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FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

MEC 435: COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN

PROPOSAL FOR DESIGNING A CAR SUSPENSION SYSTEM

PREPARED BY:

1. Andi Muhammad Basri Bin Pojojongi 2016238614


2. Ferdynand Collin Anak Julian 2016238458
3. Muhammad Hafidz Bin Amran 2016238804
4. Muhammad Rizwani Bin Gani @ Ghani 2016229986
5.

PREPARED FOR:
1.0 INTRODUCTION

A disc brake is a type of brake that uses calipers to squeeze pairs of pads against
a disc in order to create friction that retards the rotation of a shaft, such as a vehicle axle,
either to reduce its rotational speed or to hold it stationary.

A disc brake is a type of brake that uses calipers to squeeze pairs of pads against
a disc in order to create friction that retards the rotation of a shaft, such as a vehicle axle,
either to reduce its rotational speed or to hold it stationary. The energy of motion is converted
into waste heat which must be dispersed. Hydraulic disc brakes are the most commonly used
form of brake for motor vehicles but the principles of a disc brake are applicable to almost
any rotating shaft.

Compared to drum brakes, disc brakes offer better stopping performance because the
disc is more readily cooled. As a consequence discs are less prone to the brake fade caused
when brake components overheat. Disc brakes also recover more quickly from immersion
(wet brakes are less effective than dry ones).

Most drum brake designs have at least one leading shoe, which gives a servo-effect.
By contrast, a disc brake has no self-servo effect and its braking force is always proportional
to the pressure placed on the brake pad by the braking system via any brake servo, braking
pedal, or lever. This tends to give the driver better "feel" and helps to avoid impending
lockup. Drums are also prone to "bell mouthing" and trap worn lining material within the
assembly, both causes of various braking problems.

The brake disc (or rotor in American English) is usually made of cast iron, but may in
some cases be made of composites such as reinforced carboncarbon or ceramic matrix
composites. This is connected to the wheel and/or the axle. To retard the wheel, friction
material in the form of brake pads, mounted on the brake calipers, is forced
mechanically, hydraulically, pneumatically, or electromagnetically against both sides of the
disc. Friction causes the disc and attached wheel to slow or stop.
2.0 REASONS OF CHOOSING DISC BRAKE

In this study, we choose disc brake to study on trigger of disc brake squeal generation.
It is well known that disc brake squeal is often caused by high friction coefficient pad
materials. Disc brake squeal is caused by dynamic unstable system under small disturbance of
friction force variation. Today, disc brake squeal comes to be simulated by FEA, but it is very
difficult to put so many dynamic unstable solutions into stable solutions.

For automotive use, disc brake discs are commonly manufactured out of a material
called grey iron. The SAE maintains a specification for the manufacture of grey iron for
various applications. For normal car and light-truck applications, SAE specification J431
G3000 (superseded to G10) dictates the correct range of hardness, chemical composition,
tensile strength, and other properties necessary for the intended use. Some racing cars and
airplanes use brakes with carbon fiber discs and carbon fiber pads to reduce weight. Wear
rates tend to be high, and braking may be poor or grabby until the brake is hot.

In racing and very-high-performance road cars, other disc materials have been
employed. Reinforced carbon discs and pads inspired by aircraft braking systems such as
those used on Concorde were introduced in Formula One by Brabham in conjunction
with Dunlop in 1976. Carboncarbon braking is now used in most top-level motorsport
worldwide, reducing unspring weight, giving better frictional performance and improved
structural properties at high temperatures, compared to cast iron. Carbon brakes have
occasionally been applied to road cars, by the French Venturi sports car manufacturer in the
mid of 1990s for example, but need to reach a very high operating temperature before
becoming truly effective and so are not well suited to road use. The extreme heat generated in
these systems is easily visible during night racing, especially at shorter tracks. It is not
uncommon to be able to look at the car, either live in person or on television and see the
brake discs glowing red during application.
3.0 PRODUCT CHOSEN

List Of Component:

No. Parts

1 Disc Brake or Rotor

2 Caliper Pin

3 Caliper

4 Brake pad

5 Wheel Stud

6 Dust Cap

7 Bleed Valve

8 Sleeve

9 Splitter

10 Pump

11 Calipers Piston

12 Hydraulic Oil Reservoir

13 Filter
Existing product:
4.0 IMPROVEMENT OF DESIGN

Increase Disc Radius

Larger discs will allow for more brake torque as the brake pad will apply pressure at a
larger radius, allowing for a higher moment. Brake torque is equal to the force applied by the
pad multiplied by the distance at which the force is applied from the center of the wheel. In
this case, were increasing the distance from the centre. This is a good thing.

Increase Caliper Piston Area

Increasing the size of the pistons (or number of pistons) means you have more area
applying a specific pressure. If pressure remains constant and the area increases, the force
applied will increase.
5.0 IMPROVED PRODUCT SKETCHING
6.0 Conclusion

For the conclusion of this project, disc brake is one the most important system in
automobile industry. Disc brakes are the most common brake systems used in vehicles today.
Typically located on the front wheels, they are comprised of brake pads, a brake calipers, and
a brake rotor. They function in the same way as brakes on a bike with brake pads on either
side of the wheel that tighten when pressure is applied. Instead of housing the major
components within a metal drum, disc brakes use a slim rotor and small caliper to halt wheel
movement. Within the caliper are two brake pads, one on each side of the rotor, that clamp
together when the brake pedal is pressed. All the systems of disc brake was successfully
understood and some of the improvements that can be applied on disc brake has been
discovered.
8.0 GANTT CHART

TIME FRAME
NO ACTIVITE STAGE MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
PLAN
1 ASSIGN TEAM
ACTUAL
CHOOSE PLAN
2
PRODUCT ACTUAL
SKETCH AND PLAN
3
DESIGN ACTUAL
PLAN
4 PROPOSAL
ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
5
TANK ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
6
CAP ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
7
FILTER ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
8 FRONT
ACTUAL
HOUSING
DESIGNING PLAN
9 BACK
ACTUAL
HOUSING
DESIGNING PLAN
10
PUSH ROD ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
11
DIAPHRAGM ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
12
SPRING ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
13
CASE ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
14
SOLID SPACER ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
15
PLUNGER ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
16
SPRING
ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
17 HYDRAULIC
ACTUAL
SEAL
DESIGNING PLAN
18
RUBBER SEAL ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
19
DISC ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
20
HOUSING ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
21 SUPPORT
BRACKET ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
22
PISTON ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
23
BOOT ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
24
SEAL ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
25
ROD ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
26 BRAKE PAD
CLIP 1 ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
27 BRAKE PAD
CLIP 2 ACTUAL
DESIGNING PLAN
28
BRAKE PAD ACTUAL
ASSEMBLY PLAN
29
PRODUCT ACTUAL
PLAN
30 ANALYSIS
ACTUAL
PLAN
31 SELECTION
ACTUAL
REPORT PLAN
32
WRITING ACTUAL

Gantt Chart
8.0 REFFERENCES

Hibbeler, Engineering Mechanics : Dynamics Twelfth Edition (2010)

Venkatramanan, Kumaragurubaran, Vishnu, Sivakumar, Saravanan, Design And


Analysis Of Disc Brake (2015)
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/295980262_Design_and_Analysis_of_Disc
_Brake_Rotor

Haul, Global Automotive Disc Brake Consumption Market Research Report (2016)
https://www.slideshare.net/DavidHaul/global-
automotivediscbrakeconsumption2016marketresearchreport