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1990s​​Study​​Guide

Isms:​ ​​Destructionism:​ ​​re-evaluated​ ​the​ ​meaning​ ​of​ ​clothes​ ​and​ ​how​ ​they​ ​are​ ​worn.​ ​Characterized​ ​by taking​​apart​​clothes​​and​​reconstructing​​them​​to​​reveal​​seams,​​frayed​​hems,​​and​​inner​​workings​​of garment.​​Challenged​​conventional​​attitudes​​towards​​the​​design,​​presentation​​&​​consumption​​of

clothing.​​Emerged​​in​​late​​80s.​​Associated​​with​​Belgian​​fashion​​design​​&​​Martin​​Margiela.​​Ex:​​leather

gloves​​become​​halter​​neck​​top,​​ballet​​shoes​​become​​bag,​​socks​​become​​jumper,​​etc.​​Designs​​have​​been in​ ​art​ ​galleries.​ ​​Postmodernism:​ ​linearity​ ​in​ ​favor​ ​of​ ​eclecticism​ ​and​ ​parody,​ ​rejection​ ​of​ ​grand narratives,​​social​​hierarchies,​​and​​low​​and​​high​​class.​​Fashion​​is​​fast​​moving,​​non​​specific,​​and democratic.​​Anything​​goes.​​Bricolage​​was​​practiced​​(adopting​​and​​recombining​​diverse​​and​​existing styles.)​ ​​Minimalism:​ ​refined​ ​and​ ​reductive​ ​aesthetic.​ ​Response​ ​to​ ​fashion​ ​of​ ​the​ ​80s,​ ​this​ ​was​ ​a​ ​refined &​​intellectual​​look.​​Elegant​​tailoring​​of​​masculine​​clothing​​incorporated​​into​​feminine​​look.​​Colors​​were neutral​​or​​subdued​​and​​had​​no​​embellishment.​​Jil​​Sander​​was​​a​​minimalist​​designer.

Rachel​​Azbell

1989-1999:​​Fashion​​Goes​​Global:Social​​life​​became​​more​​restrained​​and​​economics​​restricted​​disposable

income.​​High​​fashion​​sales​​fell.​​Authenticity​​became​​buzzword,​​subcultural​​style​​and​​ethnic​​clothing

traditions​​were​​major​​influences.

Grunge​​look:​​combination​​of​​Punk​​and​​Hippie.​​Colorful,​​dishevelled​​style.​​Clothes​​were​​homemade,

customized​​or​​second​​hand,​​worn​​with​​heavy​​army​​boots.

Non-Western​​Clothing:​​Chinese​​and​​Japanese​​sources​​inspired​​Valentino,​​McQueen.​​Oriental​​tropes

adopted.

Spiritual​​enlightenment​​and​​eco​​friendliness​​influenced​​fashion.​​Comfortable​​and​​sturdy​​footwear:​​cork

soled​​Birkenstocks,​​chunky​​walking​​boots,​​leather​​shoes.​​Concern​​for​​safety​​influenced​​fashion:

bullet-proof​​clothes​​w/​​air​​pollution​​masks,​​acid​​rain​​protection,​​night​​vision​​goggles.​​Anti-fur​​mov’t popular.​​Supermodels​​became​​fashion​​phenomena.​​Ultra​​thin. Cyber​​fashions:​​inspired​​by​​Punk,​​science​​fiction,​​virtual​​reality​​and​​cult​​films.​​Clothes​​were​​industrial and​​futuristic.​​Made​​out​​of​​polar​​fleece,​​neoprene,​​micro-fibres.​​Rubber,​​PVC,​​and​​leather​​used. Men:​​discarded​​broad​​shouldered​​and​​boxy​​power​​suits​​for​​softer,​​subtly​​tailored​​garments​​with​​sloping shoulders​​and​​long,​​lean​​fit.​​Single​​breasted​​jackets,​​and​​Nehru​​style​​popular.​​Dress​​down​​days​​became work​​policy​​for​​some-smart​​casual​​wear. Women:​​wore​​a​​variety​​of​​different​​fashions.​​Ultra​​luxurious​​materials:​​suede,​​leather,​​cashmere,​​real and​​fake​​fur,​​exotic​​feathers,​​hand​​felted​​wool,​​embroidered​​or​​beaded​​tweeds.​​Cashmere​​was​​used​​a lot.​​Cobweb​​knits,​​organza​​and​​chiffon​​garments​​often​​worn​​in​​layers.​​Accessories​​were​​fashion​​news​​in

the​​90s.​​Bags​​commanded​​special​​importance.​​Bags​​became​​part​​of​​outfits.​​Bags​​increased​​in​​size​​as

women​​had​​changing​​needs.​​But​​other​​designers​​focused​​on​​small​​special​​occasion​​bags.

By​​mid​​90s,​​aspect​​of​​80s​​fashions​​were​​being​​recalled:​​accentuated​​shoulders​​were​​paired​​with

contemporary​​subtle​​tailoring.

1998-1999:​​minimal,​​precision-cut​​clothing,​​modernist,​​sculptural​​designs,​​neutral​​colors,​​or​​vividly

colored​​bohemian​​style.​​Chain-mail​​weaves​​and​​metallic​​fabrics​​used​​by​​McQueen,​​Versace,​​and​​Ferre.

Minimalist​​interpretations​​of​​army​​fatigues​​and​​sportswear:​​used​​quilting,​​hoods​​and​​zippers.​​1950s

caped​​shoulders​​and​​sleek​​lines​​brought​​back.