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THE PEABODY CONS E RVATORY

OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Academic Year 2008–2009

Conservatory Admissions Office


Phone: 410-659-8110 or 800-368-2521 (outside Maryland)
www.peabody.jhu.edu
Academic Calendar

First Semester 2008–2009


Fall semester payment postmark date; August 13
late payment fee applied after this date
Orientation begins
Residence Hall opens August 24
Residence Hall move-in day August 26
Registration
All students: 8:30 a.m.–noon September 2
All students: 1:30–5:00 p.m.
Late fee applied for late confirmation and registration September 3
Classes and lessons begin September 4
Convocation, noon September 4
Degree recital lottery—Concert Office September 10
Last day for course drop/add without fee September 12
Degree recital registration for fall semester September 16 &
September 22
Last day for late registration, course add September 19
Last day for course drop with record deletion September 26
All work for spring, summer Incompletes due to faculty September 26
Mid-term holiday begins October 12–14
Classes, lessons and ensembles resume October 15
Grades to remove spring and summer Incompletes October 15
due to Registrar
Last day to drop course with automatic W October 17
Last day to change course to Audit October 17
Application deadline for spring semester diploma program November 1
Last day to withdraw from any first semester course November 14
Deadline for leave-of-absence return notification November 15
to Office of Academic Affairs
Undergraduate course selection for spring 2009 semester November 17–28
Graduate course selection for spring 2009 semester November 18–28
Thanksgiving Vacation November 26–30
Classes, lessons and ensembles resume December 1
Last day of classes, lessons, ensembles December 12
Examination period December 15–17
First semester ends December 18
MM portfolio deadline—Office of Academic Affairs December 18
Residence Hall move-out deadline for non- December 23
continuing students, noon
Grades due to Registrar at noon December 23
Second Semester 2008–2009
Registration
Spring semester payment postmark date; December 10
late payment fee applied after this date
Residence Hall opens January 9
Registration for new students January 9
Classes, lessons and ensembles begin January 12
Degree recital lottery—Concert Office January 15
Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday January 19
Degree recital registration for graduating students only January 22 &
January 26
Last day for course drop/add or to reconfirm January 23
registration without fee
Degree recital registration for students with degrees January 29
in progress
Petition to graduate in May 2009 due to Registrar January 29
Last day for late registration, course add January 30
Last day to register for spring semester degree recital January 30
without a fee
Last day for course drop with record deletion; February 6
all work for fall semester Incompletes due to faculty
Dissertation submission deadline for May graduation February 6
Deadline for submitting MM program notes and GPD resume/ February 15
biography to the Office of Academic Affairs
Audition/Ensemble/Masterclass Week February 16–20
(no classes or regular lessons)
Grades to remove fall semester Incompletes due to Registrar February 23
Last day to drop course with automatic W February 27
Last day to change course to Audit February 27
Spring Vacation begins March 15
Classes, lessons and ensembles resume March 23
MM/DMA document submission deadline for May graduation March 30
Last day to drop any spring semester course April 3
Application deadline for May auditions April 15
Deadline for leave-of-absence return April 15
notification to Office of Academic Affairs
Course selection for fall semester 2009
All returning graduate students; juniors and seniors April 20–30
All returning students April 21–30
Last day of classes and lessons May 4
Reading/examination preparation day May 5
Spring semester course examinations May 6–8
Juries and final auditions for May 11–14
next academic year
Second semester ends May 14
All grades due to Registrar, noon May 14
Commencement May 21
Residence Hall closes at noon May 22
Graduate Summer Session 2009
Classes begin June 29
Classes end July 31

Audition Calendar
Application deadline December 1
Auditions for admission February 16–20
Application deadline for late auditions April 15
Final auditions for fall semester admission May 11–14

Cover photo: Tasha Thomas GPD Voice ’08, Ji Eun Park MM Voice ’08, and
Madelyn Wanner BM Voice (senior) appear as the three ladies in Peabody Opera
Theatre’s March 2008 production of Die Zauberflöte, with stage design by students
from the Maryland Institute College of Art.
Photo: Cory Weaver
Table of Contents
9 General Information
9 The Preparatory
10 The Campus
11 Facilities
14 The Internet and Technology at Peabody
15 Baltimore Area Cultural Activity
15 Peabody Concerts, Lectures, and Master Classes
15 Distinguished Visiting Faculty
15 Trio in Residence
16 Competitions
17 Honorary and Professional Organizations
17 Career Counseling and Placement
17 Partnership between the Yong Siew Toh Conservatory and the
Peabody Institute
18 Study Abroad Program
18 Conducting Fellows Program
19 Student Data 2007–2008
20 Procedural Information
20 Studio Assignments
20 Recitals
21 Official Dress and Equipment
21 Outside Instruction and Public Performance
21 Inter-Institutional Academic Arrangements
22 Peabody/Homewood Double Degree Program
22 Transcripts
23 Administrative Regulations
23 Academic and Personal Codes of Conduct
23 Grading System and Regulations
23 Academic Standing and Satisfactory Progress
25 Graduation Eligibility
25 Outside Sources of Financial Aid
25 Attendance and Absences
25 Auditing
26 Course Changes and Withdrawals
26 Change of Major
26 Change of Studio Teacher
26 Definition of Full-Time Status and Credit Limits
26 Interruption of Degree Work
28 Student Rights and Responsibilities
28 Graduation Rates
28 University Policies
33 Degrees and Programs
33 Bachelor of Music Degree
33 Admission Requirements
34 Degree Requirements
34 Common Curriculum Components—Regulations and Examinations
39 Curricula
39 Performance Majors
47 Jazz Majors
48 Composition Majors
50 Computer Music Majors
52 Music Education Majors
58 Music Education Certification Program
59 Performance/Recording Arts and Sciences Majors
69 Bachelor of Music with JHU Concentration
70 Five-Year B.M./M.M. Program
71 Master of Music Degree
71 Admission Requirements
73 Degree Requirements
76 Curricula
76 Performance Majors
81 Early Music Performance
88 Performance/Pedagogy Majors
89 Composition Majors
90 Computer Music Majors
92 Music Education Majors
92 Musicology Majors
94 Music Theory Pedagogy
95 Master of Arts in Audio Sciences Degree
97 Doctor of Musical Arts Degree
97 Admission Requirements
98 Degree Requirements
99 Curriculum Components—Requirements and Examinations
103 Curricula
103 Composition Majors
103 Conducting Majors
105 Performance Majors
113 Performer’s Certificate
113 Admission Requirements
113 Certificate Requirements
113 Curricula
118 Graduate Performance Diploma
118 Admission Requirements
118 Diploma Requirements
119 Curricula
121 Artist Diploma Program
121 Admission Requirements
121 Diploma Requirements
122 Curriculum
123 Extension Study
124 Conservatory Faculty
126 Course Listings
126 Brass
126 Chamber Music
127 Composition
128 Computer Music
129 Conducting
130 Early Music
1 33 Ensemble Arts
134 General Studies
134 Guitar
135 Harp
136 Humanities­—Liberal Arts
138 Humanities—Languages
139 Jazz
140 Large Ensembles
142 Music Education
145 Music Theory
149 Music Theory—Ear-Training/Sight-Singing
149 Music Theory—Keyboard Studies
150 Musicology
154 Opera
155 Organ
155 Pedagogy
155 Percussion
156 Piano
157 Recording Arts
160 Small Ensembles
160 Strings
161 Voice
163 Woodwinds
164 Recitals
1 65 Student Life
165 Residence Hall
165 Dining Hall
165 Athletic Facilities
165 Student Activities
166 Religious Activity
166 Health Services
166 Counseling Center Services
166 Health Insurance
166 Shuttle Bus
166 Peabody Escort Van
1 67 Financial Information
167 Tuition and Fees
168 Schedule of Payments
169 Federal Aid Programs
170 Loan Programs and Grants
171 Institutional Aid Programs
171 Scholarships, Awards, Prizes
175 Peabody Career Development Fund
175 Assistantships
175 Employment
1 76 Administration
176 Peabody Institute
177 The Johns Hopkins University
179 Index
General Information
George Peabody believed in the power ists William Kroll, Louis Persinger, Oscar
of the artist to open the minds and enrich Shumsky, and Roman Totenberg; cellists
the lives of others. The Peabody Institute, Aldo Parisot and Zara Nelsova; pianists
which he founded in 1857, is the practical Harold Bauer, Ernest Hutcheson, Mieczy-
embodiment of this belief. From its begin- slaw Munz, Reginald Stewart, and Erno
nings, it has brought together a commu- Balogh; scholars Nadia Boulanger, Otto
nity of artists, teachers, and scholars to Ortmann, and Nicolas Slonimsky.
train other artists and to spread, by their The Conservatory’s present faculty is
precept and example, an understanding of in the same distinguished tradition, and
what the arts can do to uplift the quality includes prizewinners in the Moscow
of human life. Tchaikovsky Competition, Queen Elisa-
Today, the Peabody Institute concen- beth of Belgium Competition, the ASCAP
trates primarily upon music. Through Deems Taylor Awards, as well as Guggen-
its constituent divisions, the Preparatory heim fellows and Fulbright grantees.
and the Conservatory, it trains musi- Peabody’s teachers and alumni appear as
cians of every age and at every level, from soloists and recitalists across the country
small children to seasoned professionals, and around the world, conduct workshops,
from dedicated amateurs to winners of lecture in colleges and universities, make
international competitions. It challenges recordings, and serve as jurists for interna-
all its students to aspire to their highest tional competitions from Texas to Tokyo,
potential as artists and human beings. It from Brussels to Moscow. Near and far,
seeks to promote a respect for music as a its graduates are active in orchestras, in
discipline of the mind and spirit, a joyful arts organizations, and as teachers at all
affirmation of life, and a passionate com- levels from precollege through postgradu-
mitment to an ideal. By connecting its ate education. Among its most illustrious
students with the great traditions of the alumni are pianist Andre Watts, vocal-
past, Peabody gives them the key with ists James Morris and Richard Cassilly of
which to unlock the future. the Metropolitan Opera, and the Pulit-
The Peabody Conservatory strives to zer Prize–winning composer Dominick
provide aspiring artists with the skills to Argento. The Peabody Conservatory of
pursue professional careers in music as well Music is accredited by the National Asso-
as with the education to become leaders in ciation of Schools of Music and, as a divi-
the cultural life of their communities. sion of The Johns Hopkins University, by
Peabody Conservatory has become an the Middle States Commission on Higher
acknowledged leader in the cultural life of Education, 3624 Market St., Philadelphia,
Maryland and has built a reputation that PA 19104-2680; 267-284-5000.
is truly international. As a division of The
Johns Hopkins University, Peabody takes The Preparatory
its place beside the university’s other world- Founded in 1894, the Peabody Prepara-
famous centers of research and learning in tory is the pre-college complement to the
the sciences, humanities, and medicine, Peabody Conservatory. Like the Conserva-
poised to define the con­tribution of music tory, the Preparatory also has a dual mis-
in our lives in the 21st century. sion: to provide a broad-based performing
Among the leading musicians who have arts education to all who are desirous of
served on the Peabody faculty are compos- high quality performing arts study and
ers Henry Cowell, Elliott Carter, Peter to provide an accelerated curriculum for
Mennin, Ernst Krenek, Benjamin Lees, talented pre-professional musicians and
Earle Brown, and Hugo Weisgall; violin- dancers.

9
With a student body of approximately headquarters of the Institute’s Preparatory
2,000, ranging in age from 2 months department and contains studios for the
to 83 years, the Preparatory also spans a use of both Conservatory and Preparatory
wide geographical area including a main faculty.
campus downtown and several satellite The Arthur Friedheim Library and aca-
branches throughout the Greater Balti- demic facility opened during the 1989–90
more region. The curriculum in Early academic year. This handsome structure is
Childhood, Music, Dance, and Adult fully integrated physically and architectur-
Education has been developed to provide ally within the Peabody block and is inter-
a solid instructional base while allowing connected on each floor with Leakin Hall.
for each student to develop his or her full The facility houses acoustically pleasing
potential. In addition to a wide range of practice rooms, a two-floor media center
courses, the school offers a rigorous pre- with greatly expanded space for the music
conservatory program and graduated levels and audio-visual library, a bright student
of performance opportunities. The student lounge for quiet study and relaxation, and
body of the Preparatory is as diverse as its three large fully equipped dance studios.
curriculum, ranging from pre-school chil- The Offices of the Institute’s Director,
dren and their families to high school and Conservatory Dean, Associate Dean for
adult students. The Preparatory provides Academic Affairs, and Registrar are also
a special environment for learning about located in this building or in Leakin Hall.
the arts, supporting students with special The campus is bounded on the south
talents and fostering a love of music and by the residence hall-cafeteria-garage
dance. complex, a modern structure designed by
Edward Durrell Stone, architect of the
The Campus Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
As the first music conservatory estab- in Washington. There is direct access from
lished in America, the Peabody Institute the complex to the Conservatory building
occupies a cherished historic structure on and to Leakin Hall. Some of Peabody’s
Mt. Vernon Place, the cultural heart of administrative offices are located in Scha­
Baltimore. More than a hundred years of piro House, a mid-19th-century town-
sustained growth has resulted in expansion house facing North Charles Street.
throughout the entire city block with two The Peabody Inn is the restored Mt.
delightful garden courtyards in its center. Vernon Place townhouse complex that
Peabody’s architecture is a fascinating mix has become the home for the Peabody
from Renaissance Revival to contemporary Elderhostel program. Peabody’s program,
style. which is among the most popular in the
The original Conservatory and Peabody country’s extensive Elderhostel network
Library buildings face Mt. Vernon Place of lifelong learning vacations for senior
and are two of the city’s foremost architec- citizens, features music classes and the rich
tural landmarks. The Conservatory build- performance offerings given daily by Pea-
ing was completed in 1866. The library body students and faculty.
building, completed in 1878, is famed for In spring 2004, the Peabody Institute
its tiered cast-iron balconies and spectacu- completed a $26.8 million major con-
lar open space. It is acknowledged to be struction project that has fundamentally
the masterpiece of the American architect restored and enhanced its campus, inte-
Edmund G. Lind, and served as a model grating the historic 19th-century build-
for the domed main reading room of the ings into a harmonious whole.
Library of Congress in Washington. A Grand Arcade cascades down from
Adjoining the library building is Leakin the main entrance at 17 East Mt. Vernon
Hall, built in 1927, which serves as the Place to the Peabody Plaza. Its graceful

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staircase provides an elegant counterpoint Facilities
to the original famed circular stairway. Performance. The Miriam A. Friedberg
Often called Peabody’s new “Main Street,” Concert Hall, with seating for 695, com-
the Grand Arcade wraps round the Mir- bines modern technical facilities with
iam A. Friedberg Concert Hall to create its resplendent historic architecture. The
an extended lobby and gathering place. Conservatory’s other performance halls
A sky-lighted roof fills the space with are Leith Symington Griswold Hall, a
natural light during the day and creates a renovated concert and rehearsal space with
dramatic backdrop during the evening. a seating capacity of 150 and a three-
The Bank of America Mews Gallery to manual tracker-action Holtkamp concert
one side of the Grand Arcade is a venue organ; the 95-seat Cohen-Davison Family
for exhibitions drawn from Peabody’s own Theatre; and Hilda and Douglas Goodwin
rich Archives and other sources. Adjacent Hall, the primary facility for Preparatory
to the Grand Arcade is East Hall, recon- recitals and for many Conservatory reper-
structed to supply a dedicated rehearsal tory classes and recitals.
and recording space for large ensembles. It The Conservatory maintains a collection
is used for cabaret-style jazz performances of string, woodwind, brass, and percussion
as well. instruments available for use in instru-
The construction project created the mental classes. Its collection of baroque
Cohen-Davison Family Theatre, a new instruments includes two French double
95-seat lecture/recital hall, a percussion harpsichords by William Dowd, a Flem-
studio, improved box office, concert and ish single harpsichord by Rodney Regier,
ensemble offices, and 12 new practice a virginal, fortepiano, clavichord, several
rooms. Two new elevators provide access baroque flutes, oboes, bassoon, viols, vio-
to all levels of the main Conservatory lins, viola, cello, and bows. In 2007 the
building from either end of the Grand Conservatory acquired a matched baroque
Arcade. string quartet by Juraj Vancik, a cornetto
by Christopher Monk, and a theorbo by
Security Ed Greenhood.
The Peabody campus is protected by The collection of Renaissance instru-
the Peabody Campus Police Department ments includes full consorts of recorders,
24 hours a day. Guided by its community- gems­horns, krummhorns, five lutes, two
based philosophy, the department is flutes, sackbuts, viols, and percussion.
headed by a director and staffed by 12 Acquisitions during 2007 included a
uniformed officers, commissioned by the Renaissance long drum by Ben Harms,
state of Maryland with full arrest powers. tenor and bass sackbuts by Von der Heide,
The department also provides a van escort an Italian harpsichord by Robert Duffy, and
service which operates in the evenings to an 11-course baroque lute by Martin Shep-
transport members of the community to herd. Students also have access to Renais-
and from campus within approximately a sance and baroque guitars, a vihuela, and a
12-block area. cittern as well as a full consort of recorders
The entrances to campus are secured at by Adriana Breukink.
all times, and community members may
enter at any time by use of their indi- Libraries. One of the oldest music col-
vidual “card-key access” identification and lections in the United States, the Arthur
sign-in at the main entrance. Most campus Friedheim Library traces its history from
buildings are open seven days a week from the establishment of an orchestral library
6 a.m. to 2 a.m. The practice rooms in when Peabody first opened its doors in
the library building and the basement are 1868. Since then it has grown from a
available 24 hours a day. library of a dozen or so sets of orchestral

11
parts to a major regional collection of over The main library building houses the
100,000 volumes. Among the strengths George Peabody Collection of The Johns
of the collection are performance materials Hopkins University. Formerly the Pea-
for solo players and chamber ensembles, body Research and Reference Library,
orchestral scores, music reference books, which was part of the Enoch Pratt Free
scholarly editions, books of musical biog- Library system of Baltimore, this library’s
raphy, music history and music theory, collections are internationally renowned
recordings, and music periodicals. and still accessible to the general public as
The Arthur Friedheim Library opened in well as to Peabody students.
February, 1990 and in May of the same year The Johns Hopkins University’s pri-
was dedicated to the memory of the great mary library collection is housed in the
pianist and student of Liszt, Arthur Fried- Milton S. Eisenhower Library on the
heim, by his son Eric Friedheim, whose Homewood campus. Not only is it the
generous gift made possible the attractive primary research, teaching, and cultural
new facility. Modern and well-equipped, the resource of the university, but the quality
Arthur Friedheim Library is accessible to and quantity of its collections and services
all students with abundant and comfortable rank it as one of the major research librar-
study space. The open stack library collec- ies in the country. The Albert B. Hutzler
tion includes over 90,000 scores and books. Undergraduate Reading Room in Gil-
An audio-visual center on the plaza level man Hall supplements this collection on
incorporates a collection of over 25,000 the Homewood campus. Within walking
sound recordings, a videotape library, 25 distance of the Conservatory is the central
study carrels variously equipped for audio, building of the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
video and computer use, and a microfilm Also nearby is the Maryland Historical
reader-printer. Society, which contains a large collec-
Located on the first floor of the Arthur tion of 18th- and 19th-century American
Friedheim Library, the Archives of the music imprints. The proximity of these
Peabody Institute serves as the official institutions and of the Library of Congress
repository for the historical records of in Washington, D.C., with its extensive
the Institute and also collects the papers and internationally recognized musical
and records of musicians and musical resources, permits wide latitude in the
organizations of the greater Baltimore choice of research projects undertaken
metropolitan area. The early years of the towards the fulfillment of degree require-
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Bal- ments.
timore Opera, and a host of other musical Recording Studios. The Peabody Recording
organizations are documented in Peabody’s Studios record all concerts, degree recitals,
Archives. A computerized finding guide is and special events at Peabody, utilizing
available in the Archives’ reading area to advanced techniques and state-of-the-art
assist students and accredited scholars. equipment. Studio 220, the main Con-
The generous gift of P. William and servatory studio facility, is directly linked
Vera Ruth Filby established the Rare Book to the Miriam A. Friedberg Concert Hall.
Room in the Music Library of the Peabody Studio 203, also located in the Conserva-
Conservatory in 1990. This room, located tory building, is the primary studio for
on the second level of one of the distinctive events in Griswold Hall. Both studios
townhouses on Mt. Vernon Place, houses are fully digital and surround capable, as
over 1,000 volumes including music scores, well as being interconnected, permitting
individual manuscripts, personal papers and data transfer between the facilities. Two
artifacts, and books on music dating from other recording control rooms, Studio
the 16th century to the present. 3036 and Studio 2002, are located in the

12
Leakin Hall building and provide services ested in the recording arts degree program
to Goodwin Hall and East Hall. Studio or classes should call the Recording Office.
2002 features digital recording from
two to 24 tracks and has comprehensive Computer Music Studios. The Computer
digital editing facilities. Studio 3036 is Music Studios serve as a working labora-
a fully equipped 24-track analog record tory for music composition and research,
and mix room. Studio 220 is also adjacent as well as a center for courses, demonstra-
to an acoustically balanced performance tions, and public programs. Many projects
area with a nine-foot Steinway piano. All use both analog and digital facilities.
studios are constantly updated to reflect Peabody’s activity in electronic (analog)
the current state of modern recording. In music began with summer workshops
addition, there is a sound booth in the for teachers first held in 1967. When the
balcony area of the Friedberg Concert Peabody Electronic Music Studio opened
Hall, used primarily for sound reinforce- officially in 1969, it was the first such
ment work but also capable of recording studio in Maryland, and one of the first in
digitally from Friedberg Hall. Recording the country to be located in a conservatory.
sessions and the recording of non-degree Over the years, its facilities have been sys-
recitals can be arranged through the tematically updated and expanded.
Recording Studio Office located on the The affiliation of Peabody with The
second floor of the Conservatory building Johns Hopkins University has made pos-
or by going to the Recording Arts sible expansion into the field of computer
web page at www.peabody.jhu.edu/ music, utilizing the computers, advanced
recording-arts. Copies of concerts can be technology, and computer expertise
ordered at those locations also. available at Johns Hopkins. In addition
The Recording Studios record most to Peabody courses in computer music,
events direct to CD with hard disc backup. Conservatory students have access to uni-
Master recordings for all events are per- versity courses in computer science, elec-
manently stored in the Peabody Archives. tronics, and related fields.
Each student is entitled to one free CD of
Computer Music Consort. The Computer
his/her degree recital, with additional cop-
Music Consort is a professional ensemble in
ies available on a fee basis. Students, faculty,
residence at the Computer Music Depart-
and staff may also use the Recording Stu-
ment dedicated to the performance of the
dios for special projects and audition tapes
digital arts. The Consort aims to bring the
on an hourly fee basis. A price schedule is
best current computer music and multi-
available on request and is published on the
media performance to the public in unique
Peabody Recording Studio web page. As a
and original ways. Activity includes perfor-
special service to students, and on request,
mances (many of which involve “live” per-
CDs of all major events are placed in the
formers plus tape, real-time electronics, and
Peabody Listening Library for 30 days after
mixed media presentations), lectures, and
each concert.
commissions for new works in the medium.
In addition to producing recordings for The Consort frequently invites guest com-
archival use and broadcast, the Studios are posers and performers to participate in its
the working laboratories for the students events.
in the Recording Arts and Sciences degree
programs. Additionally, there are classes Facilities. The Computer Music Depart-
in recording technology and production ment is located on the third floor of the
available for non-recording majors on the historic Conservatory building. There are
undergraduate and graduate levels. More two fully equipped studios, one devoted
information can be found at www.peabody to teaching and the other to production
.jhu.edu/recordingarts. Any student inter- work. There is a digital performance stu-

13
dio optimized for solo or chamber music other performance-oriented synthesizers.
plus electronics rehearsals, and a digital This space is easily reconfigured and may
arts studio of workstations for use by com- be used for rehearsal as well as research
puter music and composition students. and com­position.
The departmental studios feature a wide
variety of music technologies, including 5. Workstations. The department supports
MIDI, Direct Digital Synthesis, Digital a network of computers optimized for
Audio Workstations, SMPTE synchroniza- music-making and research. A wide vari-
tion and digital multi-track recording. ety of platforms are supported, including
Windows, Macintosh, Unix, and Linux. A
1. The Teaching Studio is intended primar- wireless network allows the easy integra-
ily for introductory-level and non-major tion of student laptops. A wide variety of
students but is also used as an additional commercial and noncommercial software
production facility by departmental grad- applications for music are available for
uate students and faculty. MIDI, audio, and video recording, editing
The room doubles as the department’s and playback as well as tools for program-
primary classroom, and for this reason ming and software for music notation.
features a high-quality data projection
system for computer and video demonstra- The Internet and Technology at Peabody
tions. This studio also houses the depart- Peabody students, faculty, and staff have
ment’s vintage Moog synthesizers, which full access to the Internet. Buildings on
are carefully maintained for historical and the Peabody campus are interconnected
pedagogical purposes. Multichannel A/D via a fiber-based backbone, and links to
and D/A conversion systems along with other divisions of The Johns Hopkins
a 24x8 console are available, as well as University are provided through a high-
a quadraphonic sound system featuring speed network. Most rooms on campus are
Meyer 833 studio monitors. wired for Internet access.
With an account on JHMI, students, fac-
2. The Production Studio is intended for use ulty, and staff have access to electronic mail.
by computer music graduate students and Computers for student use are available in
faculty. It is a fully professional production the Friedheim Library, a computer resource
facility designed for high-end composition room in 205 Leakin Hall, and in the Unger
and research. A state-of-the-art all-digital Lounge Computer Center. All rooms in the
console is at the heart of this studio. The Residence Hall are wired for student Inter-
digital board is interfaced with a 24-chan- net access.
nel A/D and D/A conversion system to the Information about Peabody can be
Macintosh-based digital audio worksta- found on the Internet in the appropri-
tion. Monitoring is through a Dynaudio ate directories of The Johns Hopkins
5.1 studio monitor system. University web site (www.jhu.edu) or at
3. The Digital Arts Studio is a multiuser Peabody’s own site on the World Wide
facility supporting a variety of digital arts Web (www.peabody.jhu.edu).
applications. A number of workstations The Steering Committee for Informa-
for MIDI, digital audio, video, and multi- tion Services (SCIS) coordinates efforts to
media are available, as well as general pur- employ advanced technologies in support
pose computers for programming, Internet of the goals of the Peabody Institute and
access, and general use. the technological initiatives of The Johns
Hopkins University. Campus networking,
4. The Digital Performance Studio is an telecommunications, and computing func-
experimental rehearsal space/practice tions are supported by the Network and
room. The MIDI system here includes a Telecommunication Services Office and its
Yamaha Disklavier grand piano as well as Help Desk.

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Information Systems Usage Policy: Use of Camerata contemporary music ensemble;
the Peabody Information Systems is gov- Renaissance Ensemble; Chorus and Con-
erned by the “Guidelines for the Use of cert Singers; Opera Theatre and Chamber
Computing and Networked Information Opera; the Sylvia Adalman Artist Recital
Resources” and the “Policies for Student Series; organ, jazz, and computer music
Use of Shared Information Technology concerts; and special events. These events
Resources” of the Johns Hopkins schools feature student ensembles and soloists,
of Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, Peabody’s internationally acclaimed fac-
and Engineering. The guidelines are avail- ulty, and guest artists. Peabody also pres-
able for review on the Peabody web site. ents a Thursday Noon Recital Series while
school is in session with student soloists
Baltimore Area Cultural Activity and chamber ensembles. Individual stu-
Baltimore’s arts organizations include dents and ensembles present over 600 con-
the Walters Art Museum (directly across certs yearly at Peabody, and make frequent
the street from Peabody’s Schapiro House appearances throughout Maryland and
on North Charles Street), the Baltimore adjoining areas.
Museum of Art (adjacent to the Home- Each season the musical and intellectual
wood campus of The Johns Hopkins Uni- environment at Peabody is enriched by
versity), Center Stage, the Hippodrome master classes, lecture recitals, and semi-
Theatre, the Maryland Institute College of nars given by many of the world’s out-
Art, the Maryland Historical Society, the standing artists and teachers.
National Aquarium, the Science Center
and Planetarium, and many smaller gal- Distinguished Visiting Faculty
leries and theaters—all within minutes of Distinguished visiting faculty come to
the Conservatory. Peabody several times during the school
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra year to interact with students on a master
presents a full season of concerts in Joseph class and private lesson basis as mutually
Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, while the Bal- determined by departmental faculty in
timore Opera Company performs in the consultation with the dean.
historic Lyric Opera House. The two halls Visiting Composers. A grant from Randolph
are adjacent to one another and within S. Rothschild underwrites the cost of visit-
easy walking distance of the Peabody. ing composers each academic year.
Numerous professional chamber music
and choral groups present concert series at Trio in Residence
the Hopkins Homewood campus, Goucher The Peabody Trio serves as the resident
College, the Walters Art Museum, the faculty ensemble of the Peabody Conserva-
Baltimore Museum of Art, and other tory, a position they have held since 1989.
Baltimore locations. Peabody students Since winning the prestigious Naumburg
may attend most concerts and recitals at Chamber Music Award that same year, the
reduced rates. In addition, further cultural Trio has performed throughout the U.S.,
opportunities are available in Washington, Canada, Europe, Japan, and Israel to criti-
D.C., which is less than an hour away cal acclaim. Summer festival appearances
from Baltimore by train or automobile. have included Tanglewood Music Center,
the Ravinia Festival, Skaneateles Festival,
Peabody Concerts, Lectures, and Master Classes and the “Music in the Vineyards” Festival
The extent of Peabody’s concert year in Napa, California. The Peabody Trio
is seen in its Concert Calendar, which has been ensemble-in-residence at Yellow
includes performances by the Peabody Barn music school and festival since 1998.
Symphony Orchestra and Concert Orches- The Trio has also been heard in numerous
tra; the Wind Ensemble; Chamber Winds; radio broadcasts, including St. Paul Sunday

15
Morning, Morning Pro Musica, NPR’s Per- Macht Orchestral Composition Competition.
formance Today, CBC, Radio Canada, and Endowed in 2000 by the Macht Philan-
the WQXR Listening Room in New York. thropic Fund, this annual competition
Equally committed to the performance for composition majors was established
of new music and the classics of the rep- to provide a premiere public performance
ertoire, the Peabody Trio has been praised for new works for orchestra. Entries must
for its interpretations of music ranging have been written during a student’s
from the works of Haydn to Charles period of enrollment at Peabody and
Wuorinen. They have worked with such received an orchestral reading session. A
composers as Shulamit Ran, Zhou Long, cash prize and a performance of the win-
Bright Sheng, Charles Wuorinen, and ning work at a Peabody public concert are
Leon Kirchner. awarded to the winner.
As faculty, members of the Peabody William L. Marbury Prize, awarded each
Trio teach majors, coach Conservatory year to an outstanding undergraduate
ensembles, and hold a weekly seminar in violin student in a juried competition,
the performance of chamber music. includes a major public performance at
Peabody, as well as a cash prize. This
Competitions competition was endowed by the law firm
Yale Gordon Concerto Competition. Endowed of Piper and Marbury (now DLA Piper)
by the Peggy and Yale Gordon Trust, this in memory of Mr. William L. Marbury,
competition was established by the late former chairman of the Peabody Board of
Yale Gordon, who wished to encourage Trustees.
the development of talented young musi-
cians. A cash prize, a performance with Prix d’Eté Competition. Endowed by Walter
orchestra, and solo appearances at Shriver Summer in 1994, this annual competition
Hall and other venues are awarded to the encourages Peabody student composers
winner of this competition, which rotates to create chamber music that explores
annually in the areas of strings, piano, and new instrumental, vocal, dance, com-
orchestral instruments. puter, and multimedia horizons. The Prix
d’Eté is open to undergraduate, gradu-
Virginia Carty deLillo Composition Competi- ate, and recently graduated (within two
tion. A contest for composition majors years) composition students of Peabody
who may submit works in any medium, Conservatory. Significant involvement
this biennial competition, offered in of electronic and computer technologies
odd-numbered years, was made possible is required in odd years; technology is
through a bequest of former dean Virginia optional in even years. The first-prize win-
Carty deLillo. Awards include cash prizes ner receives a cash prize and gives a perfor-
to first- and second-place winners and a mance of the work.
public performance, where practical, of the
winning composition. Harrison L. Winter Piano Competition was
established in 1990 to encourage the devel-
Sylvia L. Green Voice Competition. Founded opment of young pianists. It was endowed
in 1986 by Beth Green Pierce, this bien- by gifts in memory of Judge Winter from
nial competition was established in his family, friends, and former law clerks.
memory of Mrs. Pierce’s mother, Sylvia L. The first-prize winner receives a cash prize
Green. Its first and second prizes include and a performance with the orchestra. The
a cash award and a performance for the second-prize winner receives a cash prize.
first-prize winner with one of the Peabody This major competition, which is a tribute
symphony orchestras. to a former chairman of Peabody’s Board

16
of Trustees, is held on a two-years-on, one- organization that stresses academic excel-
year-off basis. lence, leadership, and community service.
Induction occurs annually in the spring
Honorary and Professional Organizations on the Homewood campus of The Johns
Pi Kappa Lambda. National honorary Hopkins University.
society for outstanding juniors, seniors, Career Counseling and Placement
and graduate students, elected annually Peabody’s Career Counseling and Place-
by the faculty according to the by-laws of ment service aids students and alumni
Pi Kappa Lambda, the music profession’s as they plan their careers and search for
equivalent of Phi Beta Kappa. professional employment. To this end, the
Mu Phi Epsilon. National professional coed office maintains personal files of confiden-
fraternity whose activities include spon- tial references for students and alumni,
sorship of the prestigious Sterling Staff copies of which are sent on request to
Competition and of many scholarships for prospective employers or graduate schools
summer music camps and festivals such as for a nominal charge. The office offers con-
Tanglewood, Aspen, and Music Academy sultation and information on career path,
of the West. The fraternity’s goal of service the job search, cover letters, resumes, and
has been promoted by the Peabody Phi other career-related topics.
Gamma Chapter through activities in the The Career Counseling Office is a
Baltimore area. repository of information on jobs in music
across the U.S., musical and non-musical
MENC (Music Educators National Confer- work in the Baltimore area, competitions
ence). National professional organization in the U.S. and abroad, grants and awards,
of music teachers whose membership summer festivals, and events of interest.
includes elementary and secondary school All announcements received are noted in
music teachers as well as those involved in the semimonthly Job Vacancy Bulletin
teacher education at colleges and universi- published by the office for the benefit of
ties throughout the country. Its official Peabody students and alumni. The com-
publication, the Music Educators Journal, plete newsletter is available on campus,
features excellent articles and is considered and the text portion can be found at
a major source of information about issues www.peabody.jhu.edu/jvb.
and developments in the field of music The Office of Career Counseling and
education. Membership is open to all Placement publishes lists of places to teach
music education majors. and informal and formal recital venues in
CLEA (Consortium for the Liberal Educa- the Baltimore/Washington, D.C. area. The
tion of Artists). A representative national office operates a Musician Referral Service
association whose mission is to strengthen which refers qualified students and alumni
the liberal education of college students to callers from outside Peabody seeking
enrolled in institutions dedicated to the music for concerts, weddings, parties, or
training of performing artists. Through other events.
the cross-disciplinary collaboration of
Partnership between the Yong Siew Toh
administrators, faculty, and students,
Conservatory of the National University of
CLEA supports projects providing student
Singapore and the Peabody Institute of
artists with opportunities to bridge art
The Johns Hopkins University
and its broader communities.
The signing of an agreement between
Golden Key Society. Juniors and seniors who the National University of Singapore and
have achieved at least a 3.65 grade point The Johns Hopkins University on Novem-
average are eligible to be inducted into the ber 26, 2001, created the first collabora-
Golden Key Society, a national honorary tion of its kind between a top American

17
conservatory of music and a leading out an application, and then proactively
university in the Asia Pacific region. The work through application details with the
Peabody Institute embraced the opportu- offices of Financial Aid, International Stu-
nity to provide artistic advice and conser- dents, Ensembles, and Academic Affairs.
vatory expertise in the development of a
new conservatory in Singapore—the Yong Conducting Fellows Program
Siew Toh Conservatory of Music, National In 2007–2008, the Baltimore Sym-
University of Singapore. This partnership phony Orchestra with Music Director
brings a fresh infusion of international Marin Alsop and the Peabody Conserva-
dialog and opportunities to Peabody’s Bal- tory launched a Conducting Fellows Pro-
timore campus as its musicians, scholars, gram, a collaborative project that supports
and administrators lend the wisdom of the the musical and leadership development
Institute’s accumulated knowledge to the of young conductors. An outgrowth of the
development and growing reputation of American Symphony Orchestra League’s
Yong Siew Toh Conservatory. Combining American Conducting Fellows Program
Singapore’s vision with Peabody’s know- launched in 2002, the Baltimore project
how, Yong Siew Toh has already gradu- offers conductors in the early stages of
ated its first class of musicians and is an their careers an opportunity to hone their
international benchmark for excellence for skills before assuming a role with a profes-
Southeast Asia and the world. The collab- sional orchestra.
oration continues to provide unparalleled The BSO and Peabody together have
opportunities to Peabody and Yong Siew designed a program that takes advantage
Toh students. There is a vibrant exchange of the two institutions’ vast resources—
program between the schools, and faculty training not only in theory, music history,
from each institution give master classes and baton technique, but also a broad
and lessons every year. curriculum in subjects such as psychology,
public speaking, foreign language, and
Study Abroad Program political science, plus practical on-the-
Peabody currently facilitates three job training and real-time feedback from
international exchanges with the Yong Marin Alsop, professional orchestra musi-
Siew Toh Conservatory of the National cians, and administrators.
University of Singapore, Paris Conserva- Conducting fellows will be chosen every
tory, and Royal Academy in London. two years through a competitive audition
Interested students should approach the process created by Peabody and the BSO.
international student coordinator and fill

18
Student Data 2007–2008

Geographical Distribution
United States
Alabama . . . . . . . . . 2 Kentucky . . . . . . . . . 2 Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Alaska . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Maine . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Oklahoma . . . . . . . . 3
Arizona . . . . . . . . . . 1 Maryland . . . . . . . . 91 Oregon . . . . . . . . . . 1
Arkansas . . . . . . . . . 1 Massachusetts . . . . . 14 Pennsylvania . . . . . 34
California . . . . . . . 24 Michigan . . . . . . . . . 2 South Carolina . . . . . 6
Colorado . . . . . . . . . 2 Minnesota . . . . . . . . 3 South Dakota . . . . . . 1
Connecticut . . . . . . . 8 Missouri . . . . . . . . . 3 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . 18
D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Nevada . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vermont . . . . . . . . . 2
Delaware . . . . . . . . . 3 New Hampshire . . . . 3 Virginia . . . . . . . . . 23
Florida . . . . . . . . . . 4 New Jersey . . . . . . . 16 Washington . . . . . . . 2
Georgia . . . . . . . . . . 9 New Mexico . . . . . . . 1 West Virginia . . . . . . 1
Illinois . . . . . . . . . . 6 New York . . . . . . . 28 Wisconsin . . . . . . . . 3
Indiana . . . . . . . . . . 2 North Carolina . . . . . 5 Puerto Rico . . . . . . . . . . 1
Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . 1 North Dakota . . . . . . 1

Foreign Countries
Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Germany . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Poland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Brazil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hong Kong . . . . . . . . . . 3 Russia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Indonesia . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Singapore . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Costa Rica . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Israel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Spain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
China (P.R.C.) . . . . . . . . 8 Italy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Taiwan/ROC . . . . . . . . 33
Croatia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Turkey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Cyprus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Korea . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 United Kingdom . . . . . . 2
Finland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 New Zealand . . . . . . . . . 1 Vietnam . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Classification of Students by Program


Candidates for the B.M. degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
Candidates for the M.M. degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Candidates for the M.A. degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Candidates for the D.M.A. degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Candidates for the Performer’s Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Candidates for the Graduate Performance Diploma . . . 68
Candidates for the Artist Diploma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Graduate Extension Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Non-Resident Graduate Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Cooperative and Visiting Students* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Undergraduate Extension Students . . . . . . . . . . . . .      3
828

* Not included in the 2007–2008 Geographical Distribution Chart

19
Procedural Information
Studio Assignments
Studio assignments are made by the student wishing to study with a particular
dean on the basis of student request and teacher may contact the teacher personally
availability of the preferred teacher. A to discuss the teacher’s availability.

Recitals
Public recitals are required for completion of all undergraduate and graduate perfor-
mance degrees. Recital length requirements by program and instrument category are
listed below. No degree recital, with the exception of Artist Diploma piano recitals,
may contain more than 60 minutes of music. All degree recitals, including lecture-recit-
als, will be limited to a total of 70 minutes of stage time (with the exception of Artist
Diploma piano). This limit includes all stage and personnel changes from the beginning
to end of the recital.
Minutes of Music Minutes of Music Minutes of Music
Instrument Junior Recital Senior Recital Graduate Recital
Brass — 50-60 50-60
Guitar 25-30 50-60 50-60
Early Music — 50-60 60
Harpsichord — 50 60
Harp — 50-60 50-60
Jazz 30 50-55 55-60 for GPD
Piano — 50-55 50-55 for MM, DMA
55-60 for GPD
70 for AD*
Organ — 50-60 50-60
Percussion — 50-60 50-60
Violin 45-60 50-60 50-60
Viola 45-60 50-60 50-60
Cello — 50-60 50-60
Double Bass — 50-60 50-60
Voice — 45 50-55 for MM, DMA,
GPD
55-60 for AD
Woodwinds — 50-60 50-60
*May include an intermission if requested

Scheduling of recitals is done through the Concert Office. The program for each recital
to be presented must be printed on the form provided by the Concert Office and signed
by the major teacher, observing all deadline dates and procedures as established by the
Concert Office and published in the Student Handbook. All degree recitals are recorded,
with tapes kept in the Peabody Archives. Each student is entitled to one free CD of his/
her degree recital, with additional copies available on a fee basis.

20
Official Dress and Equipment mance outside the Conservatory, with the
The official dress for Peabody public permission of the teacher.
ensemble performance is:
Inter-Institutional Academic Arrangements
Men: Within the university system, cross-
• Black tuxedo, black dress shoes and socks registration without extra cost extends for
• Pressed white dress shirt, black bow tie Peabody students to courses offered by the
• Black cummerbund or black tuxedo vest School of Arts and Sciences, the Whiting
• Suspenders are permitted, but they School of Engineering, the Carey Busi-
must be either black or white ness School, and the School of Education.
Students enrolled in the schools of Arts
Women: and Sciences or Engineering may, simi-
• Plain black floor to mid-calf length larly, register for an un­limited number
gown with long or ¾-length sleeves, or of classes, on a space-available basis, at
• Long or mid-calf black skirt (or black the Peabody Conservatory. The granting
dress slacks) with a black top with long of credit for Conservatory study must be
or ¾-length sleeves. Slacks must be approved by the deans of the appropriate
wide, loose, and flowing. Johns Hopkins University divisions.
• Black or neutral hose and black dress Reciprocal arrangements also have been
shoes. No open-toed shoes or sandals. made with several Baltimore colleges
• No excessive jewelry, sequins or spar- whereby full-time sophomores, juniors,
kles. Hair accessories must be black, and seniors may take one course per
silver or gold. semester for credit in academic classroom
For some opera performances, orchestra courses, subject to course availability and
members (both men and women) may be observance of all regulations of the host
asked to wear “dressy black,” i.e., nice institution.
black shoes and socks, black pants (or Students requesting cross-registration
skirts) and black shirt or top. Black jeans must complete appropriate forms which
and tee shirts are not acceptable. are available in the Office of the Conserva-
All Peabody students should own tory Registrar. Credit sought for any other
proper concert attire by the beginning courses taken outside the Conservatory
of the school year. They also should be during the period of a student’s enroll-
equipped with their own music stands ment must be approved in writing by the
for small ensemble rehearsals and practice associate dean for academic affairs.
room purposes. Music and dance instruction is also
available through the Peabody Preparatory
Outside Instruction and Public Performance for non-credit. Students wishing to take
Peabody facilities may not be used for private music lessons through the Prepara-
private teaching of lessons except as con- tory must go through placement inter-
nected in some way with Conservatory or views/auditions. Lessons are scheduled on
Preparatory programs. A student must a space-available basis. Students in Arts
secure the approval of his or her teacher to and Sciences or Engineering desiring to
appear as soloist or ensemble member on take individual instruction pay 75 percent
programs presented under auspices other of the Preparatory individual tuition as
than the Conservatory’s. Peabody reserves listed in the current Preparatory catalog.
the right to prohibit such participation Students in all other JHU divisions desir-
if it is considered detrimental to either ing to take individual instruction pay
the student or the school. Students in the 100 percent of the Preparatory individual
harpsichord program are permitted to use instruction tuition as listed in the current
the school’s instruments for public perfor- Preparatory catalog. Non-Peabody stu-

21
dents desiring to take any music or dance any other form of financial aid from Pea-
class in the Preparatory are subject to full body. Double Degree students must enroll
tuition as listed in the current Preparatory at a minimum in private lessons and, for
catalog. instrumental majors, large ensembles to
maintain their status as Peabody degree
Peabody/Homewood Double Degree Program candidates in the Double Degree Program.
Peabody and the Homewood schools of Additional information regarding the
The Johns Hopkins University offer the Double Degree Program is available from
opportunity for a limited number of stu- the Office of Admissions and in the Office
dents to pursue simultaneously a Bachelor of Academic Affairs.
of Music degree and either a Bachelor of
Arts degree from the School of Arts and Transcripts
Sciences or a Bachelor of Science degree Requests for transcripts involve two
from the Whiting School of Engineering. offices of the Conservatory: the Business
Students must be admitted independently Office and the Registrar’s Office. A fee is
to Peabody and one of the Homewood charged for each official or unofficial copy
schools and be invited to participate in the of any academic transcript. Transcripts
Double Degree Program. Students who may not be released prior to payment
have begun their junior year of study are of the transcript fee and all outstanding
not eligible to enter the Double Degree monies owed the Conservatory. After pay-
Program nor may students transfer into ment of the fee at the Business Office,
the program midyear. Typically, the Dou- written requests may be submitted to the
ble Degree Program takes a minimum of Registrar’s Office. Unofficial transcripts
five years to complete. are sent to students. Official transcripts,
Administrative services such as registra- carrying the school seal and the signature
tion, financial aid, and health care are pro- of the Registrar, are sent to institutions
vided to Double Degree students by the and agencies.
Homewood schools. Consequently, stu- Official financial aid transcripts should
dents in the Double Degree Program do be requested directly from the Financial
not receive Peabody merit scholarships or Aid Office.

22
Administrative Regulations

Academic and Personal Codes of Conduct Credit/no credit Artist Diploma recitals,
The Peabody Conservatory of The Johns portfolios, dissertations,
Hopkins University, its faculty, staff, and graduate review courses,
students are committed to encouraging remedial undergraduate
academic honesty and ethical conduct. courses, English as a Second
Membership in the Peabody community is Language courses
contingent upon adherence to high stan-
dards of personal and professional ethics. Credit grade points
The effective practice of an ethical code A 4.00
of conduct requires the support of each A– 3.67
member of the Peabody community. Each B+ 3.33
person is entrusted with two essential B 3.00
responsibilities: to live honorably within B– 2.67
the established codes of conduct, and to C+ 2.33
hold other members of the community to C 2.00
the same high standard of conduct. C– 1.67
Students enrolled in the Peabody Con- D 1.00
servatory assume an obligation to conduct F 0.00
themselves in a manner appropriate to an Non-credit designations
institution of higher education. A student AU Audit
is obliged to refrain from acts which he I Incomplete
or she knows, or under the circumstances IP In progress
has reason to know, threaten the academic NCR No credit
integrity of the Conservatory. Viola- P Passing
tions of academic integrity include, but W Withdrawn
are not limited to cheating, plagiarism, WF Withdrawn failing
misrepresentation of work, multiple WP Withdrawn passing
submissions of the same work, falsifica-
tion of an approval signature, knowingly Grade point averages are computed each
furnishing false information to any agent semester. The cumulative average is used
of the Conservatory for inclusion in the in determining status prior to graduation.
academic records, and falsification, forgery, Details on grading procedures are con-
alteration, destruction, or misuse of official tained in the Student Handbook.
Conservatory documents or shared infor- Academic Standing and Satisfactory Progress
mation technology resources. Procedures Undergraduate. Undergraduate students
for alleged violations of the academic and who maintain a cumulative and current
personal codes of conduct may be found in grade point average of at least 2.50, a
the Student Handbook. grade of at least B- in their major area
(lessons, juries, recitals, hearings), and
Grading System and Regulations are making appropriate progress through
The grading system at Peabody falls the core curriculum are considered to be
into two categories: in acceptable academic standing. The
Letter grades private lessons, class associate dean for academic affairs reviews
work, ensembles, juries, all transcripts and identifies all students
recitals who are not meeting the stated minimum

23
GPA and or major area grade benchmarks. Below average for undergraduate students
Students who fall below one or more of D need for marked improvement
the stated benchmarks will be brought to to remain in the program
the attention of the Undergraduate Com-
Not acceptable at the undergraduate level
mittee at its meeting in January (for fall
F
semester grades) or May (for spring semes-
ter grades). Dean’s List Criteria. The criteria for inclu-
The Undergraduate Committee may sion on the Dean’s List are:
dismiss any student who does not meet 1. Full-time status in an undergraduate
the minimum benchmarks. The Under- degree program
graduate Committee also has the right to
2. A semester grade point average of 3.67
put any student who does not meet the
or higher
minimum benchmarks on warning for
dismissal. 3. No Incompletes for the semester
Undergraduate students are normally Dean’s List students with a semester grade
classified as follows: point average of 3.90 or higher will be
1st year 0-30 hours of passing work designated “High Honors.”
completed Dismissal. Students who fail to attain the
2nd year 31-60 hours of passing work minimum acceptable grade point average
completed or the minimum acceptable grade(s) in
their major area, or whom the applicable
3rd year 61-90 hours of passing work academic committee judges as having
completed failed to make progress toward completion
of their degree program, may be dismissed
4th year over 90 hours of passing work
immediately at the end of any semester,
completed
without prior warning. A student who is
Classification may be modified in accor- dismissed on academic grounds may apply
dance with appropriate performance level for readmission after one full semester, but
as determined by departmental examina- Peabody is under no obligation to grant
tions. readmission. A dismissed student may not
enroll at Peabody in any capacity until
The following grading standards are used such time as he or she is readmitted. The
at the undergraduate level: Conservatory reserves the right to exclude
Outstanding performance for undergraduate at any time a student whose academic
students standing or general conduct is considered
A genuinely outstanding unsatisfactory.
A- a very high standard in which Graduate. Graduate students must main-
strengths far exceed weaknesses tain a cumulative and current grade point
High quality for undergraduate students average of at least 3.00 and a grade of at
B+ high quality least B- in the major area (lessons, recitals,
B high quality with some graded hearings) in order to be consid-
weaknesses ered in acceptable academic standing and
B- high quality with some serious eligible for graduation. Master of Music
weaknesses and Doctor of Musical Arts students must
satisfactorily complete 18 credit hours per
Average for undergraduate students academic year. Students enrolled in the
C+ barely above average Graduate Performance Diploma and Artist
C average Diploma programs must satisfactorily com-
C- marginally acceptable plete 8 credits per academic year.

24
The associate dean for academic affairs readmission. A dismissed student may not
will review all transcripts and identify all enroll at Peabody in any capacity until
graduate students who are not meeting such time as he or she is readmitted. The
the stated minimum grade point aver- Conservatory reserves the right to exclude
age and/or major area grade benchmarks. at any time a student whose academic
Students who fall below one or more of standing or general conduct is considered
the stated benchmarks will be brought to unsatisfactory.
the attention of the Graduate Committee
at its meeting in January (for fall semes- Graduation Eligibility
ter grades) or May (for spring semester To be approved for graduation, students
grades). The Graduate Committee may must have resolved any and all outstand-
dismiss any student who does not meet ing charges of misconduct and violations
the minimum benchmarks. The Graduate of academic ethics, in addition to satisfy-
Committee also has the right to put any ing all degree requirements.
student who does not meet the minimum
benchmarks on warning for dismissal. Outside Sources of Financial Aid
Maintenance of good academic stand-
The following grading standards are used ing and satisfactory academic progress are
at the graduate level: requirements for continued eligibility for
Performance markedly above average financial assistance from federal and state
A genuinely outstanding sources.
A- a very high standard in which Attendance and Absences
strengths far exceed weaknesses
Classes and Lessons. Regular and prompt
The standard normally expected of graduate attendance in classes and lessons is
students expected of all students. A statement
B+ above average of individual class attendance policy is
B average provided in each class at the beginning
B- revealing certain weaknesses of each semester. It is expected that ill-
Below average for graduate students ness claimed as reasons for absence will be
C+ lacking essential qualities appropriately documented.
C marginally acceptable All students who are absent from class
C- need for marked improvement for an extended period of time, or for a
to remain in the program personal or medical emergency, should
contact the Office of Academic Affairs,
Not acceptable at the graduate level provide documentation, and ask that
D their teachers be notified. These notifica-
F tions do not signify approval but are sent
to instructors as a courtesy. The student
Dismissal. Students who fail to attain the
remains responsible for making up all
minimum acceptable grade point average
missed work and for securing the permis-
or the minimum acceptable grade(s) in
sion of the instructors for absences.
their major area, or whom the applicable
academic committee judges as having Performance groups. Regulatory guidelines
failed to make progress toward comple- for ensemble attendance are published in
tion of their program, may be dismissed the Student Handbook.
immediately at the end of any semester,
without prior warning. A student who is Auditing
dismissed on academic grounds may apply Full-time students may audit any Con-
for readmission after one full semester, but servatory class, upon permission of the
Peabody is under no obligation to grant instructor. Part-time students must pay

25
the regular cost for each course of study, Definition of Full-Time Status and Credit Limits
unless otherwise specified. Students at the Conservatory are consid-
ered full time if they carry the following
Course Changes and Withdrawals number of credit hours per semester:
The Registrar’s Office must approve all 1. Undergraduate Programs
course additions, withdrawals, or changes. Bachelor of Music 13
Courses or lessons dropped within the first Performer’s Certificate 13
four weeks of a semester will be deleted
from the student’s registration. With- Students enrolled in degree programs may
drawals do not become effective until register for as many credits as is appropri-
the properly signed forms are received ate for their plan of study.
in the Registrar’s Office. For courses 2. Graduate Diploma Programs
dropped within the fifth or sixth week Graduate Performance Diploma 4
of the semester an automatic grade of W Artist Diploma 4
will be recorded. After the sixth week, the GPD and AD programs are for full-time
grade being earned will be recorded with students only. Students in these programs
a WP or WF (Pass or Fail), which will are allowed to register for lessons, recitals,
not affect the GPA. All requests for a WP unlimited ensembles, and between one
or WF must be approved by the associate and three credits of academic coursework
dean for academic affairs. each semester. Academic credits in excess
The deadline for changing sections or of three will entail additional per credit
withdrawing from classes is the end of the hour fees. The credit limits for graduate
10th week of the semester. Exact deadline degrees reflect Peabody’s educational
dates are listed in the Academic Calendar. philosophy that graduate students should
Courses may not be changed from focus on the intense challenges specific
Credit to Audit after the sixth week of the to their major area and related academic
semester. studies.
3. Graduate Degree Programs
Change of Major Master of Music 9
Students requesting a change of major Doctor of Musical Arts 9
must qualify through auditions and inter-
views with appropriate faculty. To initiate In addition to lessons, ensembles, recit-
a change of major, a student must com- als, and audited courses, students enrolled
plete a change of major form available in in graduate degree programs (M.M. and
the Admissions Office. D.M.A.) may enroll for a maximum of
nine credit hours of academic coursework
Change of Studio Teacher each semester. Undergraduate language
In general, a student is expected to classes, pedagogy classes and depart-
remain with the same studio teacher for mentally recommended classes may be
the duration of a program. In instances excluded from the credit limit. Academic
where there are compelling reasons for credits in excess of nine hours will entail
requesting a change, a student may do so additional per credit hour fees.
by contacting the associate dean for aca-
demic affairs. All studio changes require Interruption of Degree Work
the signature of both the current and new Leaves of absence. A leave of absence is an
major teacher, followed by the signature of approved interruption of the degree pro-
the associate dean for academic affairs. gram. Any student in good standing (see
If no studio teacher at Peabody Conser- pp. 23–24) may be placed on leave of
vatory is willing to accept a student, the absence for personal or professional reasons.
student may be required to withdraw. A student on a leave of absence may not be

26
enrolled as a full-time student at another A fitness for return assessment will be
institution. required as a condition of returning from
an involuntary leave of absence arising
Voluntary. A student may request a leave from any of these circumstances.
of absence by writing to the associate dean
for academic affairs. A leave of absence Undergraduate: Undergraduate students
is granted for the period of one semester on leave of absence for more than the
or one academic year. A leave of absence allowed year must petition the Under-
is not granted routinely, however, and a graduate Committee for readmission and
student should have compelling reasons certification of previously earned credits
for requesting an interruption of his/her toward the degree program. This process
regular progress toward the degree. includes reauditioning and may include
If a leave of absence has been granted, placement tests in specific areas.
the student must notify the Office of Aca-
demic Affairs in writing of the intent to Graduate (other than D.M.A.): Graduate
return by November 15 for re-enrollment students on leave of absence for more than
the following spring semester, or by April the allowed year must petition the Gradu-
15 for fall re-enrollment. A tuition deposit ate Committee for readmission and certifi-
of $50 will be required at that time to cation of previously earned credits toward
reserve space on the major teacher’s ros- the degree program. This process includes
ter; however, a student requesting a leave reauditioning and may include placement
of absence is not guaranteed a space in a tests in specific areas.
teacher’s studio upon return to school. D.M.A.: Once a D.M.A. candidate has
Involuntary. In situations where a leave completed the required coursework, he
of absence is indicated due to circum- or she may no longer exercise the leave-
stances as described below, the associate of-absence option, but must continue to
dean for student affairs will encourage the enroll for Degree-in-Progress through the
student to initiate a voluntary leave of semester of completion of degree require-
absence. If the student declines to do so, ments in order to maintain standing in
the associate dean may require an invol- the program. If a student interrupts his or
untary leave of absence. This step will be her program by failing to pay the DIP fee
taken when necessary to protect the safety for more than one year, the student must
of the student or other individuals or to petition the D.M.A. Committee for read-
preserve the integrity of the university’s mission. Upon approval of the petition, all
learning environment. Such a decision retroactive fees must be paid in order for
may be based on behavior and/or commu- reinstatement of status to become effec-
nication that: tive. Any D.M.A. candidate who fails to
register for Degree-in-Progress will be
•  Harms or threatens harm to the health dropped from the program.
or safety of the student or others;
•  Causes or threatens to cause significant International Students: International
damage to the property or resources of the students who request a leave of absence
university; should be aware that U.S. law governing
•  Evidences chronic and/or serious drug the visa status of F-1 students requires
or alcohol abuse; them to leave the United States for the
duration of their leave of absence, unless
•  Significantly disrupts the functioning of the leave is granted for reasons of illness or
the university community; and/or other medical conditions. Students wish-
•  Reflects disorganized or altered think- ing to remain in the United States during
ing incompatible with successful partici- their leaves of absence must provide medi-
pation in the academic program. cal documentation to the school to support

27
such a request. Medical leave of absence University Policies
cannot exceed an aggregate of one year.
Completion of Program
Withdrawals. Requests for total with- The award of degrees and certificates
drawal from degree programs must be ini- of satisfactory completion is dependent
tiated in the Office of Academic Affairs. upon satisfaction of all current degree and
instructional requirements at the time of
Readmission. Former degree candidates who
such award, compliance with university
have withdrawn from the Conservatory must
and divisional regulations, as well as per-
submit a written request for readmission to
formance meeting bona fide expectations
the associate dean for academic affairs. Final
of faculty. No member of the faculty is
decisions on readmission will be made by
obliged to provide students or graduates
the associate dean in consultation with the
with an evaluation or letter of recommen-
appropriate academic committee.
dation which does not accurately reflect
that faculty member’s true opinion and
Student Rights and Responsibilities evaluation of academic performance and
Students are responsible for understand- conduct.
ing all academic regulations and require-
The Johns Hopkins University does
ments for graduation, as set forth in this
not guarantee the award of a degree or a
catalog and the Student Handbook, and
certificate of satisfactory completion of
are responsible for completing the appli-
any course of study or training program to
cable requirements for graduation. The
students enrolled in any instructional or
Peabody Institute of necessity reserves the
training program.
right to change any provision, require-
ment, policy, or regulation published in Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy as to
the catalog within a student’s term of resi- Students
dence. However, it may be assumed that,
except under the most unusual circum- The Johns Hopkins University admits
stances, the regulations in force during a students of any race, color, gender, religion,
student’s term of residence are those stated age, national or ethnic origin, disability,
in the catalog of the year in which that marital status or veteran status to all of
student’s matriculation was begun. the rights, privileges, programs, benefits,
and activities generally accorded or made
available to students at the university. It
Graduation Rates
does not discriminate on the basis of race,
In compliance with the federal Student color, gender, marital status, pregnancy,
Right-to-Know Act of 1990 (Public Law ethnicity, national origin, age, disability,
101-542, Sec. 668.46), Peabody Conser- religion, sexual orientation, gender iden-
vatory of The Johns Hopkins University tity or expression, veteran status, or other
provides the following information to legally protected characteristic in any stu-
prospective and currently enrolled under- dent program or activity administered by
graduates: the university, including the administration
Entering Freshman Class, of its educational policies, admission poli-
September 2002: 77 cies, scholarship and loan programs, and
athletic and other university-administered
returning as sophomores 60 78%
programs or in employment.
graduating within 4 years 41 53%
Questions regarding Title VI, Title
graduating within 5 years 47 61%
IX, and Section 504 should be referred
Questions about graduation data should to the Office of Institutional Equity, 130
be addressed to the Conservatory Regis- Garland Hall, Telephone: 410-516-8075,
trar, 410-659-8100, ext. 4410. (TTY): 410-516-6225.

28
Policy on the Reserve Officer Training Corps for refraining from conduct that vio-
Defense Department policies regard- lates this policy.
ing sexual orientation in ROTC programs 2. For purposes of this policy, harassment
conflict with this university policy. is defined as:
Because ROTC is a valuable component of
a) any type of behavior which is based
the university that provides an opportu-
on gender, marital status, preg-
nity for many students to afford a Hopkins
nancy, race, color, ethnicity, national
education, to train for a career, and to
origin, age, disability, religion,
become positive forces in the military, the
sexual orientation, gender identity
university, after careful study, has contin-
or expression, veteran status, that
ued its ROTC program, but encourages a
b) is so severe or pervasive that it
change in federal policy that brings it into
interferes with an individual’s work
conformity with the university’s policy.
or academic performance or creates
Anti-Harassment Policy an intimidating, hostile or offensive
Preamble working or academic environment.
The Johns Hopkins University is com- 3. Harassment when directed at an
mitted to providing its staff, faculty and individual because of his/her gender,
students the opportunity to pursue excel- marital status, pregnancy, race, color,
lence in their academic and professional ethnicity, national origin, age, dis-
endeavors. This can only exist when each ability, religion, sexual orientation,
member of our community is assured an gender identity or expression, personal
atmosphere of mutual respect. The free appearance, veteran status, or any
and open exchange of ideas is fundamental other legally protected characteristic
to the university’s purpose. It is not the may include, but is not limited to:
university’s intent in promulgating this unwanted physical contact; use of epi-
policy to inhibit free speech or the free thets, inappropriate jokes, comments
communication of ideas by members of or innuendos; obscene or harassing
the academic community. telephone calls, e-mails, letters, notes
Policy Against Discriminatory Harassment or other forms of communication; and,
any conduct that may create a hostile
1. The university is committed to working or academic environment.
maintaining learning and working
environments that are free from all 4. Sexual harassment, whether between
forms of harassment and discrimina- people of different sexes or the same
tion. Accordingly, harassment based sex, is defined to include, but is not
on an individual’s gender, marital limited to, unwelcome sexual advances,
status, pregnancy, race, color, ethnic- requests for sexual favors, and other
ity, national origin, age, disability, behavior of a sexual nature when:
religion, sexual orientation, gender a) submission to such conduct is made
identity or expression, veteran status, implicitly or explicitly a term or
or other legally protected characteristic condition of an individual’s employ-
is prohibited. The university will not ment or participation in an educa-
tolerate harassment, sexual harassment tion program;
or retaliation in the workplace or edu- b) submission to or rejection of such
cational environment whether commit- conduct by an individual is used as
ted by faculty, staff, or students, or by the basis for personnel decisions or
visitors to Hopkins while they are on for academic evaluation or advance-
campus. Each member of the commu- ment; or
nity is responsible for fostering civility, c) such conduct has the purpose or effect
for being familiar with this policy, and of unreasonably interfering with an

29
individual’s work or academic per- 3. Individuals who witness what they
formance or creates an intimidating, believe may be discriminatory harass-
hostile or offensive working or educa- ment of another are encouraged to
tional environment. report their concerns as soon as possible
Sexual harassment may include, but to the Office of Institutional Equity,
is not limited to, unwelcome sexual their supervisors, divisional human
advances; demands/threats for sexual resources, or the Office of the Dean of
favors or actions; posting, distributing, their school.
or displaying sexual pictures or objects; 4. Complainants are assured that reports
suggestive gestures, sounds or stares; of harassment will be treated in a con-
unwelcome physical contact; sending/ fidential manner, within the bounds
forwarding inappropriate e-mails of a of the university’s legal obligation to
sexual or offensive nature; inappropri- respond appropriately to any and all
ate jokes, comments or innuendos of allegations of harassment.
a sexual natures; obscene or harassing
telephone calls, e-mails, letters, notes 5. Managers, including faculty manag-
or other forms of communication; and ers, who receive reports of harassment
any conduct of a sexual nature that should contact human resources or the
may create a hostile working or educa- Office of Institutional Equity for assis-
tional environment. tance in investigating and resolving
the issue.
5. Retaliation against an individual who
complains of discriminatory harass- 6. Managers, including faculty managers,
ment under this policy is strictly are required to implement corrective
prohibited. Intentionally making a action where, after completing the
false accusation of harassment is also investigation, it is determined correc-
prohibited. tive action is indicated.
7. The university administration is
Responsibilities Under This Policy responsible for ensuring the consistent
The university is committed to enforce- application of this policy.
ment of this policy. Individuals who are
found to have violated this policy will be Procedures for Discrimination Complaints
subject to the full range of sanctions, up to Brought Within Hopkins
and including termination of his/her uni- Inquiries regarding procedures on dis-
versity affiliation. crimination complaints may be directed to
the Vice Provost for Institutional Equity,
1. All individuals are expected to conduct or the Director for Equity Compliance &
themselves in a manner consistent with Education, 130 Garland Hall, Homewood
this policy. Campus, 410-516-8075, 410-516-6225
2. Staff, faculty and/or students who (TTY).
believe that they have been subject to Nonimmigrant Alien Students
discriminatory harassment are encour- The Peabody Institute enrolls nonim-
aged to report, as soon as possible, their migrant alien students and encourages
concerns to the Office of Institutional applications from qualified foreign
Equity, their supervisors, divisional students.
human resources or the Office of the
Dean of their school. The university University Policy on Alcohol and Drug Abuse
provides a network of confidential The Johns Hopkins University rec-
consultants by which individuals can ognizes that alcoholism and other drug
discuss concerns related to discrimina- addiction are illnesses that are not eas-
tory harassment. ily resolved by personal effort and may

30
require professional assistance and treat- place (which includes any location where
ment. Faculty, staff and students with one is in the performance of duties) within
alcohol or other drug problems are five (5) days after such conviction. If the
encouraged to take advantage of the diag- individual is supported by a federal grant
nostic, referral, counseling and preventive or contract, the university will notify the
services available through the university. supporting government agency within ten
Procedures have been developed to assure (10) days after receiving notice
confidentiality of participation, program
files and medical records generated in the Smoke-free Environment
course of these services. The Johns Hopkins University is a
Substance or alcohol abuse does not smoke-free environment, and, as such,
excuse faculty, staff or students from prohibits smoking in all its facilities.
neglect of their employment or academic Campus Violence
responsibilities. Individuals whose work The Johns Hopkins University is
or academic performance is impaired as committed to providing a learning and
the result of the use or abuse of alcohol or working environment that is safe to all
other drugs may be required to participate members of the university community.
in an appropriate diagnostic evaluation The university will not tolerate violent
and treatment plan. Further, use of alcohol acts on its campuses, at off-campus loca-
or other drugs in situations off campus or tions administered by the university, or
removed from university activities that in its programs. The policy of “zero toler-
in any way impairs work performance is ance” extends not only to actual violent
treated as misconduct on campus. Stu- conduct but also to verbal threats and
dents are prohibited from engaging in the intimidation, whether by students, faculty,
unlawful possession, use or distribution of staff, or visitors to the university.
alcohol or other drugs on university prop-
The university urges individuals who
erty or as a part of university activities.
have experienced or witnessed incidents
It is the policy of The Johns Hopkins of violence to report them to Campus
University that the unlawful manufacture, Security. Alternatively, students are urged
distribution, dispensation, possession or to report concerns about violence to the
use of controlled substances is prohibited divisional office responsible for student
on the university’s property or as a part matters, faculty to the divisional office
of university activities. Individuals who responsible for faculty matters, and staff to
possess, use, manufacture or illegally the applicable human resources offices.
distribute drugs or controlled dangerous The university will not permit retali-
substances are subject to university disci- ation against anyone who, in good faith,
plinary action, as well as possible referral brings a complaint of campus violence or
for criminal prosecution. Such disciplinary serves as a witness in the investigation of a
action of faculty and staff may, in accor- complaint of campus violence.
dance with this policy, range from a mini-
mum of a three day suspension without Firearms
pay to termination of university employ- The possession, wearing, carrying,
ment. Disciplinary action against students transporting, or use of a firearm or pellet
may include expulsion from school. weapon is strictly forbidden on university
As a condition of employment, each premises. This prohibition also extends
faculty and staff member and student to any person who may have acquired
employee must agree to abide by this a government-issued permit or license.
policy, and to notify the divisional human Violation of this regulation will result in
resources director of any criminal convic- disciplinary action and sanctions up to and
tion related to drug activity in the work- including expulsion, in the case of stu-

31
dents, or termination of employment, in engaged in teaching, rehearsals, and per-
the case of employees. Disciplinary action formances and other activities at Peabody
for violations of this regulation will be for use in Peabody publications such as
the responsibility of the divisional student catalogs, concert calendars, posters, fliers,
affairs officer, dean or director, or the vice media advertising, admissions recruitment
president for human resources, as may be and development brochures, as well as on
appropriate, in accordance with applicable the Peabody web site or for distribution
procedures. Any questions regarding this to state or national media for promotional
policy, including the granting of excep- purposes.
tions for law enforcement officers and for Classes and private lessons will only
persons acting under the supervision of be photographed with the permission of
authorized university personnel, should be the faculty member; performances and
addressed to the appropriate chief campus rehearsals will only be photographed with
security officer. the permission of the conductor or director
in charge of the event. Such photographs
Availability of Annual Security Report
will be retained in the Peabody files and
In accordance with the Crime Aware- archives and may be used by Peabody
ness and Campus Security Act of 1990, without time limitations or restrictions.
(Pub.L. 102-26), as amended, and the Faculty, students, and staff are made aware
regulations promulgated thereunder, by virtue of this policy that the university
the university issues its Annual Security reserves the right to alter photography and
Report which describes the security ser- film for creative purposes.
vices at each of the university’s divisions
and reports crime statistics for each of Faculty, students and staff who do not
the campuses. The report is published on wish their photographs used in the man-
the university’s web page (www.jhu.edu). ner described in this policy statement
Students, faculty, and staff may obtain a should contact the Peabody Communica-
copy from the web page or the university’s tions Office at 410-659-8100, ext. 3045.
Security Department, 14 Shriver Hall, Faculty and students are advised that
3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, persons in public places are deemed by law
Maryland 21218-2689. Telephone: 410- to have no expectation of privacy and are
516-4600. subject to being photographed by third
parties. Johns Hopkins University has no
Photography and Film Rights control over the use of photographs or film
Peabody Institute reserves the right taken by third parties, including, without
from time to time to take photographs limitation, the news media covering uni-
of and film faculty, staff, and students versity activities.

32
Degrees and Programs
Application deadlines for all classifications are: nations must be taken within a one-year
December 1 Admission/Scholarship period prior to the time of entrance. Gen-
April 15 Admission, except for D.M.A. eral admission requirements as listed for
and Artist Diploma, for which specific degrees and programs are identical
auditions and interviews are for all applicants. However, immigra-
held only during February tion regulations, varying educational
Audition Week. backgrounds, and financial considerations
make special procedures necessary in
In general, there is no midyear admis- order to help meet the needs of individual
sion to a degree program except for cur- students. The detailed instructions sent
rent Peabody students beginning a higher to each applicant should be studied with
degree. Students may seek midyear admis- utmost care.
sion to Extension study subject to course
and teacher availability. Reapplication. An individual may not apply
An audition in the student’s major for admission to a particular degree or
field and other required admissions exami- diploma program more than twice.

The Bachelor of Music Degree


The Bachelor of Music program at preparation for their Peabody coursework.
Peabody Conservatory is designed to offer Non-native speakers of English are urged
gifted students the training to prepare to take a summer language course at one
themselves for careers in performance, of the many U.S. institutions that offer
composition, computer music, music edu- ESL, including Johns Hopkins University,
cation, recording arts, and related areas of prior to their first semester at Peabody.
professional activity.
Audition requirements. Undergraduate
Admission Requirements applicants are urged to perform their audi-
Prior study. An applicant for admission to tions during a personal visit to Peabody,
the Bachelor of Music degree program must ideally during the February audition week
be a graduate of an accredited high school reserved by the school exclusively for that
or present evidence of equivalent study. purpose. With the exception of piano,
SAT Testing. Each applicant from the those undergraduate applicants living
United States must present SAT scores. over 300 miles to the west of Baltimore or
over 150 miles to the north or south may
TOEFL Testing. Each applicant whose audition by submitting a CD recording.
native language is not English must pres- The CD must be a high quality recording
ent a score from the Test of English as a containing only audition material. Full
Foreign Language (TOEFL). Scores of at information about the time, place, and
least 550 from the basic paper test, at least circumstances of the recording must be
213 from the computer-based version, included. It is also possible to play for a
or 79 from the Internet-based test are
traveling admissions representative who
expected of undergraduate applicants.
will record the audition and present it to
International students. International stu- the appropriate faculty during the Febru-
dents admitted to Peabody must take ary audition period. Refer to the Academic
responsibility to improve their English in Calendar for dates.

33
Applicants for the B.M. in jazz perfor- Required music course credits may be estab-
mance, organ, percussion, and piano can- lished through verifying examinations
not audition at off-campus audition sites. taken at Peabody.
Audition guides (not requirements) in Elective music course credits with a grade
each major field are listed on the Peabody of C or better may be transferred pending
website at www.peabody.jhu.edu approval of the associate dean for academic
/admissions and are also available from affairs and the registrar.
the Admissions Office. Pre-screening Ensemble credits do not transfer. There is a
recordings are required in certain majors two-year minimum requirement. See the
and programs. Please refer to the Peabody Student Handbook for details.
web site and admissions materials for Liberal arts credits with a grade of C
details. or better may be transferred from an
Applicants at live auditions may be accredited college or university without
asked to perform at sight a composition examination, pending approval by the
selected by the examination committee. registrar in consultation with the chair of
The audition requirements for Music the Humanities Department.
Education applicants are the same as
those for performance majors, with the Common Curriculum Components—
addition of an interview with the Music Regulations and Examinations
Education faculty. Composition majors, in Applied Study
addition to submitting written materials, Each student taking applied music
are expected to have a reasonable level of must demonstrate satisfactory progress,
proficiency in a performance area and in as determined by the faculty in the major
music theory. and minor applied areas.
Degree Requirements (B.M.) Major field: Study in the major field
must continue through the last semester
Hours and residence. A minimum of 122 of enrollment. Advancement is accom-
semester hours, excluding ensemble, is plished by departmental examination, and
required for the attainment of the Bache- the progress of each student is monitored
lor of Music degree. Residence is normally by the department at intervals not greater
four years, during which time a student than two semesters. Each student must
must maintain full-time status for at least play a performance jury in his or her major
four semesters, accumulating no fewer applied area at the end of each school
than 60 credit hours during those four year. A graduation recital is required of
semesters. all degree candidates. Some departments
In all departments, the major teacher require a half-recital in the junior year.
advises students in the selection of appro- 109—The freshman jury is considered an
priate courses. advising aid to the student and his
Transfer students. Transfer students must or her teacher in planning the fol-
fulfill a two-year full-time requirement lowing year’s study.
and obtain a minimum of 60 hours at 209—The purpose of the 209 jury
Peabody in order to receive the Bachelor taken at the end of the sophomore
of Music degree. year (4th semester or credit hour
Major area placement. The applied level equivalent) is to assess the student’s
of transfer students is determined by the overall progress and to determine
department at the time of the audition whether or not he or she should be
and validated by the year-end departmen- advised to continue in the chosen
tal jury. curriculum.

34
    On the basis of this jury and all periods of Western art music from
the student’s overall record, the jury classical antiquity to the present. The
committee makes recommendations courses may be taken in any order and at
for the student’s remaining years any time, though students are encouraged
of undergraduate study. It is in the to enroll in their third and fourth years of
student’s best interests that a careful study. One semester of Music and Culture
professional assessment and subse- may be substituted for one music history
quent recommendation be made. course. Jazz majors are required to take
309—The 309 jury is taken at the end of two of the five available offerings.
the junior year. A half or full recital Transfer credits will be considered for
may be accepted in fulfillment of approval by the chair of the Musicol-
the 309 requirement, if juried by ogy department on a case-by-case basis.
the majority of the department. Undergraduates may in no circumstances
Where the 309 also includes techni- apply more than two courses from other
cal examination and/or orchestral institutions towards their Peabody under-
excerpts, students shall present those graduate degrees, and they must receive
during the regular jury period. at least a “B” in any courses transferred.
Advanced Placement courses in musicol-
395—The 395 is the recital for the Per- ogy or music history cannot be applied for
former’s Certificate. Candidates credit to Peabody undergraduate degrees.
for the Bachelor of Music degree
with a music education major also Pedagogy
perform this recital in their junior In addition to pedagogy courses offered
year and qualify for the Performer’s in specific majors, studio repertoire and
Certificate. master classes provide for regular discus-
sions on principles of pedagogy, enabling
495—The 495 is the senior recital. Jury all performance majors to achieve compe-
content requirements specific to tency in this area.
each department are published in
the Student Handbook. Thursday Noon Recital Series
Thursday Noon Recital Series provides
Composition majors. Students majoring in a weekly program throughout the aca-
composition receive private lessons with a demic year. Students have the opportunity
member of the Composition Department. to hear a variety of solo and chamber
Weekly seminars are scheduled with the works, as well as occasional guest per-
entire Composition Department in atten- formances of music outside the classical
dance, providing ongoing departmental tradition. No classes or lessons that enroll
evaluation for each student. first-year undergraduates are scheduled
during the Thursday Noon hour, and all
Musicology
members of the campus community are
The academic discipline of musicol-
encouraged to attend. All first-year stu-
ogy investigates the varied relationships
dents (freshmen and transfer students) will
between musical traditions and the
be required to attend 10 Thursday Noon
cultures that create and sustain them. The
recitals in their first and second semesters
discipline necessarily combines histori-
of residency at Peabody. All second-year
cal and cultural research with analysis of
students (sophomores and second-year
music.
transfer students) will be required to com-
All undergraduate degree programs
plete a concert attendance project during
at Peabody, with the exception of jazz,
their third and fourth semesters.
require a four-semester sequence of courses
(History of Music I, II, III, IV) covering

35
Music Theory/Ear-training/Keyboard before the start of classes. Students placed
Studies in ESL courses must successfully complete
The music theory program is a three- these courses in order to fulfill the require-
year requirement for all students. Entrance ments for the Bachelor of Music degree
into Music Theory I presumes a firm program. Some Peabody courses require
knowledge of the fundamentals of music, ESL courses as a prerequisite.
i.e., rhythm, meter, scales, intervals, keys, The ESL requirement may extend the
triads, and inversions. Entering students length of a student’s program. Intensive
who are not strong in this area are encour- English study over the summer months is
aged to review their preparatory work strongly recommended for ESL students.
during the months prior to the beginning
of the freshman year. Those who are not Humanities
able to show proficiency in these areas will Peabody’s humanities courses serve a
be placed in a special fundamentals review vital role in the undergraduate curricu-
section for which no credit is given, in lum. Studies in liberal arts and language
addition to Music Theory I. Ear-training complement the structured musical train-
and sight-singing classes are closely coor- ing of the Conservatory, bridging the
dinated with the music theory sections focused life of musical endeavor and the
during the first two years of study. Stu- broader, ever-changing world from which
dents who are not able to show proficiency that life draws shape and meaning. The
in ear-training will be placed into a special humanities curriculum contributes richly
ear-training review section for which no to the undergraduate experience at Pea-
credit is given, in addition to Ear-training/ body. It is essential to Peabody’s highest
Sight-singing I. educational goals, uniquely challenging
Advanced placement in music theory is Peabody students to aspire to their full
possible; students with strong music the- potential as responsible and productive
ory backgrounds may take the Advanced artists and members of the human com-
Placement Undergraduate Exam in munity.
Music Theory during Orientation, which A flexible humanities curriculum
includes part-writing, analysis, and coun- accommodates the individual needs of
terpoint. Samples of this examination are undergraduates with varied backgrounds,
available from the Admissions Office or at skills, interests, and goals. The program
www.peabody.jhu.edu/theory. also recognizes the unique situations of
Keyboard Studies classes are coordi- transfers and international students.
nated with the first two years of music Each fall the Humanities Seminar helps
theory and ear-training classes. Auditions new undergraduates transition into aca-
held during fall Orientation determine demic study at Peabody; in subsequent
placement in sections which are grouped semesters students complete their humani-
according to piano and music theory back- ties distribution requirements by selecting
ground. Advanced placement is possible, courses from three different study areas:
based on the audition. Global Perspectives, Language and Litera-
ture, and Historical/Philosophical Studies.
English as a Second Language (ESL) All Peabody undergraduates are encour-
Peabody offers intensive English as a aged to fulfill humanities requirements
Second Language (ESL) courses for students with courses offered on the Homewood
whose English language skills are not at campus (the School of Arts and Sciences at
college level. All incoming international Johns Hopkins University).
students will be tested and interviewed to
determine their level of English proficiency Liberal Arts
during fall semester Orientation Week at Students in Peabody’s liberal arts
Peabody. This testing must be completed courses confront issues of relevance to

36
their lives as artists, teachers, and citizens AP and Transfer Credits for Humanities
in the 21st century. Most of the liberal arts Classes
courses are interdisciplinary, encouraging Advanced Placement and transfer deter-
students to formulate, explore, and express minations are made by the Humanities
their ideas. These classes rely heavily on Department chair in consultation with the
student input and class participation; associate dean for academic affairs. Superior
they demand creative thought within the scores of either a 4 or a 5 on the Advanced
context of disciplined study. Writing is Placement Examinations administered by
emphasized in liberal arts courses. the College Board or a 6 or 7 on the Inter-
national Baccalau­reate Exam are accepted
Foreign Languages for credit in most required study areas.
Knowledge of foreign languages opens Transfer credits that fulfill humanities dis-
personal and professional opportunities for tribution requirements are also accepted.
our students. Our program requires one Relevant documentation must be for-
year of foreign language study for most warded to the Peabody Registrar’s Office;
majors; some majors require more. Inter- students should then confer with the
ested students can enroll in advanced lan- Humanities Department chair to review
guage courses for ongoing, intensive study. their situation.
The foreign languages offered on
campus are French, German, and Ital- Placement Examinations in Foreign Language
ian; Spanish is offered on the Homewood Examinations for advanced placement
campus. Students whose linguistic back- in French, German, and Italian are given
ground and/or professional interests show during Orientation Week. Placement
sufficient grounds for study of other lan- exams in Spanish must be taken on the
guages may petition the foreign language Homewood campus.
coordinator for permission. Petitions will
Electives. Unless otherwise specified, the
be reviewed by the Humanities Depart-
term elective means class elective. Ques-
ment as a whole and judged according to
tions about the appropriateness of courses
their merits.
for elective credit can be directed to the
The JHU Digital Portfolio Registrar’s Office.
A portfolio requirement leads students
Repeated courses. Undergraduate students
to reflect critically on their work in the
who fail any single course more than once
humanities and to make deliberate links
will be required to petition the appropri-
between musical and academic study.
ate department and the Undergraduate
Through the years of their undergraduate
Committee before enrolling for a third
study, students assemble work that best
time. The appropriate department may
represents the effort and achievement of
require additional prerequisites to the
their humanities coursework for inclusion
course failed.
in their personal digital portfolio. The
portfolio project puts broad perspective on Ensemble requirement. All undergradu-
undergraduate studies in humanities; as a ates participate in performing ensembles,
marketing tool, it helps students as they for which specified blocks of time are set
enter competitive fields of professional aside each day.
endeavor and as they seek further opportu-
nities for study. The Humanities Depart- Large ensembles. Bachelor of Music candi-
ment works in partnership with the Johns dates majoring in orchestral instruments
Hopkins University School of Education must participate in at least one of the
on this initiative. following large ensembles during each
semester of enrollment for major study:
the Peabody Symphony Orchestra,

37
Peabody Concert Orchestra, or Peabody beyond those required cannot be counted
Wind Ensemble. Audition excerpts for the as elective credits. Detailed guidelines for
fall hearings are available by late spring or large and small ensemble participation are
early summer of each year, and students found in the Student Handbook.
are urged to prepare themselves thor-
oughly during the intervening summer Advanced Standing
months. Large ensemble auditions are held Advanced credit is granted to stu-
during Orientation Week, and they are dents who demonstrate accomplishment
heard by the conductors and departmental of college-level work in certain areas.
coordinators. Other faculty members are The amount of credit granted for such
invited to attend. Composition majors advanced standing will be that listed in
have a four-semester requirement in one the catalog of entry, and appropriate nota-
of the above-mentioned ensembles or the tion will be made in the student’s perma-
Peabody/Hopkins Chorus or Peabody Con- nent record.
cert Singers, depending on the student’s Major applied study. It is not expected
primary applied performance area. All that entering freshmen will be granted
voice and organ B.M. candidates have a advanced placement in applied study.
six-semester choral requirement. For voice Freshmen exhibiting extraordinary prog-
majors, performance of a major opera role ress and extensive repertoire may, however,
may qualify for large ensemble credit. All complete their four performance examina-
other nonorchestral B.M. candidates have tions in three years upon recommendation
a four-semester choral requirement. of the major teacher and approval by the
associate dean for academic affairs.
Small ensembles. String and percussion Academic music study. Placement is estab-
majors are required to enroll for four lished by examination.
semesters of chamber music. Woodwind Music theory: All undergraduate appli-
and brass majors have a one-semester small cants will be tested in music theory. The
ensemble requirement, which may be sat- examination will include rhythm, meter,
isfied over a period of time. To earn credit, scales, intervals, keys, and triads. Place-
a minimum of 10 certified coaching hours ment into Music Theory I presumes a
and a performance must be completed. solid grasp of the basic rudiments of music
After completing the Sight-reading course theory. This skill level is tested during
in their freshman year, piano majors ful- the audition period, and students who
fill accompanying and chamber music show deficiencies are sent study recom-
requirements specified in the curriculum. mendations. They should then retake
There is no limit to the number of the rudiments examination (Speed and
credits that can be earned for ensemble Comprehension Rudiments Examination
participation. However, ensemble credits —SACRE) during Orientation Week.

38
B.M. Curricula
B.M. Curriculum-Performance Majors
Guitar

Credits
Performance 64
Guitar: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Departmental Seminar: 8 semesters, 1 credit per semester 8
Department Examination: 2 spring semesters, 2 credits each 4
Half Recital (in junior year): 2 credits 2
Senior Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Guitar Ensemble: 6 semesters, 1 credit per semester 6
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required sophomore and 8
junior years, 2 credits per semester
Chamber Music: 1 credit per semester 2

Music academics 55
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits
per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Guitar Music Skills I (530.585-586), Guitar Music Skills II 4
(530.587-588); 1 credit per semester (required in freshman
and sophomore years)
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156), 2 credits per semester; 4
placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music 8
History I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Guitar Literature (530.431-432, recommended junior year), 4
2 credits per semester
Lute Tablature and Notation (530.433-434, recommended 4
senior year), 2 credits per semester
Guitar Pedagogy (530.637-638, recommended senior year), 4
2 credits per semester
Basic Conducting, 1 credit 1

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester freshman year) 5
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 6
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman year), 1
½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year) ½ credit per semester
General Electives 4
Total 157

39
Early Music Instruments: Harpsichord

Credits
Performance 61-65
Major Lesson: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Department Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits each 6
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Voice Minor: 2 semesters, 1 credit per semester 2
Organ Minor: 2 semesters, 1 credit per semester 2
Minor Instrument: 2 semesters, 1 credit per semester 2
Baroque Ensemble, 7 semesters, 1 credit per semester 7
Baltimore Baroque Band (2 credits per semester) 8-12

Music academics 51
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312),
3 credits per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.157-158), 2 credits per semester; 4
placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Continuo I and II: Figured Bass, 2 credits per semester 4
Harpsichord Tuning (370.492) 2
Harpsichord Literature (530.421,422) 1 credit per semester 2
Baroque Ornamentation, (530.441-442), 2 semesters, 2 credits per semester 4
Basic Conducting, 1 credit 1

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 6
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year) ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year) ½ credit per semester
General Electives 4
Total 150–154

40
Early Music Instruments: Viola da Gamba, Baroque Flute, Recorder, Baroque Oboe,
Baroque Violin/Viola, Baroque Cello, Renaissance Lute, Baroque Lute, Theorbo

Credits
Performance 63
Major Lesson: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Department Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits each 6
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Minor Instrument: 4 semesters, 1 credit per semester 4
*Baroque Ensemble, 7 semesters, 1 credit per semester 7
Choice of Renaissance Ensemble or Baltimore Baroque 12
Band, 2 credits per semester for 6 semesters

Music academics 47–55


Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312),
3 credits per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.157-158), 2 credits per semester; 4
placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
**Lute Literature and Notation (530.433-434), 2 credits per semester 4
***Continuo I and II (530.315, 445), 2 credits per semester 4
Major instrument literature 4
Baroque Ornamentation (530.441-442), 2 credits per semester 4
Basic Conducting, 1 credit 1

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 6
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
General Electives 4
Total 148–156

   *Four credits of Viola da Gamba consort are required for viola da gamba majors
  **Required for lute majors
***Required for Renaissance lute, Baroque lute, theorbo, Baroque cello, and viola da
gamba majors

41
Strings, Brass, Woodwinds, Harp, Percussion

Credits
Performance 58–60
Major Instrument: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Department Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits each 6
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
*Large Ensemble: required each semester of enrollment for major 16
lessons, 2 credits per semester
Chamber Music: 4 semesters, 1 credit per semester, except for 2-4
woodwind and brass majors, who have a 2-semester requirement

Music academics 43–45


Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312),
3 credits per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156 and 710.255-256), 2 credits 8
per semester; placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Basic Conducting (330.311), 1 credit 1
**Piccolo Class (530.463-464) 1 credit per semester 2

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 12
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
Music Electives 6
General Electives 4
Total 145-147

  *Additional ensemble credit may not be used to fulfill elective requirements


**Required for flute majors and to be taken in two consecutive semesters;
recommended for the junior year.

42
Organ

Credits
Performance 64
Major Instrument: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Departmental Seminar: 8 semesters, 1 credit per semester 8
Department Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits each 6
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Piano Minor: 1 credit per semester for 2 semesters 2
Voice Minor: 1 credit per semester for 2 semesters 2
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required freshman through junior years, 12
2 credits per semester

Music academics 57
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III, (710.311-312),
3 credits per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies, 2 credits per semester 4
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music 8
History I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture) 2 credits per semester
Sight-reading (530.111-112), 2 credits per semester 4
Organ Literature (530.423-424), 3 credits per semester 6
Resources for the Contemporary Church Organist (530.425-426), 6
3 credits per semester
Continuo I: Figured Bass (530.315) 2
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 6
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman 1
year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
General Electives 4
Total 159

43
Piano

Credits
Performance 52
Major Instrument: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Department Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits each 6
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required sophomore and junior years, 8
2 credits per semester
Chamber Music:1 credit per semester for 4 semesters 4

Music academics 61
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312),
3 credits per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors (530.211-212 and 530.213-214), 8
2 credits per semester
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music 8
History I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Sight-reading (530.111-112), recommended in the freshman year, 4
2 credits per semester
Accompanying (530.213-214), recommended in the sophomore year, 2
1 credit per semester
Keyboard Literature I, II, III, IV (530.411, 412, 413,414), 8
2 credits per semester
Piano Pedagogy (530.667-668), recommended in the senior year, 4
2 credits per semester
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 10
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
Music Electives 4
General Electives 4
Total 155

44
Voice

Credits
Performance 60
Major Instrument: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Departmental Seminar: recommended for senior year 1
Vocal Coaching: junior and senior years, 1 credit per semester 4
Department Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits each 6
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required freshman through junior years, 12
2 credits per semester
*Opera performance electives, junior and senior year, 3
1 credit per semester

Music academics 67
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312),
3 credits per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156, 710.255-256), 2 credits per 8
semester; placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture) 2 credits per semester
Singing in English (530.475), English and American Song (530.476), 4
recommended in freshman year, 2 credits per semester
Singing in Italian (530.469), Italian Song (530.470), 4
recommended in sophomore year, 2 credits per semester
Singing in German (530.477), 3 credits; German Lieder (530.481), 5
recommended in junior year, 2 credits
French Mélodie (530.480), recommended in junior year 2
Singing in French (530.483), recommended in senior year 3
Opera Literature (560.473, 474), 2 credits per semester 4
Stage Movement (530.391) 1
Acting for Opera (530.491) 1
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115), required first-semester 5
freshman year
Italian I (250.111-112), recommended in freshman year, 6
3 credits per semester
German I (240.111-112), recommended in sophomore year, 6
3 credits per semester
French I (230.111-112), recommended in junior year, 6
3 credits per semester
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (3 credits); Global Perspectives 9
(3 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies (3 credits)

45
Voice (continued)

Credits
Other 14
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
General Electives 6
Second year German or Italian or Vocal Lit elective 6
Total 173

*The three credits of opera performance electives must be fulfilled by participation in


two separate productions of Opera Workshop, Opera Etudes, Chamber Opera, or Opera
Theatre, as assigned by the Opera Department. One of the three may also be fulfilled
by participation in any performance class offered by the Opera Department, such as the
second semester of Acting for Opera or Opera Styles and Traditions.

Early Music Concentration for B.M. Voice


An early music concentration is offered in the voice curriculum. Application for
admission is made to the Department of Early Music in the sophomore year. Those
admitted have the following modified curriculum.
Removed from the curriculum:
German Lieder (530.481), 1 semester, 2 credits
French Mélodie (530.480), 1 semester, 2 credits
Added to the curriculum:
Early Vocal Literature (530.543,544), 2 semesters, 2 credits each
Baroque Ornamentation (530.441-442), 2 semesters, 2 credits each
Historical Diction for Singers (530.559), 1 semester, 1 credit
Other modifications to the curriculum:
• Renaissance Ensemble (950.529-530) and Baroque Ensemble (950.527-528) are the
required ensembles instead of Chorus in the junior year. A total of six semesters of
Renaissance Ensemble and Baroque Ensemble are required.
• Vocal coaching is given by early music faculty.
• The number of opera performance electives is reduced from three to two. One of the
electives may be fulfilled by participation in any performance class offered by the
Opera Department, such as Acting for Opera or Opera Styles and Traditions.
• The requirements for the senior recital shall remain the same as for the B.M. in voice,
but the repertoire must be predominantly pre-19th-century, subject to approval by
the Early Music Department chair and the major teacher.

46
B.M. Curriculum—Jazz Performance
The Bachelor of Music program in jazz performance is designed to provide students
with the necessary performance skills to pursue a career in jazz. This goal will be pur-
sued through private study, improvisation workshops, ensemble rehearsals and per-
formances, master classes with prominent guest artists, plus class work in jazz theory,
arranging and composition. Virtually all classes in the program include performance
activity, generally in small combos. Jazz Orchestra, required each semester of enrollment
in the program, will provide performance experience with literature encompassing all of
the jazz idioms.
Students applying for admission into the jazz performance program must pass
entrance auditions on their major instrument of study (trumpet, percussion, double bass,
sax, flute, piano, guitar, voice). A certain number of scholarships are available on a com-
petitive basis.
A general placement test in music theory, dictation, and ear-training will be admin-
istered in accordance with standard Peabody practice. Auditions are held on campus in
Baltimore in February and May according to the Conservatory audition schedule. Due
to the interactive nature of these auditions, it is not possible to audition at off-campus
audition sites.

Jazz Performance

Credits
Performance 60
Major Lesson: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Department Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits per semester 6
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
*Jazz Orchestra (Large Ensemble): 2 credits per semester 16
Small Ensemble: 1 credit per semester for 4 semesters 4

Music academics 51
Jazz Fundamentals (710.127-128), 2 credits per semester 4
Music Theory I (710.111-112), 3 credits per semester; placement 6
by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), 2 credits per semester; 4
placement by examination
Jazz Ear-training (710.263-264), 2 credits per semester 4
Jazz Theory/Keyboard Lab I and II (710.259-260, 710.359-360); 8
2 credits per semester
Jazz Arranging and Composition (710.361-362), 2 credits per semester 4
Jazz Improvisation I and II (530.561-562, 530.563-564), 8
2 credits per semester
History of Music (2 of the following 5 courses: Music History 4
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Constructive Listening and Analysis/Jazz History (530.569-570), 4
2 credits per semester
Orchestration (710.413-414), 2 credits per semester 4
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

47
Jazz Performance (continued)
Credits

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies (6 credits);
Electives (6 credits)
Other 6
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman 1
year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
Sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
General Electives* 4
Total 149

* Recommended electives include Basic Recording Techniques for Musicians (2-2),


Introduction to Computer Music (3-3), and The Music Business: Cash, Contracts, and
Copyrights (2,0).
Ensemble Requirements: Jazz majors are required to participate in the Jazz Orchestra each
semester of enrollment. Students are also encouraged to perform in the department’s
small ensembles.
Additional Requirements
Woodwinds: Jazz woodwind majors have an additional applied study requirement
as follows:
Saxophone—one semester each of applied study on flute and clarinet.
Flute—one semester each of applied study on saxophone and clarinet.
Clarinet—one semester each of applied study on flute and saxophone.
Percussionists: Jazz percussionists must acquire adequate skills on mallet instruments and/
or piano in order to demonstrate knowledge of melodic and harmonic materials in jury
performance. Recitals must include improvisation on vibes.
Bassists: Bassists must complete one year of minor studies on electric bass.
Time permitting, all jazz majors are urged to complete at least one semester of minor-
level improvisational studies with a teacher of an instrument other than the student’s
principal instrument.
All jazz majors must submit one large ensemble (17 pieces minimum) composition to be
played in rehearsal or performance before graduation.

B.M. Curriculum—Composition Majors


The undergraduate composition program stresses musical, technical, and conceptual
development as fundamental to the creative process. Diversity of compositional styles
and aesthetic viewpoints is welcomed and encouraged. During the first two years compo-
sitions for solo instruments, voice, and smaller chamber groups are emphasized. Works
of greater scope, including chorus, large chamber ensembles, and small orchestra, are
suggested for the remaining study period.
Composition students have numerous opportunities to hear their works performed in
recitals scheduled by the Composition Department or by individual teachers and stu-

48
dents in readings by the Peabody Orchestra, the Opera Workshop, and other Peabody
ensembles, by paid performers during Composition Seminar, and informally through
personal contact with the many excellent performers at Peabody. Many of these perfor-
mances are recorded for later listening and study. In the senior year, every composition
major is required to present a complete recital of compositions he or she has composed at
Peabody.
Composition majors are required to take four semesters of minor study of voice or an
instrument, which may include performance in computer music, with at least two con-
secutive semesters on the same instrument.

Composition

Credits
Performance 54
Major Lesson: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Departmental Seminar: 8 semesters, 1 credit per semester 8
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Applied Minor: 1 credit per semester for 4 semesters 4
*Chorus (Large Ensemble): required sophomore and junior years, 8
2 credits per semester

Music academics 61
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits per semester;
placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156, 710.255-256), 2 credits per semester; 8
placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Introduction to Computer Music (350.463-464), 3 credits 6
per semester
Orchestration (710.413-414), 3 credits per semester 6
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1
Theory electives 6

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 2
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
Total 149

*Qualified instrumentalists may audition for placement in other large ensembles.

49
B.M. Curriculum—Computer Music
The undergraduate computer music program offers majors in either composition or
performance. The program is designed for students wishing to combine music and tech-
nology to enhance their career opportunities both within the music profession and in
related fields outside the profession.

Computer Music – Composition

Credits
Performance 54
Major Lesson: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Composition Seminar: 8 semesters, 1 credit per semester 8
Computer Music Seminar: 8 semesters, 1 credit per semester 8
Recital: (in senior year) 2
Large Ensemble: (2 credits per semester) 4

Music academics 67
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits per semester;
placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156, 710.255-256), placement by 8
examination; 2 credits per semester
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Introduction to Computer Music (350.463-464), 3 credits 6
per semester
Studio Techniques (350.835) 3
Introduction to Programming (350.466) 3
Orchestration (710.413-414), 3 credits per semester 6
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1
Theory Electives 6

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies
(6 credits); Electives (6 credits)

Other 10
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman 1
year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
Music Electives 8
Total 163

50
Computer Music – Performance

Credits
Performance 76
Major Lesson: 8 semesters, 4 credits per semester 32
Departmental Examination: 3 spring semesters, 2 credits each 6
Computer Music Seminar: 8 semesters, 1 credit per semester 8
Computer Music Minor: 4 semesters, 2 credits per semester 8
(junior and senior years)
Recital (in senior year): 2 credits 2
Large Ensemble: 8 semesters, 2 credits per semester 16
Small Ensemble: 4 semesters, 1 credit per semester 4

Music academics 55
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits per semester;
placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156, 710.255-256), 2 credits per semester; 8
placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Introduction to Computer Music (350.463-464), 3 credits 6
per semester
Studio Techniques (350.835) 3
Introduction to Programming (350.836) 3
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

Academics 32
Humanities Seminar (260.115, required first-semester 5
freshman year)
Liberal Arts: Language and Literature (9 credits); Global 27
Perspectives (6 credits); Historical/Philosophical Studies (6 credits);
Electives (6 credits)

Other 10
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
Music Electives 8
Total 173

51
B.M. Curriculum—Music Education Majors
The Peabody music education major is designed for the gifted performer who also
has a special interest in sharing his or her musical expertise through teaching music in
elementary or secondary schools. The aim of the professional preparation program is to
impart to prospective teachers the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are necessary to
the effective teaching of music.
Graduates of the program will be certified to teach music K-12 in Maryland and in all
other states with which Maryland shares reciprocity.
All students accepted into the music education program must fulfill specific liberal
arts requirements (32 credits) as mandated by state and national accrediting agencies. To
the extent these requirements are not satisfied within the liberal arts core course of study
required for all Peabody undergraduates, students elect courses in communications,
sociology, history, literature, American history, cultural anthropology, math, and science.
Students who enroll in liberal arts courses at institutions other than Peabody should
receive prior approval from the coordinator of music education. All Advanced Place-
ment credits to be used toward fulfilling the liberal arts requirement for music education
students must have a score of 4 or 5. The Music Education Department will determine
which credits may be accepted.
Orchestral instrument music education students qualify for the Performer’s Certifi-
cate in their performance major area. Coursework for the Performer’s Certificate requires
additional study beyond the four-year degree for voice majors.
Music Education: Guitar

Semester
First Year Hours
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
171.    .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.585-586 Guitar Music Skills I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
530.501-502 Thursday Noon Recital Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
260.115 Humanities Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-0
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
290.111 Introductory Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510.    .112 Introduction to Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
950.541-542 Guitar Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
43
Second Year
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
171.    .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Voice Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
610.312,313 History of Music II, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.587-588 Guitar Skills II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
530.503-504 Thursday Noon Alternate Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.541-542 Guitar Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
510.213 Basic Instrumental Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.237-238 Conducting the Secondary Choral/
Instrumental Ensemble I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
46
52
Music Education: Guitar (continued)

Third Year
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.311,314 History of Music I, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.431,432 Guitar Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.541-542 Guitar Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
510.413 Music and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.337 Conducting the Secondary Choral Ensemble II . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-0
510.311 Techniques for Teaching Elementary General Music . . . . . . . . . 3-0
510.    .314 Techniques for Teaching Secondary Vocal /
General Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0-3
47

Fourth Year
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
190.    .395 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.637-638 Guitar Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,9
950.531-532 Guitar Chamber Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
510.411 Intern Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,0
510.441 Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
510.    .414 Music and the Special Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,3
37

Music Education: Orchestral Instruments


Woodwinds, Brass, Percussion, Strings, Harp

Semester
First Year Hours
Major Applied Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.501-502 Thursday Noon Recital Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
260.115 Humanities Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-0
Liberal Arts Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
290.111 Introductory Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510.    .112 Introduction to Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
*Large Ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
41
* Required each semester of enrollment for major study. Additional ensemble credits may not
be used to fulfill elective requirements.

53
Music Education: Orchestral Instruments (continued)

Second Year
Major Applied Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Applied Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.255-256 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
610.312,313 History of Music II, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.503-504 Thursday Noon Alternate Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
510.211-212 Class Woodwinds/Brass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
510.223 Class Percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
510.237-238 Conducting the Secondary Choral/
Instrumental Ensemble I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
*Large Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
50

Third Year
Major Applied Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190.395 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.311,314 History of Music I, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,6
510.324 Class Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.413 Music and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.311 Techniques for Teaching Elementary General Music . . . . . . . . . 3-0
510.    .312 Techniques for Teaching Instrumental Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510.337-338 Conducting the Secondary Choral/
Instrumental Ensemble II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.463-464 **Piccolo Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
*Large Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
49-51
Fourth Year
Major Applied Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
710.    .412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,9
510.411 Intern Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,0
510.441 Intern Teaching Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
510.    .414 Music and the Special Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
*Large Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
32
  * Required each semester of enrollment for major study. Additional ensemble credits may
not be used to fulfill elective requirements.
** Required for flute majors and to be taken in two consecutive semesters.

54
Music Education: Piano

Semester
First Year Hours
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
165     .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.501-502 Thursday Noon Recital Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
260.115 Humanities Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-0
Liberal Arts Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
530.111-112 Sight-reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
290.111 Introductory Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510    .112 Introduction to Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
37

Second Year
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
165     .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.211-212 Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors I-II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
610.312,313 History of Music II, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.503-504 Thursday Noon Alternate Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
530.411 Keyboard Literature I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.213-214 Accompanying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
510.213 Basic Instrumental Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.237-238 Conducting the Secondary Choral/
Instrumental Ensemble I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
50
Third Year
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
165     .309 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.311,314 History of Music I, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.311-312 Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors III-IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
510.413 Music and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
530.412 Keyboard Literature II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
950.531-532 Chamber Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
510.222 Class Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
510.337 Conducting the Secondary Choral Ensemble II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
510.311 Techniques for Teaching Elementary General Music . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.314 Techniques for Teaching Secondary Vocal/General Music . . . . . 0,3
50

55
Music Education: Piano (continued)

Fourth Year
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190.395 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710     .412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
530.413,414 Keyboard Literature III, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.667-668 Piano Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,9
510.411 Intern Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,0
510.441 Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
510     .414 Music and the Special Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,3
40

Music Education: Voice

Semester
First Year Hours
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
185.    .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.501-502 Thursday Noon Recital Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
260.115 Humanities Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,0
250.111-112 Italian I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.475 Singing in English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
530.    .476 English and American Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
530.391 Stage Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
290.111 Introductory Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510     .112 Introduction to Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,1
49

Second Year
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
185     .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
610.312,313 History of Music II, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
710.255-256 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.503-504 Thursday Noon Alternate Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 - 1/2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
240.111-112 German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.469 Singing in Italian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
530.    .470 Italian Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
510.237-238 Conducting the Secondary Choral/
   Instrumental Ensemble I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
50

56
Music Education: Voice (continued)

Third Year
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
185     .309 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.311,314 History of Music I, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
530.483 Singing in French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-0
530.480 French Melodiè . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
530.477 Singing in German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.491 Acting for Opera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
Opera Performance Elective* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
510.222 Class Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
510.413 Music and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.311 Techniques for Teaching Elementary General Music . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.314 Techniques for Teaching Secondary Vocal/General Music . . . . . 0,3
510.337 Conducting the Secondary Choral Ensemble II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
510.213 Basic Instrumental Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3,0
52

Fourth Year
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190.395 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
186.411-412 Vocal Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Opera Performance Electives* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,1
Liberal Arts Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
510.411 Intern Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,0
510.441 Intern Teaching Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
510     .414 Music and the Special Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,3
27
* The three credits of opera performance electives listed in the junior and senior years must
be fulfilled by participation in two separate productions of Opera Workshop, Opera Etudes,
Chamber Opera, or Opera Theatre, as assigned by the Opera Department. One of the three
may also be fulfilled by participation in any performance class offered by the Opera Depart-
ment, such as the second semester of Acting for Opera or Opera Styles and Traditions.

57
Music Education: Certification Program
The certification program is designed for individuals who hold a Bachelor of Music
degree from an accredited institution and who wish to become certified by the state of
Maryland to teach in the public schools.
An interview with the Music Education faculty should be arranged to gain admission.
Individuals will be asked to supply an official transcript from their undergraduate degree
and may be asked to complete a basic musicianship skills test. Prior to entering the pro-
gram, accepted candidates must complete either Praxis I exams, SAT, or GRE and submit
passing scores to the Music Education division of the Professional Studies Department.
Special tuition rates apply. For more information, consult the Tuition and Fees sched-
ule in this catalog.
Enrollment for 9 credits is considered full time for this program.

Instrumental Music

Semester
First Year Hours
882.411* Human Growth and Development Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
510.413 Music and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.414 Music and the Special Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510.211,212 Class Woodwinds/Brass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,2
510.223 Class Percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
510.324 Class Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.312 Techniques for Teaching Elementary Instrumental Music . . . . . . 0,3
510.313 Techniques for Teaching Secondary Instrumental Music . . . . . . . 0,3
510.452 Music in the Secondary Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,3
24

Second Year
510.411 Intern Teaching, Elementary/Secondary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,0

* Competency in the fall semester

Vocal/General Music

Semester
First Year Hours
510.413 Music and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.414 Music and the Special Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510.213 Basic Instrumental Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.311 Techniques for Teaching Elementary General Music . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
510.314 Techniques for Teaching Secondary Vocal/
General Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
510.337 Conducting the Secondary Choral Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
510.452 Music in the Secondary Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,3
20

Second Year
510.411 Intern Teaching, Elementary/Secondary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,0

58
B.M. Curriculum—Performance/Recording Arts and Sciences Majors
The Bachelor of Music in recording arts and sciences program is designed to meet the
expanding need for skilled audio technicians, producers, and engineers who possess both
technical expertise and a sophisticated knowledge of music. A five-year double-degree
program, Recording Arts combines an applied performance major with a technical
education in recording technology. Relevant studies in electrical engineering, math, sci-
ence, and computer science are taken at the Whiting School of Engineering of The Johns
Hopkins University on the Homewood campus.
The Recording Arts curriculum includes extensive practical experience, ranging from
jazz, rock, and pop music to grand opera and major choral and orchestral works. In
addition to regular laboratory sessions with live musical groups of all styles, students
participate in recording a wide variety of Peabody events, many of which are open to the
public. All recording majors, with the exception of first-semester freshmen, are expected
to work in the Recording Studios throughout the course of their enrollment as part of
the College Work Study program. In the fifth year, students complete an internship with
local radio, television, and recording companies. The place of internship requires prior
approval from the Recording Arts coordinator, with a minimum of 320 hours required.
Fourteen semester hours of credit in liberal arts are required for the bachelor’s degree
in recording arts and sciences. It is recommended that the requirement be met during
the first six semesters of the program through cross-registration for courses offered in the
School of Arts and Sciences at The Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus. At
least four courses are required: two non-math/science courses approved by the Humani-
ties chair, and two math/science courses approved by the Recording Arts coordinator.
Students who have not been awarded Advanced Placement standing in English must also
take at least four hours of intensive writing courses. Students with Advanced Placement
standing in English need complete only the four required courses in liberal arts.
The degree recital should be performed in the fourth year of the program. If all
requirements have been met, students may then receive the performance diploma in May
of the fourth year prior to completion of the recording internship. Students who also
wish to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from the Whiting
School of Engineering may apply to the Peabody/JHU Double Degree program in their
fourth year. Students must fulfill requirements for the performance degree at Peabody
before entering the Double Degree program. Simultaneous enrollment in three majors is
not permitted.
Due to credit and scheduling conflicts, it is not possible to combine the recording arts
major with the music education major or the computer music major at Peabody, or any
Double Degree program in electrical engineering or arts and sciences at the Homewood
campus of Johns Hopkins University.
Recording Arts: Composition

Semester
First Year Hours
Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
310.545-546 Composition Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.111-112 Basic Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Calculus I, II (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4-4
42

59
Recording Arts: Composition (continued)
Second Year
Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
310.545-546 Composition Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.255-256 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts (Math/Science) at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Physics/Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.211-212 Basic Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 *Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
46

Third Year
Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
310.545-546 Composition Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Applied Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.311,312 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
330.311 Basic Conducting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
360.411 Copyrights and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
525.101-102 Electrical Engineering Circuits and Signals (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.311-312 Basic Recording III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 *Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
41
Fourth Year
Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190.495 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
310.545-546 Composition Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Applied Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
710.413-414 Orchestration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.313,314 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
525.139-140 Integrated Electronics (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.411-412 Advanced Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.    .519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
42
Fifth Year
Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.618 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
520.345 Electrical and Computer Engineering Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
520.448 Advanced Electronics Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550     .419 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,4
28
*  Qualified instrumentalists may audition for placement in other large ensembles.

60
Recording Arts: Guitar

Semester
First Year Hours
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
171.    .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.585-586 Guitar Music Skills I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.111-112 Basic Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Calculus I, II (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4-4
950.541-542 Guitar Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
48

Second Year
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
171    .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.587-588 Guitar Music Skills II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Liberal Arts (Math/Science) at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Physics/Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.211-212 Basic Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.541-542 Guitar Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   1-1
48

Third Year
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
171.    .309 Half Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.311,312 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.431,432 Guitar Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
330.311 Basic Conducting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
360.411 Copyrights and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
525.101-102 Electrical Engineering Circuits and Signals (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.311-312 Basic Recording III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.541-542 Guitar Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   1-1
47

61
Recording Arts: Guitar (continued)

Fourth Year
Guitar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
470.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
190.495 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.313,314 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.433-434 Lute Tablature and Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.    .412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
525.139-140 Integrated Electronics (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.411-412 Advanced Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
950.531-532 Chamber Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.    .519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,3
43
Fifth Year
530.637-638 Guitar Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.    .516 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
520.345 Electrical and Computer Engineering Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-0
520.448 Advanced Electronics Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.    .419 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,4
32

Recording Arts: Jazz Performance

Semester
First Year Hours
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.127-128 Jazz Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.569-570 Constructive Listening/Jazz History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
330.311 Basic Conducting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,1
550.111-112 Basic Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Calculus I, II (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
910.537-538 Jazz Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
45
Second Year
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.561-562 Jazz Improvisation I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.259-260 Jazz Theory I/Keyboard Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.263-264 Jazz Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts (Math/Science) at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Physics/Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.211-212 Basic Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.525-526 Small Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
910.537-538 Jazz Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
46

62
Recording Arts: Jazz Performance (continued)
Third Year
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .309 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
710.359-360 Jazz Theory II/Keyboard Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.361-362 Jazz Arranging and Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
610.311,312 History of Music I, II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
360.311 Copyrights and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
525.101-102 Electrical Engineering Circuits and Signals (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.311-312 Basic Recording III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.537-538 Jazz Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
41

Fourth Year
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190.495 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
530.563-564 Jazz Improvisation II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
525.139-140 Integrated Electronics (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.411-412 Advanced Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.519 Acoustical Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
950.525-526 Small Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
910.537-538 Jazz Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
41

Fifth Year
Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Liberal Arts at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.618 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
520.345 Electrical and Computer Engineering Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
520.448 Advanced Electronics Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.419 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,4
34

Recording Arts: Orchestral Instruments


Woodwinds, Brass, Percussion, Strings, Harp

Semester
First Year Hours
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.111-112 Basic Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Calculus I, II (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
*Large Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
46

63
Recording Arts: Orchestral Instruments (continued)
Second Year
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.255-256 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts (Math/Science) at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Physics/Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.211-212 Basic Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
*Large Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
46
Third Year
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
        .309 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.311,312 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
330.311 Basic Conducting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
360.411 Copyrights and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
525.101-102 Electrical Engineering Circuits and Signals (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.311-312 Basic Recording III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
*Large Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.531-532 **Small Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   1-1
530.463-464 ***Piccolo Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
40-42
Fourth Year
Major Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190     .495 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.313,314 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
710.    .412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
525.139-140 Integrated Electronics (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.411-412 Advanced Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
*Large Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.531-532 **Small Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3,0


550     .519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
41

Fifth Year
Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.    .516 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
520.345 Electrical and Computer Engineering Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
520.448 Advanced Electronics Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.    .419 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,4
28
   * Required each semester of enrollment for major study. Additional ensemble requirements
may not be used to fulfill elective requirements.
  ** For woodwind and brass majors the small ensemble requirement is one semester.
*** Required for flute majors and to be taken in two consecutive semesters.

64
Recording Arts: Organ

Semester
First Year Hours
Organ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
460.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
163.    .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.157-158 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.111-112 Basic Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Calculus I, II (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
48
Second Year
Organ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
460.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
163.    .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts (Math/Science) at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Physics/Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.211-212 Basic Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.111-112 Sight-reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Voice Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   1-1
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
50
Third Year
Organ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
460.545-546 Departmental Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
163.    .309 Departmental Exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.423-424 Organ Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
330.311 Basic Conducting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
525.101-102 Electrical Engineering Circuits and Signals (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.311-312 Basic Recording III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.315 Continuo I: Figured Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2,0
43

Fourth Year
Organ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190.    .495 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.311,312 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.425-426 Resources for Contemporary Church Musicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
525.139-140 Integrated Electronics (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.411-412 Advanced Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,3
360.411 Copyrights and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.    .519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
40

65
Recording Arts: Organ (continued)

Fifth Year
Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
610.313,314 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.    .516 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
520.345 Electrical and Computer Engineering Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
520.448 Advanced Electronics Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.    .412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.    .419 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,4
35
Recording Arts: Piano

Semester
First Year Hours
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
165.    .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.111-112 Basic Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Calculus I, II (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
530.111 Basic Conducting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   1
530.111-112 Sight-reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
43
Second Year
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
165.    .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
520.211-212 Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors I-II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.411 Keyboard Literature I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
Liberal Arts (Math/Science) at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Physics/Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.211-212 Basic Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.213-214 Accompanying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
50
Third Year
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
165.    .309 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.311-312 Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors III-IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
610.311,312 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.    .412 Keyboard Literature II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
360.411 Copyrights and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
525.101-102 Electrical Engineering Circuits and Signals (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.311-312 Basic Recording III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
950.531-532 Chamber Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   1-1
46

66
Recording Arts: Piano (continued)

Fourth Year
Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
190.    .495 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.313,314 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.413,414 Keyboard Literature III, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
710.    .412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
525.139-140 Integrated Electronics (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.411-412 Advanced Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.    .519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,3
39
Fifth Year
Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.    .516 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
520.345 Electrical and Computer Engineering Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
520.448 Advanced Electronics Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.    .419 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,4
28
Recording Arts: Voice

Semester
First Year Hours
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
185.    .109 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.111-112 Theoretical Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.123-124 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Liberal Arts at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.111-112 Basic Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Calculus I, II (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
250.111-112 Italian I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.475 Singing in English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-0
530.    .476 English and American Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-2
530.391 Stage Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
57
Second Year
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
185.    .209 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.211-212 Theoretical Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.223-224 Ear-training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
710.255-256 Keyboard Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
240.111-112 German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.469 Singing in Italian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
530.    .470 Italian Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
330.311 Basic Conducting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Liberal Arts (Math/Science) at JHU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Physics/Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.211-212 Basic Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
57
67
Recording Arts: Voice (continued)

Third Year
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
186.311-312 Vocal Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
185.    .309 Departmental Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.311-312 Theoretical Studies III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
530.473-474 Opera Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
530.477 Singing in German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
230.111-112 French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
525.101-102 Electrical Engineering Circuits and Signals (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
550.311-312 Basic Recording III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
910.511-512 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2-2
47
Fourth Year
Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
186.411-412 Vocal Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
480.545 Vocal Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,0
190.495 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.311,312 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
530.480 French Mélodie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
530.481 German Lieder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,2
530.483 Singing in French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
525.139-140 Integrated Electronics (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
550.411-412 Advanced Recording I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,3
360.411 Copyrights and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,0
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
44

Fifth Year
610.313,314 History of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,2
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
550.    .516 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
520.345 Electrical and Computer Engineering Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,0
520.448 Advanced Electronics Lab (JHU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
710.    .412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0,3
550.    .419 Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   0,4
29
Note: A
 n opera performance course will be selected in conjunction with the opera faculty to
fulfill requirements for the B.M. in voice. A sixth year of enrollment may be required
to complete requirements for the B.M. in recording arts and voice due to scheduling
conflicts.

68
Bachelor of Music with JHU Liberal Arts Bachelor of Music with JHU Engineering
Concentration Concentration
Peabody students wishing to earn a Peabody students wishing to earn a
Bachelor of Music with a liberal arts con- Bachelor of Music with an engineering
centration must complete six courses at concentration must complete six courses
the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences on in the Whiting School of Engineering on
the Homewood campus with at least three the Homewood campus with at least three
at the 200 level or higher. At least one of at the 200 level or higher.
the courses must be an expository writing All students planning a B.M. with an
course or a writing-intensive course. engineering concentration must have their
Language courses at the 100 level in proposed program of study approved by
the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences the chair of the Humanities Department
cannot be used to fulfill the requirements of the Peabody Conservatory of Music.
for the liberal arts concentration. Music Courses taken in the Whiting School
courses offered at the Krieger School of of Engineering to satisfy a major require-
Arts and Sciences cannot be used to fulfill ment in a Peabody program of study may
the requirements for the liberal arts con- not be used toward an engineering con-
centration. centration.
All students planning a B.M. with a The following statement will appear
liberal arts concentration must have their on the transcript of any Peabody student
proposed program of study approved by who successfully completes an engineering
the chair of the Humanities Department concentration: Engineering concentration
of the Peabody Conservatory of Music. completed on the Homewood campus of
The following statement will appear The Johns Hopkins University.
on the transcript of any Peabody student
who successfully completes a liberal arts
concentration: Liberal Arts concentration
completed on the Homewood campus of
The Johns Hopkins University.

69
Five-Year B.M./M.M. Program

Qualified Peabody undergraduates have Undergraduate students may apply for


the option of applying to complete a mas- admittance to the B.M./M.M. program in
ter’s degree in one additional year of study the academic year in which they are sched-
after they complete their bachelor’s degree. uled to perform their 309 jury or junior
The selection process takes place in the recital (or, for composition majors, in their
junior year and includes academic and per- junior year) by submitting an application
formance elements. Students selected for by April 1 of that year.
the program maintain their initial finan- Admittance into the B.M./M.M. pro-
cial assistance levels throughout the five gram guarantees the extension of the stu-
years of study. dent’s initial merit scholarship award for a
Admittance to the B.M./M.M. program fifth year of study.
is limited to outstanding performers with Admittance into the B.M./M.M. pro-
excellent academic records. Minimum gram includes the proviso that a student’s
standards for applying are an average of A- fourth and fifth years of performance or
and above in all major lessons and juries, composition study be with a single studio
and grades of B+ or higher in each of the teacher unless there are circumstances that
following areas: two or more semesters require special arrangements to be made
of the core music history courses; four or by the associate dean for academic affairs.
more semesters of the core music theory Students who wish to complete a B.M.
courses; two or more semesters of ear­ in performance or composition and then
training/sight-singing courses; and two or earn an M.M. in musicology, music theory
more semesters of keyboard skills courses. pedagogy, or performance/pedagogy are
In addition, successful applicants will also eligible to apply for this program.
have a minimum cumulative grade point
average of 3.50 and will have attained the
Dean’s List (a cumulative GPA of 3.67 or
higher) for a minimum of four semesters.

70
The Master of Music Degree

The program leading to the degree of Entrance/placement examinations. All


Master of Music provides for intensive entering students take placement examina-
development of performance skills, exten- tions at the time of their auditions:
sive knowledge of the literature in the a. written music theory, including
major field of study, and achievement of a part-writing from figured bass and
broadened knowledge of the art. harmonic analysis (Roman numerals
and figured bass). Candidates for the
Admission Requirements music theory pedagogy degree and
for graduate assistantships in music
Prior study. A Bachelor of Music degree theory take an advanced examination
or the equivalent from an accredited insti- which includes the above and work
tution is a prerequisite for consideration in written counterpoint and 20th-
for admission to the Master of Music century techniques.
degree program. Evidence of a degree b. ear-training, including melodic and
recital in the senior year must be submit- harmonic dictation.
ted in the form of a degree recital program The following examinations are taken
or credit listed on the student’s transcript. during the Orientation period at the
Students holding a Bachelor of Arts degree beginning of the fall semester:
must satisfy the requirements of the Pea- 1. Sight-singing: a test in various clefs
body Bachelor of Music degree, demon- will be required only of those students
strated by examination or by completion who passed all written requirements at
of additional undergraduate courses. As a the time of their audition. Clefs tested
rule, an applicant must have achieved an may include treble, alto, tenor, and
undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0, exclu- bass.
sive of performance credits. Applicants 2. Music theory (late exams and retests for
must demonstrate good musicianship, improved placement)
solid academic skills, and substantive
musical knowledge through performance 3. Music history placement exam (classi-
and written examinations. cal antiquity to the present)
4. French, German, and Italian for voice
TOEFL testing. Each applicant whose performance majors: a written first-
native language is not English must pres- year-level comprehension test in each
ent a score from the Test of English as a language. Dictionaries are permitted.
Foreign Language (TOEFL). TOEFL scores 5. Keyboard skills for piano majors (sight-
of at least 550 from the basic paper test, reading, keyboard harmony, and score-
at least 213 from the computer-based ver- reading)
sion, or 79 from the Internet-based test
are expected of applicants. 6. All incoming international students will
be tested and interviewed to determine
International students. International their level of English proficiency. This
students admitted to Peabody must take testing must be completed before the
responsibility to improve their English in start of classes. Peabody offers intensive
preparation for their Peabody coursework. English as a Second Language (ESL)
Non-native speakers of English are urged courses for students whose English lan-
to take a summer language course at one guage skills are not at graduate level.
of the many U.S. institutions that offer Students placed in ESL courses must
ESL, including Johns Hopkins University, successfully complete these courses in
prior to their first semester at Peabody. order to fulfill the requirements for the

71
M.M. degree program. Some Peabody Composition. The graduate program
courses require ESL courses as a prereq- assumes reasonable compositional attain-
uisite. The ESL requirement may extend ment and experience as a prerequisite
the length of a student’s program. for admission. Applicants are expected to
Intensive English study over the sum- have the bachelor’s degree in composition,
mer months is strongly recommended or the equivalent. A portfolio of mature
for ESL students. works for various media for pre-screen-
ing by the composition faculty should be
All students entering the M.M. program submitted to the Admissions Office by the
must take the complete music theory and application deadline.
ear-training placement examinations prior Conducting. The audition process con-
to enrollment in theory courses. sists of two rounds. Conducting applica-
tions and materials, including an audition
Major field requirements. All entering
DVD, are due in the Admissions Office by
students must pass a personal audition,
December 1. VHS cassettes in NTSC for-
interview, or examination in the major
mat can be accepted. The recording should
field. CDs are acceptable only for inter-
consist of three to four excerpts, each two
national applicants who cannot audition
to three minutes in length, of contrasting
in person at Peabody. Acceptance into
standard repertoire demonstrating a vari-
a graduate program is conditional until
ety of styles and tempi. The camera should
the satisfactory performance of a personal
be placed at the back of the orchestra with
audition and successful completion of the
the focus on the front of the conductor. A
written entrance examinations to be taken
full-size orchestra is not required; a quin-
in September. The September validating
tet with piano would suffice, for example.
auditions have the same criteria as the Feb- The applicant’s name and a written log
ruary auditions. of the excerpts with timings should be
Performance. Applicants should prepare included. The log should not be video-
sufficient material to perform a full solo taped. Appropriate dress is expected.
recital containing works that show a Round two will take place during the
diversity of periods and styles. All major February audition week and will consist of
works must be complete (to include all a live audition with orchestra. Candidates
movements). Detailed audition reper- who have been selected for the live audi-
toire requirements are available from the tion will be notified in January and receive
Admissions office and the Peabody web a repertoire list. Students will be expected
site at www.peabody.jhu.edu/admissions. to have all materials fully prepared. Inter-
Pre-screening recordings are required for views and testing in addition to the live
some majors. auditions may be required for acceptance.
Performance/Pedagogy. In addition to the Computer music. Applicants should ordi-
normal audition material for the perfor- narily have completed two semesters of an
mance major, the applicant for the peda- undergraduate course in computer music
gogy emphasis will be scheduled for an or the equivalent, and demonstrate com-
interview with the pedagogy faculty. petency in a high-level programming
Pedagogy emphasis is currently avail- language (C, Java, Pascal, or comparable).
able in the areas of harp, guitar, piano, Deficiencies may be corrected by reme-
violin, viola, double bass, and voice. The dial study at the Conservatory. Specific
interview will include a review of the entrance requirements for each of the three
applicant’s demonstrated interest and tracks follow:
experience in teaching, and a discussion of 1.  Composition. The program assumes rea-
professional and program goals. sonable compositional attainment and

72
experience as a prerequisite for admis- interview with members of the musicol-
sion. Applicants are expected to have ogy faculty.
the bachelor’s degree in composition or
the equivalent, and to submit a portfo- Music theory pedagogy. Applicants should
lio of mature works for various media. possess a bachelor’s degree in music and
The portfolio should include some a minimum of 18 credit hours in under­
works involving computer music. graduate music theory, preferably includ-
2.  Performance/Concert Production. Appli- ing at least one semester each of form and
cants should demonstrate the equiva- analysis and tonal counterpoint, and a
lent of a personal audition and prepare demonstrable level of keyboard and aural
sufficient material to perform a full proficiency. An interview will be scheduled
solo recital. The audition should during Audition Week at which applicants
include some works involving com- will be asked to speak about their interest
puter music. in music theory pedagogy, analyze music,
and demonstrate keyboard skills.
3. Research/Technology. Applicants are
expected to have the bachelor’s degree
in music or the equivalent, and to Degree Requirements (M.M.)
demonstrate knowledge and experience Residence. For all majors except music
in the area of music-related research education, completion of a Master of
or technology they intend to pursue. Music degree program will require full-
Although applicants without a music time attendance for a minimum of one
degree will be considered, additional year beyond receipt of the Bachelor of
study may be required to meet the Music degree. Exceptions to this residency
Conservatory’s stringent music exit requirement may be made upon approval
requirements. This submission may of the Graduate Committee, with consid-
take the form of a project report or eration given to previous experience, pro-
research paper. fessional record, and demonstrated ability.
Music education. An applicant must have The application of previously earned
completed a bachelor’s degree in music coursework credits does not remove the
education and be qualified for initial full-time residency requirement for the
certification as an elementary or second- graduate degree. Students who have com-
ary school teacher. An interview with the pleted all program requirements except
Music Education department will include the master’s essay (required of musicology
a review of the applicant’s musical and majors), the music theory pedagogy proj-
educational background and discussion of ect (required of music theory pedagogy
professional goals, and may include a brief majors), or portfolio/thesis (computer
audition in the applicant’s major area of music majors), must register for Degree-
performance. in-Progress.

Musicology. During the admissions Transfer credits. A maximum of six


process applicants must demonstrate an semester hours of graduate study (course-
aptitude for scholarly research, and it is work) completed at other accredited insti-
recommended that they have a reading tutions may be applied to the Master of
knowledge of German, French, or Italian. Music degree at Peabody, with the review
Four copies of a writing sample, such as a and approval of the Musicology and Music
term paper or article on a musical subject, Theory department chairs. Credit must
must be submitted to the Admissions have been earned within five years prior
Office by the application deadline. The to first graduate degree registration at
entrance procedure also includes a personal Peabody.

73
Previously earned Peabody credits. Stu- Program components
dents may petition the associate dean for Music coursework. The core curricu-
academic affairs to have credits for upper lum consists of Music Bibliography and
division or graduate courses which were courses in music theory and musicology.
over and above the minimum requirements All full-time Master of Music students are
for a previous Peabody degree applied to required to take Music Bibliography in
the M.M. degree program. No coursework their first year of study, with the exception
that was required or used to fulfill mini- of students placed into English as a Second
mum credit requirements for an undergrad- Language Level I, who may defer Bibliog-
uate degree may be applied to a subsequent raphy to their second year of study. Most
graduate degree. Work completed in the Master of Music students are also required
Graduate Extension program may transfer to take two Graduate Seminars in musi-
to the M.M. program upon satisfaction cology; see individual program descrip-
of all other admission requirements. This tions for details. Before students can enroll
includes credit for properly juried recitals. in Graduate Seminars, they must pass a
All previously earned credits applied to the music history placement test offered about
M.M. degree must carry grades of B or bet- one week before the fall semester begins.
ter, and must have been earned not more The test requires students to write short
than five years prior to initial registration essays without reference to books or notes
in this degree program. about various topics in music history from
medieval times to the present. Grading
Advanced placement. Advanced place- is on the basis of demonstrated writing
ment may be awarded in areas of required ability and knowledge of music history.
coursework, where warranted by place- Students who fail this examination are
ment examination results. required to enroll in Music History Inten-
sive Review. Only after passing Music
Review courses. Deficiencies in the areas History Intensive Review are they permit-
of music theory, ear-training, music his- ted to enroll in Graduate Seminars. The
tory, keyboard skills, or English must be only musicology graduate course which
corrected by remedial study at the Con- can be taken concurrently with Music
servatory. Please note: Students placed in History Intensive Review is Music Bibli-
ESL courses cannot complete their history ography. Students enrolled in English as
requirement in their first year of study. a Second Language (ESL) courses require
Review courses do not count toward consent of the instructor to enroll in
fulfillment of degree requirements, and Graduate Seminars in musicology, even if
the grades earned are not calculated in they have passed Music History Intensive
the student’s GPA; however, the hours Review.
are counted as part of the course load for Other coursework requirements for the
tuition determination. Students must M.M. degree include repertoire studies
satisfy any review requirements in music and such electives as are considered appro-
theory, music history, or keyboard skills priate by the department in which the
before enrolling in other graduate-level student is majoring. These courses shall
courses in these fields. not be the same ones taken as part of the
undergraduate curriculum.
Program completion. All requirements Foreign languages. Foreign language
for the Master of Music degree must be proficiency is required for the Master of
completed within five years of the date of Music degrees in musicology and voice
initial registration. performance (see individual curriculum
descriptions). Coursework undertaken to
remove deficiencies in foreign language is

74
governed by the same regulations as are satisfied by participation in either a choral
other review courses. or instrumental large ensemble during
Electives. Unless otherwise specified, the first year of residence. All graduate
the term elective means class elective. instrumental majors in the M.M. program
Ensemble credits cannot be counted as participate in one or two semesters of
elective credits. Only courses designated chamber music as required by the individ-
as “G” (Graduate Elective) in the Master ual program (this may be studio accompa-
Schedule of Classes may be used to fulfill nying for pianists). Detailed guidelines for
graduate elective requirements. Questions ensemble participation are published in
about the appropriateness of courses for the Student Handbook.
elective credit can be directed to the regis- Recitals and compositions. A full recital is
trar and associate dean for academic affairs. required of all performance and conduct-
All M.M. students are encouraged to ing majors. In individual instances, a
seek employment relevant to their field of teacher or department may recommend a
study while enrolled in a degree program. chamber music recital, second solo recital,
The employment must be designated and or combination thereof. Any performance
structured to enhance the student’s educa- major not presenting a degree recital in a
tional program. The employment must be given year will be scheduled for a graded
approved by the student’s studio teacher hearing before the departmental faculty
who must ensure its academic relevance. at the end of the spring semester. In lieu
The employment can be established as of a recital, candidates for the degree in
an elective course taken for ½ credit each composition must submit a portfolio of
semester or for one credit in the sum- works, including an orchestral work of
mer. Employment can fulfill a maximum approximately 10 minutes’ duration, to
of three elective credits and may not be the composition faculty by April 1 of the
applied to fulfill major or core require- year in which they intend to graduate.
ments. The portfolio must contain compositions
Please note: International students can- written during the student’s time of study
not begin off-campus employment until at Peabody. Registration for major study
they receive written approval from the is required in the semester in which the
international student advisor for Curricu- recital or portfolio is presented.
lar Practical Training (CPT) or Optional Program notes. All candidates for the
Practical Training. Students in F-1 sta- Master of Music in performance must
tus must have been lawfully enrolled in write original program notes with a
school on a full-time basis for at least one bibliography for their degree recital. Pro-
academic year before they are eligible for gram notes must be at least 750 words
practical training. CPT must be under- in length, not including translations or
taken prior to the completion of a course the bibliography. The student must sub-
of study. mit written program notes initialed by
Ensembles. Master of Music candidates the studio teacher to the Office of Aca-
majoring in orchestral instruments must demic Affairs no later than February 15
participate in the Peabody Symphony of the year in which he or she expects to
Orchestra, Peabody Concert Orchestra, graduate. All program notes must also be
or Peabody Wind Ensemble during each submitted electronically to the Office of
semester of enrollment for major study. Academic Affairs. Program notes must
Master of Music candidates in organ are be approved by a faculty member of the
required to take two semesters of a choral Graduate Committee or the associate dean
ensemble in the first year of residence. for academic affairs. The approved pro-
Composition majors have a two-semester gram notes for the Master of Music recital
large ensemble requirement which may be are a graduation requirement.

75
M.M. Curricula
M.M. Curriculum—Performance Majors
Conducting
Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
330.845-846* Conducting Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory counterpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Music Theory analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
710.413-414 Orchestration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Early Music performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Electives*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
40
   * Required every semester of enrollment
  ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
***Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

76
Wind Conducting
Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
330.845-846* Conducting Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory counterpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Music Theory analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major
710.412 Instrumentation and Arranging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Electives*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
35
   * Required every semester of enrollment
  ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
*** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

Guitar
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital (ensemble or solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
470.845-846 Guitar Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.631-632 Guitar Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.433-434 Lute Literature and Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Electives*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.637-638****Guitar Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.831-832 Chamber Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
950.841-842****Guitar Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
40
    * If recommended by the department
   ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
  ***Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
**** Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. in guitar at Peabody

77
Orchestral Instruments
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital (ensemble or second solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Electives*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
530.463-464 Piccolo Class**** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Large Ensemble***** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Chamber Ensemble (unconducted groups of 3 to 8 members)
String instruments (except double bass) two semesters . . . . . . . . 2
Percussion, woodwinds, brass, and double bass, one semester . . . . 1
35-36
     * If recommended by the department
    ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
   *** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
  **** Required for flute majors if not already taken to complete the B.M. in flute at Peabody
***** Required each semester of enrollment for major study. Additional ensemble credit
may not be used to fulfill elective requirements.
Organ
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
At discretion of the department, may include any upper division undergraduate level
or above courses specific to the major but not already taken during completion of
an undergraduate organ major program.
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    6
910.811-812*** Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Small Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
36
   * Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
  ** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
*** Required in the first year of residence

78
Piano
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Courses Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Analysis of 18th- or 19th-Century Piano Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Analysis of 20th-Century Piano Music or a 20th-Century
  analysis course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    2
34
  * Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
**Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits

Piano: Ensemble Arts


Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695,696 Recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Courses Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
530.621,622 Instrumental Chamber Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.619,620 Accompanying and Coaching Skills for Pianists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.813-814 Advanced Accompanying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.817-818 Advanced Accompanying II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
38
* Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.

79
Piano: Ensemble Arts With a Concentration in Vocal Accompanying
The Master of Music degree program in Ensemble Arts: Vocal Accompanying is
designed for pianists wishing to expand their musical experience to include collaborative
playing in the study of art song, vocal chamber music, opera, and oratorio. The curricu-
lum provides advanced technical study while emphasizing the linguistic skills necessary
for comprehensively coaching opera and song literature. Versatility is stressed, with a
practical eye toward employment opportunities for skilled keyboard players in a variety
of areas including the professional recital accompanist, opera coach, church musician,
choral/symphonic pianist, and musical theater keyboardist.
The degree program normally requires a minimum of two years to complete. In
addition to two degree recitals, the curriculum requires the development of repertoire,
attained through the performance of non-degree collaborative vocal recitals and partici-
pation as an opera, studio, and/or classroom pianist.
All candidates must meet language and diction standards in English and two of the
following three languages: Italian, German, and French. These requirements may be
satisfied by successful completion of a departmental exam in translation and pronuncia-
tion, or by completing the appropriate diction course and the equivalent of one year of
college-level study in each language. Diction courses include Singing in Italian, Singing
in German, and Singing in French.

Piano: Ensemble Arts with a Concentration in Vocal Accompanying


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695,696* Recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Courses Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
530.813-814 Advanced Accompanying (Graduate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.619-620 Accompanying and Coaching Skills for Pianists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.625-626 Accompanying and Coaching Skills II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.639*** Student Coach, Opera Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
530.640*** Student Coach, Opera Theatre production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
41
   *Two full recitals of vocal repertoire are required.
  ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
***Permission of the instructor is required to register for this course.

80
Voice
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
186.611-612 Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Vocal Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
480.845** Vocal Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Electives*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
37
   * Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their sec-
ond year in the program.
  ** Required only if not already taken to complete the undergraduate voice major program
at Peabody
*** All candidates for the M.M. in voice must meet language and diction standards in
French, German, Italian, and English. Electives may be chosen which help the student
meet these standards. Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to
3 electives.

Early Music Performance: Baroque Oboe


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
610.433-434 Early Wind Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.615*** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Recommended Electives**** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (8)
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Recorder minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.355-356 Recorder Consort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

81
Early Music Performance: Baroque Oboe (continued)

Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
36
(w/out electives)
    * If recommended by the department
   ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
  *** Counts as one of the two Musicology seminars
**** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

Early Music Performance: Recorder


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
530.577, 578***Early Wind Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.355-356 Recorder Consort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Recommended Electives***** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (6)
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.443-444 Baroque Flute Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.829-830 Renaissance Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
42
(w/out electives)
     * If recommended by the department
    ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
   *** Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. in recorder at Peabody
  **** Counts as one of the two Musicology seminars
***** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

82
Early Music Performance: Traverso (Baroque Flute)
Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
530.577,578*** Early Wind Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Recommended Electives***** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (12)
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
125.111-112 Recorder Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.355-356 Recorder Consort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
950.829-830 Renaissance Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
36
(w/out electives)
     * If recommended by the department
    ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
   *** Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. in baroque flute at Peabody
  **** Counts as one of the required Musicology seminars
***** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

Early Music Performance: Renaissance Lute


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
530.433-434*** Lute Literature and Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)

83
Early Music Performance: Renaissance Lute (continued)
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
950.829-830 Renaissance Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
950.853,854 Renaissance Chamber Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Required Elective
Theorbo minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
46
    * If recommended by the department
   ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
  ***Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. in lute at Peabody
**** Counts as one of the two required Musicology seminars

Early Music Performance: Baroque Lute, Theorbo


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
530.433-434*** Lute Literature and Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Required Elective
Renaissance Lute minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
44
    * If recommended by the department
   ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
  *** Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. in lute at Peabody
**** Counts as one of the two required Musicology seminars

84
Early Music Performance: Baroque Violin
Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
*** Literature Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Recommended Electives***** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (12)
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Viola da gamba minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.353, 354 Viola da Gamba Consort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
950.829-830 Renaissance Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
36
(w/out electives)
     * If recommended by the department
    ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
   *** To be selected from Viola da Gamba Literature, Early Cello Literature, and Early
Violin Literature classes. Could be reduced to 1 credit if a minimum of 2 credits in
these areas has already been earned to complete the B.M. at Peabody
  **** Counts as one of the required Musicology seminars
***** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

Early Music Performance: Baroque Violoncello


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
*** Literature Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

85
Early Music Performance: Baroque Violoncello (continued)
Recommended Electives***** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (8)
Viola da gamba minor lessons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.353, 354 Viola da Gamba Consort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
950.831-832 Renaissance Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
40
(w/out electives)
     * If recommended by the department
    ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
   *** To be selected from Viola da Gamba Literature, Early Cello Literature, and Early Vio-
lin Literature classes. Could be reduced to 1 credit if a minimum of 2 credits in these
areas has already been earned to complete the B.M. at Peabody
  **** Counts as one of the two required Musicology seminars
***** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

Early Music Performance: Harpsichord


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
530.421-422*** Harpsichord Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530,441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
370.492 Harpsichord Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
42
    * If recommended by the department
   ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
  *** Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. in harpsichord at Peabody
**** Counts as one of the two required Musicology seminars

86
Early Music Performance: Viola da Gamba
Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
*** Literature Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.353,354 Viol Consort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.615**** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Recommended Elective***** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (4)
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.829-830 Renaissance Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
40
(w/out electives)
     * If recommended by the department.
    ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
   *** To be selected from Viola da Gamba Literature, Early Cello Literature, and Early
Violin Literature classes. Could be reduced to 1 credit if a minimum of 2 credits in
these areas has already been earned to complete the B.M. at Peabody
  **** Counts as one of the two required Musicology seminars
***** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

Early Music Performance: Voice


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
186.611-612 Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
480.845 Vocal Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696* Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

87
Early Music Performance: Voice (continued)
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
530.543,544 Early Vocal Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.615*** Performance Practice Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3)
530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Recommended Electives**** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (6)
530.315,445 Continuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Harpsichord (or another early instrument) minor lessons . . . . . . . 2
Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
950.829-830 Renaissance Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
950.827-828 Baroque Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
41
(w/out electives)
    * If recommended by the department
   ** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of stu-
dents placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to
their second year in the program.
  *** Counts as one of the two Musicology seminars
**** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
All candidates for the M.M. in voice must meet language and diction standards in
French, German, Italian, and English. Electives may be chosen which help the student
meet these standards.
M.M. Curriculum—Performance/Pedagogy
This area of graduate focus is designed for students accepted to a performance major
who wish to broaden their study to include particular attention to the concurrent devel-
opment of pedagogical skills. Performance/Pedagogy is not a separate degree program,
but a pedagogy emphasis within the student’s M.M. performance program. Courses
specific to the area of pedagogical concentration fulfill the elective requirements in the
M.M. degree program. Pedagogy emphasis is currently available in the areas of harp,
guitar, piano, violin, viola, double bass, and voice. In addition to the usual perfor-
mance major requirements (see M.M. curricula on previous pages), the curriculum is
designed to provide maximum opportunity for the student to develop his/her teaching
skills—through classwork, observation, and practice—using the combined resources
of the Institute’s Conservatory and Preparatory faculties and programs. The admission
process includes an audition before the major performance faculty plus an interview with
members of the pedagogy faculty. Individuals approved to embark upon this study are
assigned a three-person advisory group. The required two-credit elective is waived for
guitar majors who are instead required to enroll in Guitar Seminar and Guitar Literature
and for voice majors due to language requirements. Performance/Pedagogy candidates
majoring in orchestral instruments must participate in the Peabody Symphony Orches-
tra or Peabody Concert Orchestra during each semester of residency.

Courses Specific to Area of Pedagogical Concentration


(fulfills electives in performance curriculum)
*Pedagogy/Practicum (one of the following) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.637-638 Guitar Pedagogy
530.629-630 Harp Pedagogy
530.667-668 Piano Pedagogy
530.651-652 Violin/Viola Pedagogy
530.683-684 Vocal Pedagogy and Lab

88
520.615 Pedagogy Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
520.617 Internship Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
520.618 Portfolio Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
**Electives (choose one)
510.611 Psychology of Music Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
710.649 Music Theory Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Homewood Human Growth and Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Homewood Child Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Homewood Adolescent Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
OR Independent Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
10-11
  * If courses specific to pedagogy were completed for the B.M. program at Peabody, four
credits of electives must be taken instead. Not required of voice or guitar majors.
** Courses listed are suggested electives. Other courses may be taken which satisfy
a student’s personal goals.

M.M. Curriculum—Composition Majors


The Master of Music degree program in Composition normally requires a minimum
of two years to complete. Coursework in the master’s program will be chosen with the
advice and approval of the Composition Department, in keeping with the candidate’s
background and special interests, to ensure solid and comprehensive training. Skill in
the utilization of various chamber and choral resources is emphasized, as is composition
for orchestra in larger forms. The study of computer music and orchestration must be
included in the curriculum, unless previous experience in these areas has been
documented.
Composition students have numerous opportunities to hear their works performed, in
recitals scheduled by the Composition Department or by individual teachers or students;
in readings by the Peabody Orchestra, the Opera Workshop, and other Peabody ensem-
bles; and through personal contact with the many excellent performers at Peabody. Many
of these are recorded for later listening and study.
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
310.845-846 Composition Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
310.691 Composition Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Ensemble
910.811-812** Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Electives*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
36
   * Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
  ** Qualified instrumentalists may audition for placement in another large ensemble.
Required in the first year of residency.
*** Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

89
M.M. Curriculum—Computer Music Majors
The Master of Music degree program in this field prepares students for advanced work
in areas of music where technology occupies an essential role. It normally requires a min-
imum of two years to complete. Students specialize in one of three tracks: Composition,
Performance/Concert Production, and Research/Music Technology.
The Composition track allows special concentration in composing music utilizing com-
puter music systems. Students will work with the latest digital synthesis hardware and
software and learn to develop idiomatic composing techniques which take advantage
of the unique capabilities of digital music technology. Students in this track will take
instruction in composition. They must submit, by April 1 of the year they intend to
graduate, a portfolio of compositions created during the time of study. This should
include a variety of works in the computer music medium, with a substantive work of
at least 10 minutes’ duration, and at least one work that uses acoustic instrument(s)
and/or voice(s). Please refer to departmental guidelines for exact composition port­folio
requirements.
The Performance/Concert Production track allows students to gain the skills and sensibili-
ties necessary to become expert performers with the new technology. The term “perfor-
mance” may include real-time control of musical parameters using existing technology
in an expressive way, performance on electronic instruments such as synthesizers,
performance on conventional instruments combined with electronics, and concert pro-
duction techniques, depending on the student’s background and needs.
Students in this track will take instruction in performance. In the year they intend to
graduate, they will present a full program, which may be entirely computer music, or
combined with acoustic instrument(s) and voice(s). Please refer to departmental guide-
lines for exact performance concert requirements.
The Research/Music Technology track is designed for students pursuing musically related
research or developing new music technology. Students in this track may work with
practicing composers and performers in developing technology, such as real-time per-
formance systems in which computers are able to follow a conductor’s expressive tempo
variations during a concert. Research topics in psychoacoustics and perception and in
music-related computer science may also be pursued. Students in this track will have a
document advisor analogous to the instructor in composition or performance mentioned
above, and will submit by April 1 of the year they intend to graduate a thesis document-
ing their research or new technology. Please refer to departmental guidelines for exact
research portfolio requirements.
Cooperative Interaction Among Tracks. Students in the three areas of concentration are
expected to work together closely. Specifically, students in the Composition area are
expected to create at least one composition that requires the assistance of students in the
performance and research/technology areas. Students in the Performance/Concert Produc-
tion area are similarly required to perform or produce at least one piece by a student in the
composition area that requires assistance from a student in the research/technology area.
Students in the Research/Technology area are expected to create at least one technological
advance that is applied by a student in the performance or composition area.

90
Computer Music: Composition
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
350.693 Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
350.840 History of Electroacoustic Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
350.837-838 Digital Music Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
350.845-846 Computer Music Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
350.835 Studio Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
350.867-868 Synthesis Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
42
* Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
Computer Music: Performance/Concert Production
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
350.840 History of Electroacoustic Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Program Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
350.837-838 Digital Music Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
350.845-846 Computer Music Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
350.835 Studio Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
350.867-868 Synthesis Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
42
* Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.
Computer Music: Research/Technology
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
350.841-842 Research Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
350.691 Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
350.840 History of Electroacoustic Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

91
Computer Music: Research/Technology (continued)
Coursework Specific to the Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
350.837-838 Digital Music Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
350.845-846 Computer Music Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
350.835 Studio Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
350.867-868 Synthesis Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
42
* Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.

M.M. Curriculum—Music Education Majors


The Master of Music degree program in music education is designed for students
already possessing initial certification to teach music in the public schools. Coursework
in this program will be determined according to the background and professional goals
of the candidate.
Peabody offers a partial tuition grant for degree-seeking graduate music education
majors. Students must be a teacher in the State of Maryland and enrolled for a maximum
of 6 credits per semester. Funds are limited, and there is an application process. For more
information, contact the Music Education Department at 410-659-8100, ext 4430, or
http://www.peabody.jhu.edu/musiceducation.
Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
510.611* Psychology of Music Teaching and Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
510.612* Research in Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
510.613* History and Philosophy of Music Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
510.614 Supervision and Curriculum Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
510.615-617 Music Education Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
510.621 Graduate Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
510.624 Conducting Wind Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
510.626 Music Education and Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
510.691* Independent Field Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
32
  *Required courses
** Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their sec-
ond year in the program.

M.M. Curriculum—Musicology Majors


The academic discipline of Musicology investigates the varied relationships between
musical traditions and the cultures that create and sustain them. The discipline necessar-
ily combines historical and cultural research with analysis of music.
The Master of Music degree program in Musicology offers the student an introduction
to the academic study of music at the graduate level. Coursework exposes the student
to a broad range of approaches to contemporary musical scholarship and emphasizes
the development of critical, analytical, and practical skills germane to the profession.
All students are assigned an advisor who will monitor the student’s progress during the
first year of the program. In the second year of study, the advisor will supervise an inde-
92
pendent project of research and writing leading to the completion of the master’s essay.
Upon completion of the program, students are well positioned for admission to Ph.D.
programs in musicology.
Students entering the program should demonstrate a strong potential for future suc-
cess in the field. Successful applicants normally possess (1) a solid undergraduate founda-
tion in music history, theory, and musicianship, (2) relevant experience as a performing
musician, or (3) a distinguished academic background in a related field of study. All
students are required to meet the proficiency standards in music history, theory, and ear
training required of master’s students in all disciplines.
All students must pass a reading exam in French, German, or Italian and should plan
to fulfill this requirement before the completion of the third semester of full-time study.
Entering students who are not prepared to meet this requirement are advised to under-
take appropriate coursework at Peabody or on the Homewood campus of The Johns
Hopkins University. In certain instances, a student may petition the department for an
examination in a language other than those listed above. In such cases, the student must
make a compelling case that knowledge of this language is of direct relevance to his/her
research interests. All such requests must be submitted in writing to the department
chair before the end of the second semester of study, and cases will be decided by a vote
of the full faculty. Any questions about the language requirement should be directed to
the graduate advisor.
As the final requirement for the Master in Musicology degree, all students complete a
master’s essay, a serious scholarly endeavor displaying excellence in research, writing, and
critical thinking. The following guidelines are provided as a general model only, and, as
such, they are intended to be descriptive rather than prescriptive. Topics and approaches
vary widely, and detailed requirements for the content of the master’s essay are deter-
mined on an individual basis in consultation with the student’s academic advisor.
1. During the second semester of full-time study, each student registers for graduate research
with a member of the faculty, to commence at the beginning of the third semester.
2. During the third semester, the student and advisor devise an independent program of
reading and research leading to the identification of a topic for the master’s essay.
3. Working closely with the advisor through the various stages of the writing process, the
student submits a draft of the completed essay to the advisor at least one month prior to
the submission deadline set by the Office of Academic Affairs. The submission deadline
for the final copy is currently March 30. As changes in the academic calendar often occur,
students should consult with the academic program coordinator to verify the date of the
submission deadline.
4. Once the advisor has approved the final version of the essay, two copies are submitted to
the Office for Academic Affairs. The final copy should include a title page that follows the
template provided in Appendix F of the D.M.A. Guidelines (available from the Office for
Academic Affairs).
5. Final copies of the essay, printed on acid-free paper, should be produced on a laser printer.
High-quality photocopies are acceptable as final copies.
6. The bibliography and footnotes should be formatted according to the methods outlined in
The Chicago Manual of Style.
7. There is no required page length for the master’s essay, but most range between 30 and
50 pages in length.

Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21


610.633-692 Seminars in Musicology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
610.755-756 Graduate Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.691 Master’s Essay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

93
Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
To be selected in consultation with the Musicology chair from courses offered at
other divisions of The Johns Hopkins University or another affiliated institution.
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
610.651* Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Applied Lessons or Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
34
* Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.

M.M. Curriculum—Music Theory Pedagogy


The Master of Music in music theory pedagogy is intended for musicians with
strong abilities and interest in teaching music theory. The program of study encourages
students to perceive and articulate large and small musical phenomena. In addition to
courses in music theory pedagogy, students take courses in counterpoint, analysis, and
20th-century music as well as Music Bibliography and two musicology seminars.

Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27


710.649 Music Theory Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
710.650 Music Theory Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
710.685 Music Theory Pedagogy Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Counterpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Students are required to take Baroque Counterpoint (710.634) unless
exempted by examination. Students who are exempted from Baroque
Counterpoint must take Renaissance Counterpoint (710.633)
Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Students are required to take two graduate courses in music analysis,
to be chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor.
Twentieth Century (one of the following) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
710.643,644 Music from 1900 to 1945
710.645,646 Music Since 1945
710.651 Twentieth-Century Style and Analysis
710.714 Thinking by Ear: Segue to the Twentieth Century
Electives* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives may include additional music theory, musicology, or language
electives, or graduate-level courses offered at The Johns Hopkins University.
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
610.651** Music Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
35
  * Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
**Bibliography must be completed in the first year of study, with the exception of students
placed in English as a Second Language Level I, who may defer Bibliography to their
second year in the program.

94
Master of Arts in Audio Sciences Degree

The Master of Arts program in audio Program Requirements


sciences was developed in conjunction Students choose from two tracks: a con-
with members of the professional audio centration in Recording and Production or
community to provide the technical an emphasis on Acoustical Studies. Core
knowledge and musical skills necessary coursework will include Music Theory I,
to work at an advanced level in the field Musical Acoustics, Electroacoustics, Psy-
of audio and/or acoustics. The program is choacoustics, and Physical Acoustics. The
intended both for current audio profes- remaining coursework in each track will
sionals wishing to obtain a post-bacca- consist of courses specific to the concentra-
laureate credential and individuals with a tion chosen by the student in accordance
background in science, technology, and/or with his or her background and profes-
music seeking additional training in order sional goals.
to gain employment in the audio or acous-
tics industry.

Concentration in Acoustical Studies


The Acoustical Studies concentration is designed to prepare students to work as pro-
fessionals in the fields of acoustical consulting, sound systems design, acoustical product
design, and sound systems integration. The program provides a thorough grounding
in acoustical fundamentals and design practices to enable graduates to begin careers in
these specialized fields.
Admission Requirements
A bachelor’s degree in architecture, audio technology, computer sciences, electrical
engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, or recording sciences is required. Under-
graduate coursework must include one year of college physics and one year of calculus.
Additional requirements are a background in music with the ability to play an instru-
ment at high school level, courses in music history, and skills sufficient to enter Music
Theory I. International students must demonstrate competencies in English commensu-
rate with expectations for Peabody’s Master of Music Degree.
Major  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
550.624 Architectural Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.626 Noise Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
550.625 Sound System Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.627 Computer Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
550.631 Professional Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
550.640 Acoustics Design Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.516 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.623 Physical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
36

95
Concentration in Recording and Production
The Recording and Production concentration is designed to prepare students to work
as professionals in the audio/video production field and as recording and broadcast engi-
neers. The program draws on the student’s previous work in the pertinent undergraduate
field to build skills that are applied to the proper use of professional digital and analog
audio recording and production equipment.
Admission Requirements
A bachelor’s degree in music, physics, electrical engineering, or audio technology is
required. Undergraduate coursework must include one year of college physics, one year
of calculus, one year of audio fundamentals, basic audio engineering, and circuits and
signals or the equivalent. Additional requirements are a background in music with the
ability to play an instrument at high school level, courses in music history, and skills
sufficient to enter Music Theory I. International students must demonstrate competen-
cies in English commensurate with expectations for Peabody’s Master of Music degree.

Major . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
550.611 Music and Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.612 Audio Science and Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.511-512 Advanced Recording Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Core Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
550.515 Musical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.517 Psychoacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.516 Electroacoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
550.623 Physical Acoustics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
36

96
The Doctor of Musical Arts Degree

The objective of the program leading to Audition requirements by major are


the degree of Doctor of Musical Arts is to available on the Peabody web site at
provide a select number of qualified stu- www.peabody.jhu.edu/admissions or from
dents with the highest level of professional the Admissions Office. Pre-screening
development in the art of musical perfor- recordings are required in certain majors.
mance or the craft of musical composition,
Composition. The D.M.A. program
within a context of comprehensive under-
assumes considerable compositional
standing of the common body of theoreti-
attainment and experience as a prerequi-
cal and historical knowledge and of the
site for admission. Applicants are expected
literature specific to the applied major.
to have the M.M. degree in composition,
The Doctor of Musical Arts degree
or the equivalent. A portfolio of mature
certifies that its holder is a sophisticated
works for various media for pre-screen-
professional performer or composer who
ing by the composition faculty must be
is able to exercise professional leadership,
submitted to the Admissions Office by the
using his or her skills and understanding
application deadline.
to expand existing horizons of knowledge
and perception. Computer music. Although there is no
doctorate in computer music, it is possible
Admission Requirements
to emphasize computer music studies in
Prior study. A Master of Music degree or conjunction with another major, such as
its demonstrated equivalent is a prerequi- composition, conducting, or performance.
site for admission to the Doctor of Musical In this case, approval of both departments
Arts degree program. Equivalency may be is required for acceptance into the D.M.A.
validated by examination or by comple- program. Entrance requirements, elective
tion of additional prerequisite courses. studies, composition portfolio contents,
Evidence of a graduate-level degree recital and recital contents must be approved by
must be submitted in the form of a recital both departments, and individual instruc-
program or credit listed on the applicant’s tion is required in both departments on an
transcript. Professional experience is alternating basis.
highly recommended as a desirable qualifi-
cation for study at the doctoral level. Pos- Conducting. The audition process consists
session of an M.M. degree from Peabody of two rounds. Conducting applications
does not necessarily grant admission to the and materials, including an audition
D.M.A. program. DVD, are due in the Admissions Office by
December 1. VHS cassettes in NTSC for-
Major field requirements. All entering mat can be accepted. The recording should
students must pass a personal audition consist of three to four excerpts, each two
and interview at the regularly scheduled to three minutes in length, of contrasting
audition period in February. D.M.A. audi- standard repertoire demonstrating a vari-
tions are not held in May. It is not possible ety of styles and tempi. The camera should
to audition for the D.M.A. program by be placed at the back of the orchestra with
recording. the focus on the front of the conductor. A
Performance. Applicants should prepare full-size orchestra is not required; a quin-
sufficient material to perform a full solo tet with piano would suffice, for example.
recital containing works which show a The applicant’s name and a written log
diversity of periods and styles. All major of the excerpts with timings should be
works must be complete (to include all included. The log should not be video-
movements). taped. Appropriate dress is expected.

97
Round two will take place during the reflect the applicant’s academic capability. Of
February audition week and will consist of particular interest to the D.M.A. interview-
a live audition with orchestra. Candidates ing committee is evidence of a capacity for
who have been selected for the live audi- independent thinking, initiative, and ability
tion will be notified in January and receive to present, develop, and support a thesis or
a repertoire list. Students will be expected point of view. Four copies of the essay must
to have all materials fully prepared. Inter- be submitted to the Admissions Office by
views and testing in addition to the live the application deadline. If the essay is not
auditions may be required for acceptance. submitted by the application deadline, the
application is considered incomplete, and
Entrance examinations. Applicants must the applicant must wait until the next audi-
demonstrate good musicianship, solid tion period for admission consideration.
academic skills, and extensive musical Graduates of other Peabody programs are
and professional knowledge. At the time not exempt from this requirement.
of auditions, all applicants take music
theory examinations, written and aural. Interview. At the time of audition, the
These examinations are used to evaluate D.M.A. applicant will be scheduled for an
the applicant both for admissions and interview with members of the Peabody
for placement in graduate music theory faculty. The purpose of this 15- to
courses. They assess knowledge and skill 20-minute interview is to ascertain the
in the following areas: a) harmony, analy- applicant’s suitability for the academic
sis, tonal counterpoint and 20th-century aspects of the D.M.A. program. The meet-
techniques; b) melodic and harmonic ing also provides an opportunity for the
dictation; c) sight-singing in four clefs: faculty to assess the applicant’s verbal
treble, alto, tenor, bass. skills, and to discuss the applicant’s partic-
During the audition period, all appli- ular interests and motivation in pursuing
cants must take a music history exam in the degree. A portion of the interview
which they write essays chosen from a list will relate to the essay submitted with the
of topics in the history of Western music. application.
The exams are graded for knowledge of
music history, ability to organize and Degree Requirements (D.M.A.)
present ideas, and command of written Residence. The program of study for the
English. This exam is used to evaluate the Doctor of Musical Arts degree will nor-
applicant for admission. mally require an attendance of two years
D.M.A. students who have not success- beyond receipt of the master’s degree. The
fully completed a graduate-level course doctoral candidate must attend full time
in counterpoint (including students who for at least one year (minimum of 18 to
earned the undergraduate degree at Pea- maximum of 36 credits for one academic
body) are strongly advised to take a gradu- year, including 8 credits of private study),
ate counterpoint course in preparation for and may complete the remainder of the
their D.M.A. music theory examination. requirements on a part-time basis. Con-
tinuous registration each year in courses,
Writing sample. All applicants must sub- applied studies, or degree-in-progress is
mit evidence of their research and writing required. Regulations governing inter-
skills in the form of an essay written within ruption of study apply uniformly to all
the previous two years. This essay, of 1,500 students (see p. 26, Interruption of
or more words, should be on a musical Degree Work).
subject of the applicant’s choice. It must be
typed and supported by citations and refer- Transfer credits. A maximum of 12
ences. The essay serves as the basis of the semester hours of graduate study (course-
D.M.A. interview and should adequately work) completed at other accredited

98
institutions may be applied to the Doctor Curriculum Components (D.M.A.)—
of Musical Arts degree, with the approval Requirements and Examinations
of the associate dean for academic affairs,
after examination of placement results and Advisory Committees
consultation with the entrance interview Academic advisory committee. By the last
committee. Credit must have been earned day of classes of the third semester of study
within five years of the student’s first the student shall submit to the associate
graduate degree registration at Peabody dean for academic affairs for approval the
and must carry grades of B or better. names of a three-person faculty advisory
committee, in addition to the major
Previously earned Peabody credits. Stu- teacher. These faculty should represent
dents may petition the associate dean for areas of musicology, music theory, and
academic affairs to have credits for courses an optional area of study (humanities,
and/or ensembles that were over and above computer music, etc.). The student will
the minimum requirements for a previous have approached the potential advisors
Peabody degree applied to the D.M.A. beforehand. This committee shall be avail-
degree program. No coursework that was able to the student for consultation and
required or used to fulfill minimum credit advice concerning curriculum and possible
requirements for a previous degree may be dissertation or paper topics. Members of
applied to a subsequent graduate degree. this committee also shall submit appropri-
Work completed in the Graduate Exten- ate questions for the written qualifying
sion program, beyond the M.M. degree examinations and sit on the oral qualifying
level, may transfer to the D.M.A. pro- examination committee.
gram, upon satisfaction of all other admis-
Major field advisory committee. Each stu-
sion requirements. All previously earned
dent will be assigned a major field advi-
credits applied to the D.M.A. degree must
sory committee consisting of three faculty
carry grades of B or better, and must have
members appointed by the associate dean
been earned not more than five years prior
for academic affairs and including the
to initial registration in the program.
major teacher. This committee is respon-
Review courses. Deficiencies in ear-train- sible for approving the student’s repertoire
ing and music theory identified during list, approving and jurying all the stu-
the entrance/placement examinations must dent’s recitals, and submitting questions
be corrected in the first year of enrollment for the major field qualifying examination.
and may be corrected either by remedial Major applied study. Individual studio
study or by re-examination. Students may work includes in-depth repertoire devel-
not enroll in graduate courses in these opment, and culminates in a series of
areas until deficiencies are remedied. recitals or final projects, depending on the
Review courses carry zero credit and do chosen path of study. D.M.A. candidates
not count toward fulfillment of degree may elect alternative programs of study
requirements, but the grades earned are in some areas (see individual curriculum
calculated in the GPA and the hours are descriptions).
counted as part of the course load which Ensembles. D.M.A. students may per-
determines full-time status. form in large ensembles on a space-avail-
Program completion. All requirements for able basis after students with an orchestral
the Doctor of Musical Arts degree must requirement have been seated.
be completed within seven academic years Repertoire requirement. Upon entry to the
from the date of initial D.M.A. registra- program, each candidate must submit a
tion. Exceptions to this regulation may be repertoire list to the department faculty
granted by the D.M.A. Committee only indicating works memorized and works
under extraordinary circumstances. performed. At the end of each year in

99
the program, the candidate will submit (Students are respons­ible for obtaining the
an updated repertoire list reflecting new necessary signatures.)
works studied and performed. Program notes. The candidate must sup-
ply program notes of publishable quality
Recitals. A minimum of three recitals is
before each program is approved. These
required of all performance majors. (See
should be approximately one page in
pages 103-112 for individual majors.)
length, and must be approved by a repre-
Any student not playing a degree recital sentative of the musicology faculty. The
in a year of residency will be scheduled for program submitted to the candidate’s
a graded hearing before the departmental committee must carry the appropriate
faculty at the end of the spring semester. signature indicating such approval.
Program Content Lecture-recital. The lecture-recital must
1. Performance be based on an analytical or historical
a. One program may be specialized in document approved by the candidate’s
content, if the others are varied. academic advisory committee and by the
b. One ensemble program may be Graduate Document Committee. The
presented. program submitted to the Concert Office
c. One lecture-recital may be presented must carry the appropriate signatures
subject to prior approval by the major indicating such approval. The recital is
field advisory committee. juried by the members of the candidate’s
2. Conducting major field and academic advisory com-
The first two recitals must be chosen mittee. The document may be filed with
from the following three options: the Academic Affairs Office at any point
a. A full-length program given on prior to April 1 of the semester in which
campus the candidate expects to graduate and
b. A full-length program presented at must be completed prior to presentation
some other venue while the student of the lecture-recital.
is in residence Registration. It is advisable for the doc-
c. A combination of performances toral student to register for recitals when
presented during the student’s resi- enrolled full time. The student must be
dency that total at least 60 minutes. registered for private study during the
This must be approved by both the semester in which a recital is presented.
student’s advisor and the Ensemble Exceptions to this include the chamber
Office. music recital (chamber music registration)
Each performance must be videotaped and lecture-recital (lecture-recital registra-
and copies provided by the student to tion). Any degree recital must be approved
each committee member who is grading. by the associate dean for academic affairs
The student’s major field committee must and Concert Office (see Program Approval
approve each program prior to perfor- above and Student Handbook).
mance, and all students must complete the Portfolio of compositions (composition majors).
necessary paperwork for scheduling and Content. Composition majors must sub-
registration as required by the Concert mit to the composition faculty, by April
Office in consultation with the Ensemble 1 of the year in which they intend to
Office. graduate, a work of major proportions as
Program approval. Each program must to length and medium and a substantial
be approved by the candidate’s major research paper on a topic approved by the
field advisory committee and the associate candidate’s Academic Advisory Commit-
dean for academic affairs. A copy of the tee. These together constitute the final
approved program must be received by the document for composition. In addition, the
Concert Office six weeks before the recital. portfolio must contain one or more smaller

100
works. The specific requirements of these ing and critical thinking abilities. Some
works will be determined in each case in majors require D.M.A. students to take
consultation with the composition faculty. additional graduate seminars in musicol-
Registration. Candidates who are ogy as well; see specific program curricula
enrolled full time may register for the for details. After D.M.A. students pass
portfolio of compositions without addi- the preliminary oral examination (usually
tional fee; non-full-time candidates will at the beginning of their second year of
be charged fees on a credit-hour basis. study), they will choose an advisor from
Students wishing to delay submission among the full-time members of the
of the portfolio beyond the first week of Musicology faculty who will then serve as
the semester following registration must a guide through the remaining portion of
make application through the Office of the D.M.A. musicology curriculum. These
Academic Affairs and must be registered duties will include approving program
for private study during the semester in notes, preparing and helping to adminis-
which the portfolio is actually presented. ter the D.M.A. history examination, and
No additional fees will be charged for a advising on preparation of the document or
delayed submission. dissertation, lecture-recital, and final oral
Submission of portfolio. The student examination. For further details students
should submit the completed portfolio should refer to the D.M.A. guidelines,
to the composition faculty, at the same available in the Office of Academic Affairs.
time advising the Office of Academic Language. Doctoral students will be
Affairs that this is being done. Following required to demonstrate proficiency in one
acceptance of the portfolio by the faculty, language besides English, the language
the student should prepare a final version, to be approved by the department and
incorporating any modifications which competency determined by the results
may have been requested, and deliver the of a reading examination. As a rule, the
portfolio with the official acceptance sheet foreign languages must be chosen from
signed by members of the composition among French, German, or Italian. With
faculty to the Office of Academic Affairs approval of the members of the D.M.A.
for presentation to the library. Committee, other languages may fulfill
Coursework. Each student shall take a the requirement when so indicated by the
minimum of six hours in musicology and special nature of the student’s intended
six hours in music theory, plus electives in research. In addition to the reading exami-
repertoire and other studies, including a nation, voice majors must demonstrate
minimum of three hours of upper division diction competency in all three languages
coursework in humanities at the School of (French, German, Italian), conversational
Arts and Sciences of The Johns Hopkins ability in one of the three languages, and
University or another accredited institu- functional knowledge of the other two.
tion. Minimum requirements vary depend- Electives. Unless otherwise specified, the
ing on the major. See the curriculum term elective means class elective. Ensem-
listings for individual programs, pages ble credits cannot be counted as elective
103-112. credits. Questions about the appropriate-
Musicology Requirements. Doctor of ness of courses for elective credit can be
Musical Arts students are required to directed to the associate dean for academic
enroll in the Musicology Colloquium affairs.
during their first year. The colloquium All D.M.A. students are encouraged to
provides opportunities to hear guest lec- seek employment relevant to their field
turers speak on musicology topics of their of study while enrolled in this degree
expertise, and focuses on developing writ- program. The employment must be

101
designated and structured to enhance pletion of the required coursework and
the student’s educational program. The shall consist of:
employment must be approved by the 1. Written examinations in musicology,
student’s studio teacher who must ensure music theory, and the literature of the
its academic relevance. The employment major field. Detailed information on
can be established as an elective course the music theory qualifying exami-
taken for 1/2 credit each semester or for nation may be found in the D.M.A.
one credit in the summer. Employment Guidelines, available in the Office of
can fulfill a maximum of three elective Academic Affairs.
credits and may not be applied to fulfill
major or core requirements. 2. The final oral examination shall be the
last of the comprehensive exams and
Please note: International students cannot will cover many facets of the student’s
begin off-campus employment until they major field as well as a comprehensive
receive written approval from the interna- professional perspective (see D.M.A.
tional student advisor for Curricular Prac- Guidelines).
tical Training (CPT) or Optional Practical
Training. Students in F-1 status must have Lecture-Recital. For most D.M.A. can-
been lawfully enrolled in school on a full- didates, the final recital will be a lecture-
time basis for at least one academic year recital. The lecture-recital will be based
before they are eligible for practical train- on an analytical or historical essay written
ing. CPT must be undertaken prior to the under the guidance of a member of the
completion of a course of study. candidate’s academic advisory committee.
This essay must be completed prior to
Preliminary oral examination. The the presentation of the lecture-recital.
third-semester preliminary oral examina- Candidates will submit two clean copies of
tion is intended to demonstrate a student’s their essay, incorporating all additions and
ability to speak about and respond to corrections, for placement in the Arthur
questions on a single, substantial piece Friedheim Library. Details concerning the
of repertoire, chosen by the student and scope of the project, topic approval, the
approved by members of the D.M.A. format of the lecture-recital, and the time-
Committee. The 25-minute preliminary table of the process may be found in the
oral examination consists of: D.M.A. Guidelines.
1. an examination on selected repertoire
Dissertation. In fields where candidates
2. a listening portion for the D.M.A. degree have a choice of
The intention of the preliminary oral exam- writing a dissertation, they must choose a
ination is to identify areas in which the stu- musical subject which has been approved
dent may need additional guidance. by the Graduate Document Committee.
Dissertations may deal with any aspect of
Admission to candidacy. A student is
music, e.g., analysis, theory, history, criti-
not admitted to official candidacy for the
cism, performance practice, development
D.M.A. degree until he or she has satisfac-
of a critical edition, etc. For composition
torily passed all qualifying examinations.
majors, the dissertation will be a composi-
In order to be eligible to take the qualify-
tion of major proportions as to length and
ing examinations the student must have
medium (e.g., a symphony) accompanied
completed all coursework, at least two
by a substantial written commentary on it.
recitals, and satisfied the language require-
See also the statement on page 100 under
ment. Piano majors must have completed
Portfolio of compositions (composition
the literature exam.
majors).
The qualifying examinations must be
taken within one calendar year after com-

102
Oral defense of dissertation: An oral 1.  Option A—dissertation
defense of the dissertation must immedi- 2. Option B—lecture-recital and
ately follow completion of the disserta- document
tion, and must take place at least two
weeks prior to the date of submission of 3. Option C—offered in piano (Ensemble
the dissertation to the library. Detailed Arts) and voice (Performance/
procedures are available in the D.M.A. Pedagogy)
Guidelines. Options are not available in all majors.
Curriculum options. The following
cur­riculum options are available for the
D.M.A. program:

D.M.A. Curriculum—Composition Majors


Composition
Applied Major  (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
310.845-856 Composition Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Coursework* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Musicology seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
310.793 Compositions/Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
60
   * Coursework will be chosen with the advice and approval of the Composition Depart-
ment. It must include some study in computer music, if not taken earlier.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
*** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

D.M.A. Curriculum—Conducting Majors


The D.M.A. in conducting is available to qualified students seeking additional profes-
sional experience as conductors. Students are required to present a public lecture preced-
ing the third recital and a final document equivalent to a lecture-recital paper.
Orchestral Conducting
Following completion of course requirements as listed below, but within seven years of their
matriculation, candidates must furnish a videotape of one public performance (Recital 190.797)
for which they were engaged as conductor. The acceptability of the program is determined prior
to the performance in consultation with the director of conducting programs.
Applied Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

103
Orchestral Conducting (continued)
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.797 Recital, off campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Lecture (with recital 190.796) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
330.847-848 Conducting Seminar* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60
   * Required every year of enrollment.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution.
*** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

Wind Conducting: Option A


Applied Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
330.847-848 Conducting Seminar+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.791 Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60
   +Required every year of enrollment (two years, two credits per year)
   *Conducting the Peabody Wind Ensemble as part of the coursework will count toward one recital
if the sum of minutes is equal or greater than the standard recital time of 60 minutes.
  **Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
***Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

104
Wind Conducting: Option B
Applied Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Lecture (with recital 190.796) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
330.847-848 Conducting Seminar+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60
   +Required every year of enrollment (two years, two credits per year)
   *Conducting the Peabody Wind Ensemble as part of the coursework will count toward one recital
if the sum of minutes is equal or greater than the standard recital time of 60 minutes.
  **Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
***Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

D.M.A. Curriculum—Performance Majors


Guitar
Program Requirement
1. Prepared recitals
3  solo recitals
1  concerto recital including at least two works of contrasting styles for guitar and
orchestra; may be performed with piano, with ensemble considered a factor in assess-
ment. Performance with orchestra may satisfy this requirement on the condition that
the faculty jury be present at the performance.
1  chamber music recital; may include chamber music with voice.
1  lecture-recital based on a document approved by the candidate’s Academic Advisory
Committee.
2. Lecture-recital document

Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.797 Recital (concerto) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.798 Recital (chamber music) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Recital (lecture-recital) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

105
Guitar (continued)
Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60
  * Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

D.M.A. Curriculum—Performance Majors


Orchestral Instruments: Option A
Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Electives (must be performance activity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
610.755-756 Graduate Research** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.791 Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60
  * Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

106
D.M.A. Curriculum—Performance Majors
Orchestral Instruments: Option B
Program Requirement
1. Prepared recitals: six major performances, of which there must be:
2 solo recitals
1 lecture-recital
3 choices from the following:
a) chamber music recital(s)
b) orchestral concerto performances (solo concerto of significant scope, i.e.,
more than a 10-minute Vivaldi concerto)
c) early music (original instruments) recital
d) jazz recital (especially application for saxophone)
e) additional solo recital
2. Lecture-recital document

Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30


Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.797 Recital (concerto) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.798 Recital (chamber music) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Recital (lecture-recital) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Electives (must be performance activity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
62
  * Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

107
D.M.A. Curriculum—Performance Majors
Organ and Piano: Option A
Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
450.845 Piano Seminar* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
610.755-756 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.791 Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60
   * Required of all piano majors. Must be taken during the first year of D.M.A. enrollment.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
*** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

Organ and Piano: Option B


Program Requirement
1.  Prepared recitals
3  solo recitals
1  concerto recital including at least two works of contrasting styles for piano or organ
and orchestra; may be performed with second piano, with ensemble considered a factor
in assessment. Performance with orchestra may satisfy this requirement on the condition
that the faculty jury be present at the performance.
1 chamber music recital; may include chamber music with voice.
1 lecture-recital based on a document approved by the candidate’s Academic Advisory
Committee.
2.  Lecture-recital document

Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital (solo) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.797 Recital (concerto) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.798 Recital (chamber music) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Recital (lecture-recital) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

108
Organ and Piano: Option B (continued)
Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
450.845 Piano Seminar* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60
   * Required of all piano majors. Must be taken during the first year of D.M.A. enrollment.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
***Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

Piano: Option C (Ensemble Arts)


Program Requirement
1. Prepared recitals
5 instrumental and/or vocal chamber music or sonata recitals.
1 lecture-recital based on a document approved by the candidate’s Academic Advisory
Committee.
2. Lecture-recital document

Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital (chamber music/sonatas) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital (chamber music/sonatas) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital (chamber music/sonatas) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.797 Recital (chamber music/sonatas) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.798 Recital (chamber music/sonatas) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Recital (lecture-recital) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
450.845 Piano Seminar* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
60  
   * Must be taken during the first year of D.M.A. enrollment.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
*** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

109
D.M.A. Curriculum—Performance Majors
Voice
The D.M.A. in voice provides three choices. Each program requires a two-year residency
including prescribed courses and recitals. After successfully completing the qualifying
examinations, and in consultation with his or her advisory committees, the candidate shall
declare or confirm a choice of the three options.

Voice: Option A
Performance Requirement: three major performances, of which there must be:
1 solo recital
1 chamber music recital or orchestral performance
1 more of the above or a major opera role

Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
186.711-714 Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
480.845 Vocal Seminar* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

Electives (must be performance activity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
610.755-756 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.791 Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
64
   * Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. or M.M. in voice at Peabody.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. 530.683-684 Vocal
Pedagogy and Lab are strongly recommended. Curricular Practical Training may be used
to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
*** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

110
Voice: Option B
Program Requirement
1. Prepared recitals: five major performances, of which there must be:
2  solo recitals
1  lecture-recital
2  choices from the following:
chamber music recital(s)
major operatic role(s)
additional solo recital
2. Lecture-recital document

Performance Component (minimum semester hours) 32


Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.798 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Recital (lecture-recital) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
186.711-714 Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
480.845 Vocal Seminar* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

Electives (must be performance activity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
64
   * Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. or M.M. in voice at Peabody.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. 530.683-684 Vocal
Pedagogy and Lab are strongly recommended. Curricular Practical Training may be used
to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
*** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

111
Voice: Option C (Performance/Pedagogy)
Program Requirements
1.  Performance requirement: four major performances, of which there must be:
1 solo recital
1 chamber music recital or orchestral performance
1 more of the above or a major opera role
1 lecture-recital based on a document
2.  Lecture-recital document
3. Teaching component: A designated number of hours of supervised student teaching
and teacher observation, at Peabody and elsewhere, is required. This requirement is
fulfilled by successful completion of Vocal Pedagogy Lab.

Performance Component (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30


Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
190.794 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.799 Recital (lecture-recital) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
186.711-714 Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
480.845 Vocal Seminar* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

Electives (must be performance activity) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Electives** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Research Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
610.755 Graduate Research*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
610.792 Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Program notes for all recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

Teaching Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
530.683 Vocal Pedagogy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
530.684 Vocal Pedagogy Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
64
   * Required only if not already taken to complete the B.M. or M.M. in voice at Peabody.
  ** Includes a minimum of 3 credits in humanities at the School of Arts and Sciences of
The Johns Hopkins University or another accredited institution. Curricular Practical
Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.
*** Prerequisite: 610.651 Bibliography or demonstration of basic skills in that area.

112
The Performer’s Certificate Admission Requirements
The admission requirements for the
The Performer’s Certificate is designed Performer’s Certificate are the same as
primarily for those undergraduate students those for the Bachelor of Music degree.
with outstanding musical and performance Students should consult the appropriate
ability who do not choose to include the section of this catalog and the Peabody
academic component of the Bachelor of web site at www.peabody.jhu.edu/
Music curriculum. Majors are available admissions for complete information.
in guitar, orchestral instruments, organ, Pre-screening recordings are required for
piano, and voice. some majors.
A student who has matriculated into
the Performer’s Certificate program may Certificate Requirements
later change to the Bachelor of Music The Performer’s Certificate is normally
degree program with the approval of the a three-year course of study, with a mini-
associate dean for academic affairs and the mum residency of two years. At least 80
Undergraduate Committee. semester hours of course credit are needed
for the completion of requirements. Can-
didates must participate in ensembles
throughout their period of study.

Guitar
Performance 52
Guitar: 6 semesters, 4 credits per semester 24
Departmental Seminar: 6 semesters, 1 credit per semester 6
Department Examination: 2 spring semesters, 2 credits each 4
Recital (in third year): 2 credits 2
Guitar Ensemble: 6 semesters, 1 credit per semester 6
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required second and 8
third years, 2 credits per semester
Chamber Music: 1 credit per semester 2

Music academics 55
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits
per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Guitar Music Skills I (530.585-586), Guitar Music Skills II 4
(530.587-588), 1 credit per semester (required in first two years)
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156), 2 credits per semester;
placement by examination 4
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Guitar Literature (530.431-432), 2 credits per semester 4
Lute Tablature and Notation (530.433-434, recommended
third year), 2 credits per semester 4
Guitar Pedagogy (530.637-638, recommended third year),
2 credits per semester 4
Basic Conducting, 1 credit 1

113
Guitar (continued)

Other 2
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman year),
½ credit per semester 1
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester 1
Total 109

Strings, Brass, Woodwinds, Harp, Percussion


Performance 48
Major Instrument: 6 semesters, 4 credits per semester 24
Department Examination: 2 spring semesters, 2 credits each 4
Recital (in third year): 2 credits 2
*Large Ensemble: required each semester of enrollment for major 12
lessons, 2 credits per semester
Chamber Music: 6 semesters, 1 credit per semester 6

Music academics 43–45


Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits
per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156 and 710.255-256), 2 credits 8
per semester; placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music 8
History I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Basic Conducting (330.311), 1 credit 1
**Piccolo Class (530.463-464), 1 credit per semester, 2 semesters 2

Other 5
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman year), 1
½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
Music Electives 3
Total 96–98

*Additional ensemble credit may not be used to fulfill elective requirements


**Required for flute majors and to be taken in two consecutive semesters; recommended
for the junior year.

114
Organ
Performance 52
Major Instrument: 6 semesters, 4 credits per semester 24
Departmental Seminar: 6 semesters, 1 credit per semester 6
Department Examination: 2 spring semesters, 2 credits each 4
Recital (in third year): 2 credits 2
Piano Minor: 1 credit per semester for 2 semesters 2
Voice Minor: 1 credit per semester for 2 semesters 2
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required for 6 semesters,
2 credits per semester 12

Music academics 57
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits
per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies, 2 credits per semester 4
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music 8
History I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Sight-reading (530.111-112), 2 credits per semester 4
Organ Literature (530.423-424), 3 credits per semester 6
Resources for the Contemporary Church Organist (530.425-426), 6
3 credits per semester
Accompanying (530.213-214), 1 credit per semester 2
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

Other 2
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required 1
freshman year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester 1
Total 111

Piano
Performance 40
Major Instrument: 6 semesters, 4 credits per semester 24
Department Examination: 2 spring semesters, 2 credits each 4
Recital (in third year): 2 credits 2
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required second and third years, 8
2 credits per semester
Chamber Music: 1 credit per semester, 2 semesters 2

Music academics 61
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits
per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination

115
Piano (continued)
Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors (530.211-212 and 530.213-214), 8
2 credits per semester
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music History 8
I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Sight-reading (530.111-112), recommended in the freshman year, 4
2 credits per semester
Accompanying (530.213-214), recommended in the second year, 2
1 credit per semester
Keyboard Literature I, II, III, IV (530.411, 412, 413,414), 8
2 credits per semester
Piano Pedagogy (530.667-668), recommended in the third year, 4
2 credits per semester
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

Other 4
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman year), 1
½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
second year), ½ credit per semester
Electives 2
Total 105

Voice
Performance 44
Major Instrument: 6 semesters, 4 credits per semester 24
Departmental Seminar: recommended for third year 1
Vocal Coaching: third year, 1 credit per semester 2
Department Examination: 2 spring semesters, 2 credits each 4
Recital (in third year): 2 credits 2
Chorus (Large Ensemble): required first two years,
2 credits per semester 8
*Opera performance electives, second and third years,
1 credit per semester 3

Music academics 67
Music Theory I (710.111-112), Music Theory II (710.211- 18
710.212), Music Theory III (710.311-312), 3 credits
per semester; placement by examination
Ear-training I (710.123-124), Ear-training II (710.223-224), 8
2 credits per semester; placement by examination
Keyboard Studies (710.155-156, 710.255-256), 2 credits per semester; 8
placement by examination
History of Music (4 of the following 5 courses: Music 8
History I, II, III, IV, Music and Culture), 2 credits per semester
Singing in English (530.475), English and American Song (530.476), 4
recommended in first year, 2 credits per semester
Singing in Italian (530.469), Italian Song (530.470), recommended in 4
second year, 2 credits per semester

116
Voice (continued)
Singing in German (530.477), 3 credits; German Lieder 5
(530.481), 2 credits
French Mélodie (530.480), recommended in second year 2
Singing in French (530.483), recommended in third year 3
Opera Literature (560.473, 474), 2 credits per semester 4
Stage Movement (530.391) 1
Acting for Opera (530.491) 1
Basic Conducting (330.311) 1

Academics 12
Italian I (250.111-112), recommended in first year, 3 credits 6
per semester
German I (240.111-112), recommended in second year, 6
3 credits per semester

Other 2
Thursday Noon Recital Series (530.501-502, required freshman 1
year), ½ credit per semester
Thursday Noon Alternate Project (530.503-504, recommended 1
sophomore year), ½ credit per semester
Total 125

  *The three credits of opera performance electives must be fulfilled by participation in


two separate productions of Opera Workshop, Opera Etudes, Chamber Opera, or Opera
Theatre, as assigned by the Opera Department. One of the three may also be fulfilled by
participation in any performance class offered by the Opera Department, such as the second
semester of Acting for Opera or Opera Styles and Traditions.

117
Graduate Performance Diploma

The Graduate Performance Diploma students when enrolled for lessons and
program is designed to meet the needs of recitals.
highly accomplished graduate-level per-
formers who wish to pursue a more perfor- Performance requirements. In addition
mance-intensive goal than represented by to individual major lessons, chamber
the M.M. or D.M.A. Majors are available music participation is an essential com-
in all areas of performance, including ponent of the Graduate Performance
opera and chamber music. Diploma program, and each student
admitted to the program is expected to
Admission Requirements participate in some phase of ensemble arts
in each semester of study. A minimum of
Prior study. A Performer’s Certificate,
bachelor’s degree in music, or equivalent two recitals is required for completion of
from a recognized institution is required. the program. For an individual majoring
in performance, one of the recitals may be
Audition requirements. Applicants must a chamber music recital with the permis-
perform selections from a full recital pro- sion of the major applied department. For
gram for the applied department at the chamber music majors, all recitals must be
regularly scheduled audition periods in chamber music recitals. For opera majors,
February and May. All major works must at least one opera performance (not neces-
be complete (to include all movements). sarily a complete role) during each semes-
Detailed audition repertoire requirements ter of study is required. Any student not
are available from the Admissions office presenting a graded recital in a given year
and the Peabody web site at www.peabody is required to perform at a graded hearing
.jhu.edu/admissions. Pre-screening record- before the departmental faculty at the end
ings are required for some majors. For the of the spring semester.
Graduate Performance Diploma in Cham-
ber Music, all students must be accepted Students are encouraged to pursue
into the studio of a major teacher in their development of as much public perfor-
applied area. There are no additional mance experience as possible, both inside
audition requirements for the Chamber and outside the institution.
Music GPD. For more information, go to Prior to graduation, all Graduate Per-
www.peabody.jhu.edu/chambermusic and formance Diploma candidates are required
click on “Program Overview.” to submit a personal biography suitable
for a concert program and a performance
Diploma Requirements resume. The biography and performance
Residence. One year of full-time residency resume must be typed, co-signed by the
is required, with two years of study gener- student and the major studio teacher,
ally necessary to complete the program. and submitted to the Office of Academic
Completion in less than two years requires Affairs no later than February 15 of the
the permission of the major teacher and year in which the student expects to
associate dean for academic affairs. receive his or her diploma. The associ-
Part-time enrollment in the Graduate ate dean for academic affairs or a faculty
Performance Diploma program is not member of the Graduate Committee will
permitted. International students in this review all submissions. The personal biog-
program are considered by Immigration raphy and performance resume are gradua-
and Naturalization Services to be full-time tion requirements.

118
Ensembles. Graduate Performance requirements prior to enrolling in gradu-
Diploma candidates majoring in orchestral ate-level courses.
instruments must participate in the Pea- All Graduate Performance Diploma
body Symphony Orchestra, Peabody Con- students are encouraged to seek employ-
cert Orchestra, or Peabody Wind Ensemble ment relevant to their field of study while
during each semester of enrollment. enrolled in this diploma program. The
Organ majors have a two-semester Chorus employment must be designated and
requirement which must be completed in structured to enhance the student’s educa-
the first year of residency. There is no large tional program. The employment must be
ensemble requirement for other Graduate approved by the student’s studio teacher
Performance Diploma candidates. Detailed who must ensure its academic relevance.
guidelines for ensemble participation are The employment can be established as
published in the Student Handbook. an elective course taken for ½ credit each
semester or for one credit in the sum-
Related requirements. The student may mer. Employment can fulfill a maximum
choose electives from music theory, musi- of three elective credits and may not be
cology, repertoire studies, Curricular Prac- applied to fulfill major or core require-
tical Training, or other music courses at ments.
or above the 400 level. With the approval
of the associate dean for academic affairs, Please note: International students cannot
undergraduate courses may be accepted begin off-campus employment until they
when the student demonstrates its special receive written approval from the interna-
career relevance. Students are limited to tional student advisor for Curricular Prac-
three credits of coursework per semes- tical Training (CPT) or Optional Practical
ter, in addition to lessons, recitals, and Training. Students in F-1 status must have
ensembles. Additional course credits or been lawfully enrolled in school on a full-
audits carry a per-credit charge. In the time basis for at least one academic year
areas of music theory and musicology, the before they are eligible for practical train-
student must take the appropriate place- ing. CPT must be undertaken prior to the
ment examinations and satisfy any review completion of a course of study.

Graduate Performance Diploma Curriculum


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
190.695 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Large Ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Orchestral majors* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Organ majors** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Related Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classroom electives (musicology/music theory/repertoire studies/
   Curricular Practical Training)*** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music elective (may be a minor study) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
32-36
   * Participation in a large ensemble is required for orchestral majors each semester of
residency. Additional ensemble credits may not be used to fulfill elective requirements.
  ** Chorus is required for organ majors in the first two semesters of residency.
***Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

119
Graduate Performance Diploma Curriculum—Opera
Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Voice Instruction (3 credits per semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
530.893-894 Opera Coaching (1 credit per semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
190.695 Recital (major role in an opera performance) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.696 Recital (major role in an opera performance) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Ensembles* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Related Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Professional or repertoire studies** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Music elective (may be a minor study) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
32
  * Participation in opera performance, either Opera Theatre, Chamber Opera, or Opera
Workshop, is required each semester of residency.
**Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

120
The Artist Diploma Program

The Artist Diploma is a non-degree Diploma Requirements


program reserved for the most exceptional Residence. One year of full-time residency
and experienced performers, with empha- is required, with a minimum of two years
sis on repertoire designed to meet the of study at Peabody expected. The pro-
needs of performers who are preparing and gram must be completed within five years.
qualified to embark upon a professional Financial aid is awarded for a maximum
career. of two years. International students in the
Artist Diploma program are considered by
Admission Requirements Immigration and Naturalization Services
Majors are available in all areas of per- to be full-time students when enrolled for
formance. There is no Artist Diploma in lessons and recitals. Students enrolled in
composition. Applicants must submit the the program are expected to be active per-
following with the application: forming members of the Peabody campus
1. Standard evidence of formal train- community.
ing, e.g., certificates and/or diplomas, Performance requirements. The Artist
including transcripts certifying pro- Diploma candidate must present a mini-
ficiency in all basic areas of musical mum of four public recitals. For chamber
study. music majors, all recitals must consist of
2. Evidence of professional performing chamber music. In voice, a major opera
experience, e.g., programs. Reviews are role may be considered an appropriate
optional. substitute for one or more recitals, subject
to approval of the major teacher and the
3. Repertoire list indicating works stud- departments involved.
ied and works performed.
Related requirements. The Artist
4. A 75-minute recital program ready to
Diploma curriculum includes pertinent
be performed in its entirety.
coursework as determined by the student
5. Written recommendations from three or as advised by the major teacher in con-
outstanding professional musicians sultation with members of the department
familiar with the applicant’s perfor- and the dean. The program also includes
mance ability. counseling, coursework, and/or indepen-
An individual may not apply for admis- dent study projects in various aspects of
sion to the Artist Diploma program more career development, as directed by the
than twice. dean, the major teacher, and/or the depart-
ment.
Audition requirements. Entrance to the All Artist Diploma students are encour-
Artist Diploma program is determined aged to seek employment relevant to
by live audition only in February. All their field of study while enrolled in this
applicants must perform selections from a diploma program. The employment must
full recital program for the applied depart- be designated and structured to enhance
ment at the regularly scheduled audition the student’s educational program. The
time. Upon the recommendation of the employment must be approved by the
department, the performer(s) will be student’s studio teacher who must ensure
scheduled for a second audition before a its academic relevance. The employment
panel of invited outside judges on the final can be established as an elective course
day of February audition week. taken for ½ credit each semester or for one
credit in the summer. Employment can

121
fulfill a maximum of three elective credits Continuation in the program. Continu-
and may not be applied to fulfill major or ation in the program is contingent upon
core requirements. satisfactory completion of each year’s
study, in the opinion of the major teacher,
Please note: International students cannot members of the department, and the dean.
begin off-campus employment until they The assessment will include review of
receive written approval from the interna- the student’s performance portfolio. Any
tional student advisor for Curricular Prac- student not presenting a recital in a given
tical Training (CPT) or Optional Practical year will be required to perform at a hear-
Training. Students in F-1 status must have ing before the departmental faculty at the
been lawfully enrolled in school on a full- end of the spring semester.
time basis for at least one academic year
before they are eligible for practical train-
ing. CPT must be undertaken prior to the
completion of a course of study.

Artist Diploma Curriculum


Major (minimum semester hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Recitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
190.795 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.796 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.797 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
190.798 Recital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Related Study* (does not include large ensembles) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8


32
*Curricular Practical Training may be used to fulfill up to 3 elective credits.

122
Extension Study
Undergraduate may not enroll as an extension student
Individuals wishing to enroll in private for at least one full semester following
lessons or classwork on an undergraduate dismissal. The student may apply for read-
non-degree basis, or in preparation for mission after that semester, but Peabody
application to a Conservatory degree is under no obligation to grant readmis-
program, may register for such study sion. The Conservatory reserves the right
through the Peabody Extension Division, to exclude at any time a student whose
pending faculty availability and demon- academic standing or general conduct is
stration of appropriate qualifications. considered unsatisfactory.
A student who has been dismissed from
a degree or certificate program at Peabody Audition requirements. A Graduate
may not enroll as an extension student Extension student may make his/her own
for at least one full semester following arrangements with an applied teacher
dismissal. The student may apply for read- before making formal application to
mission after that semester, but Peabody the Conservatory. The audition (then or
is under no obligation to grant readmis- earlier) must be heard by the accepting
sion. The Conservatory reserves the right teacher. A tape or CD will be acceptable,
to exclude at any time a student whose but the performing level must be vali-
academic standing or general conduct is dated in person upon the student’s arrival
considered unsatisfactory. at Peabody before Graduate Extension sta-
Further information may be obtained tus is confirmed. When at all possible, the
from the Registrar’s Office. audition should be a part of the regular
audition schedule. A Graduate Extension
Graduate student may be accepted onto a teacher’s
Graduate Extension is designed for schedule or into coursework on a space-
the individual who already holds an available basis if the application process is
undergraduate or master’s degree in music, complete before registration.
or the equivalent of a Peabody Performer’s Registration. The student may register
Certificate, and who may fall into the for applied study and/or any combina-
following categories: tion of academic coursework. In the areas
1. has been working in the field for sev- of music theory and music history, the
eral years and is seeking to refresh his/ Graduate Extension student must take the
her knowledge or improve pedagogical appropriate placement examinations and
or technical skills. satisfy any review requirement prior to
2. has a particular personal goal, and pre- enrolling in graduate-level courses. Lesson,
fers to make use of Peabody’s resources performance, and coursework credits may
in an unstructured way. count toward fulfillment of subsequent
3. is the recipient of a special one-year graduate diploma or degree requirements,
grant such as Fulbright. if approved by the major department. For-
4. has missed the degree or diploma mal application for any change in graduate
entrance deadlines and wishes to begin program must be made with the Admis-
work on a space-available basis. sions Office and all other requirements for
entrance must be met. Graduate Extension
Prior Study. A bachelor’s or master’s registrants are eligible to participate in
degree in music from a recognized insti- ensembles by audition but generally are
tution, or the equivalent of the Peabody not considered for institutional scholar-
Performer’s Certificate, is required. ship support.
A student who has been dismissed from
a degree or certificate program at Peabody

123
Conservatory Faculty
Chamber Music Guitar Horn
Small Ensembles Manuel Barrueco Philip Munds
Michael Kannen, Director Ray Chester Denise Tryon
Katherine Jacobson Julian Gray, Chair Trombone
Seth Knopp Randall Campora
Jazz David Fetter
Maria Lambros Nasar Abadey
Violaine Melancon James Olin*
Paul Bollenback Tuba
Jeffrey Sharkey Jay Clayton
Alison Wells David Fedderly
Michael Formanek Euphonium
Larry Williams Donvonté McCoy
Early Music Steven Kellner
Timothy Murphy
Baroque cello, viola da Gary Thomas, Chair Harp
gamba Jeanne Chalifoux
John Moran Opera Ruth Inglefield*
Baroque flute Carol Bartlett Percussion, Timpani, and
Colin St. Martin Garnett Bruce Marimba
Baroque lute, theorbo Roger Brunyate, Chair Robert Van Sice
Richard Stone Eileen Cornett Organ
Baroque oboe JoAnn Kulesza Donald Sutherland*
Stephen Bard John Walker
Orchestral Instruments
Baroque violin and Organ Piano
Risa Browder Ensemble Arts
Woodwinds
Harpsichord Eileen Cornett
Adam Pearl Flute
Marina Piccinini Ellen Mack*
Recorder Piano
Gwyn Roberts Emily Skala
Laurie Sokoloff Leon Fleisher
Renaissance lute Brian Ganz
Mark Cudek, Director Piccolo
Laurie Sokoloff Marian Hahn
Composition Clarinet Seth Knopp
Composition Steven Barta Ellen Mack, Chair
Derek Bermel Anthony McGill Yong Hi Moon
Michael Hersch Edward Palanker Benjamin Pasternack
Kevin Puts Saxophone Alexander Shtarkman
Gary Louie Boris Slutsky
Computer Music Repertoire Studies
McGregor Boyle, Chair Oboe
Jane Marvine Michael Habermann
Geoffrey Wright Sharon Levy
Katherine Needleman
Ensembles and Conducting Bassoon Strings
Ensembles Phillip Kolker, Chair Violin
Hajime Teri Murai, Chair Brass Victor Danchenko
Harlan Parker Trumpet Pamela Frank
Edward Polochick Josef Burgstaller Herbert Greenberg
Gene Young Wayne Cameron Violaine Melancon
Graduate Conducting Edward Hoffman Keng-Yuen Tseng, Chair
Gustav Meier*
Markand Thakar

124
Repertoire Studies Humanities Music Theory
Rebecca Henry Language Randall Bauer
Viola Paul Oorts Vern Falby
Victoria Chiang* Patricia Palmer Mark Janello
Richard Field Karen Pevac Ildar Khannanov
Stephen Wyrczynski Sebastian Vogt* Sharon Levy
Violoncello Liberal Arts Paul Mathews
David Hardy Ron Levy, Chair David Smooke
Amit Peled Gary Popoli Elam Ray Sprenkle
Alan Stepansky* Hollis Robbins Stephen Stone
Alison Wells Sarah Snyder Kip Wile, Chair
Double Bass
John Hood Musicology Professional Studies
Paul Johnson* Suhnne Ahn Business of Music
Jeffrey Weisner Robert Follet Linda Goodwin
Richard Giarusso Gary Louie
Voice John Gingerich Music Education
Phyllis Bryn-Julson, Chair David Hildebrand Harlan Parker, Chair
Marianna Busching John Moran Laura Parker
Stanley Cornett Elam Ray Sprenkle Cherie Stellaccio
Ah Hong Andrew Talle, Chair Recording Arts
Steven Rainbolt Elizabeth Tolbert Matthew Lyons
William Sharp Piero Weiss Michael MacDonald
John Shirley-Quirk Susan Weiss Neil Thompson Shade
Vocal Coaching and Edward Tetreault
Repertoire Studies Music Theory Pedagogy
Vera Danchenko-Stern Ear-training Laura Parker*
Wolfgang Justen Clinton Adams*
Ernest Ligon Courtney Orlando
Ernest Liotti Keyboard Studies
Stacey Mastrian Patricia Graham*
Robert Muckenfuss Ken Johansen
Lura Johnson
Shirley Yoo

Distinguished Visiting Faculty


Christopher Rouse, composition
Marin Alsop, conducting
William Nerenberg, Business of Music
Dame Gillian Weir, organ

*Coordinator

125
125
Course Listings
In most cases, there are two semester- A comma separating the two numbers
hour numbers in parentheses following the indicates that the first semester is not
course description. The first number refers a prerequisite for the second. 400-level
to the first semester and the second num- courses may be used to fulfill graduate
ber refers to the second semester. A dash requirements. Undergraduates may enroll
separating the two numbers indicates that in 600- or 700-level courses with permis-
the completion of the course in the first sion of the instructor and the registrar.
semester is a prerequisite for continuing Students should check with the Reg-
the course in the second. istrar’s Office each semester for the latest
information on course availability.

Brass
James Olin, Coordinator
530.419,420 Trombone Repertoire Class
The development of orchestral skills through low brass sectionals; performance in trombone
choir, departmental recitals, and mock orchestral auditions. (1,1) Olin

530.453,454 Horn Repertoire Class


Open to all horn students wishing a variety of performing situations involving solo and
orchestral repertoire. Includes a class recital and mock audition each semester. (1,1) Munds/
Tryon

530.459 Respiratory Function


Basic techniques of breathing and breath control for wind instruments tailored to the stu-
dent’s instrument with a goal of enhancing one’s use of air and efficiency to improve perfor-
mances. Consists of five private one-hour lessons during the semester. Enrollment is limited
to three students per semester. (1) Fedderly

530.457,458 Orchestral Repertoire for Trumpet


The development of orchestral performance skills for trumpet with emphasis on repertoire.
(1,1) Hoffman

950.547,548/847,848 Brass Repertoire Class


Performance of large brass ensemble repertoire and British-style brass band repertoire;
rehearsal of important orchestral literature for brass. (1,1) Olin/Kellner

Chamber Music
Michael Kannen, Director
530.521,522 Chamber Music Seminar
Open to complete groups enrolled in the chamber music program. This class focuses on a
different area of the chamber music repertoire each semester. It is an open forum in which all
participants contribute, a goal being that active listening will lead to meaningful and help-
ful responses. Through each group’s performance, the class will explore the issues that lead to
the successful re-creation of a work, and will strive to put single works into larger contexts.
Groups must apply for admission into the seminar each semester, and will be admitted at
the discretion of the faculty. This class is offered as an elective. (2,2) Kannen, Knopp, Lambros,
Melancon

126
530.621,622 Instrumental Chamber Music Class
Designed for concentrated study of the sonata and instrumental chamber music literature.
Audition/permission of the instructor required. (2,2) Hahn, Mack

530.623 New Chamber Music


This class brings together composers and instrumentalists who will work together to pro-
duce a piece of chamber music to be performed at the end of the semester. Issues of writing
for chamber ensemble as well as issues of performing contemporary music will be explored.
Interactions between composers and performers will be the focus. Instrumentalists will be
required to do some composition. All instruments, as well as voice, are welcome. Participat-
ing composers will be selected by the composition faculty. This course is offered as an elective.
(2) Kannen

530.579,580 Vocal Chamber Music


This class brings together singers and instrumentalists to explore the vast chamber music
literature that includes voice, from the baroque to the 21st century. Ensembles can include
all orchestral instruments, organ, harpsichord, piano, guitar, and percussion. This course is
offered as an elective. Permission of the instructor is required. (2,2) Sharp/Shirley-Quirk

950.531,2/831,2 Chamber Ensemble


The study and performance of the chamber music literature from all periods of music history
and including instrumental groups and combinations of orchestral instruments, keyboard
instruments, guitar, early music instruments, and voice, where appropriate. All groups receive
weekly coachings and are required to perform at the end of the semester. (1,1) Faculty

950.539,540/839,840 Piano Ensemble


The study and performance of selected duo piano literature, including music written for one
piano, four hands, as well as repertoire for two pianos. (1,1) Jacobson, Faculty

950.527,8/827,8 Baroque Ensemble


Small ensembles of instruments and singers formed by faculty coaches who cover aspects of
historic performance styles as well as ensemble playing. Instrumental students are matched
according to ability on period or modern instruments. Prior experience on period instruments
is desirable. (1,1) Faculty

950.553,4/853,4 Renaissance Chamber Ensemble


The study and performance of selected Renaissance literature for specific instrumental and vocal
groups such as, but not limited to, quartets of like instruments (e.g., guitars), lutesongs (for
voice and guitar), and the “English” or mixed consort of violin, flute, viol, lute, and guitar. (1,1)
Cudek

Composition
McGregor Boyle, Chair

Composition
310.515,516,517,518 Music Now I, II
This elective course will focus on music of the last 25 years by international region and will
look at the major figures and movements of those countries with a special, extended look at
music from the United States. I and II are offered in alternate years. (2,2) Faculty

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310.545-546/845-846 Composition Seminar
Informal sessions in which works of students and faculty are discussed in depth, guest lectur-
ers appear, and important contemporary works, trends, and techniques are analyzed. Required
for composition majors all semesters of residence. Open to others with permission of the
Composition Department. (1-1) Composition Faculty

310.691 Composition Portfolio


The completion of works of major proportions, for full orchestra and chamber ensemble, as
required in the Master of Music degree program. (2) Faculty

310.793 Compositions/Commentary
The completion of works of major proportions, for full orchestra and chamber ensemble,
accompanied by a substantial written commentary, as required in the Doctor of Musical Arts
degree program. (6) Faculty

Computer Music
Geoffrey Wright, Coordinator
350.437-438/837-838 Digital Music Programming
This course will teach computer programming theory and skills pertaining to computer
music composition, performance, and research. It covers data structures, networking, real-
time computing, machine architecture, advanced C, MAX external objects, and Java. Prereq-
uisites: 350.466 and 350.835 or equivalent. (2-2) Boyle

350.463-464 Introduction to Computer Music


A study of the techniques, repertoire, and aesthetics of computer music. Composition and
research projects are completed using the resources of the Computer Music Studios. Participa-
tion in at least one public program. (3-3) Boyle

350.465 Introduction to Web Design


Designed for music students with little computer experience, this course will provide an
overview of the usefulness of computers for musicians by looking at what computers are, how
they work, what they can do, and how they affect many other aspects of living. Focus will be
on both the humanistic and technical sides of computing. (3,0) Wright

350.466 Introduction to Programming (using Java)


A non-mathematical introduction to computer science, this course is designed for musicians
with limited background in computing. It is similar to Computer Science I courses at Johns
Hopkins and other universities but focuses on musical, multimedia, and World Wide Web
projects instead of mathematical or statistics projects to learn programming. The course will
be taught using Java J2SE and jMusic. (0,3) Wright

350.467-468/867-868 Synthesis Theory


A course designed to examine digital signal processing techniques as applied to computer
music applications. Topics include theoretical background of digital synthesis and processing
techniques (sampling theory, FM, linear and nonlinear synthesis systems), hybrid synthesis
systems, mixed digital synthesis systems (MIDI), direct digital synthesis (Csound), vari-
ous music synthesis and processing languages. Specifically for computer music majors and
recording arts majors, but open to others with permission of the instructor. Prerequisites:
350.463-464 and 350.835 or equivalent. (3-3) Faculty

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350.545-546/845-846 Computer Music Seminar
The seminar focuses on the work of student and faculty composers, performers, and research-
ers, with class discussion of these and other current developments in the field of computer
music. The seminar also functions as a repertoire class, and the participation of computer
music majors is required and evaluated as part of lessons and research practicum. Open to
others with permission of the department. (1-1) Faculty

350.835 Studio Techniques


A course that covers advanced computer music studio techniques, including advanced use
of MIDI, synthesizer programming, sample editing and processing, SMPTE Time Code and
synchronization, and recording and production techniques. Prerequisite: 350.463-464 or
equivalent. (3,0) Wright

350.840 History of Electroacoustic Music


A course devoted to the history, literature, and bibliography of electronic and computer
music, and the relationship between this field and other trends in 20th-century music. The
focus is on musical and technological developments since 1900, and the impact these have
had on musical thought. (0-3) Boyle

350.841-842 Research Practicum


An intensive course for those following the computer music research/technology track. Sub-
stantial individual projects will be pursued. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (4-4)
Faculty

350.847-848 Computer Music Area Seminar—Special Topics


One-semester seminars, often given by guest lecturers and faculty, will be offered in a variety
of areas pertaining to computer music composition, performance, and research/technology. A
total of four area seminars must be taken during each student’s two-year residency, the topics
of which must be approved by departmental faculty. (1-1) Faculty

350.871 Music Notation Software


A course that introduces the basic concepts of music notation using computer software, focusing
on the Finale application from Coda Music Technology. No prerequisite, open to all Conservatory
students. May be taken by computer music majors for Special Topics credit. (2) Faculty

350.691 Computer Music Master’s Thesis


A scholarly work describing the author’s research activities as required for the Research track
of the M.M. program in Computer Music. (2) Faculty

350.693 Computer Music Composition Portfolio


The completion of works of major proportions that utilize computer technology, accompanied
by a substantial written commentary, as required by the M.M. program in Computer Music.
(2) Faculty

Conducting
330.311 Basic Conducting
A basic course in orchestral techniques. Offered fall and spring. (1) H. Parker

330.411,412 Intermediate Conducting


Designed for the student who desires more intensive study in conducting. Literature will be
sequenced with the more difficult works in the Advanced Conducting course. Prerequisite:
Basic Conducting or permission of instructor. (1,1) H. Parker

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330.413,414 Advanced Conducting
Designed for the student who desires more intensive study in conducting. Prerequisite: Inter-
mediate Conducting or permission of the instructor. (1,1) H. Parker

330.845-846/847-848 Conducting Seminar


A seminar in all aspects of conducting as a profession, from orchestra management to program
making. Videotapes of each week’s rehearsal with the conductor’s orchestra will be discussed.
Required of all conducting majors throughout period of enrollment. (1-1) Meier/Thakar

Early Music
Mark Cudek, Director
530.315 Continuo I: Figured Bass
Designed to develop the skill of continuo playing, reading, and improvising from a figured
bass, this course will use standard repertoire as well as exercise drills. Open to all qualified
keyboard students. Offered on an as-needed basis; next in 2008–2009. (2-0) Pearl/Stone

530.337-338 Baroque Violin/Viola Repertoire


An introduction to the playing of early repertoire on period violin or viola and bow. The
student will learn the basics of baroque technique and will be introduced to a range of music,
from early baroque to early classical, and its interpretation from a historical perspective. (1-1)
Browder

530.343 Violin Literature


A chronological survey of violin literature, pedagogical as well as musical, with an emphasis
on historical techniques and performance practices of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.
Along with treatises (Geminiani, Leopold Mozart, and Baillot), the repertoire of correspond-
ing periods will be examined in light of the techniques and tastes of the times in which it was
written. No prior early music training is required. Prerequisite: Music History II or permis-
sion of the instructor. Offered in alternate years; not in 2008–2009. (1,0) Browder

530.351-352 Beginning Viola da Gamba


An introduction to the playing technique of the viola da gamba through easy to intermedi-
ate-level ensemble literature. A preparatory step to consort playing and the viol solo litera-
ture. Prior string experience is not necessary. (1-1) Moran

530.353,354 Viola da Gamba Consort


Designed for students of intermediate to advanced proficiency on viola da gamba, the consort
class provides an opportunity to read and perform music written specifically for combinations
of two to six viols (primarily from 17th-century England). Refinement of ensemble playing
is stressed. Students have the opportunity to work with other instruments of the period in
broken consort and consort songs. Prerequisite: 530.351-352 or permission of the instructor.
(1,1) Moran

530.355-356 Recorder Consort


The study and performance of ensemble music of the Renaissance for recorder consort, with
emphasis on sound, blend, tuning, style, articulation, and historical fingerings. (1-1) Roberts

530.421,422 Harpsichord Literature


A study of the literature for the harpsichord from the late 16th to the 20th century. The
course is approached from the performer’s point of view with analysis and discussion of form
and style. Offered on an as-needed basis. (1,1) Pearl

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530.433-434 Lute Literature and Notation
Intensive study of repertoire and genres for Renaissance and baroque lute and vihuela through
listening, transcribing, and performance of selected works from French, Italian, and German
tablatures. Performance practice is also a key focus of this class and will be learned initially
through simple ensemble pieces transcribed for guitar duo, trio, and quartet. Required for
guitar majors. (2-2) Cudek

530.435 Viola da Gamba Repertoire


A chronological survey of the viola da gamba and its literature (16th to 18th centuries). The
class includes live performances of seldom heard repertoire in addition to discussions of viol
technique and history. No prior early music training is required. (1,0) Moran

530.436 Early Cello Literature


A chronological survey of violoncello literature, pedagogical as well as musical, with an
emphasis on historical techniques and performance practices of the 17th, 18th, and 19th cen-
turies. The class includes consideration of the most important cellists of the 18th and 19th
centuries. No prior early music training is required, but familiarity with cello repertoire is
expected. Prerequisite: Music History II or permission of the instructor. (0,1) Moran

530.439,440 Baroque Violoncello


This course combines the history of the violoncello with listening and hands-on experience.
Students have use of Peabody’s recently “baroqued” instruments and work with primary
source tutorials as an introduction to performance practice. Solo and ensemble playing are
integral to the course. The art of bowed continuo playing is stressed and practiced in ensem-
bles with other “original” instruments. (1,1) Moran

530.441-442 Baroque Ornamentation


A course in performance practices in baroque literature from 1600 to 1785. An in-depth
study of melodic and harmonic embellishments organized by country with emphasis on
sources of the period. Examples from vocal, keyboard, and other instrumental sources used.
May be used to satisfy music history electives. Text is Frederick Neumann’s Ornamentation in
Baroque and Post-Baroque Music. (2-2) Pearl

530.443,444 Baroque Flute Class


An introduction to the playing technique of the baroque flute with emphasis on fingering,
tonal production, historic styles, and appropriate literature. (1,1) St. Martin

530.445 Advanced Continuo


A continuation of 530.315 Continuo I: Figured Bass. Specific styles of accompanying recita-
tive, chamber ensembles, orchestral, including Italian, French, German. Offered on an as-
needed basis; next in 2008–2009. (0-2) Pearl/Stone

370.492 Harpsichord Tuning


A course in basic tuning and maintenance, including tuning wrench technique, ear-training,
voicing of plectra, replacement of strings. Some study of development and construction of
harpsichords. Historic temperaments are taught. Majors must pass this course with not less
than a grade of B. Offered on an as-needed basis. (0,2) Pearl

530.543,544 Early Vocal Literature


Fall: a study of vocal works and styles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. From chant
and early polyphony to mass, motet, madrigal, and lute song. Spring: transition from Renais-
sance to baroque—monody, opera and oratorio, aria, and recitative. An emphasis on coached
in-class performances. (2,2) Cudek/Stone

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530.559 Historical Diction for Singers
Coached performance class for vocalists of 17th- and 18th-century (baroque) repertoire in
French, German, Italian, and Latin. Particular emphasis on interplay between text and music.
(1,0) Stone

530.577,578 Early Wind Literature


A chronological survey of the literature for recorder, flute, and oboe from the beginnings of solo-
istic composition in the late 16th century through the end of the 18th century, with attention
to historical context and performance practice. Includes history and development of the instru-
ments themselves and consideration of how the recorder, flute, and oboe repertoires overlap, dif-
fer, and developed over time. No prior early music experience is necessary. (1,1) Roberts

610.634 Baroque Performance Practice


What assumptions did performers bring to interpretation in the baroque era? This class pro-
vides a detailed overview of prevalent performance conventions of the time as taught to us by
primary sources, including Quantz, CPE Bach, Leopold Mozart, Muffat, and Geminiani, as
well as some insight into why these matters are important and what drives the early music
movement. While everyone will be expected to develop a solid grasp of the most significant
issues, each student will also independently cultivate expertise in a specific area of his or her
choosing. (3,0) Moran

910.527-528/910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band (Baroque Orchestra)


At the core of the baroque orchestra are the strings and continuo, forces ranging from one on
a part to the “Twenty-four Violins” of Versailles. Winds were regularly added, to suit reper-
toire and fortune. Baltimore Baroque Band is Peabody’s baroque orchestra. Like Bach’s Col-
legium Musicum, it is a flexible group that explores a broad repertoire where students work
in close partnership with experts. Playing on historical instruments, students gain firsthand
experience in period style in an environment combining orchestral discipline and chamber
music sensibility. (2-2) Moran/Browder

950.527,8/827,8 Baroque Ensemble


Small ensembles of instruments and singers formed by faculty coaches who cover aspects of
historical performance styles as well as ensemble playing. Instrumental students are matched
according to ability on period or modern instruments. Prior experience on period instruments
is desirable. (1,1) Faculty

950.529,30/829,30 Renaissance Ensemble


Open to singers and instrumentalists who wish to play early winds and strings such as
recorder, krummhorn, shawm, sackbut, cornetto, rebec, vielle, viola da gamba, lute, cittern,
Renaissance guitar, harp, etc. Repertory will include madrigals and chansons, motets and
anthems, lute and consort songs, and various instrumental consorts. (2,2) Cudek

950.553,4/950.853,4 Renaissance Chamber Ensemble


The study and performance of selected Renaissance literature for specific instrumental and
vocal groups such as, but not limited to, quartets of like instruments (e.g., guitars), lute
songs (for voice and guitar), and the “English” or mixed consort of violin, flute, viol, lute, and
guitar. (1,1) Cudek

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Ensemble Arts
Ellen Mack, Coordinator
350.847,848 Ensemble Arts Seminar
(1,1) Piano Faculty

530.213-214 Accompanying
Open to all qualified keyboard students at any level. Required for keyboard majors as part of
the chamber music program. (1-1) E. Cornett

530.513-514 Advanced Accompanying (Undergraduate)


(2-2) Mack

530.619,620 Accompanying and Coaching Skills for Pianists


An in-depth study of basic accompanying and vocal coaching skills, including diction and
phonetics, standard aria repertoire, operatic and oratorio coaching, ornamentation, and musi-
cal style. Also incorporates studies of popular styles: musical theater accompanying, synthe-
sizer skills, lead sheet reading, transposition, and improvisation. Offered in alternate years.
(2,2) E. Cornett

530.621,622 Instrumental Chamber Music


Designed for concentrated study of the sonata and instrumental chamber music repertoire.
Audition/permission of the instructor required. (2,2) Hahn, Mack

530.625,626 Accompanying and Coaching Skills II


A continuation of Accompanying and Coaching Skills I, this course is designed to build rep-
ertoire, interpretation, and coaching skills in the operatic literature. Audition/permission of
the instructor required. (2,2) E. Cornett

530.813-814,817-818 Advanced Accompanying (Graduate)


(2-2) Mack, Shirley-Quirk

530.639 Student Coach, Opera Workshop


Participation as student coach in the preparation and performance of scenes from the operatic
repertoire, in simple stagings with piano accompaniment. (1) Faculty

530.640 Student Coach, Opera Theatre Production


Participation as student coach in the preparation and performance of complete fully staged
operas with orchestra. (2) Faculty

530.677 Advanced Vocal Repertoire in French


Study and performance of representative songs. Singers should be comfortable singing in
French. Open to vocalists and pianists by audition/permission of the instructor. Offered in
alternate years; next in 2009–2010. (0,2-3) Ligon

530.678 Advanced Vocal Repertoire in German


Study and performance of representative songs. Singers should be comfortable singing in
German. Open to vocalists and pianists by audition/permission of the instructor. Offered in
alternate years; next in 2009–2010. (2-3,0) Ligon

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General Studies
360.411 The Music Business: Cash, Contracts, Copyrights
This course examines the business and commercial factors the musician encounters when
making a living in the United States. It considers the legal, financial, and marketing aspects
of a professional musician’s livelihood. Topics include the basics of contract and copyright
laws, key aspects of the recording industry, performing rights and venues, broadcasting, pub-
lishing, unions and other professional societies, managers, booking agents, tax planning, and
marketing. (2,0) Goodwin

360.415,416 The Arts Administrator/Orchestra Management


An examination of the principles of orchestra management and its administrative structure,
with detailed practical consideration given to programming, planning, budgeting, fund rais-
ing, staffing, library science, development, and community relations. (2,2) Goodwin

360.421 The Business of Music


The course explores the strategies for starting a career as a soloist or chamber musician. It will
help musicians define their personal career goals and will provide the tools necessary for suc-
cess. (1,1) Louie/Nerenberg

530.501-502 Thursday Noon Recital Series


Student performances covering all historical periods and a variety of genre. Attendance
required in the first two semesters of undergraduate enrollment. (1/2-1/2) Staff

530.503-504 Thursday Noon Alternate Project


A concert attendance project required in the third and fourth semesters of undergraduate
enrollment. (1/2-1/2) Staff

Guitar
Julian Gray, Chair
530.431,432 Guitar Literature: Undergraduate
A study of the literature for the guitar from the Renaissance to the present. Offered in alter-
nate years; next in 2009–2010. (2,2) Gray

530.631,632 Guitar Literature: Graduate


A more advanced and specialized course which includes detailed study of selected works from
the guitar literature. It will include additional research and documentation beyond the under-
graduate level. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (1,1) Gray

530.433-434 Lute Literature and Notation


Intensive study of repertoire and genres for Renaissance and baroque lute and vihuela through
listening, transcribing, and performance of selected works from French, Italian, and German
tablatures. Performance practice is also a key focus of this class and will be learned initially
through simple ensemble pieces transcribed for guitar duo, trio, and quartet. Required for
guitar majors. (2-2) Cudek

530.585-586 Guitar Music Skills I


The application of theoretical skills to the guitar. Includes harmony, position reading,
rhythm, transposition, analysis, and more. (1-1) Chester

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530.587-588 Guitar Music Skills II
A continuation of 530.585-586 for guitar majors; emphasis on form and analysis and basic
skills such as transposition, sight-reading. (1-1) Chester

530.637-638 Guitar Pedagogy


A study of guitar instructional principles and procedures for their application. Graduate stu-
dents enrolled in this course will be required to do more advanced and specialized research
and documentation. (2-2) Chester

470.545-6/845-6 Guitar Seminar


A seminar for performance and discussion of the guitar and related repertoire. Required of all
guitar majors in all semesters of enrollment. (1-1) Guitar Faculty

950.541,2/841,2 Guitar Ensemble


The development of guitar ensemble skills with two, three, and four guitars. (1,1) Chester

Harp
Ruth Inglefield, Coordinator
370.497-498 Harp Maintenance
Incoming students take this class for one year unless expertise can be established. Class covers
the basics of instrument care, changing felts, replacing rods, minor regulation, pedal adjust-
ment, etc.; students must demonstrate ability to perform standard maintenance on the school
instruments. (1-1) Inglefield

530.495-496 Harp Repertoire


All harp majors are expected to participate in this class every semester. Individual perfor-
mances of standard and contemporary repertoire (as per lesson material and/or recital prepa-
ration) with discussion of both musical and practical aspects of performance. May include
chamber performances, periodic written “reviews” by classmates, etc. (2-2) Inglefield

420.545-546/845-6 Harp Seminar


Varying topics relative to different aspects of the profession: contest/audition preparation,
arranging, orchestral techniques, amplification, resume writing, etc. For all majors from
sophomore year. Expectations vary with topic, but normally involve preparation as well as
participation. (1-1) Harp Faculty

530.629-630 Harp Pedagogy


May be taken by all majors from sophomore year, and may be repeated (at least one year is
required). Materials covered in first semester include principles of hand position, fingering,
placing, sequencing of materials, choice of music, etc., as these apply to beginning students
at every age level. Second semester consists of continued discussion as above, plus a practicum
level in which each member of the class must teach one student for 12 weeks, after which a
mini-recital will provide the basis for group evaluation and final discussion. Graduate stu-
dents are further expected to prepare a notebook of specialized teaching materials for begin-
ners. (2-2) Inglefield

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Humanities
Liberal Arts
Ron Levy, Chair
Listed below are courses taught at the Peabody campus. A full complement of humanities
courses is available on the Homewood campus of The Johns Hopkins University. Courses may
also be taken at the Maryland Institute College of Art and Loyola College. (See Inter-Institu-
tional Academic Arrangements, p. 21.)
260.011-012 Introduction to Liberal Arts
Designed for international students for whom English is a second language, this course nur-
tures the basic skills of critical thought and self-expression necessary for success in Peabody’s
undergraduate academic program. Students in this class will study Greek myths, selections
from the Bible, Shakespeare plays, and other works that have inspired Western composers
and artists. Course readings will form the basis of class discussion and writing exercises.
(3-3) Snyder

220.514 Writing Workshop


Working in a variety of genres (short stories, poems, essays, etc.), students draft, discuss,
revise, and edit their own writing projects. Student-led classes allow for creative activities.
Student work is published in a class anthology at the end of the semester. Material changes
each year so that students may enroll more than once. (0,3) Snyder

260.117 Writing Skills


This course emphasizes practical strategies for successful academic and professional writing.
Students complete a variety of writing exercises and projects. Student writing is frequently
exchanged for discussion and critique. The course is not available for open enrollment; a small
group of students selected from the first semester’s Humanities Seminar will enroll in spring
semester. (0,3) Snyder

260.115 Humanities Seminar


A team-taught course designed for new Peabody undergraduates. The course introduces stu-
dents to college-level academic studies. Designed as a text-based, interdisciplinary course,
course themes and assignments change from year to year. The course fosters critical think-
ing through discussion and a range of carefully supervised projects in a small-group setting.
Writing and collaborative work are central to the Humanities Seminar. (5,0) Faculty

260.235 Power and Racism


This is an interdisciplinary course that examines white supremacy and anti-black racism as a
global system of power. Through reading texts in philosophy, history, sociology, politics, and
law, the course will focus on trends, developments, and future challenges related to the social
relations of racism and power in America and in Brazil. (3,0) Hayes

260.237 Ethnographies of the Ordinary: The Politics of Identity


This course intends to improve students’ ability to see themselves and to see others not as
passive “members” of groups pre-defined by place, gender, occupation, race/ethnicity but as
actors who create identity in everyday performances of familiar “scripts” that falsely claim to
define who’s who. The course will engage students via a range of activities, including field-
work (disciplined observation, interviewing, participation in community events, generating
cultural “texts”); analysis (finding the ordinary in extraordinary; identifying patterns of dis-
persion and cultural continuity); and interpretation (moving from recognition to meaning,
developing awareness of ethnocentrism). (3,0) Camp

136
AS 362-200 African-American Poetry & Poetics
This course will explore the category, history, and development of African-American poetry
from Phillis Wheatley to the present. We will focus on poetry and poetics specifically but
will consider the general movement of literature produced by African-American writers over
the course of three centuries. We will read works by the key contributors to this particular
American literary tradition with the goal of understanding the aesthetic, cultural, and criti-
cal legacy of African-American poetry to the American literary and musical sensibility of
the 21st century. From 18th-century odes to the blues, hip-hop, and rap traditions, we will
examine the role that race, cultural identity, legal status, and the impersonal structures (or
shackles) of poetic forms have played in shaping and reshaping African-American verse. This
class will be taught on the Homewood campus. Students can cross-register to enroll.
(3,0) Robbins

260.216 Twentieth-Century Aesthetics and Politics


This course will introduce students to the ways that the relationships among art (aesthetics
and critical theories of art), ideology, and politics were articulated in the 20th century. We
will look at politics in its broadest sense to mean “the total complex of relations between peo-
ple living in society, and the relations or conduct in a particular area of experience especially
as seen or dealt with from a political point of view” (Merriam Webster). We will look specifi-
cally at the relationship between aesthetic innovation (including of course transgression) and
social/political revolutions; we will explore the many links between aesthetics, critical theory,
politics, and modernity. We will consider the different ways in which aesthetic discourse has
been caught up, implicated in, and called to serve process of revolution in the modern period.
We will read writers such as Mao, Lenin, Trotsky, Brecht, Georg Lukács, Theodor W. Adorno,
and Walter Benjamin. (0,3) Robbins

260.222 Introduction to Interpretation


This course will help you to develop reading and writing skills, to expand your understand-
ing of aesthetic and rhetorical principles, and to introduce you to the discipline of literary
study. You will learn how to read and interpret literary texts from poetry, short fiction, and
novels to drama and film. You will be introduced to traditional interpretive approaches and
theories and learn to be active (as opposed to passive) readers. You will develop a critical
vocabulary to help you read and interpret literary texts, to articulate your own points of view,
and locate your own positions within current theoretical debates. This course will help you to
improve your paper-writing skills for all future classes at Peabody. Texts include poetry, one
play (Twelfth Night), one novel (Lolita), and one film (The Big Lebowski). (0,3) Robbins

260.236 Science and Religion


This course explores science and religion both as complementary and as competing ways by
which individuals have sought to understand the world and their place within it. Analysis of
the recently published Science, Evolution, and Creationism by the National Academy of Science
(2008) will show how contemporaries distinguish science and religion as separate modes of
inquiry and understanding, while assessment of earlier commentators and scientific thinkers
will reveal an overlap and compatibility that often goes unrecognized today. The class will
study a range of primary documents, reaching back to the practitioners of alchemy, astrology,
and natural magic—many of whom were profoundly religious—whose quest for the secrets of
nature and spiritual forces gave birth to modern scientific inquiry. (0,3) R. Levy

290.111 Introduction to Psychology


An introduction to the fields and research methods of contemporary psychology, including
such topics as biological and social bases of behavior, human development, perception, mem-
ory, learning theory, intelligence, and abnormal behavior. Special emphasis will be placed on
subjects of importance to music education. (0,3) Popoli

137
530.539 Poetry in German
Beginning with Goethe’s work, this course focuses on German poems representative of a
poet, a period, or a genre, from the 18th century to the present. Special attention will be
paid to works set to music by various composers from Mozart to Henze. Texts will be read in
the original German (with English translations); discussion will be in English. Prerequisite:
none. (3,0) Vogt

Languages
Sebastian Vogt, Coordinator

225.001-002 English Skills for Classroom Success: Listening and Speaking


This intensive course develops the English skills of listening and speaking necessary for suc-
cess in Peabody classes. Placement is determined through an entrance exam and a personal
interview. Students in this class must concurrently enroll in 225.003-004 Reading and
Writing. Graduate students placed in this course are required to complete it with a grade of
B or better and to enroll in ESL II in their second year at Peabody. Attendance is mandatory.
(0-0) Pevac

225.003-004 English Skills for Classroom Success: Reading and Writing


This intensive course develops the English skills of reading and writing necessary for success
in Peabody classes. Placement is determined through an entrance exam and a personal inter-
view. Students in this class must concurrently enroll in 225.001-002 Listening and Speaking.
Graduate students placed in this course are required to complete it with a grade of B or better
and to enroll in ESL II in their second year at Peabody. Attendance is mandatory. (0-0) Palmer

225.007-008 ESL II – English Skills for Graduate Study


This intensive course for international graduate students develops English skills for aca-
demic success. The first semester emphasizes oral communication, including listening and
note taking, class discussion, and conversation; academic vocabulary, reading and writing;
and cultural differences in and out of the classroom. The second semester continues the skill
development begun in the first semester, with concentration on expository writing, especially
resource-based writing, self-evaluation, and editing; critical reading; and informal and formal
presentations. Placement is determined through an entrance exam and a personal interview.
Students placed in this class must complete the course with a grade of B or better in order to
proceed with their degree requirements. Attendance is mandatory. (0-0) Palmer

230.111-112 French I
A thorough study of the fundamentals of the four language skills: understanding, speak-
ing, reading, and writing. Concentrating on practical everyday situations, the course aims to
provide the commonly used vocabulary, expressions, and grammatical structures needed to
achieve a functional use of French. (3-3) Faculty

240.111-112 German I
A thorough study of the fundamentals of the four language skills: understanding, speak-
ing, reading, and writing. Concentrating on practical everyday situations, the course aims to
provide the commonly used vocabulary, expressions, and grammatical structures needed to
achieve a functional use of German. Students should plan to complete both the fall and spring
semesters of this course. (3-3) Vogt

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240.114 German for Reading Knowledge
Designed to help students prepare for translations on the level required to pass D.M.A.
exams. It concentrates on recognizing sentence structure and grammatical features encoun-
tered in musical biographies, theory analyses, and musicological essays. This course does not
stress speaking competency of the language and does not count as a Liberal Arts elective.
Prerequisite: one year of college-level German, or one semester and permission of instructor.
(0,2) Vogt

240.211-212 German II
A review and continuation of grammatical and syntactical structures, with a view to improv-
ing ability in the four language skills. Through the use of readings based on cultural and
topical material, students will enhance conversational and writing skills. Prerequisite: Ger-
man I or placement test. Students should plan to complete both the fall and spring semesters
of this course. (3-3) Vogt

250.111-112 Italian I
A thorough study of the fundamentals of the four language skills: understanding, speak-
ing, reading, and writing. Concentrating on practical everyday situations, the course aims to
provide the commonly used vocabulary, expressions, and grammatical structures needed to
achieve a functional use of Italian. (3-3) Oorts

Jazz
Gary Thomas, Director of Jazz Studies
530.547, 548 Singing/Playing Jazz Standards
A performance class which includes learning the jazz standard repertoire, establishing keys
and making jazz charts, developing a personal repertoire book, counting off tempos and
understanding form, working with instrumentalists with stock arrangements and the begin-
nings of vocal improvisation. Instrumentals will get the opportunity to play vocal standards
with instructor and other singers, working on playing intros, soloing in different keys, end-
ings, exploring different feels and the concept of instrumental accompaniment. (1,1) Clayton

530.549,550 Jazz: Free Ensemble


This ensemble will include improvisation exercises to develop personal vocabulary and solo,
duo, trio, and group improvisation exercises to develop composition skills. Repertoire will
include original compositions by instructor as well as new pieces created by participants.
(1,1) Clayton

530.561-562 Jazz Improvisation I


Performance/theory course designed to help students acquire and develop basic language for
improvisation through the practical application of information learned in 710.127-128 Jazz
Fundamentals: chords, scales/modes, melody, rhythm, patterns, harmonic progression, and
song forms. Incorporates the performance and examination of several vehicle types, including
songs drawn from standard jazz repertoire. Special emphasis will be devoted to the perfor-
mance and analysis of various improvised solos by master musicians. In addition, develop-
ment of technical facility, listening/hearing skills, sound and musical awareness will also be
addressed. Prerequisites: 710.127-128 Jazz Fundamentals and 530.570 Jazz History or place-
ment by the instructor. (2,2) Thomas

530.563-564 Jazz Improvisation II


The continued development of knowledge and skills acquired in Jazz Improvisation I with
emphasis on increased fluency and mastery. Prerequisite: Jazz Improvisation I or placement
by the instructor. (2-2) Thomas

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530.569-570 Constructive Listening and Analysis/Jazz History
This course has two main areas of focus: 1) The People—a survey of the chronological his-
tory of jazz through the use of texts, recordings, videos, and when possible, guest lecturers.
The development of jazz as an art form will be traced from the acculturation of Africans in
America to the present day by learning about its major instrumentalists, ensembles, com-
posers, arrangers, innovators, revivalists, and revisionists. 2) The Methods—a survey of the
techniques and processes that have been employed by jazz musicians throughout its history
to help make it into the highly structured and evolved art form that it is today. Students will
receive limited firsthand performance, arranging, and composing experience, along with lec-
tures, demonstrations, and extensive discussion. Improvisation is an essential element of daily
life, and now more than ever it is becoming a basic requirement for any performing musician
or composer to have some understanding of jazz styles and practices. (2-2) Formanek

710.127-128 Jazz Fundamentals


Course covering the fundamental aspects of jazz theory through the study of notation,
melody, harmony, rhythm, chords, scales, modes, harmonic progressions, etc. Provides the
musician with the foundation necessary for study in 530.561-562 Jazz Improvisation I and
710.259-260 Jazz Theory/Keyboard Lab. Class includes both an ear-training and singing
component. Basic improvisation skills will be covered as well. (2-2) Thomas

710.259-260 Jazz Theory/Keyboard Lab I


The introduction of the fundamental grammar, vocabulary, and structure of the jazz idiom
through the study of its notational conventions, melodic and harmonic functions, and their
application on the piano. (2-2) Murphy

710.263-264 Jazz Ear-training


A progressive course designed for real-world use in the music business, it will help students
understand basic hearing of jazz harmonies, melodies, and forms. (2-2) Bollenback

710.359-360 Jazz Theory/Keyboard Lab II


Continuation of the techniques and harmonic concepts studied in Jazz Theory/Keyboard Lab
I. (2-2) Murphy

710.361-362 Jazz Arranging and Composition


Beginning study of the language, techniques, and disciplines employed in arranging music
for various jazz ensembles, including orchestration, notation, rhythmic embellishment,
melodic ornamentation, chord substitution, and harmonization techniques. Prerequisite:
710.259-260 Jazz Theory/Keyboard Lab. (2-2) Murphy

910.537-538/837-838 Jazz Orchestra (Big Band)


The study and performance of literature encompassing all of the jazz idioms with emphasis on
historically significant works. Strong readers, sax/flute doubles are required. Student composi-
tions are encouraged. Open to all Conservatory students by audition or permission of instruc-
tor. May be repeated for credit. (2-2) Formanek

Large Ensembles
Hajime Teri Murai, Chair
Orchestral instrument majors please note: The large ensemble requirement can be met with
participation in Peabody Symphony Orchestra, Peabody Concert Orchestra, and/or Peabody
Wind Ensemble. Credit is awarded for participation in the other large ensembles but is in
addition to the aforementioned organizations.

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910.521-522/821-822 Peabody Symphony Orchestra
A full symphony orchestra which provides comprehensive orchestral training and perfor-
mance experience. Its members are primarily graduate and upper-division undergraduate stu-
dents. Each season, the Symphony Orchestra and the Concert Orchestra (see below) perform
a cross section of the standard orchestral repertoire, supplemented by new works and lesser-
known compositions. The Symphony Orchestra also performs opera with the Peabody Opera
Theatre. Seating assignments in both orchestras are rotated as much as possible. Placement is
by audition. (2-2) Murai

910.523-524/823-824 Peabody Concert Orchestra


A full symphony orchestra which provides comprehensive orchestral training and perfor-
mance experience. It includes graduate and undergraduate students. The Concert Orchestra
occasionally performs opera with the Peabody Opera Theatre. Placement is by audition.
Qualified Peabody Preparatory students and Hopkins students from other divisions may be
assigned to this orchestra on a space-available basis. (2-2) Murai

910.511-512/811-812 Peabody/Hopkins Chorus


Devoted to the study and performance of major choral repertoire, sacred and secular, from
the baroque through the present day. Its repertoire will range from a cappella music to major
works with full orchestra. Placement is by audition. (2-2) Polochick

910.515-516/815-816 Peabody Concert Singers


A select group of mixed voices organized to study and perform choral masterworks from the
Renaissance through the present day. This group also joins the Peabody/Hopkins chorus for
major choral performances. Placement is by audition. (2-2) Polochick

910.527-528/910.827-828 Baltimore Baroque Band (Baroque Orchestra)


At the core of the baroque orchestra are the strings and continuo, forces ranging from one on
a part to the “Twenty-four Violins” of Versailles. Winds were regularly added, to suit reper-
toire and fortune. Baltimore Baroque Band is Peabody’s baroque orchestra. Like Bach’s Col-
legium Musicum, it is a flexible group that explores a broad repertoire where students work
in close partnership with experts. Playing on historical instruments, students gain firsthand
experience in period style in an environment combining orchestral discipline and chamber
music sensibility. (2-2) Moran/Browder

910.535-536/835-836 Peabody Wind Ensemble


A large wind and percussion ensemble which studies and performs well-known and unusual
symphonic wind ensemble/wind symphony literature, including world premieres and works
for larger chamber ensemble. Public performances, audition required. (2-2) H. Parker

910.537-538/837-838 Jazz Orchestra (Big Band)


The study and performance of literature encompassing all of the jazz idioms with emphasis on
historically significant works. Strong readers, sax/flute doubles are required. Student composi-
tions are encouraged. Open to all Conservatory students by audition or permission of instruc-
tor. May be repeated for credit. (2-2) Formanek

910.539/839 Peabody Improvisation and Multimedia Ensemble


The Peabody Improvisation and Multimedia Ensemble (PIME) is a large ensemble of varied
instruments: strings, brass, woodwinds, percussion, voices. While the major focus of PIME
is to provide an ensemble setting in which the students gain valuable experience and develop
practical performance skills, an additional aim is to expand the boundaries of traditional
ensemble performance by incorporating elements of other genres of artistic expression: dance,
visual art, poetry; and various multimedia technologies: computers, midi, and video. Perfor-

141
mance pieces cover a broad scope, ranging from standard big band repertoire to audio-visual
works combining elements of music, visual art, dance, film and poetry. Students are encour-
aged to actively participate in the creation of new works. The Peabody Improvisation and
Multimedia Ensemble is open to all Hopkins students. Placement is by audition or by per-
mission of the ensemble director. (2,2) Thomas

910.541,2/841,2 Opera Theatre


Preparation and performance of complete fully staged operas with orchestra. Casting by audi-
tion. Previous or concurrent acting training required. (1,1 or 2,2 depending on size of role)
Brunyate/Faculty

910.545,6/845,6 Opera Workshop


Preparation and performance of scenes from the operatic repertoire, in simple stagings with
piano accompaniment. Enrollment by audition. Previous or concurrent acting training
required. (1,1) Brunyate/Faculty

910.547,8/847,8 Chamber Opera


Preparation and performance of complete chamber operas, with modest production values and
instrumental ensemble accompaniment. Enrollment by audition. Previous or concurrent act-
ing training required. (1,1 or 2,2 depending on the size of the role) Brunyate/Faculty

Music Education
Harlan D. Parker, Coordinator
510.112 Introduction to Music Education
An overview of music teaching as a profession. Included is an examination of contemporary
philosophical and pedagogical trends in music education as well as roles and attitudes of the
elementary and secondary school music teacher. (0,1) Stellaccio

510.211 Brass Class


Study of the trumpet, trombone, French horn, and tuba with emphasis on methods and mate-
rials for instruction of beginners in the public school setting. (0,2) Cameron

510.212 Woodwinds Class


Study of the clarinet, flute, oboe, bassoon, and saxophone with emphasis on methods and
materials for instruction of beginners in the public school setting. (3,0) L. Parker

510.213 Basic Instrumental Pedagogy


Study of the trumpet, clarinet, and violin to familiarize guitarists, vocalists, and pianists with
fundamental concepts of brass, woodwind, and stringed instrument playing. Also includes
elementary pedagogy related to those instruments. (3,0) H. Parker

510.222 Guitar Class


Basic guitar techniques including complete fingerboard and chords in first position for use in
accompanying basal series pieces and instruction of beginners. (1,0) Cudek

510.223 Percussion Class


Study of the percussion instruments. Emphasis is on playing techniques, percussion notation,
and diagnosis of student problems. Also included are basic maintenance and repair proce-
dures. (0,1) Locke

142
510.237/337 Conducting the Secondary Choral Ensemble I/II
Development of conducting skills and rehearsal strategies appropriate to the secondary school
choir. Also includes methods of teaching singing in the large ensemble setting. (2-0) Stellaccio

510.238/338 Conducting the Secondary Instrumental Ensemble I/II


Development of conducting skills and rehearsal strategies appropriate to the secondary school
band/orchestra. Also includes methods of teaching wind, string, and percussion playing in
the large ensemble setting. (0-2) H. Parker

510.311 Techniques for Teaching Elementary General Music


An eclectic approach to teaching vocal, and general music in the elementary and middle
school. Includes organization of instruction, selection of appropriate materials, theories of
learning, and childhood development. Observation and guided teaching in local schools are
required. (3,0) Stellaccio

510.312 Techniques for Teaching Elementary Instrumental Music


A performance-based approach to teaching instrumental music in the public school setting,
particularly beginning and intermediate instruction. Includes organization of instruction,
selection of appropriate materials, theories of learning, childhood and adolescent develop-
ment. Observation and guided teaching in local schools included. (0,3) L. Parker

510.313 Techniques for Teaching Secondary Instrumental Music


This course includes principles of secondary education and activities of Conducting the Sec-
ondary Instrumental Ensemble (510.338), plus independent projects and workshops related
to marching band and jazz ensembles. (For certification candidates only.) (0,3) H. Parker

510.314 Techniques for Teaching Secondary Vocal/General Music


A performance-based approach to teaching vocal and general music in secondary schools,
and continued study of an eclectic approach to teaching general music. Includes principles of
secondary education, organization of instruction, selection of appropriate materials, theories
of learning, and adolescent development. Observation and guided teaching in local schools
included. (0,3) Stellaccio

510.324 String Class


Study of the violin, viola, cello, and double bass with emphasis on methods and materials for
instruction of beginners in the public school setting. (3,0) Laird

510.411 Intern Teaching


Supervised student teaching in public schools daily for one semester (8 weeks in elementary,
7 weeks in secondary). (6,0) L. Parker

510.413 Music and Language


An overview of strategies for teaching reading and other language skills, and examination of
relationships between music learning and language learning. Students who take 510.413 for
3 credits will be required to complete additional projects and/or observations. (3,0) Stellaccio

510.414 Music and the Special Student


An overview of instructional strategies and modifications for special students, including phys-
ically impaired students, talented/gifted students, abused children, and students with social/
emotional disorders. Students who take 510.414 for 3 credits will be required to complete
additional projects and/or observations. (0,3) Stellaccio

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510.441 Intern Teaching Seminar
Concomitant with 411, the seminar is devoted to discussion of problems related to teaching
music in the schools. Special emphasis is on practices in the secondary school. (1,0) L. Parker

510.452 Secondary Curriculum in Music


The study of curriculum development, budget and finance, and scheduling in the secondary
music program. Will also include topics such as evaluating music teaching, evaluating perfor-
mance, and independent projects. For certification candidates only. (0,3) L. Parker

510.611 Psychology of Music Teaching


Application of selected theories of learning to teaching music in the elementary and second-
ary school. Characteristics of childhood and adolescent development will also be examined
with implications for designing and implementing appropriate musical instruction. (2,0)
H. Parker

510.612 Research in Music Education


Seminar in research specific to music education. Prepares the teacher to read and interpret
music education research in professional publications. The course includes an examination of
basic procedures of historical, descriptive, and experimental research in music education. (0,2)
Faculty

510.613 History and Philosophy of Music Education


Seminar in the historical and philosophical perspectives of music education. Includes the
study of history of music education in the United States and various philosophies of music
education. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (2,0) L. Parker

510.614 Supervision and Curriculum Development


Examination of the role of the music supervisor or department coordinator in the public
schools, including problems of schedule, staff, and budget. Includes the development of cur-
riculum guides and materials with specific focus on individual areas of interest. (0,2) L. Parker

510.615-616 Music Education Electives


Elective credit may be granted for graduate courses or workshops in the area of specialization;
Orff, Kodaly, Dalcroze, or Suzuki certification; courses included in JHU’s Carey Business
School and School of Education. (1-1) Faculty

510.621 Graduate Practicum


Observation and guided teaching in a variety of settings, designed to enhance and expand the
teaching skills of the practicing educator. Includes individualized video taping of teaching
demonstrations, and follow-up conferences. Practicum experiences are arranged according
to student interests and needs, and may include teaching and supervisory internships. (2,0)
Faculty

510.624 Conducting Wind Literature


This course is primarily designed for, but not limited to, the graduate music education major
interested in conducting wind ensemble literature. Score reading techniques, technical con-
ducting skills, interpretive concepts, and rehearsal techniques will be covered. (0,2) H. Parker

510.626 Music Education and Society


Seminar examining the role of music in general society and the role of music education in
schools. Discussions will be based on readings from two disciplines: the sociology of music
and the sociology of education. The course focuses on schools as social organizations and the
role music plays in them. (2,0) Faculty

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510.691 Independent Field Study
An exit project which may include, but is not limited to, the following options: (1) develop-
ment of instructional/curriculum materials, (2) demographic profile of a school district and
the music education program, (3) historical or descriptive research, (4) limited experimental
research. (4) Faculty

Music Theory
Kip Wile, Chair
710.111-112 Basics of Tonal Music I
This course includes study of melody, counterpoint, figured bass, diatonic and chromatic har-
mony, and analysis and composition of short homophonic and polyphonic pieces. (3-3) Faculty

710.211 Baroque Styles


Continuing studies of counterpoint. Analysis and composition of two- and three-voice
baroque-style pieces, including fugue. (3,0) Faculty

710.212 Classical Styles


Studies in the classical style, as exemplified by the works of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and
Schubert. Forms studied will include larger rounded binary and ternary structures, sonata-
allegro, sonata-rondo, rondo and variation. (0,3) Faculty

710.311 Romantic and Early 20th-Century Styles


Extension and expansion of harmonic, formal, and contrapuntal techniques into music from
the mid-19th to early 20th centuries. (3,0) Faculty

710.312 20th-Century Styles


A study of the newer formal, contrapuntal, and harmonic techniques of the 20th and 21st
centuries. A wide variety of styles and techniques will be covered, as well as new analytical
approaches. (0,3) Faculty

710.412 Instrumentation and Arranging


A course for developing skills in orchestration, arranging, and transcribing. A study of instru-
mentation and its practical application through the scoring of excerpts and complete pieces.
For music education and recording arts majors; others by permission of the instructor. Offered
fall and spring. (3) Faculty

710.413-414 Orchestration
A course for composers and conductors studying instrumental technique and ensemble com-
binations as demonstrated in orchestral literature, 1750 to the present. Music theory credit
available only for graduate composers and conductors; other students are directed to take
710.412 Instrumentation and Arranging for music theory credit. Course must be taken for
the entire school year. (3-3) Faculty

710.415 Graduate Music Theory Review


An intensive review of the materials and techniques of tonal music, including diatonic and
chromatic harmony, part writing, and analysis. Offered fall semester only. (0) Faculty

710.617 Principles of Analysis


Basic principles of musical construction as seen through examination and analysis of represen-
tative forms and compositions from the Renaissance to the present. (3) Faculty

145
710.619 Song Analysis
An exploration of the interactions between text and music within the art-song repertoire
from various style periods, drawing on theories of drama, linguistics, cognition, and music.
(0,3) Faculty

710.620 Chamber Music Analysis


Analysis of chamber music in various styles, with particular emphasis on works currently
being performed in Peabody’s chamber music program. (3,0) Faculty

710.623 Schenkerian Analysis


An intensive study of linear reductive analysis, as developed by Heinrich Schenker. The rela-
tionship of analysis to performance and hearing will be investigated. (3) Faculty

710.630 Chopin
A study of the music of Chopin and his contemporaries. Emphasis is placed on analysis of
chords, structure, modulation, and motivic development. (3) Faculty

710.633 Counterpoint of the Renaissance


An examination of sacred music in the late Renaissance. Intensive analysis and composition in
the style are stressed. (3) Faculty

710.634 Baroque Counterpoint


The course concentrates on the contrapuntal practice of J.S. Bach, including analysis and
composition of a suite movement, invention, fugue, and chorale-prelude or passacaglia.
Offered fall and spring. (3) Faculty

710.635 Styles Analysis


This course explores the elements of musical style through an intensive study of a few selected
composers from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. (3) Faculty

710.638 Classical Style and Practice


An investigation through analysis of unique and shared features of the music of various clas-
sical composers. Although the greatest emphasis may be placed on the music of Mozart and
Haydn, other composers may be studied. (3) Faculty

710.639 Romantic Style and Practice


An investigation of the unique and shared features of selected 19th-century composers.
Emphasis on stylistic elements and formal design. (3) Faculty

710.643,644 Music from 1900 to 1945


A survey of important trends in music since the turn of the century with particular attention
to the works of Stravinsky, Hindemith, Schoenberg, and Bartok. Emphasis on score analysis
and listening. (3,3) Faculty

710.645,646 Music Since 1945


A study of musical styles and practices from 1945 to the present. The music of Cage, Xena-
kis, Berio, and others will be studied through the analysis and discussion of representative
compositions and selected literary writings of the composers. (3,3) Faculty

710.647 Analysis of 19th-Century Piano Literature


Detailed analysis of representative works from the piano repertoire. (3,0) Faculty

146
710.648 Analysis of 20th-Century Piano Literature
Detailed analysis of representative works from the piano repertoire. (0,3) Faculty

710.649 Music Theory Pedagogy


Designed for those who may wish to teach undergraduate theory. The course will include an
investigation and discussion of available teaching resources, including current technology, as
well as classroom observation and practice teaching. (3,0) Faculty

710.650 Music Theory Internship


Designed to give teaching experience to the M.M. in Theory Pedagogy student. The course
will include classroom experience. (3) Faculty

710.651 20th-Century Style and Analysis


Analysis of selected music in the 20th century to show the diversity of techniques and
approaches to pitch, rhythm, and formal structures. (3) Faculty

710.653 Bach Solo and Chamber Music


This course covers the solo and chamber sonatas, partitas, and suites of J.S. Bach. Topics
include music for solo keyboard, and the solo and accompanied works for violin, cello, and
other instruments. Analysis is informed by studies of genre and dance forms as well as Bach’s
compositional procedure. (3,0) Faculty

710.654 Debussy
Close examination of Debussy’s works, covering a variety or techniques and genres. (0,3) Faculty

710.658 18th-century Keyboard Masters


A close examination of selected compositions from this extraordinary century, ranging from
Bach’s fugal masterworks to Mozart’s incomparable concerto writing. (0,3) Faculty

710.660 Contemporary Theory Literature


This course familiarizes students with several theoretical models used in current research and
with popular contemporary theory journals. Especially recommended for Theory Pedagogy
majors and D.M.A. students. (0,3) Faculty

710.661 Post-Romantic Chromaticism


Beginning with the enharmonic-chromatic technique of Wagner (Tristan and Parsifal), the
course follows the development of this language through Strauss’ extension of Wagner’s
approach, to the advanced vocabulary and bi-tonal effects in Salome and Electra, his two most
advanced operas. Other contemporaries of the day (Mahler, Schoenberg) will also be studied.
(3) Faculty

710.662 Music Theory Seminar


For D.M.A. students only, this seminar investigates various aspects of music and music
theory. (3) Faculty

710.665 Analysis and Performance


How analysis enhances performance: discussion of readings and in-class demonstrations, using
a variety of analytical techniques. (3) Faculty

710.666 18th-Century Music Theory and Practice


Examination and discussion, with musical demonstrations, of 18th-century treatises by
C.P.E. Bach, Leopold Mozart, Kirnberger, Quantz, and others. (3) Faculty

147
710.667 Beethoven’s String Quartets
An intensive analysis of selected quartets from all three style periods. (3) Faculty

710.669 The Mass as a Musical Structure


An investigation into the musical traditions, structures, and their applications to the liturgi-
cal text of the Mass. The course also includes a study of the setting of the Requiem and its
relation to the traditional liturgy. Representative composers include Bach, Beethoven, Strav-
insky, and Britten. (3) Faculty

710.670 Tonal Chromaticism


This course explores in detail the effect of chromatic inflection on line, harmony, and form
through analysis and writing. Late romantic tonality and modulation will be emphasized,
though earlier styles will be investigated as well. (3) Faculty

710.673 Bartok
A detailed study of representative works of Bela Bartok with a view to penetrating the man-
nerisms and signatures that make Bartok “Bartok.” (3) Faculty

710.676 Stravinsky
A detailed study of representative works of Igor Stravinsky with a view to penetrating the
mannerisms and signatures that make Stravinsky “Stravinsky.” (3) Faculty

710.677 Fugue: From Bach to Shostakovitch


This course will look at the wide-ranging use of fugue in music from the high baroque to the
mid-20th century. The class will examine the techniques and designs themselves, and how
those techniques and designs relate to both the larger works studied and the broader musical
styles of the times. (3,0) Faculty

710.685 Music Theory Pedagogy Project


Designed for Music Theory Pedagogy students; to be taken under the supervision of a music
theory advisor. The project will examine a specific aspect of music theory teaching. (3) Faculty

710.687-688 The Well-Tempered Clavier


A detailed analysis of the preludes and fugues in Books I and II of Bach’s Well-Tempered
Clavier. (3-3) Faculty

710.702 Analytical Techniques


An investigation of techniques currently in use, including traditional, Schenkerian, cognitive,
phenomenological, and comparative. (3) Faculty

710.713 Thinking by Ear: Strategies for Music Making


An exploration of issues concerning music of the common practice period. Examines the
practical implications for research and performance of various approaches to analytical inter-
pretation of music. The work involves listening, reading, creative thinking, and analysis. (3)
Faculty

710.714 Thinking by Ear: Segue to the 20th Century


An exploration of issues concerning music of the 20th century. Examines the practical impli-
cations for research and performance of various approaches to analytical interpretation of
music. The work involves listening, reading, creative thinking, and analysis. (3) Faculty

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710.843,844 Independent Study in Theory
Designed for those who wish to make a concentrated study of selected topics in music theory.
May not be used to substitute for an offered course. Open only to advanced students with
approval of the instructor and the Department of Music Theory. Hours to be determined.
Faculty

Ear-Training/Sight-Singing
Clinton Adams, Coordinator
710.023 Ear-Training Fundamentals
(0,0) Faculty

710.123-124 Ear-Training, Rhythm Studies, and Sight-Singing


A basic course in the skills of reading and hearing music, employing Dalcroze techniques
for the development of musicianship. To be taken in conjunction with Music Theory I. (2-2)
Adams, Orlando

710.125-226 Ear-Training, Rhythm Studies, and Sight-Singing


Perfect Pitch accelerated version of 710.123 and 710.223 that covers the material of the two-
year course in one year. (2-2) Adams

710.223-224 Ear-Training, Rhythm Studies, and Sight-Singing


A continuation of the first-year course, with heavy emphasis on Bach chorales and 20th-cen-
tury techniques. (2-2) Adams, Orlando

710.323-324 Ear-Training: Contemporary Music Studies


After a short review of highly chromatic late 19th- and early 20th-century music, classes will
focus on atonal music, beginning with the late works of Liszt and Wolf and continuing into
the music of today. This course is open to undergraduates who have successfully completed
both semesters of 710.223-224. (2-2) Orlando

710.425-426 Ear-Training Review


A review course in the principles of ear-training, dictation, sight-singing, and clefs. (2-2)
Adams, Orlando

710.521-522 Ear-Training Tutorial


Individual work in ear-training and sight-singing. Hours to be determined. Adams, Orlando

Keyboard Studies
Patricia Graham, Coordinator
710.155-156 Keyboard Studies: Non-piano majors
A study of basic skills involved in reading, harmonization, transposition, improvisation, and
analysis, to be taken in conjunction with Music Theory I. Assignments to sections of varying
levels will be based on the student’s piano background and determined through audition.
(2-2) Graham, Faculty

710.255-256 Keyboard Studies: Non-piano majors


A continuation of 710.155-156. Emphasis on harmonic and formal analysis as tools for sight-
reading and memorization. Repertoire includes solo and duet works, accompaniments, and
score-reading. (2-2) Graham

149
Musicology
Andrew Talle, Chair

610.311 History of Music I


A study of music from classical antiquity through the Renaissance period. Fall and Spring
(2) S. Weiss

610.312 History of Music II


A study of music from the baroque period through the end of the 18th century. Fall and
Spring (2) Sprenkle and Gingerich

610.313 History of Music III


A study of music in the 19th century. Fall and Spring (2) P. Weiss and Gingerich

610.314 History of Music IV


A study of music since the beginning of the 20th century. Fall and Spring (2) Giarusso

610.555 Music and Culture


An introduction to the basic concepts of ethnomusicology through the study of selected non-
Western musical traditions. The course format features a series of live performances, partici-
patory workshops, and guest lectures. (0,2) Tolbert

AS 360.133 Great Books at Hopkins (Homewood)


Great Books explores some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical tradition
in Europe and the Americas. In lectures and panel sessions, professors from several academic
disciplines introduce texts and lead further discussion in small group sessions. Where appro-
priate, as in the Faust legend, Peabody resources allow comparison of the literary text and its
musical counterparts. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of Great
Books at Hopkins, along with a reading list that varies each term based on faculty expertise:
this term’s readings include The Odyssey; The Inferno; Don Quixote; Faust (Goethe and Berlioz);
Ground work of the Metaphysics of Morals; Wuthering Heights; Narrative of the Life of Frederick
Douglass, an American Slave; and A Room of One’s Own. This course meets on the Homewood
campus and requires registration through the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. (3,0) The
course is taught collaboratively by three professors: Giarusso (Musicology), Egginton (German
and Romance Languages), and Patton (Writing Seminars).

AS 376.231 Introduction to Western Music History (Homewood)


This course is a study of five famous pieces of music, both as timeless works of art and as
moments in cultural history. Close attention is given to techniques of musical listening, and
to the details of the first performance of each work, with a consideration of the problems
involved in assembling such a picture. Works studied are Monteverdi, L’Orfeo; Handel,
Messiah; Beethoven, Symphony no. 9; Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique; and Stravinsky, Le Sacre du
Printemps. A series of additional pieces commissioned especially for the course from Peabody
composers concludes the semester. No previous knowledge of musical notation or termi-
nology is required. This course meets on the Homewood campus and requires registration
through the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. (3,0) Talle

610.601 Music History Intensive Review


A review course for graduate students, covering classical antiquity to the 21st century. Fall
only. (2,0) Tremblay

150
610.651 Music Bibliography
As an introduction to the materials and techniques available to the performing musician, the
course will include fundamentals of library research, the computer as a library research tool,
acquaintance with and use of essential music reference texts, and exploration of local and
national library resources. Fall and Spring. (2) Follet and Talle

610.691 Master’s Essay


A scholarly work written under the supervision of a member of the musicology faculty.
Required for the master’s degree in Musicology. See the specific guidelines in this catalog.
Fall and Spring. (2) Giarusso, Talle, Tolbert, P. Weiss, S. Weiss

610.755-756 Graduate Research


An introduction to methods of research through independent written projects in music
history. Required of all doctoral candidates and musicology majors. Fall and Spring. (2)
Giarusso, Talle, Tolbert, P. Weiss, S. Weiss

610.791 Dissertation
A study of an original musical topic, approved by the D.M.A. Committee, culminating in
the completion and defense of a scholarly work written under supervision of the student’s aca-
demic advisor. (4) Faculty

610.792 Lecture-Recital Paper


A study of a specific musical topic, approved by the D.M.A. Committee and suitable as the
basis for a lecture-recital, culminating in a written paper and a public lecture-recital. Fall and
Spring. (2) Giarusso, Talle, Tolbert, P. Weiss, S. Weiss

610.813,814 Consultation/Degree in Progress


For graduate students working with a faculty member to complete a dissertation or a lecture-
recital essay. Registration required each semester following completion of coursework in order
to maintain active status in the program. Fall and Spring. (1) Giarusso, Talle, Tolbert, P. Weiss,
S. Weiss

610.843,4 Musicology Independent Study


Designed for those who wish to make a concentrated study of selected topics in musicology.
Open only to advanced students with approval of the instructor and the department. Fall and
Spring. (1 to 3) Giarusso, Tolbert, P. Weiss, S. Weiss

610.847-848 Musicology Colloquium


The colloquium introduces D.M.A. students to doctoral-level academic study at Peabody.
Emphasis is on critical thinking, argument from sources, written and oral presentation. Every
other week an invited speaker gives a talk in the area of his or her expertise (speakers and
topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester). In alternate weeks students give
presentations. The lectures are open to members of the Peabody community and the general
public. (3-3) Tolbert

Musicology Seminars
Musicology seminars offer in-depth study of selected topics in musicology. Each section is
limited to 15 students. The seminar format encourages individual initiative on the part of
students, who are expected to share in the discussion, prepare projects for presentation, and
write reports on work done outside of class. Prerequisite: passing mark on music history
placement exam or passing grade in Music History Intensive Review. Students required to
take English as a Second Language courses must obtain permission of the instructor to enroll
in graduate seminars, even if they have already passed Music History Intensive Review. The
following seminars will be offered in 2008–2009.

151
Fall Semester
610.634 Baroque Performance Practice
What assumptions did performers bring to interpretation in the baroque era? This class pro-
vides a detailed overview of prevalent performance conventions of the time as taught to us by
primary sources, including Quantz, CPE Bach, Leopold Mozart, Muffat, and Geminiani, as
well as some insight into why these matters are important and what drives the early music
movement. While everyone will be expected to develop a solid grasp of the most significant
issues, each student will also independently cultivate expertise in a specific area of his or her
choosing. (3,0) Moran

610.646 Schubert Song Cycles


The course will center on Schubert’s settings of the two cycles of Müller poems, Die schöne
Müllerin and Winterreise, and on Schwanengesang, especially his Heine settings. Issues discussed
will include the poetic backgrounds of the cycles, their narrative structures, poetically and
musically, and related controversies. The cycles will be considered in the context of Schubert’s
life and career, and of their history of reception. (3,0) Gingerich

610.663 Bach Passions


An overview of the work of J. S. Bach with concentration on the Passions. (3,0) Sprenkle

610.674 History and Technology of Musical Instruments


This course focuses on classification, technology, and repertoire of musical instruments. While
the emphasis is on contemporary Western models, the history and technology of precursors
and non-Western instruments will be addressed. It is hoped that each student will develop a
thorough knowledge of the history, technology, and performance of his/her own instrument,
as well as an appreciation and some familiarity with all modern musical instruments. Projects
will include performances on and making of acoustic and electronic instruments. (3,0)
S. Weiss

610.675 Mozart
An introduction to Mozart studies. Students will investigate a selection of his works in differ-
ent genres within their historical and biographical context. (3,0) P. Weiss

610.677 The Concerto in the 19th Century


A historical overview of standard repertoire concerti from the 19th century, including an
in-depth analysis of works by Beethoven, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms,
Tchaikovsky, and Dvorak. (3,0) Sprenkle

610.684 Transnationalism and Globalism in Music


An examination of contemporary world music genres from an ethnomusicological perspec-
tive, with emphasis on transnational and global issues. (3,0) Tolbert

AS 376.407 Music and Evolution (Homewood)


This course will examine the bio-cultural evolution of music in light of recent interdisciplin-
ary research on the social bases of human cognitive evolution, and explore its implications for
current debates in musicology, ethnomusicology, psychology of music, and human cognitive
evolution. This course meets on the Homewood campus and requires registration through the
Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. (3,0) Tolbert

152
Spring Semester
610.630 German Song in the 19th Century
This course considers the repertoire of 19th-century German art song through a focused study
of the works of four major figures: Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, and Wolf. We will address
theories of text in music, evolving notions of the song “cycle,” analytical approaches to the
lied, and the place of the lied within the social sphere. We will devote particular attention to
Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin and Winterreise, Schumann’s Dichterliebe, and Brahms Vier ernste
Gesänge. (0,3) Giarusso

610.642 Music and the Enlightenment


This course will examine relationships between 18th-century musical culture and the eco-
nomic and cultural environment known as the Enlightenment. Composers studied will
include Bach and Mozart, as well as lesser known contemporaries. (0,3) Talle

610.658 Beethoven: Music and Compositional Procedure in His


Sketches and Autographs
How did Beethoven compose his works? Students will have an opportunity to investigate
Beethoven's creative process by examining primary source material such as surviving auto-
graphs and sketchbooks. Tools for navigating the vast field of Beethoven research are pre-
sented. (0,3) Ahn

610.664 Schubert
An introduction to Schubert studies. Students will investigate a selection of his works in
different genres within their historical and biographical context. (0,3) P. Weiss

610.667 Beethoven’s Symphonies


A structural analysis of Beethoven’s nine symphonies with attention to historical effect on the
genre: listening and analytical quizzes, essay. (0,3) Sprenkle

610.678 Two Operas, Two Historical Epochs


A detailed study of Berg’s Wozzeck and Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro in their cultural con-
texts. (0,3) Sprenkle

610.683 Music in the United States: 1607–1950


A survey of American Music, from colonial times to the middle of the 20th century. There
will be a considerable emphasis on relating musical expressions to changing social/historical
conditions. We will examine the roles played by technological developments and the rise of
the music business shortly after the American Revolution. Our country’s varied musical styles
invite serious study of all modes of performance and dissemination, not just “classical” com-
position and performance. Active participation in discussion is a requirement of this seminar,
as is writing a research paper on a topic of the student’s choice. (0,3) Hildebrand

AS 010.382 Games of Eres and Mars: Art and Music of Renaissance Ferrara (Homewood)
Ferrara under the patronage of the Estensi dukes and duchesses was a favorite locus amoe-
nus for Renaissance artists such as Andrea Mantegna, Lorenzo Costa, and Dosso Dossi. The
well-known composers Josquin des Prez and Heinrich Isaac vied for a coveted position in the
court of Ercole d’Este. His daughter Isabella sought out the best painters, writers, instrument
builders, and musicians, as did Alfonso, the catalyst for the well-known women’s performance
ensemble, the Concerto delle donne. Supplemented by a rich array of evidentiary materials, live
musical performances, and trips to museums in the Baltimore-Washington area, this course
will focus on the factors that contributed to making Ferrara one of the most sumptuous courts
in early Modern Europe. This course meets on the Homewood campus and requires registra-
tion through the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. (0,3). It is taught collaboratively by
S. Weiss (Musicology) and Campbell (History of Art).

153
Opera
Roger Brunyate, Chair
530.391 Stage Movement for Singers
Techniques for attaining intellectual and physical control to achieve greater security and
facility on stage in general, and to use movement as a tool in characterization. (1) Bartlett

530.491-492 Acting for Opera


An approach to dramatic characterization through the development of the actor’s imagination
and expressive range, with special emphasis on the ensemble and projection techniques of the
lyric stage. (1-1) Brunyate

530.497-8/697-8 Dramatic Text


A practical acting course which will examine some of the main styles of dramatic performance
from the Greeks to the present day, and explore the technical choices open to the interpreter
in performing each style. Although intended as an advanced-level acting class for opera stu-
dents, the course will use mainly material from the spoken theater, and so may be accessible
to non-music majors. Enrollment limited, by permission of the instructor. (2-2) Brunyate

530.535,536 Opera Styles and Traditions


Musical performance practice in opera and musical theater for singers, pianists, and conduc-
tors. Topics will rotate on a semester-by-semester basis to include such subjects as standard
arias, operatic recitative, and musical theater. Enrollment by audition. (2,2) Kulesza, E. Cornett

530.561 Opera Etude Composition


The creation and performance of short original operas in which cast and composer work
together to develop a scenario through improvisation, devising a libretto, and workshopping
the musical score. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (2,0) Brunyate

530.562 Opera Etude Performance


The creation and performance of short original operas in which cast and composer work
together to develop a scenario through improvisation, devising a libretto, and workshopping
the musical score. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (1,0) Brunyate

530.593,4/893,4 Professional Coaching in Opera


Individual musical and dramatic coaching for advanced voice students seeking a career in
opera. In regular weekly coachings students may work on preparing audition material, role
study, or other professional needs not otherwise covered by the courses and production pro-
grams of the school. Enrollment limited, by permission of the instructor. (1,1) Kulesza, Faculty

910.541,2/841,2 Opera Theatre


Preparation and performance of complete fully staged operas with orchestra. Casting by audi-
tion. Previous or concurrent acting training required. (1,1 or 2,2 depending on size of role)
Brunyate and Faculty

910.545,6/845,6 Opera Workshop


Preparation and performance of scenes from the operatic repertoire, in simple stagings with
piano accompaniment. Enrollment by audition. Previous or concurrent acting training
required. (1,1) Brunyate/Faculty

154
910.547,8/847,8 Chamber Opera
Preparation and performance of complete chamber operas, with modest production values and
instrumental ensemble accompaniment. Enrollment by audition. Previous or concurrent act-
ing training required. (1,1 or 2,2 depending upon the size of the role) Brunyate/Faculty

Organ
Donald Sutherland, Coordinator

530.423-424 Organ Literature


A study of selected organ literature from all periods. Offered in alternate years; next in
2009–2010. (3-3) Sutherland

530.425-426 Resources for Contemporary Church Musicians


A survey of liturgics, choir training, choral literature for the average choir, conducting styles
and interpretation, and related subjects. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (3-3)
Walker

460.545-6/845-6 Organ Seminar


Classes in performance covering the repertoire and stylistic concepts from all periods of organ
literature. A yearly requirement of organ majors. (1-1) Sutherland

Pedagogy
Laura Parker, Coordinator

520.615 Pedagogy Internship


The internship is intended to provide a one-year supervised work experience during which
students will be expected to demonstrate repeatedly the ability to present well-planned and
engaging classes and lessons. (2,0) Faculty

520.617 Internship Seminar


The seminar is intended to provide a forum for the following activities and discussion topics:
sharing of successful teaching experiences, group review of videotapes, microteaching, discus-
sion of recordkeeping systems, the business of teaching music, motivational techniques for
special situations, the importance of the parent and parent-teacher relationship. (1,0) Faculty

520.618 Portfolio Development


Guidance in professional portfolio development. The result will be a professional portfolio
demonstrating and utilizing the student’s knowledge, materials, experience, references, audio
and video tapes of teaching and performance obtained or collected during the first three
semesters of M.M. Performance/Pedagogy. In addition, students will explore various employ-
ment opportunities and discuss how to effectively use their portfolio to gain a position as a
studio instructor. (0,1) L. Parker

Percussion
Robert Van Sice, Coordinator
530.567, 568 Contemporary Chamber Music for Percussion
(1,1) Van Sice

155
Piano
Ellen Mack, Chair
530.111-112 Sight-reading
A course to help foster fluency in the essential skill of transforming written music into
sound. Includes score scanning, pattern recognition, and analysis of harmonic, rhythmic, and
melodic structures in music from all periods. Required for undergraduate piano and organ
majors. Also offered as an elective. (2-2) Johansen

530.211-212 Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors I - II


A course applying fundamental principles of music theory to the interpretation, study, and
memorization of solo piano music. Required for undergraduate piano majors. (2-2) Johansen

530.311-312 Keyboard Skills for Piano Majors III - IV


A course designed to build score-reading skills at the keyboard. Required for undergraduate
piano majors. (2-2) Adams

530.415-416 Keyboard Skills Review


A remedial course in sight-reading and keyboard harmony for graduate piano majors. (2-2)
Johansen

530.633-634 Advanced Keyboard Skills for Pianists


A course in sight-reading, score-reading, transposition, and figured bass accompaniment.
Required for M.M. piano majors. Students who completed the undergraduate courses in
keyboard skills (530.211-212 and 530.311-312) at Peabody with a minimum grade of B or
higher are exempt from this course. (2-2) Johansen

530.636 Keyboard Skills for Non-piano Majors


Piano technique and repertoire, keyboard harmony, and sight-reading for graduate non-piano
majors. Prerequisite: at least two years of piano study. Recommended for students in the mas-
ter’s in Music Theory Pedagogy program. Also open to conducting, composition, and other
interested students. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. (0,2) Johansen

530.411,412 Keyboard Literature I, II


A study of the solo and chamber literature for keyboard instruments, from early 18th century
through the classical period. (2,2) Pearl, S. Levy

530.413,414 Keyboard Literature III, IV


A survey of piano literature from the romantic period to the present. (2,2) Habermann, S. Levy

530.613 French Piano Music


A survey of the music from 1880 to 1920, with an emphasis on neglected repertoire (particu-
larly Fauré and Chabrier), performance style (especially rhythm and timbre), and extra-musi-
cal associations (art and literature). Open to piano majors for elective credit. (2-0) Johansen

530.667-668 Piano Pedagogy


Exploration of principles, materials, career development in the teaching of piano. Includes
observation of Preparatory teachers and some supervised teaching of precollege students. (2-2)
Faculty

156
450.845 Graduate Piano Seminar
A seminar required of all doctoral students and open to second-year M.M. students with
departmental permission. Focus will be on preparation for entering the music profession,
which will include practice teaching, press kit and resume preparation, discussion of job
searches, and topics of special interest. (1) Piano Faculty

*Recording Arts
*See The Johns Hopkins University Arts and Sciences/Engineering catalog for
engineering and mathematics courses.

550.111-112 Basic Recording I


A course designed for the beginning audio student that will introduce and discuss com-
ponents of the recording chain and recording techniques for both the classical and popular
music fields. Included is a detailed analysis of the nature of sound, basic recorder and console
operation, basic microphone types and placement, tape editing, and other skills required to
work in the studios. (2-2) Faculty

550.211-212 Basic Recording II


A continuation of Basic Recording I, with emphasis on digital audio and digital audio work-
stations. Subjects include AD and DA conversion, SACD, DVD-A and multi-channel hard
disc systems, and an in-depth look at digital large format consoles. Class and individual proj-
ects in recording and digital audio editing are assigned. (2-2) Faculty

550.311-312 Basic Recording III


A continuation of Basic Recording II, with emphasis on digital signal processing and editing,
loudspeakers and monitoring systems. Studies include all frequency, amplitude and time-
based analog and digital signal processing equipment. Further demonstrations and discus-
sions of modern recording techniques are included. Class and individual projects are assigned.
(2-2) Faculty

550.411-412 Advanced Recording I


The study and operation of professional multi-track recording and mixing equipment. Top-
ics included are basic multi-tracking, mixing, and processing. Students will mix existing
multi-track tapes on several digital and analog consoles and prepare digital masters suitable
for compact disc release. Digital video editing systems and MPEG/AC-3/DTS encoding for
optical disc systems are included. (3-3) Faculty

550.419 Internship
Undergraduate students work in supervised professional positions in which they will have
the opportunity to apply the knowledge and expertise developed during their course of study.
The internship requires 320 hours of service in an approved facility. (4) Faculty

550.511-512 Advanced Recording Systems


A study and practical application of the processing and other tools used in professional audio
recording. Topics include frequency-based processing, amplitude-based processing, time-
based processing, digital video systems and encoding, as well as a comprehensive review of
materials covered in Basic Recording I and II. This course is open only to incoming students
in the Recording and Production track of the Master of Arts in Audio Sciences program. (3-3)
Faculty

157
550.513-514 Advanced Recording II
Topics and practice include digital audio consoles and workstation automation systems,
SMPTE timecode automated mixdown, and multi-channel digital multi-track recording.
Course also includes encoding systems and preparation of masters for DVD-A and SACD.
Students will record a band of their choice and, drawing upon skills learned in previous course-
work, prepare mastered media suitable for commercial replication. Prerequisites: Advanced
Recording Systems, Advanced Recording I, or the equivalent. (3-3) MacDonald

550.515 Musical Acoustics


A course concerned with the physics of sound as applied to properties of musical instruments,
perception of musical sound, electronic music reproduction, and the spaces in which they per-
form. Prerequisites for recording arts majors: Basic Recording I and II or the equivalent. Pre-
requisite for non-recording majors: Basic Recording Techniques or the equivalent. (3,0) Shade

550.516 Electroacoustics
Basics of electroacoustical principles relating to microphones and loudspeakers. Topics
include general transducer theory, microphone fundamentals, dynamic and condenser micro-
phones, proximity effect, dynamic cone loudspeakers, closed and vented enclosures, Thiele
Small parameters, compression drivers and coaxial loudspeakers, horn loudspeaker theory, and
crossover networks. Prerequisites: Musical Acoustics or Audio Design. (0,3) Shade

550.517 Psychoacoustics
Basics of the physiological and psychological aspects of hearing with applications to audio
and sound systems, architectural acoustics, and musical acoustics. Topics include auditory
physiology of the outer and inner ear, masking, critical bands, loudness, duration, binaural
hearing, localization, and pitch. (3,0) Shade

550.519 Acoustical and Audio Measurements


The theory and application of objective acoustical and audio measurements are studied. Mea-
surement techniques used in the evaluation of both physical spaces and electronic equipment
are presented. Topics include measurement microphones, sound level meters, noise sources,
spectrum and FFT analysis, reverberation, speech intelligibility, transfer function, swept sine
techniques, audio power measurements, ADC and DAC linearity, harmonic distortion, and
mixed signal testing. Prerequisites: Architectural Acoustics or Audio Science and Technology.
Offered every other year; next in 2008–2009. (0,3) Shade

550.611 Music and Technology


An in-depth study of the audio playback chain from digital source to loudspeakers. Each
product in the chain is reviewed at a block diagram level, and components are evaluated by
both subjective and objective means. Technologies that are covered include Dolby Digital,
DTS and THS systems, MP3 and other compressed audio formats, classes of power amplifica-
tion, and digital to analog conversion techniques. (0,3) Lyons

550.612 Audio Science and Technology


This class focuses on the core science that forms the basis of audio technology. Topics include
electronic circuit elements, reactive elements, filtering, linear amplification, AC and DC
power, as well as time and frequency domain representation of signals. (3,0) Lyons

550.623 Physical Acoustics


Basic fundamentals of physical acoustics involving the generation and propagation of sound.
Topics include free and forced vibrations, one-dimensional systems (strings and bars), two-
dimensional systems (membranes and plates), coupled vibrating systems, general wave
phenomena, types of sound waves (plane, spherical, and cylindrical), and types of radiating
sources (point, monopole, dipole, and line.) Prerequisites: Musical Acoustics, Psychoacoustics.
(3,0) Shade

158
550.624 Architectural Acoustics
The behavior of sound in enclosed spaces is explored. Topics include sound absorption, sound
reflection, refraction and diffusion, large and small room acoustics, room modes, reverbera-
tion, energy ratios, acoustical materials, psychoacoustic aspects, and design of rooms for
speech, music, and recording. Prerequisites: Physical Acoustics, Psychoacoustics. Not offered
in 2008–2009. (3,0) Shade

550.625 Sound System Design


Design and application of sound reinforcement systems for indoor and outdoor spaces. Topics
include design techniques, performance objectives, sound system components, loudspeaker
and sound system types, speech intelligibility, prediction of sound distribution and level,
acoustic gain equations, installation requirements, and performance measurements. Prereq-
uisites: Electroacoustics, Architectural Acoustics, Psychoacoustics. Offered every other year;
next in 2008–2009. (0,3) Shade

550.626 Noise Control


A continuation of Architectural Acoustics (550.624) with an emphasis on noise control for
buildings and equipment. Topics include noise reduction, transmission loss theory, impact
insulation, noise barriers, equipment enclosures and noise control materials, HVAC noise pre-
dictions and control. Prerequisites: Physical Acoustics, Architectural Acoustics. Not offered
in 2008–2009. (0,2) Shade

550.627 Computer Modeling


Basics of computer modeling for room acoustics and sound systems design. Topics include
general theory and assumptions underlying computer modeling, different types of acoustical
models, auralization, small room acoustic, large room acoustic, and sound system computer
models. Introduction to popular computer models including Room Sizer, Room Optimizer,
EASE, and ODEON. Prerequisites: Architectural Acoustics, Sound System Design. Offered
every other year; next in 2008–2009. (0,2) Shade

550.631 Professional Practices


This course examines professional practices common in industry. Topics include interaction
with clients, design professionals, and contractors; professional ethics and liability; insurance;
contracts; and fee setting, specifications, reports, and project documentation. Not offered in
2008–2009. (2,0) Shade

550.640 Acoustics Design Practicum


In this course taken in the final semester of study, students will act as acoustical consultants
to design or analyze an existing room or sound system using the knowledge gained through
prior classes. The students will be responsible for complete analysis, measurements, model-
ing, design documentation, and presentation of the final design in class. (0,3) Shade

550.651-652 Basic Recording Techniques for Musicians


A comprehensive course in recording and associated technologies designed for the musician
who wishes to know about the recording arts. The course is taught parallel to Basic Record-
ing I and II but without the required mathematics and physics and is open to upper-level
undergraduates and graduate students of all majors. A paper is required each semester in lieu
of an exam. Offered every other year; not in 2008–2009. (2-2) Faculty

550.699 Graduate Final Project or Internship


Culminating project or internship for students in the Master of Arts in Audio Sciences
program. Projects or internship plans are submitted to the respective faculty member for
approval. (3) Faculty/Shade

159
Small Ensembles
950.535,6/835,6 Peabody Camerata
A larger chamber ensemble devoted to study and performance of the music of the 20th cen-
tury. Works performed are typically for five winds and four or five strings. Works may call for
a single solo performer or for variations up to larger combinations of instruments. The ensem-
ble may also take part in chamber opera. Assignment is by audition to this elective designed
for advanced performers. (2,2) Young

950.545,6/845,6 Percussion Ensemble


A performance-oriented ensemble that explores a wide range of repertoire from Varese to
Zappa to traditional Javenese Gamelan. Students will learn basic technique of Asian metala-
phones and drums. Experimentation will be encouraged. Studio time is also spent on orches-
tral repertoire and sectionals for all orchestral concerts. (1,1) Faculty

Strings
Keng-Yuen Tseng, Chair
530.449,450 Orchestral Repertoire for Violin
The development of orchestral performance skills for violinists with emphasis on repertoire
and preparation for auditions. (1,1) Greenberg

530.451,452 Orchestral Repertoire for Viola


The development of orchestral performance skills for violists. Minimum of three students per
class. (1,1) Field

530.465,466 Orchestral Repertoire for Cello


(1,1) Stepansky

530.467,468 Orchestral Repertoire for Double Bass


(1,1) Faculty

530.532 Orchestral Audition Seminar for Violists


An intensive course to assist violists in their final stages of preparation before winning an
orchestral audition. The most common repertoire is not only studied but reinforced in a con-
stant audition environment. Mock auditions are held every four weeks. Audition strategies
are discussed privately and as a group. (0,1) Wyrczynski

530.651-652 Violin/Viola Pedagogy


Violin/viola teacher training from beginning to advanced levels. Study of various pedagogues.
Observation of violin/viola instructors and supervised studio teaching experience. Open to
both undergraduate (juniors and seniors) and graduate violin or viola majors in the fall semes-
ter and by permission of instructor in the spring semester. Required for all Master of Music in
Violin or Viola Performance/Pedagogy majors. (2-2) Henry

160
Voice
Phyllis Bryn-Julson, Chair
530.469 Singing in Italian
This course will prepare students to sing artistically in Italian, through a combination of dic-
tion study, text translation, and in-class singing of repertory chosen by the students and their
voice teachers. Special attention will be given to poetic word order and vocabulary and to
archaic forms common in the repertory. Prerequisite: minimum one year of college study of
Italian language or consent of instructor. (2,0) Mastrian
530.470 Italian Song
A study of the history, interpretation, and poetic content of Italian vocal music. Each student
will prepare and perform in class two pieces of different periods and styles. (0,2) Mastrian

530.471 Singing in Russian


A study of Russian vocal music, its poetry and interpretation, including analysis and perfor-
mance of selected works. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (2,0) Danchenko-Stern

530.473,474 Opera Literature


A study of selected works in opera from the 17th century to present, with emphasis on com-
positional styles and traditions of performance. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009.
(2,2) Liotti

530.475 Singing in English


An introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet as well as the sounds of English and
their applications to the singing process. (2,0) Ligon

530.476 English and American Song


A study of the history, interpretation, and poetic content of English and American songs,
from the baroque period to the present. (0,2) Ligon

530.477 Singing in German


A thorough examination of the phonemic/phonetic system of German pronunciation and its
application in singing in that language. The course is designed to give students not only the
professional tools to analyze the phonetic problems in German texts (and to transcribe those
solutions with the aid of IPA), but also the ability to hear for themselves how those solutions
can be applied. Special emphasis is placed on Bühnenaussprach/Hochlautung, noting the
differences between speaking and singing in that language, and the resulting choices that
the student will need to make in achieving a good and flexible singing pronunciation. This
is essentially a practical course; the major part of the teaching will be through speaking and
then singing excerpts from the German vocal repertoire from opera, oratorio, and lieder. (3,0)
Justen

530.480 French Mélodie


An introduction to French art song with emphasis on important contributions of composers
from Berlioz to Poulenc. Listening assignments and class performances of selected materials
are included. Required for undergraduate voice majors. (0,2) Ligon

530.481 German Lieder


A study of the development of the Lied from its origins in the Piano Songs of the 17th
century to its first flowering in the songs of Schubert (especially those of 1828) and in Schu-
mann’s Lieder year (1840). From this point, the focus will be upon the later part of the 19th
century (Mendelssohn, Brahms, Mahler, Wagner) and the 20th century (Berg, Schönberg,
Strauss, etc.). Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (2,0) Shirley-Quirk

161
530.483 Singing in French
A study of French vocal music, its poetry and interpretation, with attention to diction (using
the International Phonetic Alphabet) and grammar, including analysis and performance of
selected works. Required for the B.M. in Voice. (3,0) Ligon

530.539 Poetry in German


Beginning with Goethe’s work, this course focuses on German poems representative of a poet,
a period, or a genre, from the 18th century to the present. Special attention will be paid to
works set to music by various composers from Mozart to Henze. Texts will be read in the
original German (with English translations); discussions will be in English. This course is a
liberal arts elective (voice students may receive Advanced Studies credit by permission). (3,0)
Vogt

530.571,572 History of Song Literature


An in-depth study of song literature for the solo voice, this two-semester couse will cover
songs from the Renaissance through the 20th century and include historical context, back-
ground, textual analysis, and compositional characteristics. Selected composers will be stud-
ied in depth with regard to form and influences on style. (2,2) Muckenfuss

530.579,580 Vocal Chamber Music


This class brings together singers and instrumentalists to explore the vast chamber music
literature that includes voice, from the baroque to the 21st century. Ensembles can include
all orchestral instruments, organ, harpsichord, piano, guitar, and percussion. This course is
offered as an elective. Permission of the instructor is required. (2,2) Sharp/Shirley-Quirk

530.686 Opera: Bel Canto/Verismo


An overview of two forms of Italian opera of the early and late 19th century. Their stylistic
conventions will be discussed with examples from historic recordings and video selections.
(0,3) Liotti

530.672 Verdi
A study of the operas with special attention to Verdi’s development and his influence on other
composers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Class not limited to voice majors. Offered in alter-
nate years; next in 2008–2009. (3,0) Liotti

530.677 Advanced Vocal Repertoire in French


Study and performance of representative songs. Singers should be comfortable singing in
French. Open to vocalists and pianists by audition/permission of the instructor. Offered in
alternate years; next in 2009–2010. (0,2-3) Ligon

530.678 Advanced Vocal Repertoire in German


Study and performance of representative songs. Singers should be comfortable singing in
German. Open to vocalists and pianists by audition/permission of the instructor. Offered in
alternate years; next in 2009–2010. (2-3,0) Ligon

530.682 Arioso and Recitative


Although this is a (vocally) practical course, instrumentalists (e.g., continuo players, whether
cellist, gambists, or keyboard players) and conductors are more than welcome. The course will
recognize the two sources of recitative [plainsong which led to the Passion tradition of Schütz
and Bach, and the “nuove musiche” of the “camerata” giving rise to the more operatic style
of, say, Handel], the subsequent amalgamation of these styles in Wagner’s operas, and the cre-
ation of the operatic style of the 20th century [Berg, Debussy, Britten]. Offered in alternate
years; next in 2009–2010. (0,2) Shirley-Quirk

162
530.683 Vocal Pedagogy
A class participation course that includes an introduction to various voice teaching methods
and their respective approaches to posture and breathing, registration, resonation, coordina-
tion, interpretation, and vocal health; an examination of the anatomy and function of the
vocal mechanism; student teaching; teacher observation; repertoire and recital planning.
Required for the M.M. in Voice with Pedagogy Emphasis and the D.M.A. in Voice, Option
C; an elective for seniors and other graduate students. (2,0) Rainbolt

530.684 Vocal Pedagogy Lab


A continuation of student teaching and teacher observation from 530.683 Vocal Pedagogy.
Required for the M.M. in Voice with Pedagogy Emphasis and the D.M.A. in Voice, Option
C. (2) Rainbolt

530.687 Oratorio
Students learn standard repertoire, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries, for use in
auditions and/or performance. Offered in alternate years; next in 2008–2009. (0,2) S. Cornett

530.691,692 Music for the Voice—20th, 21st Centuries


A performance practice course including score reading, definitions of the technical language
of avant garde music, and the learning of contemporary vocal techniques. Performance is
optional. Composers to be studied will include Messiaen, Cage, Berio, Aperghis, Boulez,
Wuorinen, Carter, Rorem, and Maw. Offered in alternate years; next in 2009–2010. (2,2)
Bryn-Julson

530.695 Advanced Lieder Studies from the Poetic Perspective


The course is designed to present voice and interested piano students who perform Lied set-
tings a detailed analysis and understanding of the texts, as well as a deeper understanding of
the meaning and the significance of the poetry they read or perform. One of the desired out-
comes of this class is to give students the tools to recognize poetry from the various historic
and stylistic periods, and to reflect this understanding in their interpretations of the musical
settings. The course will start with a thorough examination of the poem: structure, historic/
poetic period, possible meanings, and how they are set by major composers. Some of these
settings will be performed in class. The poets discussed will be Goethe (fall), and Heine and
Eichendorff (spring). (2,2) Justen/Shirley-Quirk

480.545/845 Vocal Seminar


A team-taught course for voice majors, emphasizing physiology, vocal pedagogy, topics of
special interest. One year required of all voice majors who are seniors and graduate students.
(1,0) Voice Faculty

Woodwinds
Phillip Kolker, Chair
530.455,456 Orchestral Repertoire for Clarinet
The development of orchestral performance skills for clarinet with emphasis on repertoire.
(1,1) Barta/Palanker

530.459 Respiratory Function


Basic techniques of breathing and breath control for wind instruments tailored to the stu-
dent’s instrument with a goal of enhancing one’s use of air and efficiency to improve perfor-
mances. Consists of five private one-hour lessons during the semester. Enrollment is limited
to three students per semester.(1) Fedderly

163
530.463,464 Piccolo Class
Covers repertoire from both the solo and orchestral literature, increasing proficiency, famil-
iarity, and comfort with the “little flute.” Emphasis on audition preparation and experience.
Required material: Jack Wellbaum’s Orchestral Excerpts for Piccolo. (1,1) Sokoloff

530.519,520 Orchestral Repertoire for Flute


The development of orchestral performance skills for flute with emphasis on repertoire. (1,1)
Skala

530.573, 574 Orchestral Repertoire for Oboe/English Horn


The development of orchestral performance skills for oboe and English horn with emphasis
on repertoire. (1,1) Needleman/Marvine

530.591,592 Oboe Reedmaking


The construction of oboe reeds. (1,1) Needleman

530.575,576 Orchestral Repertoire for Bassoon


The development of orchestral performance skill for bassoon with emphasis on repertoire.
(1,1) Kolker

Recitals
190.395 Recital
A public performance required of all students earning the Bachelor of Music in Music
Education and/or the Performer’s Certificate. (2)

190.495 Recital
A public performance required of students earning the Bachelor of Music degree. (2)

190.695 Recital
A public performance required of all students with a major in performance in the Master of
Music degree program or the Graduate Performance Diploma program. (2)

190.696 Recital
A second public solo or ensemble performance required of all students with a major in perfor-
mance in the Graduate Performance Diploma program, and as may be required by individual
departments for students with a major in performance in the Master of Music program. (2)

190.794-799 Recital
Public performances required of all students in the Artist Diploma and Doctor of Musical
Arts programs, with the exception of those majoring in composition. (2 hours credit each)

164
Student Life
Residence Hall Athletic Facilities
The Peabody Residence Hall consists The nonacademic Department of Athlet-
of two towers connected at the Plaza ics and Recreation of the Johns Hopkins
level by the Dining Hall. Constructed in University is responsible for intercolle-
1968, the towers house fully furnished, giate athletics and the campus recreation
air-conditioned rooms for 165 persons. program for students, staff, and faculty.
The main floor of the East Tower houses The facilities of the Newton H. White
recreational space in Unger Lounge, stu- Jr. Athletic Center at the Homewood
dent mailboxes, the Student Affairs Office campus include a competition-sized swim-
Suite, and the Institute’s mailroom. The ming pool, numerous basketball courts, a
Residence Hall complex includes a com- wrestling room, fencing room, and varsity
mon room facility for laundry. Individual weight-training room.
ethernet connections to the Internet are The Ralph S. O’Connor Recreation
available within each resident’s room. Center includes a large multi-purpose court
The Residence Hall is staffed by a for basketball, volleyball, and badminton,
full-time professional coordinator and racquetball/squash courts, a 30’ climbing
part-time student resident assistants. The wall, a fitness center for strength and car-
staff is selected and trained to provide diovascular conditioning, indoor jogging
programs, assistance, advising, and leader- track, and group fitness/martial arts rooms.
ship to each floor community within the Outdoor facilities at the Homewood
Residence Hall. campus include six tennis courts which are
All freshmen, sophomores, and first- also available when not in use by the varsity
year transfer students are required to live tennis teams. All facilities can be reserved
in the Residence Hall unless they have by contacting Thomas Payne in the Office
been granted an exemption by the Resi- of Recreation (410-516-5229) or tpayne2@
dence Life Office. On-campus residency jhu.edu.
permits entering students to adjust more All participants are assessed a fee to
easily to college life and Conservatory use the O’Connor Recreation Center. For
studies. It also encourages students to cul- information regarding cost and hours of
tivate new friendships, to explore the his- operation, please contact the Office of
toric Mount Vernon neighborhood, and to Recreation at 410-516-5229 or check the
take advantage of the many cultural and JHU web site at www.jhu.edu/recreation.
social resources of Baltimore. The Peabody campus provides a recre-
ation room, ping-pong and pool tables in
Dining Hall Unger Lounge, and an exercise room.
The Peabody Dining Hall is located
between the two residence towers. Resi- Student Activities
dency requires participation in the board Students are encouraged to become
plan. The cafeteria serves breakfast, lunch, involved in campus life through par-
and dinner from Monday through Friday ticipation in student activities and self-
and brunch and dinner on the weekend. governance. The Organization Advocating
Weekday dinner and all weekend meals Student InterestS (OASIS) is a collabora-
are an “all you care to eat” buffet using tive, representative organization that
a meal swipe; breakfast and lunch meals welcomes any student willing to commit
are provided through the dining points to improving the quality of life at Peabody.
associated with each of the meal plans. Students may also form special interest
Off-campus students are encouraged to groups by following guidelines published
participate in a “commuter” plan, either in the Registered Students Organizations
the five meals per week with dining points Handbook. Peabody students are eligible to
or an all-declining-balance plan. A la carte participate in a wide range of student activ-
retail service is also offered.
165
ities, including intramural athletics, offered for students. Services are oriented toward
on the JHU Homewood campus. helping students resolve emotional dif-
ficulties, manage stress and interpersonal
Religious Activity relationships more effectively, and over-
Within walking distance of the Peabody come problematic behaviors. A variety of
campus, one can find a synagogue and services are provided, including individual
churches of most religious denominations. and group psychotherapy, crisis interven-
Johns Hopkins University Campus Min- tion, support groups, workshops, and con-
istries, located at the Bunting-Meyerhoff sultation on student-life problems. For the
Interfaith and Community Service Center convenience of Peabody students, a coun-
on the Homewood campus, promotes and selor is available at Peabody one half-day
supports spiritual development, theo- per week. For additional information or to
logical reflection, religious tolerance, and make an appointment, call 410-516-8278.
social awareness among students, faculty, You can also check the Counseling Center
and staff within the university commu- web site at www.jhu.edu/counselingcenter.
nity. Through a pastoral presence and hos- To speak to an on-call counselor in case of
pitable environment, Campus Ministries an emergency during non-business hours,
seeks to enhance the spiritual and ethical Homewood Security should be contacted
educational experience of the whole per- at 410-516-7777.
son, mind, body, and soul. JHU Campus
Ministries is a collaborative effort of the Health Insurance
university chaplain, campus ministers, and All full-time students are required to
the student-led Interfaith Council offering carry adequate health insurance coverage
prayer services, religious reflection series, for themselves and their dependents. The
interfaith education, and dialogue oppor- Johns Hopkins University has developed
tunities, as well as special community and a comprehensive health insurance plan
fellowship events. For further information, that includes hospital, surgical, and major
take the shuttle to the Interfaith Center medical benefits. Membership in this plan
at the corner of North Charles and Uni- is mandatory for all full-time students
versity Parkway, call 410-261-1880, or unless a student provides evidence that
contact www.jhu.edu/~chaplain. he or she has existing equivalent health
insurance coverage. International students
Health Services are required to purchase the school’s insur-
Full-time students receive their health ance plan.
services from the Johns Hopkins Com-
munity Physicians at Wyman Park (3100 Shuttle Bus
Wyman Park Drive). The health service A free university shuttle operates seven
provides comprehensive outpatient health days a week between the Homewood
care including evaluation and treatment campus and the Johns Hopkins Medical
of minor illnesses, allergy shots, routine Institutions with stops at the Peabody
gynecologic care and consultation, routine campus and the train station. The buses
ancillary testing, and minor surgical pro- run from 6:15 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. on week-
cedures. Visits for treatment at the health days; 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Saturdays;
service are covered by the mandatory stu- and noon to 9:30 p.m. on Sundays.
dent health fee and are otherwise free to
the student. Referrals to outside providers Peabody Escort Van
and some ancillary testing are charged to Peabody operates a van escort service
the student’s health insurance. to transport members of its community
to and from campus within roughly a
Counseling Center Services 12-block radius. When school is in session
The Counseling Center at 358 Garland the escort van runs every half hour from
Hall on the Homewood campus is the 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. and at 3, 4, and 5 a.m.
primary source of psychological assistance upon request, seven days per week.

166
Financial Information
Tuition and Fees, 2008–2009
Tuition
Full-time study (per academic year)
Degree programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,000
Artist Diploma and Graduate Performance Diploma programs . . . . . . . . . . 27,500
Part-time study (per academic year)
Major study (one-hour lessons + jury/recital); unlimited ensembles . . . . . . . . 14,670
Major study (half-hour lessons + jury/recital); one ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,650
Vocal coaching or minor study: one hour lessons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,650
Vocal coaching or minor study: half-hour lessons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,670
Supplementary Study
Second major field lessons (double performance major) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,400
Hourly per semester credit or audit
Classroom studies, ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940
Music Education certification courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470
Degree-in-progress, graduate consultation1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940
Elective minor study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
Remedial tutorial study (per clock hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
   (assigned only in consultation with the Dean’s Office)
General Fees
  * Application for degree program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100
  * Application for Extension students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
  * Tuition deposit (students returning from leave, nonrefundable)2 . . . . . . . 50
  * Tuition deposit (new students, nonrefundable)3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600
  * Matriculation (one-time fee for new degree/diploma candidates)3 . . . . . . 700
   Health services fee (required for all full-time students) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Information technology fee (required for all full-time students) . . . . . . . . 175
Health insurance—individual coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,634
Special Fees
Late payment (payments postmarked after August 13 for fall semester
and December 10 for spring semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $   100
Late registration (late registrations/registration
confirmations after September 4 for fall semester and
January 9 for spring semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $   100
N.B. It is required that all students pay tuition and fees in full in order to complete
registration and attend classes each semester.

* Nonrefundable
 1 Degree-in-progress fee is required of graduate students not registered for coursework and/or lessons or
granted official leave of absence.
  2 Due prior to registration for all students returning from leave of absence.
  3 One-time fee required for each degree/certificate/diploma program.

167
Change of course after first week each semester, per request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $    20
Special examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Graduate examination retake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Recital rescheduling fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Transcript (academic) per copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Instrument rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95-125
Bass case rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50-200
Lost folder (ensembles) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Lost instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . minimum of 500
Lost ID nonrefundable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Lost key (studio/classroom) nonrefundable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Room and Board Fees (per academic year)
Room reservation (nonrefundable after June 30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $   150
Residence Hall security deposit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Room and Board—D ouble occupancy/Board Plan I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,200
for single room add . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,290
for Board Plan II add . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
Lost key (Residence Hall and mailbox) nonrefundable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Lock replacement (nonrefundable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . minimum of 50

Schedule of Payments, 2008–2009 Residence Hall


Room contracts are based on the aca-
Tuition and Fees demic year.
Fall semester payment: First semester payment:
Postmark date August 13, 2008 Postmark date August 13, 2008
Spring semester payment: Second semester payment:
Postmark date December 10, 2008 Postmark date December 10, 2008
Entering students must pay the tuition
deposit upon notification of admission. The Residence Hall security deposit and
Student account invoices for return- the room reservation fee must accompany
ing students are available on the student all applications for Residence Hall rooms.
web site (https://isis.jhu.edu). Paper bills The room reservation fee is applied to
are no longer mailed. A JHED logon is the Residence Hall charges and is not
required to access an invoice (https:// refundable after June 30.
isis.jhu.edu/sswf for more information). The security deposit is not credited
Students are notified via e-mail when the to Residence Hall charges but will be
invoice is posted. Students can establish returned upon termination of residence.
additional authorized users to allow some- Rooms will be inspected immediately
one else to view and pay on their accounts. after they are vacated, and any repairs,
New students will receive a paper invoice exclusive of normal wear and tear, needed
via mail for their first semester bill only. to restore them to their original condi-
Federal regulations prohibit the Peabody tion will be deducted from the security
Institute from releasing student informa- deposit. In the case of double occupancy,
tion (records, billing, etc.) without written when the damage or repair charges cannot
consent from the student, according to the be specifically identified with an indi-
Family Educational Rights and Privacy vidual person, each occupant shall share
Act of 1974 (FERPA). the cost equally.

168
Tuition Refund Schedule for Withdrawals, 2008–2009
Withdrawal Date Refund
Fall Semester 2008
Before 09/04/08 100% less $100 administrative cost
09/05/08 – 09/14/08 90% less $100 administrative cost
09/15/08 – 09/29/08 50% less $100 administrative cost
09/30/08 – 10/25/08 25% less $100 administrative cost
After 10/25/08 No refund
Spring Semester 2009
Before 01/12/09 100% less $100 administrative cost
01/13/09 – 01/23/09 90% less $100 administrative cost
01/24/09 – 02/17/09 50% less $100 administrative cost
02/18/09 – 03/14/09 25% less $100 administrative cost
After 03/14/09 No refund
Students withdrawing after classes have begun are liable for that portion of their tuition
that has not been canceled. Withdrawals must be in writing and do not become effective
until received by the Office of Academic Affairs.
Residence Hall refunds for withdrawals 2008–2009
Before October 25 (Fall), March 14 (Spring) Fees prorated proportionately
After October 25 (Fall), March 14 (Spring) No refund

Tuition Payment Assistance Graduation


The Clarence Manger and Audrey Cor- Students may not obtain their certificate
dero Plitt Loan Fund. This fund was or diploma until all outstanding charges
specifically designed to help parents of full- have been paid.
time undergraduate students pay for college Federal Aid Programs
in regular installments, over an extended
period of time, at a lower than usual inter- General
est rate. It is intended to help meet the Federal aid programs consist of financial
needs of the middle income family. assistance in the form of federal grants,
Eligibility is established by the Pea- federal loans and federal Work Study.
body Institute after a review of the loan Awards are based on demonstrated financial
application form. In general, parents are need and the availability of funds. To apply
eligible if combined annual gross income for these types of aid, the Free Application
is between $30,000 and $150,000. The for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must
interest currently being charged is 3%. be completed, listing Peabody TITLE IV
For additional information about the CODE EOO233. The FAFSA can be filed
Fund, call or write: online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. A paper version
Donna Stinnette of the FAFSA may also be obtained from
21 E. Mt. Vernon Place the Peabody Financial Aid office or the
Baltimore, MD 21202 student’s high school or college counselor’s
410-659-8100 ext. 3020 office.
Additional information and other
Peabody also offers a 10-month pay- required forms are available on the
ment plan through TuitionPay with Sallie Peabody financial aid office website at
Mae. Contact the Peabody Business Office www.peabody.jhu.edu/finaid.
for more information.

169
The Peabody Conservatory will not per year. Graduate students may borrow
issue transcripts or perform any other up to an additional $12,000 in unsubsi-
service if a student becomes delinquent or dized loan. Unsubsidized loan interest is
defaults on loan payments. fixed at 6.8% for all students. Payment
may be deferred while the student is still
Loan Programs in school, but interest should be paid, as it
(students must be enrolled at least half-time) will accrue and be capitalized.
Federal Perkins Loans Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loans
Federal Perkins Loan is available to Federal Direct Graduate PLUS loans
students enrolled at least half-time and is are federally guaranteed loans available
based on demonstrated financial need and to graduate students who have exhausted
availability of funds. Perkins Loan has a their eligibility for subsidized and unsub-
5% interest rate, and payment is deferred sidized Federal Direct Student Loans.
while a student is enrolled at least half- There is no financial need requirement
time. Awards range from $500 to $6,000. to receive these loans; however, a credit
Federal Direct Student Loans review is required.
Subsidized Federal Direct Student Loans Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans
have replaced the Stafford Loan Program.
Federal Direct Parent PLUS loans are
Students no longer need to file a separate
federally guaranteed loans available to
bank application. Federal Direct Student
parents of undergraduate students. There
Loan is available to students enrolled at
is no financial need requirement to receive
least half-time who demonstrate financial
these loans; however, a credit review is
need. The following limits are set for
required. The interest rate on both Parent
loans: freshmen, $3,500; sophomores,
and Grad Direct PLUS loans is fixed at
$4,500; juniors and seniors, $5,500;
7.9%.
graduate students, $8,500. Payments are
deferred while a student is enrolled at least
Undergraduate Grants
half-time. The interest rate is currently
fixed at 6% for undergraduate student Federal Pell Grant
loans, and 6.8% for graduate student Federal Pell Grant is only available to
loans. undergraduates. Pell Grant ranges from
$400 to $4,731 and is based on demon-
Unsubsidized Federal Direct strated financial need.
Student Loans
Unsubsidized Federal Direct Student Federal SEOG
Loan is available to graduate students, Federal Supplemental Educational
independent undergraduate students, Opportunity Grant is also only available
and dependent undergraduate students to undergraduates. FSEOG ranges from
who are not eligible for all or part of $500 to $2,000 and is based on demon-
Subsidized Federal Direct Student Loan. strated financial need and the availability
A combination of Subsidized and Unsub- of funds.
sidized Direct Student Loans cannot
exceed the amounts listed above for under- Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant
graduate students. However, independent The Academic Competitiveness Grant
undergraduate students and dependent (ACG) is a federal grant for first-year
undergraduate students whose parents are undergraduate students who graduated
not eligible to borrow a PLUS Loan may from high school after January 1, 2006,
borrow as much as $5,000 in additional and second-year undergraduate students
unsubsidized loan. Freshmen and sopho- who graduated from high school after
mores can borrow no more than $4,000 January 1, 2005.

170
Students may receive an ACG of up to Aid and Scholarship Application by
$750 for their first year of study and up February 1 will be considered for amounts
to $1,300 for their second academic year higher than $10,000. Students receive
of study. To receive the ACG, applicants written notification of scholarship award
must meet these initial qualifications: with the acceptance letter. All scholar-
• U.S. citizenship ships are for one year and are renewed
• Federal Pell Grant recipient annually for the duration (8 semesters for
• Completion of a rigorous high school undergraduate students and 4 semesters
program of study (for both first- and for graduate students) of a student’s degree
second-year students) as determined by or certificate, depending on the progress
the U.S. Department of Education of the student as indicated by examina-
• Full-time enrollment in a degree tion and grade-point average. The amount
program of Peabody Scholarship remains the same
throughout a student’s program, pro-
• First-year students must not have been
vided the student maintains satisfactory
previously enrolled in an undergraduate
program academic progress. Peabody Scholarships
will not increase in subsequent years in
• Second-year undergraduate students the same program, and students cannot
must have a cumulative GPA of at least
re-audition in the same program for a new
3.0 on a 4.0 scale
scholarship or to increase current scholar-
Federal Work Study ship. Completing a satisfactory jury is a
Federal Work Study is available to personal benefit to the student and will
students who demonstrate financial need. not result in a Peabody Scholarship award
Awards range from $500 to $2,000 and or increase.
are based on the availability of funds. Scholarship is not awarded to students
Additional information can be obtained in the Doctor of Musical Arts program.
from the Financial Aid Office. Applicants to the D.M.A. are encouraged
to apply for graduate assistantships.
Institutional Aid Programs Auditions are held by the departmental
Scholarships, Awards, Prizes faculties and by the traveling admissions
Peabody Scholarships are awarded based representative on the dates indicated in
on the merit, talent, and financial need of the admissions packet.
the student and the needs of the school
for a balanced ensemble. All students are Designated Scholarships, Awards, Prizes
considered for Peabody Scholarship when Many scholarships, awards, and prizes
they apply for admission; however, only are made possible through the generosity
students who submit the Free Applica- of various individuals and organizations.
tion for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) They are made to outstanding students
or the International Student Financial based on terms specified by the donors.

171
Endowed Scholarships, Fellowships, and Graduate Assistantships

Cosimo C. Abato Clarinet Scholarship Ruby and Albert Flaccoe Endowed Scholarship Fund
Aegon USA Scholarship Fund Scott E. Forbush Scholarship
The Denes Agay Piano and Composition E. Carl Freeman Organ Scholarship
Scholarship Dorothea H. Freitag Scholarship
Elaine Austin and Oscar J. Kurtz Endowed Lillian Freundlich Endowed Scholarship in Piano
Scholarship The Eric Friedheim Endowment Fund
Bach-Horstmeier Scholarship (interpretation of the Fraser Gange Memorial Scholarship (voice)
works of J.S. Bach). Joseph Gegan Memorial Scholarship
James Backas Memorial Endowed Scholarship General Scholarship Endowment Fund
Fund (clarinet, chamber wind instrument) Lydia and Richard Gillespie Scholarship
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Women’s Music Club Philip D. Glass Endowed Scholarship in Composition
General Award Richard Franko Goldman and Alexandra Rienzi
Ruth Brouse Bauer Endowed Scholarship in Piano Goldman Memorial Scholarship
Louis D. Beaumont Foundation Scholarship Douglas and Hilda Perl Goodwin Endowed
Lindred Scott Bendann Endowed Scholarship in Scholarship Fund for Opera
Violin Arabella Leith Symington Griswold Endowed
Louis Blaustein Memorial Scholarship Scholarship in Piano
Michael R. Bloomberg Scholarship Funds The Norman J. and Sarah J. Groves Scholarship
John Charles Bohl Memorial Flute Scholarship Willard and Lillian Hackerman Endowed Scholarship
Victor Borge Scholarship Asger Hamerik and Sidney Lanier General
Franz C. Bornschein Memorial Scholarship Scholarship
The Yale Brody Memorial Scholarship (horn) John J. Hanex Memorial Scholarship
Chauncey Brooks Memorial Violin Scholarship The Jean Harnish Endowed Scholarship
Lucy Brown Memorial Piano Scholarship Howard Reid Hayden Memorial Organ Scholarship
Charlie Byrd Memorial Endowed Scholarship in Ida Heyser Memorial Piano Fellowship
Guitar Frank M. Hines Memorial Organ Fund
Cape Foundation Endowed Scholarship Hoffberger Foundation Scholarships
Louis Cheslock Memorial Scholarship (composition) The Carl Holzapfel Violin Shop Endowed
Elizabeth Rountree Church Memorial Scholarship Scholarship (strings)
Edna Parker Clemmitt Memorial Scholarship Charlotte Ludlow Hopkins Piano Scholarship
Frederick Campbell Colston Memorial Scholarship Merritt V. Howard Memorial Voice Scholarship
in Piano Florence Bentley Hughes Endowed Scholarship
Helen McGraw Chambers Memorial Endowed Alma D. Hunt/VCM Endowed Scholarship in
Scholarship in Piano Piano, Violin or Organ (sacred music)
Austin Conradi Memorial Piano Scholarship Helen J. Iliff Endowed Scholarship (piano)
Conservatory Endowed Scholarship Fund (piano) Joseph and Elizabeth Imbrogulio Scholarship
Elizabeth Coulson Piano Teaching Fund (strings)
(upperclass or graduate) The Agi Jambor Scholarship (piano)
Richard and Rosalee Davison Scholarship Claire and Allan Jensen Scholarship
The Deering Endowed Scholarship Fund Beatrice Feldman Kahn and Raymond S. Kahn
Mabell Antoinette Leonhardtsen del Mar Endowed Scholarship in Cello
Scholarship William H. Kaltenbach Jr. Endowed Scholarship
Jane Emel Donato Endowed Scholarship Stephen Kates Memorial Endowed Scholarship
Richard Dragon Memorial Scholarship (composition) in Cello
Ruth and Arno Drucker Scholarship Henriette Ries Kern Memorial Award
Dr. & Mrs. Gottfried Duschak Voice Scholarship Hans Kindler Cello Scholarship
Fund Warren Donald and Marie Evelyn Kinsman
Leah O. Effenbach Piano Scholarship Memorial Scholarship
Jennie K. Elle and Kurt D. Elle Scholarship Hjalmar and Emma Kivekas Scholarship
(piano or violin) (piano and violin)
May Garretson Evans Memorial Scholarship (every Lillian Hirschmann Konowitz Memorial Scholar-
4th year to a graduate of the Peabody Prep studying ship (piano)
at the Conservatory) The Edward and Frances Kosnik Endowed
P. William and Vera Ruth Filby Scholarship Scholarship Fund (piano, organ, voice, violin and
(orchestral instrument or voice) trumpet)

172
Willella S. Kriel General Scholarship Alexander Sklarevski Piano Scholarship
Kuehne-Finn Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund The Valerie Slingluff Violin Scholarship
Elaine Austin and Oscar J. Kurtz Scholarship (upperclass or graduate)
Maud C. Lewis Memorial Peabody Alumni David C. Smith Memorial Scholarship Fund
Scholarship Albert Snellenburg Voice Scholarship
The Irving Lowens and Margery Morgan Lowens Florence Solomon Memorial Piano Scholarship
Endowed Scholarship Fund Ruth Blumberg Sopher Endowed Memorial
Linda A. Mantegna Endowed Scholarship Fund Scholarhip in Piano
Jack E. Russell Markert Memorial Scholarship The Grace H. Spofford Scholarship
(trombone, euphonium, or tuba) (upperclass or graduate piano)
The Theodore A. Martin Violin Scholarship Geraldine D. Stansell Scholarship Fund
Samuel Masland Jr. Memorial Scholarship Hortense Iseman Stern Memorial Scholarship
(horn or piano) The Catherine Laura Stevens Memorial
Georgia McEver Endowed Scholarship for Voice Scholarship Fund
Leonora Jackson McKim Memorial Scholarship The Clinton Alvey and Catherine Stouffer
(violin in the field of composition) Scholarship
Thomas Menehan Memorial Scholarship Donald S. Sutherland Organ Scholarship
Milton H. Miller Sr. Endowed Scholarship in Organ Fanny B. Thalheimer Memorial Scholarships
Dr. Lee Mitchell Memorial Scholarship Marie K. Thatcher Memorial Theory Scholarship
W. Edwin Moffett Memorial Scholarship Mabel H. Thomas Memorial Scholarship
(double bass) (piano–Alumni award)
Sylvia Friedberg Nachlas Endowed Scholarship Louis McLane Tiffany Piano Scholarship
Rose and Leon J. Neiburger Memorial Scholarship Louis McLane Tiffany Voice Scholarship
William and Dorothy Nerenberg Endowed Senator Millard E. Tydings Scholarship
Scholarship in Piano The Ervin R. Van Artsdalen Endowed Scholarship
Hedy Oliven Scholarship Fund George M. Wagner Endowed Scholarship Fund
C. Leslie Oursler Piano Music Scholarship Weldon Wallace Memorial Scholarship
Peabody Conservatory Endowed Piano Scholarship The Richard E. and Margaret Wertheimer Wolf
Peggy Pearlstone Scholarship Scholarship Fund at the Peabody Conservatory
Phi Mu Alpha Fraternity Scholarship The Edna Dunham Willard Voice Scholarship
Gregor Piatigorsky Scholarship (cello) Elizabeth Winston Piano Scholarship
Barbara W. Pickus Memorial Scholarship Russell C. and Selina H. Wonderlic Fund
Matthew S. Polk Scholarship for Recording Arts The George Woodhead Quasi-Endowed
& Sciences Scholarship Fund
Mary Stewart Reid Piano Scholarship (every 3 years) Charles R. Woods Voice Scholarship
Horace Wolcott Robbins Piano Scholarship Carol Jean and Jay Young Scholarship in Piano
Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg Orchestral Scholarships Miles M. Young Memorial Scholarship
Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg Scholarship
Marion Savage Rosette Piano Scholarship Endowed Prizes and Awards
Richard Ross Memorial Organ Scholarship Clinton Lee Arrowood Memorial Prize (flute)
Randolph S. Rothschild Scholarship (composition) Clara Ascherfeld Award (accompanying)
Charles P. Sachs Conservatory Scholarship Martha and William Bill Memorial Prize
The Leonard Sandler Scholarship (percussion) (graduating student)
Daniel and Isabel Savanuck Endowed Scholarship P. Bruce Blair Award in Composition
in Piano George Castelle Memorial Prizes (male and female
The Eugene Scheffres & Richard E. Hartt Scholar- graduates in voice)
ship (composition and performance) Virginia Carty deLillo Award (graduating student
Joseph and Frances Schillinger Endowed with highest GPA in the Bachelor of Music program)
Composition Scholarship Virginia Carty deLillo Composition Competition
Jacques T. Schlenger Scholarship Israel Dorman Memorial Award (outstanding prog-
M. Sigmund Shapiro Scholarship ress in violin, viola, or cello)
Steven C. Shea Memorial Guitar Scholarship Charles M. Eaton Award (voice)
Leonie Shorey Piano Scholarship Anita Erdman Award (superior talent and promise
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Scholarship in opera)
The Esther G. and Joseph Silver Memorial Pauline Favin Memorial Prize (full-time piano stu-
Scholarship dent who has shown marked improvement during final
Albert and Rosa Silverman Memorial Scholarship year at the Conservatory)
(piano) Sidney M. Friedberg Prize (chamber music)

173
The Richard Franko Goldman Prize Fund Zelda & Ben Cohen Annual Scholarship
(graduating student who most exemplifies the former Dorothy deCourt Prize in Organ
director of Peabody) Evergreen House Foundation Scholarship
Yale Gordon Concerto Competition The Madeleine Friedheim Memorial Scholarship
Sylvia Green Competition The William T. Gerrard & Mario A. Duhon Pea-
The Lillian Gutman Memorial Prize (upperclass or body Conservatory Senior Orchestral Scholarship
graduate piano student) Douglas and Hilda Goodwin Annual Scholarship
The Lynn Taylor Hebden Prize Fund (performance) in Chamber Music
Sidney Jensen Memorial Prize (clarinet) The Dr. and Mrs. Walter Edwards James Award
Britton Johnson Memorial Prize (flute) Jephson Educational Trust No. 2 Scholarship
Josef Kaspar Award (graduating violinist showing the Christian A. Johnson Scholarship
most promise) The John J. Leidy Foundation, Inc. Scholarship
Gustav Klemm Award (exemplary work in a field Liberace Foundation Scholarship
of study) Maryland State Music Teachers Association Award
James Winship Lewis Endowed Memorial Prize Rose Marie Milholland Award (outstanding student
Lillian Howard Mann Memorial Award (voice) in piano)
William L. Marbury Violin Competition Marcia Neff Voice Scholarship Fund
Ada Arens Morawetz Award (composition) Presser Foundation Scholarship
Otto Ortmann Award (literature and composition Presser Music Award
proven outstanding after two or three years) The Mary and Martin Raila Music Education
Olga von Hartz Owens Memorial Prize Award
(graduating string student) Rotary Club of Baltimore Student Scholarships
Prix d’Eté Competition (a composition competition William Ellsworth Russell Memorial Scholarship
involving electronic and computer music technologies) Gulen F. Tangoren, M.D., Award for Vocal
Harold Randolph Prize (greatest general ability in Excellence
work, musicianship, and public performance) Three Arts Club of Homeland General Award
Grace Clagett Ranney Endowed Memorial Prize Sheila Vickers Memorial Scholarship
Randolph S. Rothschild Award Frank D. Willis Memorial Prize in Composition
Alice and Leary Taylor Prize The Harrison L. and Gladys W. Winter
Azalia H. Thomas Prize (instrumentalist and vocalist Scholarship
graduating with highest GPAs in theory) Avedis Zildjian Percussion Scholarship
Zaidee T. Thomas Prize (instrumentalist and vocalist
demonstrating special proficiency, outstanding talent Other Scholarships
or accomplishment) The General Assembly of the State of
Melissa Tiller Memorial Prize (violin) Maryland has enacted legislation creating
J.C. van Hulsteyn Violin Award
Annie Wentz Prize (accompanying and voice)
scholarship programs to assist students
Frances M. Wentz Turner Memorial Prize (piano) in obtaining a college education. Any
Harrison L. Winter Piano Competition Maryland resident is eligible to compete
The George Woodhead Endowed Prize for Maryland State Scholarships. Since
(voice, emphasis on oratorio or church music) these are important sources of assistance
Sarah Stulman Zierler Prize (accompanying) for many Peabody students, all Maryland
Annual Scholarships, Prizes, Awards residents are strongly encouraged to apply.
Abrams Double Degree Scholarship Further information and applications are
American Bassoon Company Prize available from:
Annual Anonymous Scholarship Maryland State Scholarship
The Associated Italian American Charities of
Maryland, Inc., Frank and Vincenzina Rapisarda
Administration
Memorial Scholarship 14 839 Bestgate Road, Suite 400
Baltimore Music Club Award (graduating Annapolis, Maryland 21401-3013
accompanist) www.mhec.state.md.us
The Mary Finney Barada Scholarship
Marian B. and Samuel Bernstein Memorial Prize
The application deadline for these
(outstanding opera student) scholarships is generally in early February.
The Pamela Buell Annual Scholarship
The Rildia Bee O’Bryan Cliburn Memorial
Scholarship

174
Peabody Career Development Fund income is considered taxable unless it
The Peabody Career Development Fund qualifies for special consideration by tax
was established in 1986 to assist eligible authorities. Consult the human resources
students and recent alumni in the devel- manager of the Institute for full details.
opment of their careers. The awards are
Registration requirements. Graduate
made possible through the generosity of
assistants must be registered as full-time
the following donors:
students for a minimum of 18 credits
• Douglas S. Goodwin per year. It is advisable not to take more
• Caswell & Constance Caplan than 12 hours of study per semester. The
• Malcolm & Loraine Bernstein student must be registered for study in
• Eyer Educational Corporation the major area. All credits taken must be
• Peggy & Yale Gordon Trust necessary and applicable to the degree for
• Friends of Peabody which the candidate is enrolled. The Con-
Applications are considered each servatory reserves the right to restrict the
semester by the committee, and awards activities of holders of assistantships.
are noted annually in the Graduation Term of assistantship. The assistantship
program. Information is available in the is for a term of one year, but upon recom-
Director’s Office and on the Peabody web mendation of the faculty, may be extended
site at www.peabody.jhu.edu/careerdev. to a maximum of two years. Only under
extraordinary circumstances may an assis-
Assistantships tantship be renewed for a third year. This
A limited number of assistantships requires a recommendation from the fac-
are available to students who have been ulty and approval of the dean.
admitted into a graduate program as full-
time degree or diploma candidates. A Retention of assistantship. Students
graduate assistantship is awarded on the holding graduate assistantships must
basis of previous academic record, place- maintain a consistently high level of
ment examination results, and a personal performance in every area of study, with
interview/audition in the specific area of a grade point average of at least 3.0, and
interest. Assistantships are available in the a grade of at least B- in the major lesson
following areas: and departmental examinations. Failure to
fulfill terms of the assistantship may result
accompanying music education in its immediate termination and may
bibliography musicology require repayment of income.
chamber music music theory
composition opera accompanying Employment
computer music piano maintenance Jobs are available at Peabody for full-
conducting piano teaching time students enrolled in a degree or
ear-training recording arts diploma program. Students are authorized
guitar voice to work on campus up to a maximum of
jazz wind conducting 20 hours per week after they complete
liberal arts the necessary paperwork with the Office
of Human Resources and Payroll Services.
Responsibilities. Full-time graduate Students are encouraged to apply for avail-
assistants are expected to assist the fac- able positions at the beginning of the
ulty for up to an average of 15 hours per academic year, as jobs are available on a
week, with specific assignments made by first-come, first-served basis. A listing of
individual faculty members. Graduate hiring departments and further informa-
assistants should not work more than a tion may be obtained through the Office
combined total of 20 hours per week for of Human Resources and Payroll Services,
the university. A portion of assistantship or by calling 410-659-8100, ext. 3050.

175
Administration
The Peabody Institute
Principal Administrative Officers and Deans
Jeffrey Sharkey, Director of the Institute
Mellasenah Morris, Dean of the Conservatory and Deputy Director
Carolee Stewart, Dean of the Preparatory
Gayle Ackley, Senior Associate Dean for Finance and Administration
Katsura Kurita, Associate Dean for Student Affairs
Paul Mathews, Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Joyce Ritchie, Associate Dean for External Relations

Directors – Department Managers


Admissions Head Librarian
David Lane Robert Follet
Alumni Relations Human Resources/Payroll Services
Debbie Kennison Laura Brooks
Business Services Information Technology and Telecommunications
Larry Catron Jonathan Richardson
Campus Police/Security Internal Student Advisor
David Fulgham Susana Rodriguez
Concert Office Major Gifts
Teresa Perez Patrick O’Neall
Ensemble Office Marketing and Communications
Linda Goodwin Richard Selden
Facilities Management Registrar
Joseph Brant James Dobson
Financial Aid Residence Life
Thomas McDermott TBA

National Advisory Council of the Peabody Institute of


The Johns Hopkins University
Robert J. Abernethy Thomas Kaurich
Pilar Bradshaw Julia Martin Keelty
Edward J. Brody M. Lucinda Kelly
Max W. Corzilius Se Ung Kim
Richard Davison Christopher Kovalchick
Anthony W. Deering Mary J. Miller
Mario A. Duhon Milton H. Miller Sr.
Leon Fleisher Terry Morgenthaler
Sandra Levi Gerstung William Nerenberg
Robert L. Goldstein Matthew S. Polk Jr.
Benjamin H. Griswold IV Tracey Schutty
Taylor A. Hanex Turner B. Smith
Sandra S. Hillman Solomon H. Snyder
Allan D. Jensen Carol Jean Young

176
The Johns Hopkins University

Trustees Westley W. O. Moore


Pamela P. Flaherty Heather Hay Murren
Chair Naneen H. Neubohn
David P. Nolan
C. Michael Armstrong, ex officio Ronald M. Nordmann
Richard S. Frary Geraldine A. Peterson, ex officio
Mark E. Rubenstein Walter D. Pinkard Jr.
Vice Chairs Michael F. Price
Robert J. Abernethy Joseph R. Reynolds Jr.
Christopher C. Angell Brian C. Rogers
Jeffrey H. Aronson David M. Rubenstein
Janie E. Bailey Marshal L. Salant
Lenox D. Baker Jr. Robert A. Seder
Alfred R. Berkeley III Donald J. Shepard
Paula E. Boggs Rajendra Singh
William R. Brody, ex officio Raymond W. Snow, ex officio
Michelle A. Brown Adena W. Testa
George L. Bunting Jr. Selwyn M. Vickers
Francis B. Burch Jr. William F. Ward Jr.
Charles I. Clarvit Christopher J. Watson
N. Anthony Coles James L. Winter
Sarah R. David Shirley S. L. Yang
Anthony W. Deering
Ina R. Drew Trustees Emeriti
Harvey Eisen Leonard Abramson
Maria T. Fazio Peter G. Angelos
Marjorie M. Fisher Norman R. Augustine
Helene D. Gayle H. Furlong Baldwin
Sanford D. Greenberg Jeremiah A. Barondess
Benjamin H. Griswold IV Ernest A. Bates
Lee Meyerhoff Hendler David H. Bernstein
David C. Hodgson Aurelia G. Bolton
R. Christopher Hoehn-Saric Randolph W. Bromery
Frank L. Hurley Constance R. Caplan
Stuart S. Janney III William P. Carey
Robert L. Johnson A. James Clark
Jeong H. Kim Victor J. Dankis
J. Barclay Knapp Edward K. Dunn Jr.
David H. Koch Manuel Dupkin II
Christopher Kovalchick James A. Flick Jr.
Donald A. Kurz Gottlieb C. Friesinger II
Joanne Leedom-Ackerman Robert D. H. Harvey
Alexander H. Levi Rafael Hernandez-Colon
Kwok-Leung Li F. Pierce Linaweaver
Roger C. Lipitz Raymond A. Mason
Diana C. Liu Harvey M. Meyerhoff
Howard C. Mandel Charles D. Miller
Christina L. Mattin Milton H. Miller
Gail J. McGovern Ralph S. O’Connor
Peter A. Meyer Morris W. Offit
Kweisi Mfume

177
George G. Radcliffe R. Champlin Sheridan Jr.
John F. Ruffle Wendell A. Smith
Arthur Sarnoff Helmut Sonnenfeldt
Frank Savage Shale D. Stiller
Wayne N. Schelle Morris Tanenbaum
Herschel L. Seder Edward G. Uhl
Huntington Sheldon Calman J. Zamoiski Jr.

Principal Administrative Officers and Deans


William R. Brody Ray Gillian
President of the University Vice Provost for Institutional Equity
Kristina M. Johnson Pamela Cranston
Provost and Senior Vice President Vice Provost for International Programs
for Academic Affairs Scott Zeger
James T. McGill Vice Provost for Research
Senior Vice President for Finance Jerome D. Schnydman
and Administration Executive Assistant to the President and
Edward D. Miller Secretary of the Board of Trustees
Chief Executive Officer of Johns Hopkins Arthur Roos
Medicine, Vice President for Medicine, and Treasurer
Dean of the School of Medicine
Kathryn J. Crecelius
Stephen S. Dunham Chief Investment Officer
Vice President and General Counsel
Adam F. Falk
Michael C. Eicher Dean, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences
Vice President for Development and
Alumni Relations Nicholas P. Jones
Dean, Whiting School of Engineering
Linda L. Robertson
Vice President for Government, Michael Klag
Community, and Public Affairs Dean, Bloomberg School of Public Health
Charlene Moore Hayes Martha Hill
Vice President for Human Resources Dean, School of Nursing
Paula P. Burger Jessica P. Einhorn
Vice Provost Dean, Nitze School of Advanced
International Studies
Michela Gallagher
Vice Provost for Academic Affairs Yash P. Gupta
Dean, Carey Business School
Edgar E. Roulhac
Vice Provost for Academic Services Ralph Fessler
Dean, School of Education
James J. Zeller Jr.
Vice Provost for Budgets and Planning Jeffrey Sharkey
Director, Peabody Institute
Jonathan Bagger
Vice Provost for Graduate and Postdoctoral Richard T. Roca
Programs and Special Projects Director, Applied Physics Laboratory
Stephanie L. Reel Winston Tabb
Chief Information Officer and Dean, University Libraries,
Vice Provost for Information Technology Vice Provost for the Arts,
Director, Johns Hopkins University Museums

178
Index
A Change of Major 26
Academic Honesty 23 Change of Studio Teacher 26
Academic and Competitions 16
Administrative Regulations 23 Composition Course Offerings 127
Academic Standing 23 Computer Music Studio 13
Administration Concert Halls 11
The Johns Hopkins University 178 Concerts 15
The Peabody Institute 176 Conducting Course Offerings 129
Admission to Candidacy, D.M.A. 102 Course Changes and Withdrawals 26
Admission Requirements Course Listings 126
Artist Diploma 121 Common Curriculum Components
Bachelor of Music Degree 33 Bachelor of Music Degree 34
Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 97 Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 99
Extension Study 123 Master of Music Degree 74
Graduate Performance Diploma 118 Computer Music Course Offerings 128
Master of Arts in Audio Sciences 95 Conducting Fellows Program 18
Master of Music Degree 71 Credit Limit for Graduate Programs 26
Performer’s Certificate 113 Cross Registration 21
Advanced Standing 38 Curricular Practical Training 75, 102,
Advisory Committees, D.M.A. 99 119, 122
Application Deadlines 4 Curriculum
Arthur Friedheim Library 11 Artist Diploma 122
Assistantships 175 Bachelor of Music
Athletic Facilities 165 Composition 49
Attendance and Absences 25 Computer Music 50
Auditing 25 Music Education 52
Audition requirements Performance 39
Artist Diploma 121 Recording Arts and Sciences 59
Bachelor of Music Degree 33 Doctor of Musical Arts
Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 97 Composition 103
Extension Study 123 Conducting 103
Graduate Performance Diploma 118 Performance 105
Master of Music Degree 72 Graduate Performance Diploma 119
Performer’s Certificate 113 Master of Arts in Audio Sciences 95
Awards 171 Master of Music
Composition 89
Computer Music 90
B Early Music Performance 81
Baltimore Area Cultural Activity 15 Music Education 92
Brass Course Offerings 126 Musicology 92
Music Theory Pedagogy 94
C Performance 76
Performance/Pedagogy 88
Calendars Piano: Ensemble Arts 79
Academic 2 Performer’s Certificate 113
Audition 4
Summer Session 4
Campus 10 D
Career Counseling and Placement 17 Dean’s List 24
Career Development Fund 175 Degree-in-Progress 27
Chamber Music Course Offerings 126

179
Degree Requirements I
Bachelor of Music 34 Instrument Collection 11
Doctor of Musical Arts 98 Internet Service 14
Master of Arts in Audio Sciences 95
Master of Music 73
Dining Hall 165 J
Dismissal 24, 25 Jazz Course Offerings 139
Dissertation Requirements 102 JHU Concentrations 69
Distinguished Visiting Faculty 15, 125 Juries 34
Documents, D.M.A. 100
Double Degree Program 22 K
Keyboard Studies Course Offerings 149
E
Ear-training Course Offerings 149 L
Early Music Course Offerings 130 Language Course Offerings 138
Educational Facilities 11 Language Requirements
English as a Second Language 36, 71 Bachelor of Music Degree 37
Ensemble Arts Course Offerings 133 Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 101
Ensemble Requirements 37, 75, 99, Master of Music Degree 74
113, 119 Large Ensembles 140
Examinations Leave of Absence 26
Entrance 71, 98 Lecture–Recital, D.M.A. 102
Qualifying, D.M.A. 102 Liberal Arts undergraduate 36
Preliminary Oral, D.M.A. 102 Liberal Arts Course Offerings 136
Extension Study 123
M
F Master Classes 15
Faculty Listing 124 Master’s Essay 93
Federal Aid Programs 169 Master’s Portfolio 75
Fee Payment Schedule 168 MENC 17
Financial Aid Eligibility 25 Mu Phi Epsilon 17
Financial Information 167 Music Education Course Offerings 142
Five-Year B.M./M.M. Program 70 Music Theory Course Offerings 145
Full-Time Status 26 Musicology Colloquium 101
Musicology Course Offerings 150
G
General Information 9 O
General Studies Course Offerings 134 Official Dress 21
Grading System 23 Opera Course Offerings 154
Graduate Assistantships 175 Oral Defense of Dissertation 103
Graduation Eligibility 25 Organ Course Offerings 155
Graduation Rates 28 Outside Instruction and Performances 21
Grants 169
Guitar Course Offerings 134 P
Peabody National Advisory Council 176
H Peabody Trio 15
Harp Course Offerings 135 Pedagogy Course Offerings 155
Health Insurance and Services 166 Percussion Course Offerings 155
Humanities Course Offerings 136 Performance Facilities 11
Humanities, undergraduate 36 Pi Kappa Lambda 17

180
Piano Course Offerings 156 S
Portfolio of Compositions 75, 100 Scholarships 171
Preparatory Division 9 Shuttle Bus Service 166
Previously earned Peabody Credits 73, 99 Small Ensemble Course Offerings 160
Prizes 171 String Course Offerings 160
Procedural Information 20 Student Data 19
Program Completion Student Life 165
Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 99 Student Rights and Responsibilities 28
Master of Music Degree 74 Study Abroad Program 18
Program Notes, M.M. 75

R T
Readmission 28 Transcripts 22
Reciprocal Academic Arrangements 21 Transfer Credits 37, 73, 98
Recitals 20 Trustees, The Johns Hopkins University 177
Artist Diploma 121 Thursday Noon Recital Series 35
Bachelor of Music Degree 35 Tuition and Fees 167
Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 100
Graduate Performance Diploma 118
Master of Music Degree 75 V
Recording Arts Course Offerings 157 Voice Course Offerings 161
Recording Studios 12
Religious Activity 166
Repertoire Requirements, D.M.A. 100 W
Residence Hall 165
Residency Requirements Withdrawals
Artist Diploma 121 Course 26
Bachelor of Music Degree 34 Refund Schedule 169
Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 98 Woodwind Course Offerings 163
Graduate Performance Diploma 118
Master of Music Degree 73
Review Courses 74, 99

181