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Sentence (Structure) Recognition Practice

A clause is a group of related words that has a subject and a verb. There are two types
of clauses:

Independent (Main) Clause - a group of related words that has a subject and a verb and
makes sense by itself. (Sound like a sentence? It is!)
Dependent (Subordinate) Clause - A group of related words that has a subject and a
verb, but does not make sense by itself because it needs the independent clause to
make sense.
Example...

As John drove around the block, Mary went into the store.

Independent Clause - Mary went into the store


Dependent Clause - As John drove around the block

There are four types of sentences according to structure:

Simple: Made up of one independent clause and the subject or verb or other parts may
be compound (more than 2).
Compound: Made up of two or more independent clauses joined by a coordinating
conjunction (and, or, nor, but, yet and sometimes, for).
Complex: Made up of one independent and one or more dependent clauses. These
clauses are joined by either a relative pronoun or a subordinating conjunction.
Compound-Complex: Made up of two or more independent clauses and one or more
dependent clauses.

Exercise Directions: In this exercise, look at the clauses within the sentence and write
down whether the sentence is: simple; compound; complex; or compound-complex.
Remember...the length of the sentence does not necessarily determine type. It is the
types of clauses in the sentence that matter.

1. A girl with brown eyes entered the room.

2. Angel and Rose entered the room just as the bell rang.

3. School starts on August 25th and I will be entering the 8th grade.

4. When I purchased my new gym clothes, I gave away my old ones.

5. Since there are so many students in my grade, English 8 will be held for Group A on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday one week, and the next week, Group A will have it on
Tuesday and Thursday.

6. Scott wrote his letter and sent it to his cousin.

7. Jim, who is in my grade, will have gym on Fridays.


8. John ran to the store and he bought five lottery tickets.

9. Flowers make beautiful gifts if they are bought from a florist.

10. When Stacy came, she walked into my bedroom and she placed the present on my
bed.

Sentence (Structure) Recognition Practice - Answers

Behind the answers are the clauses in the sentences that make the sentence that type
of sentence, so that you can see why the answer is correct.

1. Simple - one independent clause - A girl with brown eyes entered the room.

2. Complex - one independent clause - Angel and Rose entered the room. One
dependent clause - just as the bell rang.

3. Compound - two independent clauses -

School starts on August 25th


I will be entering the 8th grade.

4. Complex - one independent clause - I gave away my old ones. One dependent
clause - When I purchased my new gym clothes.

5. Compound-Complex - two independent clauses -

English 8 will be held for Group ! on Monday, Wednesday and Friday one week.
the next week, Group A will have it on Tuesday and Thursday.
Also, one dependent clause - Since there are so many students in my grade.

6. Simple (with compound verb) - one independent clause: Scott wrote his letter and
sent it to his cousin.

7. Complex - one independent clause - Jim will have gym on Fridays. One dependent
clause - who is in my grade.

8. Compound - two independent clauses -

John ran to the store


he bought five lottery tickets

9. Complex - one independent clause - Flowers make beautiful gifts. One dependent
clause: if they are bought from a florist.
10. Compound-Complex - two independent clauses -

she walked into my bedroom


she placed the present on my bed
Also, one dependent clause - when Stacy came