

??UNWRAP (Unwrap Files)

774

??UR (Unit Reserved)

777

778

779

Contents

Section 2

Commands

Memory Dump Processing and

 

Memory

Dump

Commands

781

Memory

Dump

Processing

784

Appendix A

Functional Command Groupings

General Categories

791

Automatic Display Mode (ADM) and ODT Control Commands792

BNA Commands

794

 

795

 

Directory and Disk File Management Commands

796

Disk Pack Commands

...........................................................

798

Dump Commands

Installation and Licensing Commands

800

801

Job

Queue Commands

Log

802

Commands

803

Maintenance Commands

804

MCP Commands

806

Memory Management Commands

.....................................

808

Peripheral Commands

..........................................................

810

Printer Commands

Processor Management Commands

812

814

 

815

 

System Configuration Commands

.....................................

817

System Security Commands

818

Tape Commands

819

 

820

Appendix B

Using CANDE and WFL at an ODT

Entering CANDE Control Commands at an ODT

821

...........

823

Appendix C

Cold-Start Default Values

Default Options after a Cold-Start

825

Default Status of Units

833

Contents

Appendix D

Basic Constructs

Basic Constructs

............................................................

835

Appendix E

Understanding Railroad Diagrams

Understanding Railroad Diagrams 847 .....................................

Paths

............................................................................

848

Constants and Variables 849 ..................................................

Constraints 850 ....................................................................

 

Following the Paths of a Railroad Diagram

853

 

854

Index

859

Section 1

Commands

System Commands Overview

Purpose and Audience

This document is written for system operators. It describes the commands an operator uses to display system information, start a utility, get a printout, communicate with the CONTROLLER and the operating system, initialize the data communications subsystem, take dumps, and perform similar tasks.

This document provides complete descriptions of all system commands. It presents these commands in alphabetical order for convenient reference. The syntax and functions of each command are explained, along with suggestions for using the command most effectively.

To use this document, you should understand system concepts such as cataloging, queuing, file storage, file attributes, initialization of halt/load units, and library maintenance procedures.

Notation Conventions

The following elements are used in this document to explain the system commands.

Syntax Diagrams

A railroad diagram represents the syntax of each system command.

Unit and Mix Number Ranges

The number of units and mix numbers that can be specified in a single command is limited. If you specify too many numbers, the MCP generates the error TOO MANY NUMBERS. When you include unit and mix number ranges in a command (for example, RY PK 500 - 509), the range is expanded as if each individual usint or mix number was explicitly specified. If a command generates the error TOO MANY NUMBERS, reduce the size of any unit or mix number range.

Network Support Processors (NSPs)

The type of data comm device called the network support processor (NSP) has been deimplemented. However, the term NSP continues to be used in this manual to refer to a class of data comm devices, including enhanced data communications data link processors (EDCDLPs) and data communications host adapters (DCHAs).

Arithmetic operators

The following symbols are the standard arithmetic operators used in this document.

System Commands Overview

Arithmetic

Meaning

Operator

+

Addition

Subtraction

*

Multiplication

/

Division

**

Exponentiation

Sources for Entering System Commands

This manual describes all the available system commands. These are commands that you can use to perform general system operations. You can enter the system commands described in this manual through any of the following interfaces:

Operator display terminals (ODTs).

Operations Center. This utility provides a graphical interface to selected system commands. Refer to the Operations Center Help.

Menu-Assisted Resource Control (MARC). For further information, refer to the MARC Operations Guide.

The DCKEYIN function in a privileged Data Communications ALGOL (DCALGOL) program. For further information, refer to the DCALGOL Programming Reference Manual.

Using CANDE and WFL at an ODT

If you are using an ODT, you can enter system commands, CANDE commands, or Work Flow Language (WFL) statements. This manual is concerned primarily with system commands. However, refer to the following for information about using CANDE or WFL at an ODT:

CANDE Control Commands

Work Flow Language (WFL)

System Command Descriptions

Each of the system command descriptions in this manual includes the following four topics:

A brief description of the functions of the command.

A syntax diagram outlining the various options of the command.

System Commands Overview

An explanation of each option of the command.

Examples of various forms of the command and possible responses from the system. The system responses are indented to distinguish them from the commands.

Additional information, if any, that might affect the use of the command is given under the heading Considerations for Use.

The command descriptions are presented in alphabetical order according to the preferred mnemonic assigned to each command.

Learning Which Commands to Use

For an introduction to system operations, refer to the System Operations Guide.

Internationalization

For the convenience of sites where English is not the primary language, system messages and responses can be displayed in other languages. The response to the WM (What MCP) command includes a list of languages in which translations are available on your system.

Use of the TERM CONVENTION command has an impact upon the presentation format of decimal numeric values in responses to those ODT commands that provide numeric values. The setting of the TERM CONVENTION value provides different numeric separator characters. For example, use of the ASERIESNATIVE convention, which is the default setting, provides a comma (,) as the numeric separator, so the decimal number 1234567 is presented as 1,234,567.

The use of other TERM CONVENTION values such as BELGIUM, NORWAY, and SWITZERLAND, provide the numeric separator character normally used by the selected language or convention. Following are some examples.

TERM Convention

Numeric Separator

Example

BELGIUM

(.) Period

1.234.567

NORWAY

( ) Blank

1 234 567

SWITZERLAND

(') Prime

1'234'567

JORDAN

No Separator

1234567

ASERIESNATIVE

(,) Comma

1,234,567

System Commands Overview

The following system commands are affected by internationalization:

ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor)

ASDU (ASD Usage for specified mix numbers)

CU (Core usage)

DU (Disk usage)

O (Overlay)

OL (Display label and path information of a unit)

OT (Show Stack Cell- decimal values only)

PD (and PDRES single instance only)

SHOWOPEN (Show the open files of a disk family)

TI (Times - operations counts only)

For more information, refer to the MultiLingual System Administration, Operations, and Programming Guide and the TERM (Terminal) command.

A (Active Mix Entries)

A (Active Mix Entries)

The A (Active Mix Entries) command lists all or selected active jobs, tasks, database stacks, and freeze control libraries in the mix.

Syntax

A (Active Mix Entries) A (Active Mix Entries) The A (Active Mix Entries) command lists

<wild card>

A (Active Mix Entries) A (Active Mix Entries) The A (Active Mix Entries) command lists

<delim>

One of the following characters:

/

\

I

~

!

@

#

$

%

^

&

*

'

The first delimiter must be the same as the second delimiter.

<wild-card string>

A string of characters used to search for a task name. The string can include the following special characters.

Character

Description

Equal sign (=)

Matches any sequence of characters

Question mark (?)

Matches any single character

Tilde (~)

Matches any sequence of characters except a slash (/)

The wild-card string is automatically uppercased, except for characters enclosed in quotation marks, and the system stops processing the string when it encounters a space character.

A (Active Mix Entries)

You can include lowercase characters and space characters by prefixing the wild-card string with LIT and enclosing the wild-card string in delimiters.

For example, if you enter the following syntax, the system returns entries that contain the string "PACK":

A NAME =pack=

If you enter the following syntax, the system returns entries that contain the string "pack":

A NAME LIT ^=pack=^

Explanation

A

ACTIVE

Display all active jobs or tasks that have not been suppressed by the SUPPRESS (Suppress Display) command or automatically suppressed by the SUPPRESSED option of the MP (Mark Program) command. Display of jobs, freeze control libraries, and database task stacks is controlled by the value of the SUPPRESSACTIVE system option; for the purpose of this option, jobs include active jobs and tasks with no parent.

A ALL

AA

Display all active jobs or tasks, including any that were suppressed, either by the SUPPRESS (Suppress Display) command, the SUPPRESSED option of the MP (Mark Program) command, or by the setting of the SUPPRESSACTIVE system option.

A NAME <wild-card string>

Displays all active tasks with names that match the designated wild-card string, including any that were suppressed. You can use this option with other options such as A NAME <wild-card string> SORT CPU.

A MCSNAME = <MCS name> A MCS = <MCS name>

Display only active jobs or tasks that originated from the specified message control system (MCS).

A QUEUE

A Q

Display all active jobs or tasks initiated from any queue.

A QUEUE <queue number> A Q <queue number>

Display only active jobs or tasks initiated from the specified queue.

A CPU

A CPURATE

A (Active Mix Entries)

A SORT CPU A SORT CPURATE

Displays active jobs or tasks and their CPU processor time used (CPU) or their CPU processor rate (CPURATE). If the SORT option is used, the display is in the order of decreasing central processing unit (CPU) time used or decreasing CPU rate.

The CPURATE option causes the display of processor time used (CPU Time column) to be replaced with the recent processor rate as a percentage (CPU Rate column). This rate shows the ratio of processor time divided by a recent elapsed time interval. If the interval is 20 seconds (the default), the MCP computes the processor rates of each task every 20 seconds and displays the percentages in a CPU Rate column. For example, a task using 2 seconds of CPU time during the last 20 seconds would have a CPURATE of 10% if the default time interval is in effect. This option enables you to determine which tasks are currently using the most system processor resources.

Notes:

Use the SBP (System Balancing Parameters) command to specify the time interval for CPURATE calculations.

If the SORT option is used, the output is limited to the number of processes that can fit in approximately 10 pages of the display.

A USER <usercode>

Displays only active jobs or tasks running with the specified usercode.

Note: MCSs and tasking programs do not show up when filtered by usercodes.

Examples

Example 1

A

---Mix-Pri--CPU Time------------ 93 ACTIVE ENTRIES -----------------

12828

50

:00 Job FROMQUEUE3

5456

50

:00 Job J

  • 19149 :05 Lib *SYSTEM/NXSERVICES/SERVER

80

  • 19148 :03 Job *SYSTEM/CANDE

80

  • 19241 :00 *CANDE/STACK02

80

  • 19221 :00 COMS/DTP/MONITOR

50

  • 19218 :03 Lib *SYSTEM/COMS/PSH/TTP

80

  • 19217 :01 Lib COMS/PA/FACILITY

80

  • 19197 :00 *SYSTEM/MCPSERVER/COMSTP

50

E 5510

80

14:17

(NORM) *DCALGOL (NORM)OBJECT/SYMBOL/NED

* 5483

50

:05

(NORM) *DCALGOL (NORM)OBJECT/SYMBOL/XPD

Work Flow Language (WFL) jobs do not appear if they are waiting for a task to complete.

The heading line appears on the first page of the Active Entries display and before the active mix entries in automatic display mode (ADM). The number in the heading indicates the total number of active entries, including suppressed entries.

A (Active Mix Entries)

At the beginning of each entry line, an E indicates that a syntax error was discovered during compilation. An asterisk (*) indicates that the task is being displayed for the first time.

The Mix field shows the job or task mix number of the active entry. To determine the number of the job that started a task, refer to Y (Status Interrogate).

The Pri field shows the priority of the job or task.

The CPU Time field shows the accumulated central processor time for each displayed task. A maximum of 999 hours can be displayed. If the SORT CPU option is specified in the command, the display is sorted according to decreasing CPU time used. The job or task that has used the largest amount of CPU time is the first item displayed. If an entry is greater than 999, the field is set to the following value to indicate an overflow condition:

***:**:**

The next column contains the word Job if the task has no parent, Lib if the task is a library process, or DBS if the task is a database stack. Otherwise the column is blank.

The usercode of the originator appears before the job or task name. Some tasks and jobs can have two usercodes shown for the following reasons:

One usercode indicates the USERCODE attribute of the task or job.

The other usercode is part of the NAME attribute of the task or job. This usercode is one of the following:

The usercode that the code file is stored under (an external procedure).

The usercode that the parent of the task or job had when the system initiated the task or job (an internal procedure).

Compiler tasks display with the following format:

<task usercode> <compiler name> <code file name>

Tasks other than compiler tasks display with the following format:

<task usercode> <task name>

Throughout the Active Entries display, fields are wrapped around if they need extra space. The next line begins in the first column of the field. In the example, the name information for job number 7240 is continued on another line, beginning in the first column of that field. However, fields are not wrapped if TRUNCATE = TRUE or ADM.

Example 2

This example shows the command and response for a specific queue:

A QUEUE 5

A (Active Mix Entries)

--Mix-Pri--CPU Time--------- 8 ACTIVE ENTRIES QUE=5 -------------------

  • 6524 :00 Job (SPI) (SPI)RUNMONITOR

50

  • 6525 :00 LIB (SPI) (SPI)OBJECT/SPIMON/PROGRAM/TASKMASTER ON DISKB

50

  • 6533 (SPI) (SPI)OBJECT/SPIMON/PROGRAM/SYSTEMINFO ON DISKB

50

:02

  • 6528 (SPI) (SPI)OBJECT/SPIMON/PROGRAM/LOGEXTRACTOR ON DISKB

50

1:14

  • 6527 (SPI) (SPI)OBJECT/SPIMON/PROGRAM/UTILIZATION ON DISKB

50

:07

  • 6526 (SPI) (SPI)OBJECT/SPIMON/PROGRAM/FILESHIPPER ON DISKB

50

:00

  • 6459 (OPS) *OBJECT/AUTOLABEL

50

:01

Example 3

This example shows the command and response for the USER option when no usercode is specified. The command lists the programs running without a usercode.

A USER=""

---Mix--Pri--CPU Time------16 ACTIVE ENTRIES USER= ----------------

  • 5989 :07 Job *SYSTEM/CANDE3 ON CANDE

80

  • 6297 :01 *CANDE3/SERVANT01

80

  • 5993 :03 *CANDE3/STACK01

80

  • 5992 :04 *CANDE3/STACK02

80

  • 5991 :10 *CANDE3/STACK03

80

  • 6701 :05 Lib *SYSTEM/MSNET/SUPPORT

50

  • 6683 :00 Lib *SYSTEM/DTS/SUPPORT

50

  • 6702 :00 *DTS/PIPEHANDLER

50

  • 6644 :08 Lib *SYSTEM/MARC/COMMANDER

50

  • 6638 :56 Lib *SYSTEM/DTP/TM ON DISKB

50

  • 6624 :51 Lib *SYSTEM/DSSSUPPORT/DIAGNOSTICS

50

  • 3674 :00 STATUS/CHANGE/MP051

75

  • 3666 :00 STATUS/CHANGE/MP050

75

  • 3663 :00 STATUS/CHANGE/MP003

75

  • 3617 :00 STATUS/CHANGE/ECCSA

75

  • 3209 :18 ODT/HANDLER

50

A (Active Mix Entries)

Example 4

This example shows the command and response for the SORT CPURATE option:

A SORT CPURATE

---Mix--Pri--CPU Rate------18 ACTIVE ENTRIES (ALL) SORT CPURATE-----

  • 6647 *SYSTEM/MCPSERVER/COMSTP

50

2.21%

  • 6664 0.59% TCPIP/IP/7000/1

75

  • 3590 (SILVA) *SYSTEM/NXSERVICES/FILESERVER

80

0.14%

  • 6666 TCPIP/BUFFER/7000/1

75

0.12%

  • 6458 (SITE) (SITE)OBJECT/UCF/MONITOR

50

0.09%

  • 2823 (X) (SITE)OBJECT/UTIL/RUNPM ON PACK

55

0.09%

  • 6669 TCPIP/MSS/DATA/7000

75

0.08%

  • 6456 0.6% Job GRAPHDEBUG_LOGGER

80

  • 6614 CCF/LOGON/PORT_IN_HANDLER

52

0.5%

  • 6668 TCPIP/MSS/CONTROL/7000

75

0.3%

  • 6665 TCPIP/ARP/700/1

75

0.2%

  • 6451 0.1% Lib *SYSTEM/ASSISTANT

50

The CPU Rate column shows the recent processor rate (processor time divided by elapsed time) as a percentage of the total CPU usage over a recent time interval. The default interval is 20 seconds. For information about changing this interval, refer to the SBP (System Balancing Parameters) command.

ACCOUNTING (Resource Accounting)

ACCOUNTING (Resource Accounting)

The ACCOUNTING command sets and displays task and file resource use selections for the system, users, and tasks. If the system uses the Secure Access Control Module software, only security administrators can use this command. For more information about the ACCOUNTING command, refer to the Security Administration Guide.

Syntax

ACCOUNTING (Resource Accounting) ACCOUNTING (Resource Accounting) The ACCOUNTING command sets and displays task and file

Explanation

ACCOUNTING

Displays the current settings for the task and file resource use selections.

ACCOUNTING DEPENDENTTASK IDENTIFIED

Sets the default value for system resource accounting. This value enables the maximum accounting of resource utilization and provides a complete record of all task starts and terminations.

ACCOUNTING DEPENDENTTASK ANONYMOUS

Sets the minimum accounting of resource utilization and does not provide information about task starts and terminations or completed tasks.

ACCOUNTING DEPENDENTTASK UNSPECIFIED

Sets the default value for user and task resource accounting. This value permits accounting to be specified at the user and task level.

ACCOUNTING FILE IDENTIFIED

Sets the default value for file resource accounting. This value enables the maximum accounting of resource utilization and provides a complete record of all file openings and closings.

ACCOUNTING FILE ANONYMOUS

Sets the minimum amount of file resource accounting. No SUMLOG entries are made for file openings and closings.

ACCOUNTING FILE UNSPECIFIED

Sets the default value for user and task file resource accounting. This value permits accounting to be specified at the user and task level.

ACCOUNTING (Resource Accounting)

Examples

Example 1

This example sets the highest priority of system resource utilization accounting:

ACCOUNTING DEPENDENTTASK IDENTIFIED

Example 2

This example sets the minimum level of file resource accounting:

ACCOUNTING FILE ANONYMOUS

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

The ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) command enables an active group to acquire additional resources or to change the TEMPORARY status of already acquired units and controls. For example, you can use this command to dynamically acquire and free domains or to enable and disable requestors from memory.

Many of the forms of the ACQUIRE command cause a brief system pause.

A locking mechanism prevents multiple copies of programs from attempting to use the ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource), CLOSE (Close Pack), FREE (Free Resource), INITIALIZE (Initialize Disk) , LB (Relabel Pack or Host Control Unit), PG (Purge), RC (Reconfigure Disk), and UR (Unit Reserved) commands to access the same device simultaneously. If one of these operations is already in progress when another command is issued to the same device, the command is rejected and the following message is displayed:

PK <unit> <command entered> COMMAND REJECTED BECAUSE ANOTHER COMMAND IS USING THIS UNIT.

If the command is rejected, wait for the current command to complete and enter the command again.

Note: ACQUIRE is a synonym for UP. Use ACQUIRE on IOM systems. Use UP on IOP systems.

Syntax

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) The ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) command enables an active group

<unit specification>

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) The ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) command enables an active group

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

<CTL specification>

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource) <CTL specification> For other syntax elements, refer to Basic Constructs. Explanation ACQUIRE DOMAIN

For other syntax elements, refer to Basic Constructs.

Explanation

ACQUIRE DOMAIN <number> ACQUIRE SYSTEM <number>

Acquire the modules contained in the DOMAIN or SYSTEM. The concept of DOMAIN describes a group of hardware modules that share power, cooling, maintenance access, and partitioning logic.

To acquire a module, you must acquire the DOMAIN in which the module resides. When you acquire a DOMAIN, modules in that DOMAIN are acquired and possibly put into use, subject to the saved state of the individual module. When you acquire an individual module, other modules in the DOMAIN are acquired but marked as saved.

The DOMAIN number can be 0 or 1. DOMAIN and SYSTEM are synonyms.

ACQUIRE DOMAIN <number> :SAVE ACQUIRE SYSTEM <number> :SAVE

Acquire the specified domain and mark all the modules in the domain as saved.

ACQUIRE DOMAIN <number> :READY ACQUIRE SYSTEM <number> :READY

Acquire the specified domain and ready all the modules whether or not they are saved.

ACQUIRE DOMAIN <number> :POWERUP ACQUIRE SYSTEM <number> :POWERUP

Power up, initialize, and acquire the specified domain. These commands do not cause the system to ready any MSMs.

ACQUIRE MSM <number>

Acquires the domain containing the MSM. The MSM number can be either 0 or 1. The system marks the remaining modules as saved. The system also marks the remaining memory storage units (MSUs) in the MSM as saved; you must use the RY (Ready) command before the system can make them available.

ACQUIRE MSM <number> :READY ACQUIRE MSM <number> :READY :POWERUP

Acquire the domain containing the MSM. The MSM number can be either 0 or 1. The system readies the requestor and puts it into use.

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

ACQUIRE MSM <number> :SAVE ACQUIRE MSM <number> :SAVE :POWERUP

Acquire the domain containing the MSM. The MSM number can be either 0 or 1. The system marks the requestor as user-saved.

ACQUIRE CPM <CPM list> ACQUIRE IOM <number>

Acquire the domain that contains the specified CPM or IOM. The numbers specified to identify CPMs or IOMs can be integers in the range 0 through 11. On VM systems, the range of CPM numbers is 4 through 11. The system then readies the requestor if the saved state is NOT-IN-USE.

ACQUIRE CPM <CPM list> :READY ACQUIRE IOM <number> :READY

Acquire the domain that contains the specified CPM or IOM. The numbers specified to identify CPMs or IOMs can be integers in the range 0 through 11. On VM systems, the range of CPM numbers is 4 through 11. The system then readies the requestor and puts it into use.

ACQUIRE CPM <CPM list> :SAVE ACQUIRE IOM <number> :SAVE

Acquire the domain that contains the specified CPM or IOM. The CPM and IOM numbers must be integers in the range 0 through 11. On VM systems, the range of CPM numbers is 4 through 11. The system marks the requestor as user-saved.

ACQUIRE CPM <CPM list> :READY :POWERUP ACQUIRE IOM <number> :READY :POWERUP

Acquire, power up, and initialize the domain that contains the specified CPM or IOM. The system then readies the requestor and puts it into use.

The CPM and IOM numbers must be integers in the range 0 through 11. On VM systems, the range of CPM numbers is 4 through 11.

ACQUIRE CPM <CPM list> :SAVE :POWERUP ACQUIRE IOM <number> :SAVE :POWERUP

Acquire, power up, and initialize the domain that contains the specified CPM or IOM. The CPM and IOM numbers must be integers in the range 0 through 11. On VM systems, the range of CPM numbers is 4 through 11. The system marks the requestor as user-saved.

ACQUIRE <device type> <unit number list>

Acquires the unit or units identified by the device and unit number list. The system automatically readies the units unless you use the SAVE option.

ACQUIRE <device type> <unit number list> :SAVE ACQUIRE <device type> <unit number list> :SA

Acquire the units in the saved state—that is, the units are acquired and saved in one step.

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

ACQUIRE <device type> <unit number list> :TEMPORARY ACQUIRE <device type> <unit number list> :TEMP

Acquire the designated units until the next halt/load of the system. If group reconfiguration does not occur when the system is halt/loaded, each unit reverts to a logically unowned status as a freed device of its partition. In the case of intelligent peripheral interface (IPI) units, physical ownership is relinquished as long as a usable physical path remains to the subsystem.

ACQUIRE DLP <device number> OVERRIDE ACQUIRE DLP <device number> OVERRIDE :TEMPORARY

OVERRIDE specifies that the system is to take—or steal—the specified units from another system. Because the subsystem enforces ownership of intelligent peripheral interface (IPI) units, this action might be necessary to acquire such devices when the partition that owns the devices can not cooperate in physically freeing them.

Caution Be very careful when you use the :TEMP option with intelligent peripheral interface (IPI) units.

Caution

Be very careful when you use the :TEMP option with intelligent peripheral interface (IPI) units. Because the subsystem enforces ownership of these units, explicit FREE unit action is required to give up physical ownership. Such action does not always occur when a partition is halted. You might have to use the OVERRIDE option of the ACQUIRE system command to physically take over such temporary devices before the next halt/load of the system has been completed. If the LOADER reconfigures the group by using the RECONFIGURE GROUP operation before the next system initialization, subsystem ownership might not be relinquished for IPI units that are either logically free or no longer described in a new peripheral configuration diagram (PCD). Note that using the ??PHL, ??CM, ??HALT, or RECONFIGURE GROUP commands to halt/load the system causes physical ownership to be relinquished before halting.

ACQUIRE CTL <device number list>

Acquires the CTLs identified by the device numbers in the device number list and brings the CTLs online. This syntax can be used to permanently add to the running group CTLs that were previously acquired with the :TEMPORARY or :TEMP option.

This form of the command might also be a necessary step in recovering from certain CTL and PORT failures. You might need to perform the following steps to recover CTLs that are involved in such failures:

  • 1. Remedy the hardware problem causing the failure.

  • 2. Enter FREE CTL <device number>.

  • 3. Enter ACQUIRE CTL <device number>.

For example, a BCC-clear or a base power loss requires that you perform this procedure for each CTL in the affected base.

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

ACQUIRE CTL <device number list> :RESERVED

Acquires the CTLs specified by the device numbers in the device number list and leaves them in the reserved state. If you do not specify the RESERVED option, the system acquires the CTLs and makes them available for use.

ACQUIRE CTL <device number list> :TEMPORARY ACQUIRE CTL <device number list> :TEMP

Acquires the CTLs identified by the device numbers in the device number list until the next halt/load of the system. If group reconfiguration does not occur when the system is halt/loaded, the CTL reverts to a logically unowned status as a freed device of its partition. Physical ownership of DLP controls is relinquished as long as there is still a usable port path to the CTL.

ACQUIRE CTL <device number list> OVERRIDE ACQUIRE CTL <device number list> OVERRIDE :TEMPORARY

OVERRIDE specifies that the system is to take—or steal—a CTL from another partition. Use OVERRIDE only when the partition that owns the CTL cannot be made to cooperate in giving up physical ownership of the CTL. The rules for stealing a CTL currently apply only to DLP controls, and are as follows:

The CTL cannot already be owned by the stealing host.

The CTL must be owned by another host.

The base in which the CTL resides must be shared between the stealing host and the host that currently owns the CTL.

Specifying :TEMPORARY or :TEMP steals the CTL until the next halt/load of the system. If group reconfiguration does not occur when the system is halt/loaded, the CTL reverts to a logically unowned status as a freed device of its partition. Physical ownership of DLP controls is relinquished as long as there is a usable port path to the CTL.

ACQUIRE NETPORT <device number> LINEID <number>

Acquires the LINEID <number> that is associated with the internal networking port that is identified by the device number. The LINEID number is either 1 or 2, depending on the position of the Ethernet port on which the LINEID depends. This form of the command enables the Ethernet port to be used by networking protocols.

If the LINEID is designated as NEVER ACQUIRE in the Peripheral Configuration Description, the system responds with the following message:

UNABLE TO PERFORM

This message indicates that the system cannot acquire the LINEID.

For more information, refer to Understanding IEA-1 IOPs in "Considerations for Use."

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

Examples

Example 1

Before you acquire a unit, you can use the PER (Peripheral Status) command to display the current peripheral status and to determine if the unit is available to a group. In this example, the first PER display shows that magnetic tape (MT) units 82 and 83 are not available to a group. The operator then acquires MT 82.

PER MT =

------------------------ MT STATUS --------------------------------

81*P

[000048] 1600 #1 1:0 <07/16/1994> MEMORY/DUMP

82

NOT AVAILABLE TO GROUP

 

83

NOT AVAILABLE TO GROUP

ACQUIRE MT 82

MT82 WILL BE ACQUIRED

 

This PER display shows that unit 82 was acquired and automatically readied. The operator then acquires MT 83 in the saved state.

PER MT =

------------------------ MT STATUS --------------------------

81*P

[000048] 1600 #1 1:0 <07/16/2005> MEMORY/DUMP

82*P

[MIKE

] 1600

S

C R A

T

C H

83

NOT AVAILABLE TO GROUP

 

ACQUIRE MT 83:SAVE

MT 83 WILL BE ACQUIRED

This PER display shows that unit 83 was acquired but not readied:

PER MT

------------------------ MT STATUS -----------------------------

81*P

[000048] 1600 #1 1:0 <07/16/2005> MEMORY/DUMP

82*P

[MIKE

] 1600

S C

R A T

C H

83*P

SAVED

Example 2

This example acquires the designated control units:

ACQUIRE CTL 4001,4002,4003

CTL 4001 WILL BE ACQUIRED CTL 4002 WILL BE ACQUIRED CTL 4003 WILL BE ACQUIRED

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

Example 3

This example acquires a Telephony Services Platform (TSP) unit:

ACQUIRE TSP 200

TSP200 WILL BE ACQUIRED

TSP200 SUCCESSFULLY ACQUIRED

Considerations for Use

Releasing a Resource

To release a resource from an active group, refer to the FREE (Free Resource) command.

Ready and Saved States

Each module has either a ready or a saved state as described in the following table.

State

Description

Ready

Module is available to run or is currently running.

Saved—not in

Module is saved because there have been no requests for it.

use

If the domain containing the module is freed, the module is marked as ready.

Saved—user

Module was saved by an operator request and cannot be

saved

readied without another operator request.

You can use the ACQUIRE command only on a domain, or on a module within the domain, that has been freed. If the domain has already been acquired, you must use the RY (Ready) command.

The ACQUIRE command does not put additional MSUs into use unless you use the READY option. You must use the RY (Ready) command to acquire additional memory.

Acquiring Units with a Single Command

For units that can be referenced either by device, unit number, or CTL device number, you need to enter the ACQUIRE command only once. You can use the same number to reference an NSP either as a CTL or as a unit. For example, you can acquire NSP 108 by entering either ACQUIRE CTL 108 or ACQUIRE DC 108. It is not necessary to enter both.

You can acquire the following units by entering a single number:

NSPs, such as enhanced data communications data link processors (EDCDLPs) or data communications host adapters (DCHAs)

ACQUIRE (Acquire Resource)

HYPERchannel (HY) units

Host control (HC) units

Understanding IEA-1 IOPs

The IEA-1 IOP provides two Ethernet connections and supports one internal port for connectivity between distributed networking software such as TCPIPSUPPORT in the MCP environment and NNS implementation within the IOP.

The configuration on the IEA-1 consists of a single networking port and an Ethernet port for each physical connection served by the IOP.

The networking port is a device on the IOP that enables the I/O subsystem to access and manage the networking functions provided by this IOP. This port provides the connection between the networking software components. Its state controls whether host networking is active on the IOP. However, the state of the LINEID controls determines whether the physical connection served by the IOP can be used.

Each Ethernet port contains a LINEID control that enables networking use of the physical connection. That is, if the port is enabled and the dependent LINEID is acquired, networking can activate the connection group that is associated with this physical port.

Acquiring VC Units

To acquire a voice channel (VC) unit, enter the following command syntax:

ACQUIRE VC <unit number>

All 26 units outboard of a voice interface module (VIM) CTL also have the same number as their VIM CTL. However, unlike the NSP, acquiring the VIM CTL does not acquire the VC units. You must acquire all 26 VC units outboard of a VIM CTL by entering a single ACQUIRE VC <unit number> command, which is separate from the ACQUIRE CTL <unit number> command. For example, if you enter the command ACQUIRE VC 200, you acquire all 26 VC units. You must also enter the command ACQUIRE CTL 200 to acquire the VIM CTL.

Acquiring TSP Units

You must explicitly acquire each unit that makes up a Telephony Services Platform (TSP) through a separate ACQUIRE TSP <unit number list> command, or you must list each unit number separately in one ACQUIRE command as follows:

ACQUIRE TSP 200, 201, 202, 203

Acquiring a Disk Pack Associated with the Mirrored Disk Pooling Facility (MDPF)

When you acquire a disk pack that has been assigned to the free spares pool for a mirrored disk set, the system generates a status change message. When all the members of a mirrored set are brought online as in-use spares, the system generates a status change message for each member. The status change message is defined in the MCP System Interfaces Programming Reference Manual.

AD (Access Duplicate)

AD (Access Duplicate)

The AD (Access Duplicate) command duplicates the active access structure or removes a duplicate structure. If you are running cataloging, the name of the active access structure is SYSTEM/CATALOG/<family index>; otherwise, its name is SYSTEM/ACCESS/<family index>.

The system places the duplicate structure on the same family as the original catalog family, but the duplicate structure must be on a different member of the family. The name of the duplicate structure is like that of the original structure except that the family index is different.

By default, the system places the access structure on the halt/load family. You can change this location by using the DL CATALOG command.

While a duplicate directory is not required to be on the family member that is to receive the duplicate access structure, it is recommended that a duplicate directory be present. Such a practice provides for a reduced probability of losing the access structure. For additional information, refer to the DD (Directory Duplicate) command.

When you enter the AD command, if it is free of syntax errors, the system starts a visible independent runner named AD. Use the C (Completed Mix Entries) command to find out if the AD command has completed.

Syntax

AD (Access Duplicate) AD (Access Duplicate) The AD (Access Duplicate) command duplicates the active access

Explanation

AD (<family index>)

Creates a duplicate access structure on the catalog family member specified by <family index>.

AD – (<family index>)

Removes the duplicate access structure from the specified member of the catalog family.

AD – ON <family name> (<family index>)

Removes a previous and currently unused access structure on the pack specified by <family name> and <family index>.

Examples

Example 1

AD (2)

AD (Access Duplicate)

After you enter the command, the system starts a process called AD. You can check on the progress of the job by entering one of the following monitoring commands:

A (Active Mix Entries)

C (Completed Mix Entries)

S (Scheduled Mix Entries)

W (Waiting Mix Entries)

The following shows a typical display for the A command:

*608 80

:01 Job AD (002)

Example 2

AD - ON DISK (2)

7268 PK97 SYSTEM/ACCESS/002 REMOVED ON DISK

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

The ADM (Automatic Display Mode) command lets you start or stop automatic display of current system status information on the same ODT at which the ADM command is entered. ADM settings can be changed at any time from the ODT. Automatic display is useful for monitoring the status of scheduled and completed entries, jobs in the mix, libraries, database stacks, peripheral units such as line printers, queue settings, messages from the operating system, and other automatic display information.

Two different modes exist: event-driven automatic display mode (ADM) and time- driven ADM. With event-driven ADM, any new event for which an option has been specified is automatically reflected in the updated display. The default delay time for event-driven ADM is 10 seconds. Time-driven ADM updates its display at specified intervals.

Syntax

ADM (Automatic Display Mode) ADM (Automatic Display Mode) The ADM (Automatic Display Mode) command lets

<timed options>

ADM (Automatic Display Mode) ADM (Automatic Display Mode) The ADM (Automatic Display Mode) command lets

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

<mix display command>

ADM (Automatic Display Mode) <mix display command> <mix display option> <printlabel specs> Explanation ADM Displays the

<mix display option>

ADM (Automatic Display Mode) <mix display command> <mix display option> <printlabel specs> Explanation ADM Displays the

<printlabel specs>

ADM (Automatic Display Mode) <mix display command> <mix display option> <printlabel specs> Explanation ADM Displays the

Explanation

ADM

Displays the current ADM options under which the ODT is operating. If ADM is canceled, this command sets up ADM with the following default options:

ADM (A7, W3, S2, C5, MSG) DELAY 4.

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

ADM –

Cancels ADM. Any options set up for the ODT are discarded and the default setting is used for all subsequent initiations of the ADM command.

ADM ST

Stops ADM. ADM instructions are retained but are not executed.

ADM OK

ADM GO

Resume ADM. OK is used after ADM ST, and also to restart ADM after a program has opened a file that the system has assigned to that ODT and is still using it.

ADM (<timed options>)

If the first item following ADM is a left parenthesis, ADM unconditionally displays the described pages after the specified time interval. In the time-driven mode, each group of timed options enclosed in parentheses specifies one page of an ADM display. Each page is automatically updated and displayed after the interval specified by DELAY.

You can specify multiple pages of time-driven ADM by entering more than one group of timed options enclosed in parentheses. The display rotates from one page to the next.

Information for the MSG (Display Messages) option is restricted to a maximum of 42 lines of messages, regardless of the number of lines specified.

A list of the items that can be displayed as timed options follows. The syntax for each option except PS is the same as for its system command counterpart.

Option

Meaning

A

Active entries

ASD

ASD table usage information

C

Completed mix entries

CU

System memory usage entry (core usage)

DBS

Active database stacks

JOBS

Job structure

LIBRARIES

Frozen library stacks

LIBS

Synonymous with LIBRARIES

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

Option

Meaning

MESSAGES

Most recent messages from the system. If the NW option is

MESSAGES

specified, only networking messages are displayed. If the NW

NW

option is not specified, only non-networking messages are displayed.

Note: The setting of the CONTROLLER option SEPARATEMSGS at the time that the message is received determines whether the messages appear in the MSG or MSG NW list. Refer to the CO (CONTROLLER Options) command.

MIX

Mix entries by job structure (also includes RSVP and DISPLAY messages)

ML

Summary of all queues

MSG

Synonymous with MESSAGES

MX

Synonymous with MIX

O

System overlay utilization

PER

Peripheral entries (must be specified by device)

PS

Print System status (same as PS STATUS)

S

Scheduled entries

U

System utilization

W

Waiting entries

ADM + (<timed options>)

Adds the new ADM instruction to the current ADM specification, which must be a time-driven ADM.

<number>

The number in the timed options syntax diagram specifies the number of lines to allow for each item displayed. Two or more lines must be specified for each category because the heading occupies one line. Lines need not be specified for the last entry on a page; if lines are not specified, that entry fills the rest of the page. The system utilization information as well as information for O (Overlay), CU (Core Usage), ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor), ML (Mix Limit), and PS (Print System) is displayed in its entirety no matter what value has been specified for the number.

DELAY <number>

Specifies the number of seconds of delay before the next ADM page is to be displayed.

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

ADM EVENT

If the first syntactical item following ADM is the word EVENT, the system automatically updates the appropriate screen display when a change occurs in the status of one of the named displays. For example, if the command ADM EVENT W is entered, the waiting mix list page is displayed whenever the system stops a task requiring operator attention. No matter how frequently events occur, messages are displayed only at intervals of DELAY <number> seconds, or 10-second intervals if no DELAY is specified. EVENT options are as follows.

Option

Meaning

A

Active entries

C

Completed mix entries

DBS

Active database stacks

JOBS

Job structure

LIBRARIES

Frozen library stacks

LIBS

Synonymous with LIBRARIES

MESSAGES

Most recent messages from the system. If the NW option is

MESSAGES

specified, only networking messages are displayed. If the NW

NW

option is not specified, only non-networking messages are displayed.

Note: The setting of the CONTROLLER option SEPARATEMSGS at the time that the message is received determines whether the messages will appear in the MSG or MSG NW list. Refer to the CO (CONTROLLER Options) command.

MSG

Synonymous with MESSAGES

MIX

Mix entries by job structure (also includes RSVP and DISPLAY messages)

MX

Synonymous with MIX

PER

Peripheral entries (must be specified by device)

S

Scheduled entries

W

Waiting entries

ADM + EVENT

Adds the new ADM instruction to the current ADM specification, which must be for event-driven ADM.

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

<mix display option>

Specifies the entries that are eligible for inclusion in the ADM display. The possible options are as follows.

Option

Description

ALL

Displays all entries, including any that were suppressed

SORT CPU

Displays entries according to decreasing CPU time used

SORT CPURATE

or decreasing CPU processor rate

MCSNAME = <MCS name>

Displays only entries that originated from the specified message control system (MCS)

ADM EVENT PRINTLABEL

This form of the ADM command applies to ODTs that have a hard-copy output device attached. It produces tape labels in any desired format. The text can be printed directly on the gummed labels. The quoted string is a literal that identifies the various data items. The slash (/) causes a carriage return. The number following the named data items specifies the maximum size that can be used to contain the data. If the field width of an alpha type item is too short for the data, the rightmost characters are truncated. If the field width of a numeric item is too short for the data, the field is filled with asterisks (*). If the field width of a DATE type item is less than 11 characters, the last two digits of the year are used, as in 08/22/05. Otherwise, a four-digit date is used, as in 08/22/2005.

You can extend the formatting specification by using a plus sign (+) after word ADM. After this ADM type is set up, the state of the automatic display is marked as stopped. The proper forms can then be inserted before actual data is received. To test the formatting specification, enter PRINTLABEL to display a sample tape label that has all numeric items filled with Ns and all alphabetic items filled with As. Once the formatting is correct, enter ADM OK to activate the printing of tape labels each time a tape file is closed.

If nothing follows the word PRINTLABEL, the CONTROLLER sets default values. A site can change this default setting. The default setting is as follows:

PRINTLABEL "TITLE: "

"

TITLE 28/

"TASK:

TASKID 28/

"SERIAL: "

SERIALNO 10/

"CYCLE: "

CYCLE 4/

"UNIT: "

UNITNO 5/

"DENSITY: "

DENSITY 4/

DATE 14 TIME 8/ /////

ADM + EVENT PRINTLABEL

Adds the specified items to the PRINTLABEL formatting specifications and displays the new settings. The PRINTLABEL specifications are retained across halt/loads.

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

Examples

Example 1

This example shows the current ADM settings:

ADM

---Mix-Pri-CPU Time------- 5 ACTIVE ENTRIES ---------------------

E 7226 80

14:17

(NORM) *DCALGOL (NORM)OBJECT/SYMBOL/NED

  • 7259 6:03 Job *SYSTEM/CANDE ON PACK

80

  • 7262 1:07 *CANDE/STACK01

80

  • 7248 *SYSTEM/COMS ON PACK

80

15:08

  • 7253 MARC

50

14:12

---Mix-Pri---Elapsed----------- 1 WAITING ENTRY --------------------

* 5663

50

11:14

(ROBY) (ROBY)OBJECT/SYMBOL/GOODUTIL ON TOP

NO FILE OBJECT/SCREENDESIGN/USA ON TOP

---Mix-Pri---Elapsed------------- 1 SCHEDULED ENTRY ----------------

5655

50

7:22

(SMITH) *DCALGOL (SMITH)OBJECT/PATCH/X

---Job-Task-Time--Hist----------- COMPLETED ENTRIES ----------------

* 5653\5655 08:43 EOT

* 5653\5654 08:42 EOT 5637\5652 08:40 EOT

(DON) *OBJECT/SPO/II (DON) *OBJECT/NOSUM (GEORGE) (GEORGE)OBJECT/SD ON FIRE

5637\5651 08:40 O-DS (MACS) (GEORGE)OBJECT/TAB ON FIRE ---Mix--Time------------------- MESSAGES -----------------------------

* 5633 08:42 PK51 (KAY)CANDE/TEXT640 CHANGED TO (KAY)PORTFILE ON FIRE

  • 5633 08:41 PK51 (KAY)PORTFILE REMOVED ON FIRE

At the beginning of each entry line, E indicates that a syntax error was discovered during compilation. Each time the ODT screen is updated, new mix entries appear along with old ones. An asterisk (*) to the left of the mix number means that the job or task is being displayed on the ODT screen for the first time.

For further information about the various parts of the ADM display, use the references in the following table.

Type of Entry

Refer to

Active Entries

A (Active Mix Entries)

Completed Entries

C (Completed Mix Entries)

Messages

MSG (Display Messages)

Scheduled Entries

S (Scheduled Mix Entries)

Waiting Entries

W (Waiting Mix Entries)

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

Example 2

The ADM (J 10, MSG) 5 command causes the system to display pages with 10 job lines every 5 seconds. The rest of the page contains message lines.

Example 3

The SORT CPURATE option of the ACTIVE command causes the system to display the recent processor rates of running programs, in descending order of processor rate. The display has the following format:

ADM EVENT A SORT CPURATE

-Mix--Pri--CPU Rate------18 ACTIVE ENTRIES (ALL) SORT CPURATE-----

  • 6647 *SYSTEM/MCPSERVER/COMSTP

50

2.21%

  • 6664 0.59% TCPIP/IP/7000/1

75

  • 3590 (SILVA) *SYSTEM/NXSERVICES/FILESERVER

80

0.14%

  • 6666 0.12% TCPIP/BUFFER/7000/1

75

  • 6458 (SITE) (SITE)OBJECT/UCF/MONITOR

50

0.09%

  • 2823 (X) (SITE)OBJECT/UTIL/RUNPM ON PACK

55

0.09%

  • 6669 0.08% TCPIP/MSS/DATA/7000

75

  • 6456 0.6% Job GRAPHDEBUG_LOGGER

80

  • 6614 CCF/LOGON/PORT_IN_HANDLER

52

0.5%

  • 6668 TCPIP/MSS/CONTROL/7000

75

0.3%

  • 6665 TCPIP/ARP/700/1

75

0.2%

  • 6451 0.1% Lib *SYSTEM/ASSISTANT

50

The CPU Rate column shows the recent processor rate (processor time divided by elapsed time) as a percentage of the total CPU usage over a recent time interval. The default interval is 20 seconds. This interval can be changed by using the SBP (System Balancing Parameters) command.

Considerations for Use

System Overhead

The ADM command provides a useful periodic updating of system information for operators. However, excessive use of ADM can result in visibly larger operating system overhead, as reported, for instance, by the U (Utilization) system command. Larger time interval values, fewer ADM specifications, and fewer ODTs using the ADM command can reduce this overhead.

System Limit

The overall system limit is 120 ADM options for all ODTs combined. Each timed option requested counts as a rule. If an ADM request is made that would bring the total options specified to more than 120, one of the following error messages is displayed:

ADM STORAGE EXCEEDED.

ADM CANCELED DUE TO INSUFFICIENT STORAGE.

ADM (Automatic Display Mode)

These error messages can also be displayed during system initialization, when ADM is initially set up on the ODTs. If either of these error messages occurs during normal system operation, reduce the number of options in use at the other ODTs.

AI (Automatic Initiation)

AI (Automatic Initiation)

The AI (Automatic Initiation) command can be used to specify a list of programs that are automatically initiated when the system is initialized.

The specified programs must not take any run-time parameters. No warnings are issued if such a program is specified in an AI command. An exception to this rule is that a program can have a single parameter that is a one-dimensional unbounded array, in which case the program receives a one word array containing nulls (that is,

4"000000000000").

A waiting entry with a “NO FILE“ RSVP message results if a program specified by an AI command is not present at the time of a halt/load.

Note: The AI command is intended as a replacement for the CS (Change Supervisor) command, which will be deimplemented in a future release.

Syntax

AI (Automatic Initiation) AI (Automatic Initiation) The AI (Automatic Initiation) command can be used to specify

<AI name>

AI (Automatic Initiation) AI (Automatic Initiation) The AI (Automatic Initiation) command can be used to specify

An AI name is an identifier.

Explanation

AI

Displays the list of programs previously specified by AI commands.

AI <AI name> = <file title>

Updates the name of the code file for an existing entry identified by the AI name.

AI + <AI name> = <file title>

Adds an entry for the code file identified by the AI name.

AI <AI name>

Displays the entry identified by the AI name.

AI - <AI name>

Deletes an entry identified by the AI name.

AI (Automatic Initiation)

AI + <file title>

Adds a new entry for the specified code file.

Note: This form of the command will be deimplemented in a future software release.

AI - <file title>

Deletes the entry for the specified code file.

Note: This form of the command will be deimplemented in a future software release.

Example

AI

AI HARDCOPY

= *SYSTEM/HARDCOPY

AI SUPER

= *SYSTEM/SUPERVISOR

ARCCOPY (Copy Archive Directory)

ARCCOPY (Copy Archive Directory)

The ARCCOPY command creates an offline copy of an archive directory for a family. You can then use this copy to make a backup for the archive directory in case the directory ever becomes corrupted. Use the ARCREPLACE command to restore the backup directory. When you enter the ARCCOPY command, if it is free of syntax errors, the system starts a visible independent runner named ARCCOPY. Use the C (Completed Mix Entries) command to find out if the ARCCOPY command has completed.

Syntax

ARCCOPY (Copy Archive Directory) ARCCOPY (Copy Archive Directory) The ARCCOPY command creates an offline copy of

Explanation

ARCCOPY <family name> <file title>

The family name indicates the name of the family whose directory is to be copied. The file title specifies the new name for the backup archive directory when it is copied. If the specified file title already exists, the system replaces it. Unless you use the syntax ON <family name>, the system automatically copies the archive directory to DISK.

ARCCOPY <family name> <file title> (<family index>)

The family index specifies the member of the family to which the archive directory is to be copied.

Example

The following example copies the archive directory for family PACK and uses the new name BACKUPARCHIVE/PACK. The system copies the directory to family member 1 of the family named WORKPACK.

ARCCOPY PACK BACKUPARCHIVE/PACK ON WORKPACK (1)

AR (Archive Release)

AR (Archive Release)

The AR (Archive Release) command supports the catalog subsystem, not the archive (backup and restore) subsystem. It starts the MCP independent runner called ARCHIVEHANDLER, which releases an old archive log and creates a new one. The system stores the archive log on the CATALOG family. When the archive log is full (it holds about 60,000 records), the operating system automatically releases it. When it is released, an archive log is crunched and marked as a nonsystem file.

To use this command, the cataloging and archiving options must be set. Refer to CATALOGING (Option 23) and ARCHIVING (Option 28) in the OP (Options) command.

AR (Archive Release) AR (Archive Release) The AR (Archive Release) command supports the catalog subsystem,

Explanation

AR

If no file title is specified, the online archive log is released and a new one created.

AR <file title>

If a file title is specified and that file is an archive log, the file is released so that it can be removed. (Archive logs are system files.) This feature is useful when a change of the halt/load family causes an archive log to remain on disk as a nonremovable system file.

Example

AR

MSG

--Mix--Time------------------- MESSAGES -------------------- *4080 16:26 A NEW ARCHIVELOG HAS BEEN CREATED 4080 16:25 THE ARCHIVELOG WAS RELEASED

ARCDUPLICATE (Duplicate Archive Directory)

ARCDUPLICATE (Duplicate Archive Directory)

The ARCDUPLICATE command creates or deletes a duplicate copy of an active archive directory for a disk family.

When you enter the ARCDUPLICATE command, if it is free of syntax errors, the system starts a visible independent runner named ARCDUPLICATE. Use the C (Completed Mix Entries) command to find out if the ARCDUPLICATE command has completed.

Syntax

ARCDUPLICATE (Duplicate Archive Directory) ARCDUPLICATE (Duplicate Archive Directory) The ARCDUPLICATE command creates or deletes a duplicate

Explanation

<family name>

Specifies the disk family for which the archive directory is created or deleted.

ARCDUPLICATE ON <family name> (<family index>)

Creates a duplicate archive directory for the specified catalog family on the family member specified in the value for <family index>. An archive directory for the catalog family should not be active when this command is entered.

ARCDUPLICATE - ON <family name> (<family index>)

Removes the duplicate archive directory for the specified catalog family from the family member specified in the value for <family index>.

Examples

Example 1

This example creates a duplicate archive directory for the family named WORKPACK on family member 2:

ARCDUPLICATE ON WORKPACK (2)

Example 2

This example deletes the duplicate archive directory for the family named WORKPACK on family member 2:

ARCDUPLICATE - ON WORKPACK (2)

ARCREPLACE (Replace Archive Directory)

ARCREPLACE (Replace Archive Directory)

The ARCREPLACE command replaces an archive directory with a backup archive directory that was previously saved. You can use this command when a disk family is recovered or moved by first creating a new family with the same name, then copying files to that new family. In this case, after the original disk family is closed, this command is used to instruct the MCP to associate the original disk family archive directory with the new disk family.

When you enter the ARCREPLACE command, the system starts a visible independent runner named ARCREPLACE. Use the C (Completed Mix Entries) command to find out if the ARCREPLACE command has completed.

Syntax

ARCREPLACE (Replace Archive Directory) ARCREPLACE (Replace Archive Directory) The ARCREPLACE command replaces an archive directory

Explanation

ARCREPLACE <family name> <file name> ON <catalog family>

The family name indicates the name of the family whose archive directory is to be replaced. If no catalog family is specified after the file name, the ARCREPLACE program assumes that the file in on the DISK family. The file name with the catalog family name indicates the name of the backup archive directory. This file must already reside on the catalog family and must be a valid copy of the archive directory. For more information about the catalog family, refer to the CATALOG option of the DL (Disk Location) command.

The backup archive directory cannot be in use when the ARCREPLACE command is executed. After the archive directory has been replaced, the former backup directory is renamed SYSTEM/ARCHIVE/<family name>/nnn and the old archive directory is renamed OLD/ARCHIVE/<family name>/nnn.

Examples

Example 1

Example 1 obtains the name of the family name of the catalog:

DL CATALOG

DISK LOCATION:

CATALOG

ON DMSIITEST

Example 2

Example 2 closes the archive directory for the family named PACK and replaces that directory with the file BACKUPARCHIVE/PACK. The file BACKUPARCHIVE/PACK is then renamed SYSTEM/ARCHIVE/PACK/nnn.

ARCREPLACE PACK BACKUPARCHIVE/PACK ON DMSIITEST

ARCREPLACE (Replace Archive Directory)

Example 3

Example 3 changes the pack name of a disk from WORK to XPACK, retains all the files on the family, and changes the name of the archive directory for the family to match the new name of the family.

LB PK92 NAME=XPACK OLDNAME=WORK ARCREPLACE XPACK SYSTEM/ARCHIVE/WORK/001 ON CATPACK REMOVE OLD/ARCHIVE/XPACK/001 FROM CATPACK

ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor)

ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor)

The ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor) command displays information about the ASD table and how it is being used, and (if previously specified) the amount of memory to be used to calculate the size of the ASD table. You can also use this command to change the parameters used to calculate the target size of the ASD table for any future halt/loads.

Syntax

ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor) ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor) The ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor) command displays

Explanation

ASD

Displays the following information about the ASD table:

The factor and memory size used to calculate the size of the ASD table at the last halt/load.

The factor and memory size to be used to calculate the size of the ASD table at the next halt/load only if the factor was changed from its previous value by an ASD command.

The number of ASDs in the ASD table.

The percentage of available ASDs currently in use.

The maximum percentage of ASDs actually used at one time since the last halt/load.

The ASD table entry size, which is the number of words used for each ASD entry.

ASD <factor>

Specifies the factor to be used to calculate the size of the ASD table at the next and all subsequent halt/loads. The factor is an integer value that is the estimated average size (in words) of each memory segment having an allocated ASD. The ASD table size is inversely proportional to the value of factor. The table size, in units of ASDs, is calculated according to the following equation:

ASD table size = (total memory/<factor>)

The total memory is the total physical memory (in words) available online to the system.

ASD <factor> <memory size> MEGAWORDS

Specifies the factor and the amount of memory used to calculate the size of the ASD table at the next and all subsequent halt/loads. The memory size value is an integer that specifies the number of megawords that are to be available for the calculation

ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor)

after the next and all subsequent halt/loads. If you did not specify this value (or if you entered only ASD <factor>), the system uses the available system memory at the time of the halt/load, which excludes memory reserved for memory disk or disk cache.

You can use the memory size feature on systems where memory can be added or removed dynamically without having to perform a halt/load. The feature enables you to specify in advance that the memory configuration for the system might change and that the ASD table is to be allocated for a specific amount of memory. You should specify the maximum expected amount of system memory to avoid running out of ASDs on the system. Note that you must still perform a halt/load to change the size of the ASD table.

The system uses a maximum of 25 percent of its memory for the ASD table. If you specify a memory size that would cause the system to allocate more than the maximum that is allowed, the system still uses only 25 percent of its memory after the halt/load.

If you use a specified memory size to calculate the size of the ASD table, the system displays that value as part of the ASD display, as shown in example 3. If the system is to use a memory size following a halt/load, it also displays that value, as shown in examples 2 and 4.

Examples

Example 1

ASD

---------------------- ACTUAL SEGMENT DESCRIPTORS ----------

CURRENT FACTOR

: 40 WORDS/ASD

TOTAL ASDS

: 419,439

CURRENTLY IN-USE

: 67 %

MAXIMUM IN-USE

: 78 %

ASDTABLE ENTRY SIZE: 4 WORDS/ASD

 

Example 2

ASD 60

---------------------- ACTUAL SEGMENT DESCRIPTORS ----------

CURRENT FACTOR

: 40 WORDS/ASD

NEW FACTOR

: 60 WORDS/ASD (EFFECTIVE NEXT H/L)

TOTAL ASDS

: 419,439

CURRENTLY IN-USE

: 67 %

MAXIMUM IN-USE

: 78 %

ASDTABLE ENTRY SIZE: 4 WORDS/ASD

 

Example 3

ASD

----------------------- ACTUAL SEGMENT DESCRIPTORS ------------

CURRENT FACTOR

: 60 WORDS/ASD

BASED ON MEMORY OF : 29,360,128 WORDS

ASD (Actual Segment Descriptor)

TOTAL ASDS

: 489,334

CURRENTLY IN-USE

: 68 %

MAXIMUM IN-USE

: 76 %

ASDTABLE ENTRY SIZE: 4 WORDS/ASD

Example 4

ASD 50 28 MEGAWORDS

----------------------- ACTUAL SEGMENT DESCRIPTORS -----------

CURRENT FACTOR

: 60 WORDS/ASD

NEW FACTOR

: 50 WORDS/ASD BASED ON MEMORY OF:

TOTAL ASDS

29,360,128 WORDS (EFFECTIVE NEXT H/L) : 489,334

CURRENTLY IN-USE

: 71 %

MAXIMUM IN-USE

: 82 %

ASDTABLE ENTRY SIZE: 4 WORDS/ASD

Considerations for Use

For best results, the number of ASDs on a system should be slightly more than the expected (or previously used) maximum number of ASDs in use. The system automatically begins taking action to curb ASD usage when utilization reaches 95 percent. The ASD table size should be set after careful analysis of the site requirements. If the factor is set too high, the system might run out of ASDs, resulting in possible system failure. If the factor is set too low, use of system memory is not optimized.

The minimum, maximum, and default factor values are proportional to the ASD entry size to maintain a range from 2 to 25 percent of memory used for the ASD table, with a default value of 8 percent. For an entry size of 4 words, the minimum, maximum, and default factor values are 16, 200, and 50, respectively. For an ASD entry size of 8 words, the minimum, maximum, and default factor values are 32, 400, and 100, respectively.

If an ASD command specifies a factor that produces an ASD table size outside the range, the previous factor value is unchanged and an error message appears.

The memory size option is used to specify a change in the system memory configuration in advance. Systems that can dynamically change memory allocation should use this option. The maximum amount of memory that can be allocated to the ASD table is 25 percent of the actual system memory. System memory does not include memory reserved for memory disk or disk cache. If the calculated ASD table size based on the factor and memory size parameters is greater than 25 percent of the system memory, only the maximum (25 percent) is used.

Any ASD calculations performed by the MCP do not include the system memory that is dedicated to memory disk and to the Host Memory Cache.

ASDU (ASD Usage)

ASDU (ASD Usage)

The ASDU (ASD Usage) command indicates, for a given job or task, the number of actual segment descriptors (ASDs) currently in use and the maximum number of ASDs used by the job or task since it began.

Syntax

ASDU (ASD Usage) ASDU (ASD Usage) The ASDU (ASD Usage) command indicates, for a given job

Explanation

For every job or task in the specified mix number list, the <mix number list> ASDU command displays the number of ASDs currently in use and the maximum number of ASDs used since the job or task began.

Example

0007, 1234, 5449 ASDU

ASD USAGE BY TASK

  • 0007 ASD USAGE:

CURRENTLY IN-USE:

69 ASDS

MAXIMUM IN-USE:

90 ASDS

  • 1234 ASD USAGE:

CURRENTLY IN-USE:

80 ASDS

MAXIMUM IN-USE:

169 ASDS

  • 5449 ASD USAGE:

CURRENTLY IN-USE:

5,522 ASDS

MAXIMUM IN-USE:

7,079 ASDS

AT (At Remote Host)

AT (At Remote Host)

The AT (At Remote Host) command directs a system command to another host in the network. Any response to the command appears at the ODT at which the command was entered.

Syntax

AT (At Remote Host) AT (At Remote Host) The AT (At Remote Host) command directs

Explanation

The software determines which service to use for the AT command according to the following order:

  • 1. The command specifies the service.

Either the HOSTSERVICES (or HS) option or the FTAM option is specified as the service option in the command.

  • 2. The type of command indicates the service.

Either a remote system command, which is supported by Host Services, or a File Transfer, Access, and Management (FTAM) command is included in the AT command. The software determines the type of command that was entered and routes the command to the appropriate host using that service.

  • 3. Default selection.

The software determines the service most likely able to support the command and then automatically routes the command to that service.

If HOSTSERVICES or FTAM is specified in the AT command but the service is not available, then the entire AT command is rejected.

When HOSTSERVICES (or HS) is specified, the content of the remote system command is not checked for syntax at the local host, but is transferred to the remote host. The command syntax must conform to the operator command language of the remote host and must not violate any security or access control restrictions that are in effect at that host.

The syntax for FTAM commands is checked at the local host. If there is an error, the command is not accepted and can be tried again.

The local host name can be used in an AT command only if the remote system command is NW (Network Prefix) and if the BNAVERSION is BNAV2.

AT (At Remote Host): Use with Host Services

If the local host name is used in an AT command without these remote commands, an error is displayed. You should resubmit the command without the AT <hostname> prefix.

The remote host response to the AT command is restricted to a maximum of 255 lines. The remaining output is truncated without any warning.

Examples

Example 1

AT BLUE W

***********REPLY FROM BLUE****************

-Job-Task-Pri---Elapsed---- 1 WAITING ENTRY ---------------------

1566/1568 50

1:10 *SYSTEM/DUMPANALYZER ON HLDISK

NO FILE MEMORY DUMP (MT) #1

Example 2

AT BLUE J

***********REPLY FROM BLUE*****************

-Mix-Pri----------------- JOB ENTRIES -----------------------------

  • 1566 JOB BEGIN JOB;RUN *SY

50

  • 1568 *SYSTEM/DUMPANALYZER ON HLDISK

50

Example 3

AT BLUE 1568 FA TITLE=(USER)A ON DISK

**********REPLY FROM BLUE*****************

NO RESPONSE GENERATED

AT (At Remote Host): Use with Host Services

Host Services permits access to systems that are part of either a BNA or an OSI network.

The response from the remote host uses the language and conventions defined by the LANGUAGE and CONVENTION system options of the remote host. For more information about the LANGUAGE and CONVENTION attributes, refer to the SYSOPS (System Options) command and to the MultiLingual System Administration, Operations, and Programming Guide.

With each system command sent to another host, HOSTSERVICES provides a usercode that the host can use to satisfy its security or access control restrictions. If the command is entered at an ODT to which a terminal usercode was assigned (refer to TERM (Terminal)), that usercode is used. If the command is entered through the DCKEYIN interface, the usercode of the program is used. Otherwise, the host

AT (At Remote Host): Use with Host Services

usercode is used. If there is no terminal usercode or host usercode, an error occurs and the AT command cannot be used. Refer to the HU (Host Usercode) command.

When a system receives a system command from a remote host, it determines whether the command came from a usercode defined as a SYSTEMUSER. A remote user whose usercode is marked with the SYSTEMUSER attribute has the same ODT capabilities as the ODT operator on the local system.

Any remote user can enter Work Flow Language (WFL) jobs. When the system command containing the job is received, the local alias usercode of the usercode used to transfer the job is examined. If the local alias usercode is marked as a SYSTEMUSER, the job runs without a usercode; otherwise, it runs under the local alias usercode. If the job contains a usercode, it runs under that usercode.

A remote user who is not a SYSTEMUSER can use the following system commands to monitor jobs and tasks running under that usercode.

Command

Meaning

AX

Accept

BADFILE

Bad File

C

Completed Mix Entries

CU

Core Usage

DBS

Database Stack Entries

DS

Discontinue

DUMP

Dump Memory

FA

File Attribute

FR

Final Reel

HI

Cause EXCEPTIONEVENT

J

Job and Task Display

LIBS

Library Task Entries

MSG

Display Messages

MX

Mix Entries

NF

No File

OF

Optional File

OK

Reactivate

AT (At Remote Host): Use with Host Services

Command

Meaning

OT

Inspect Stack Cell

RM

Remove

SQ

Show Queue

ST

Stop

THAW

Thaw Frozen Library

TI