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Radical Behaviourism

Lesson Plan Activity #2

Procedure: The class will be participating in a hands on, step by step origami dog. (8-10 minutes) They will
make 5 separate folds, completing the origami dog by drawing a face. Overall they will learn and new skill, how
to assemble an origami dog. After completion of the origami dog we will have a discussion and ask students
how this project relates back to shaping. (5 minutes) The origami dog is modeled below.

Goals:
Goal #1 Students will learn to follow step by step instructions to complete the task
Goal #2 Students will use geometrical procedures and paper folding to complete the dog
Goal #3 Students will be able to relate lesson back to shaping
Goal #4 Students will understand how to use shaping in their own classroom
Learning Theory Concept

The theory concept that was applied in this activity was the idea of shaping. Shaping is a procedure used
to establish a behavior that is not presently performed by an individual. Shaping rewards an approximation of
what you want then slowly gets more discriminating.
Example: Say you want a pigeon to turn all the way around to the right. First, the pigeon turns a little to
the right to and gets some seed. Eventually the bird will have to turn all the around to get the seeds.
Shaping is applied in Activity #1 by having individuals complete a series of movements in order to eventually
complete one task

Assessment
For this activity, students will be informally assessed based on the completion and effort they put into
learning how to make an origami dog. This activity can be used in a geometry, art class, and more. There are
different concepts in the activity that can be emphasized to fit the needs of different subjects. They will also be
assessed based on their participation in group and classroom discussion of how this activity relates to the idea of
shaping. Depending on time and the atmosphere of your class, you can increase the difficulty of the origami
task.
Lesson Plan Activity #2

Procedure
The class will be participating in a historical scavenger chase around campus (10-15 minutes partial
completion, 30-40 minutes full completion). They will be initially given a clue to begin their scavenger chase,
and they must work together to solve it and move onto the first location. At each location, they will be learning
a new inquiry skill ( either observation, inference, prediction, classification, communication, problem solving,
critical thinking, research) that they can apply to and use to help them in the end assignment. At the first
location they will record information they gathered at the site. Once the whole class is done writing, they will be
given the next clue so they can reach the next destination. Overall there will be eight locations that are
significant to the history of the CCSU community. (Clues and inquiry skills listed below) We will only cover
the first 3 locations in class.
Once they find all clues and destinations, we will return back to the classroom to discuss in groups what
the students found interesting about each location (5 minutes). In reality, we would then ask students to begin
research using their new inquiry skills and brainstorm in teams about ideas to creatively display the information
they found.

Starting Clue: Currently we sit in the home of Computer Science. To start our chace, decode this
combination to figure out which way to turn out of the classroom.
18-9-7-8-20
Continue down the hall in this direction until you stumble upon a dedication plaque to the building.

Location 1: We will ask students to observe the plaque and read the information given. And record their
findings

Clue 1. The home of President Toro is the main focal point of our campus and one of CCSUs original
building. Go to the building and find the Golden CCSU emblem between the Office of the Director of the
Ana Grace Project and the office of the Vice President of Student Affairs.

Location 2: We will ask students to predict the meaning of Normal School

Clue 2. This building's facade is entirely made of mirrors. Enter through the north side and across from
the room where one might go to relax between class is our next clue.

Location 3. We will ask students to infer about the student who is the owner this diploma

Clue 3-7 and Location 4-8: If we could continue this activity we would make clues that would go to the
library, history department, Henry Barnard Hall, etc. At the library students could talk briefly with a
resource librarian about different forms of research. In the history department we would want students
to communicate and ask question to a professor who is familiar with the history of The New Britain
Normal School.
At the end of the chase, In our class we will again ask as part of a group discussion, Does this activity
relate to a concept from Radical Behaviorism? (5 minutes). Once we receive some answers from the class, we
can reinforce the idea of chaining and how this relates to the activity (5 minutes).

Goals
Goal #1 Students will learn to work in a group on problem solving skills and will also learn different inquiry
skills.
Goal #2 Students will become familiar with history in their own community
Goal #3 Students will learn how to actively find out information on a topic without relying on the internet
Goal #4 Students will reflect on the information they found and report on their findings
Goal #5 Students will be able to accurately explain chaining in their own words
Goal #6 Students will be able to identify ways they can include chaining in their own classroom

Learning Theory Concept


Chaining is a process in which required behavior or task is broken down into small steps for effective learning.
An example of chaining: Pigeon turns around to the right, pecks a target, walks across the cage and rings
a bell. These four shaped behaviors can be chained into one action that gains a reward.
Chaining is applied in Activity #2 through a scavenger chase. In each location, a student will learn a new
inquiry skill. Then the students will take their findings and new skills to apply into a creative. Each inquiry skill
learned at each station represent is a small step for effective learning on how to research for a project.

Assessment
For this activity, students will be assessed on their completion and effort of the CCSU Clue Chase
worksheet. In advance we will tell that participation and group discussion is essential. We will be looking at the
content the students wrote down, and provide feedback. For the second worksheet on chaining, we will assess
their answer to Describe chaining in your own words? and also provide feedback if we believe they did not
grasp the concept. Again, while the students are in groups we will assess participation and how well the students
discuss their historical findings together. We will also provide feedback to students if they have a hard time
coming up with ideas about chaining in their own classroom.
Currently we sit in the home of Computer Science. To start our chace, decode this combination to figure out
which way to turn out of the classroom.
18-9-7-8-20
Continue down the hall in this direction until you stumble upon a dedication plaque to the building.

Location 1: We will ask students to observe the plaque and read the information given. And record their
findings

The home of President Toro is the main focal point of our campus and one of CCSUs original building. Go to
the building and find the Golden CCSU emblem between the Office of the Director of the Ana Grace Project
and the office of the Vice President of Student Affairs.

Location 2: We will ask students to predict the meaning of Normal School

This building's facade is entirely made of mirrors. Enter through the north side and across from the room where
one might go to relax between class is our next clue.

Location 3. We will ask students to infer about the student who is the owner this diploma
Reflection Mini Lesson Chapter 2

Shaping and chaining were two great topics to teach the class. The concepts were easy enough to portray

and create an activity, but still challenging enough where the class learned something new about the two

learning theory concepts. Our idea of leaving the classroom to go on a clue chase generated positive class

participation and group work. In fact, everyone learned a bit more about the history of Central connecticut State

University and also the resources and places on campus.

The chaining activity can be adapted in any classroom. It can be molded to accommodate students with

varying abilities and it can be recreated for indoor use or outdoor use. Although, we focused on history as a

subject, the clue chase can fit any subject as well with a little bit of creativity. As a future math teacher, I would

create clues that incorporated the topics that the class is focusing on, or needs more reinforcement. Questions

could involve problem solving skills, pattern recognition, and more.

My peers gave positive feedback. One peer wrote under strengths, Doing kinesthetic tasks is great for

the kinesthetic learners who usually have to sit all day. The same peer also wrote that our lesson objectives

could have been more clearly stated. Come next mini lesson, we will try to better state our goals and objectives

clearer so that students can have a better idea of the task and the target ending.