Sie sind auf Seite 1von 66

Statistical Techniques

Analysis
Presented by

Frank G. Calucin
ISO Management Consultant & Trainer

Objectives

• Provide an understanding on the need and application of 
statistical techniques based on the requirements of the 
ISO 9001: 2008 standard.

• Provide knowledge on the basics of statistics, its use, 
benefits and application to an organization

• Provide hands‐on application of selected techniques in 
statistical application.

1
Requirements
DAY 1:
Simple Calculator
Graphing paper (if available)
Ruler
DAY 2:
Computer with Microsoft Office Excel Program

PASS Requirements:
Complete the exercises
Submission of Assignment

QMS Requirements for Analysis
Brief History:

ISO 9001: 2004, Clause 4.20, Statistical Techniques
• The organization will ESTABLISH PROCEDURES that 
implement and CONTROL the USE of STATISTICAL 
TECHNIQUES for the quality system, which means 
statistical techniques needed by the organization is 
required to be established to verify the process 
capabilities and product characteristics
• It also states that procedure should explain how the 
statistical techniques will be applied and that 
monitoring and control of these techniques must be 
documented

2
QMS Requirements for Analysis
Brief History: ISO 9001: 2000
• ISO 9001: 2000 does not have a separate clause element 
for statistical techniques as compared to the 1994 
version, which means documented procedure is no 
longer required

• However, this requirement was incorporated in Clause 8, 
Measurement, Analysis and Improvement, specifically, 
clause 8.4 – Analysis of Data.

• ISO 9001: 2008, Clause 8.4 – Analysis of Data does not 
have much change except for clause 8.4 b) and clause d)

QMS Requirements for Analysis
In summary, the organization to comply with the minimum 
requirement of ISO 9001: 2008 Clause 8.4, there should be 
an evidence of implementation that analysis is done on the 
following four items:

1. Customer Satisfaction
2. Conformity to Product Requirements
3. Characteristics and Trends of Processes/Products, 
including Preventive Actions
4. Suppliers

3
Why R U Attending this Course?
• The standard does not specifically require for the 
company to attend training like this.  
• However, the standard does require that the 
organization must DETERMINE, COLLECT AND ANALYZE 
appropriate data.  
• The standard also requires in Clause 6.2.2 that when 
applicable, the organization must provide training to 
achieve the necessary competence.
• The requirement in Clause 8.4, Analysis of Data tells us 
that the users or employees who collects and analyzes 
appropriate data must have the competence in statistical 
analysis to comply with this requirement.

Data Analysis and 
Customer Satisfaction
• Quality is defined as the satisfaction on the needs and 
requirements of the customer

• Gauging on the customer satisfaction based on the 
Product and Service provided by the organization, this 
can only be determined through the determination of 
which data to collect, its objectives and the appropriate 
analysis.

4
Customer Satisfaction
• Clause 8.2.1, Customer Satisfaction, states that 
organization must MONITOR the INFORMATION relating 
to CUSTOMER PERCEPTION to determine whether the 
organization HAS MET the customer requirements.

• As such, the organization must develop or establish a 
system to collect data for a specific purpose and analyze 
it to determine if the products/services provided to the 
customer is indeed effective, which leads to the 
requirement of Clause 8.5.1, Continual Improvement.

BASICS OF STATISTICS
(Statistics 101)
• STATISTICS – is defined as a branch of mathematics that 
deals with the theory and method of collecting, 
organizing, presenting, analyzing, and interpreting data.
• STATISTICAL DATA – is concerned about numerical data 
such as sales, rejects, nonconformities, population, birth, 
death, etc.
• DATA GATHERING – includes information gathered 
through surveys, interviews and raw data from records 
such as purchase and consumption of materials, etc.

5
Two Main Division of Statistics

• DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS – refers to the collection, 
organization, presentation, computation and 
interpretation of data in order to describe the samples 
under investigation. In simplest definition, this type of 
statistics describe what the data will look like

• INFERENTIAL STATISTICS – is a statistical tool that seeks 
to give information or inferences or implications 
pertaining to the populations by studying its 
representatives. In short, this is about sampling based on 
a given population

Population and Samples
We use the samples as estimate of Population Parameter.  
The quality of all statistical  analysis depends on the 
quality of the sample data

Random Sampling: every unit in the 
population has an equal chance to 
be chosen
Sample

Population
A random sample should represent 
the population well, so sample 
statistics from a random sample 
should provide  reasonable 
estimates of population parameters

6
Population and Samples
• POPULATION – defined as the totality of objects, 
individuals or reactions, which have common observed 
characteristics.  Examples of population are trainees, 
instructors, teachers, students, employees of the 
company, products and services offered, etc.

• SAMPLING METHOD – defined as getting a small but 
representative cross section of the population.  This 
representative part is called the SAMPLE.  

This will be discussed much later on

VARIABLES

• Variable is one of the basic concepts in statistics, which is 
referred to observed characteristics such as weight, 
height, sex, age, IQ, etc.  

• Variables are considered as raw data for statistical 
analysis usually expressed as X, Y, Z, etc.

7
Two Types of Variables

• Variable is one of the basic concepts in statistics, which is 
referred to observed characteristics such as weight, 
height, sex, age, IQ, etc.  

• Variables are considered as raw data for statistical 
analysis usually expressed as X, Y, Z, etc.

VARIABLES

• Discrete Variable – variables obtained through 
COUNTING like the number of deaths, births, students, 
trainees, instructors, etc. at any given time

• Continuous Variable – values CAN NEVER BE EXACT no 
matter what we do in getting the measurement like age, 
height, weight, temperature, volume, areas, time, etc., 
for the basic reason that this type of variable can assume 
any value on an interval of real numbers.

8
Two Groups of Variables
• Independent Variable – used as predictor if the objective 
is to predict the value of one variable
• Dependent Variable – this is the predicted value
To illustrate, if we want to predict the student’s 
academic achievement for a certain course, we may 
have to analyze the different factors such as gender, 
intelligence, study habits, interest, attitude, etc.

• These variables (factors) are what we call as 
INDEPENDENT VARIABLE.  On the other hand, the 
DEPENDENT VARIABLE is the student’s academic 
achievement in mathematics.

Two Types of Data

• QUALITATIVE DATA – are categorical data, which take 
the form of categories or attributes such as gender, 
course, race, religion, etc.

• QUANTITATIVE DATA – are numerical data obtained 
from measurements like height, weight, age, score, 
temperature, etc.

9
Measurement of Scales
• Quantitative Data can be converted to quantitative 
through a process called MEASUREMENTS.  By 
measurements, numbers are utilized to code objects that 
then can be treated statistically.

• FOUR TYPES OF MASUREMENTS

1. Nominal Measurement
2. Ordinal Measurement
3. Interval Measurement
4. Ratio Measurement

Nominal Measurement
• Nominal Measurement – used for identification or 
classification purpose
• Nominal Data – the numbers are simply labels. You can 
count but not order or measure nominal data 

Example: a group of students are classified according 
to courses such 1) engineering; 2) information 
technology; 3) accounting; 4) nursing.

The above does not have any meaning attached to the 
magnitudes of numbers assigned to the courses.  The 
numbers indicate as codes.

10
Ordinal Measurement
• Ordinal Measurement – this type of measurement give 
the order of ranks or classes items or objects.  

• Ordinal Data ‐ ordered but differences between values 
are not important 

Examples: 1st prize, 2nd prize, 3rd prize; 1) very good 2) 
good 3) fair 4) poor 5) very poor

Interval Measurement
• Interval Measurement – numbers are assigned to the 
items or objects to identify and rank the objects

Example: Jerry weighs 75 kilograms and George weighs 
65 kilograms, the difference of 10 kilograms indicate 
that Jerry is 10 kilograms heavier than George

11
Ratio Measurement
• Ratio Measurement – ratio of the numbers assigned in 
the measurement

Example: Jerry is 50 years old and George is 25 years old, 
then their age may be expressed in the ration of 2:1

Sampling Method
• As defined earlier, sampling is getting small but 
representative cross section of a population.

• A representative sample of 100 is generally preferable as 
compared to the total population of 1,000 to work on for 
analysis.

12
Sample Size
To find the number of samples for a given population, the 
following is the formula: n =     N / 1 + Ne2

Where: 

n = sample size
N = population size
e = margin of error

Sample Size
Example: Find the sample size the researcher wants to 
include in his study if the population size of the students is 
1,850 at 95% accuracy

Solution: Since 95% accuracy is to be evaluated, the 
corresponding percentage margin of error is 5% or 0.05.  

Applying the formula:

n = 1,850 / (1 + (1,850 x .052))
n = 329

13
Margin of Error

• The margin of error is a statistic expressing the amount 
of random sampling error in a survey's results. 

• The larger the margin of error, the less faith one should 
have that the poll's reported results are close to the 
"true" figures; that is, the figures for the whole 
population.

Frequency Distribution
Basic Definitions
A FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION TABLE lists categories of 
scores along with their corresponding frequencies.

14
Frequency Distribution
Basic Definitions
The FREQUENCY for a particular category or class is the 
number of original scores that fall into that class.

Frequency Distribution
Basic Definitions
The CLASSES or categories refer to the groupings of a 
frequency table

15
Frequency Distribution
Basic Definitions
The RANGE is the difference between the highest value and 
the lowest value.

R = highest value – lowest value

In Excel Program

Highest Value = MAX Lowest Value = MIN

Frequency Distribution
Basic Definitions
The CLASS WIDTH is the difference between two 
consecutive lower class limits or class boundaries.

LL = Lower Class Limit
LU = Upper Class Limit
The difference between 16 and 25 is 9.  
The Class Width between the two 
consecutive lower class limit = 9

16
Frequency Distribution
Basic Definitions
• The CLASS LIMITS are the 
smallest or the largest numbers 
that can actually belong to 
different classes.

• Lower class limits are the 
smallest numbers that can 
actually belong to the different 
classes. 

• Upper class limits are the largest 
numbers that can actually 
belong to the different classes.

Frequency Distribution
Basic Definitions

• CLASS MARKS – is the 
midpoint of middle value of a 
class interval.  It is obtained by 
finding the average of the 
lower class limit and the 
upper class limit.  

• The CLASS MARK of the CLASS 
LIMIT 16 to 24 is (16 + 24) / 2 = 
20

17
Guidelines 4 Making FD

• There should be between 5 and 20 classes.
• The class width should be an odd number.
• The classes must be mutually exclusive (meaning that 
a value cannot belong to two different classes at the 
same time)
• The classes must be continuous (no gaps)
• The classes must be exhaustive (enough classes)
• The class must be equal in width

Procedure 4 Making FDT
• STEP 1: Determine the range.  
R = Highest Value – Lowest Value 
• STEP 2: Determine the tentative number of classes (k); 
k = 1 + 3.322 log N 
Always round – off 
• Note:  The number of classes should be between 5 and 20.  
The actual number of classes may be affected by 
convenience or other subjective factors
• STEP 3: Find the class size by dividing the range by the 
number of classes.  (Always round – off)

18
Procedure 4 Making FDT
• STEP 4: Write the classes or categories starting with the 
lowest score.  Stop when the class already includes the 
highest score.
• STEP 5: Add the class width to the starting point to get the 
second lower class limit.  Add the class width to the 
second lower class limit to get the third, and so on.  List 
the lower class limits in a vertical column and enter the 
upper class limits, which can be easily identified at this 
stage.
• STEP 6: Determine the frequency for each class by 
referring to the tally columns and present the results in a 
table.

EXERCISE
Based on Philippine National Police records, a total of 464 
men died from crime related incident during the first week 
of July 2010 in the Philippines.  Here are the ages of 50 
individuals randomly selected from that population.  

Construct a frequency distribution table. 

Note: The sample of 50 is for demonstration purposes only

19
EXERCISE
GET A PIECE OF PAPER TO MAKE YOUR FREQUENY TABLE

Class Tally Freq REL-F Cum.F CumF% MP

N=

EXERCISE
The following are the ages of these 50 men who died:

19 18 70 22 17
23 25 37 26 24
47 69 25 55 25
17 36 30 20 46
24 29 21 35 37
21 27 20 65 24
27 23 65 27 16
40 41 42 75 63
33 65 23 25 25
31 18 33 76 22

20
EXERCISE
Step 1: Find the highest and lowest value
Highest Value = 76 Lowest Value = 16
Step 2: Determine the Range
Range (R) = Highest Value – Lowest Value = 76 – 16 = 60
Step 3: Determine the tentative number of classes (k) using the 
formula = K = 1 + 3. 322 log; N = total number of samples = 50
K = 1 + 3.322 log 50
= 1 + 3.322 (1.69897)
= 6.64 = 7
Note: Round off the result to the next integer if the decimal part 
exceeds 0)

EXERCISE

Step 4: Find the class width (size) by dividing the range by 
the number of classes.  (Always round – off) 

Class size = Range ÷ Number of Classes Î c = R ÷ k


c = 60 ÷ 7 = 8.57 = 9

21
EXERCISE
Step 5: Write the classes or categories starting with the lowest 
score.  Add the class width to the starting point to get the 
second lower class limit.  Add the class width to the second 
lower class limit to get the third, and so on.  List the lower 
class limits in a vertical column as shown in the table
Class 1st Lower Limit = 16 (lowest value)
16 2nd Lower Limit = 16 + 9 = 25
25
34 Starting with the lowest lower limit 
43 value of 16, add the class width 9 to get 
52 the sum of 25, which will become the 
61 next lower limit of 25.
70

EXERCISE
Step 5: continuation…For the lowest upper limit, subtract 1 
from the class value of 9 to get 8, and then add this to the 
corresponding lower limit, 16, which will give you 24, then 
continue on until the class including the maximum value of 76 
is reached as shown in the table
Class 1st   Upper Limit = 9 – 1 = 8 + 16 = 24
16-24 2nd Upper Limit = 9 – 1 = 8 + 25 = 33
25-33 3rd Upper Limit  = 9 – 1 = 8 + 34 = 42
34-42
4th Upper Limit  = 9 – 1 = 8 + 43 = 51
43-51
52-60
5th Upper Limit  = 9 – 1 = 8 + 52 = 60
61-69 6th Upper Limit  = 9 – 1 = 8 + 61 = 69
70-78 7th Upper Limit  = 9 – 1 = 8 + 70 = 78

22
EXERCISE
Step 6: Tally the data, write the numerical values for the 
tallies in the frequency column and find the frequency.  The 
total number (N) of frequencies should add up to the samples 
of 50

Class Tally Freq


16-24 ///// - ///// - ///// - /// 18
25-33 ///// - ///// - //// 14
34-42 ///// - // 7
43-51 // 2
52-60 / 1
61-69 ///// 5
70-78 /// 3
N= 50

EXERCISE
Step 7: Find the relative frequency. To compute for the relative 
frequency, divide the frequency with the total number of 
samples (N)

Class Tally Freq REL-F To get the Relative 


16-24 ///// - ///// - ///// - /// 18 36%
Frequency of class 16 – 24:
25-33 ///// - ///// - //// 14 28%
34-42 ///// - // 7 14%
43-51 // 2 4%
= (Freq / N) x 100
52-60 / 1 2% = (18 / 50) x 100 = 36%
61-69 ///// 5 10%
70-78 /// 3 6%
N= 50 100%

23
EXERCISE
Step 8: Find the cumulative frequency.  To compute for the 
cumulative frequency, just add the frequencies next to the 
other.  This should add up to 50 when the class of 70 – 78 is 
reached

Class Tally Freq REL-F Cum.F


16-24 ///// - ///// - ///// - /// 18 36% 18
25-33 ///// - ///// - //// 14 28% 32
To get the Cum. Freq. of 
34-42 ///// - // 7 14% 39 class 25 – 33:
43-51 // 2 4% 41
52-60 / 1 2% 42 Class 25 – 33: 18 + 14 = 32
61-69 ///// 5 10% 47 Class 34 – 42: 32 + 7 = 39
70-78 /// 3 6% 50
N= 50 100%

EXERCISE
Step 9: Find the cumulative frequency percentages.  To 
compute for the cumulative frequency percentage, just add 
the relative frequency next to the other.  This should add to 
100% when the class of 70 – 78 is reached
Class Tally Freq REL-F Cum.F CumF% To get the Cum. Freq. % 
16-24 ///// - ///// - ///// - /// 18 36% 18 36% of class 25 – 33:
25-33 ///// - ///// - //// 14 28% 32 64%
Class 25‐33: 36 + 28 = 64
34-42 ///// - // 7 14% 39 78% Class 34 ‐42: 64 + 14 = 78
43-51 // 2 4% 41 82%
52-60 / 1 2% 42 84%
61-69 ///// 5 10% 47 94%
70-78 /// 3 6% 50 100%
N= 50 100%

24
EXERCISE
Step 10: Find the Class Marks of Midpoints of each classes.  To 
compute for the class mark (midpoint – used for constructing 
frequency polygon graph), add the lower class limit and upper class 
limit for each class category, and then divide it by 2.
Class Tally Freq REL-F Cum .F Cum F% MP
16-24 ///// - ///// - ///// - /// 18 36% 18 36% 20
25-33 ///// - ///// - //// 14 28% 32 64% 29
34-42 ///// - // 7 14% 39 78% 38
43-51 // 2 4% 41 82% 47
52-60 / 1 2% 42 84% 56
61-69 ///// 5 10% 47 94% 65
70-78 /// 3 6% 50 100% 74
N= 50 100%

To get the midpoint of class 16 – 24, add the lower class limit value 
of 16 and the upper class limit value of 24, and then divide it by 2

MP Class 16 – 24 = 16 + 24 = 40/2 = 20

VISUALIZING THE DATA

The three most commonly used graphs in research are

1. The histogram

2. The frequency polygon

3. The cumulative frequency graph, or ogive (pronounced o‐
jive)

25
HISTOGRAM
The histogram is a graph that displays the data by using 
vertical bars of various heights to represent the frequencies.  
Example of Histogram as represented by the frequency 
distribution we just presented

Number of Crime Deaths

18
18
16
Number of Occurrence

14
12 14

10
8
6 7
4 5
3
2 2 1
0
16-24 25-33 34-42 43-51 52-60 61-69 70-78

Age Brackets

FREQUENCY POLYGON
A frequency polygon is a graph that displays the data by using 
lines that connect points plotted for frequencies at the 
midpoint of classes.  The frequencies represent the heights of 
the midpoints.  
Example of Frequency Polygon
Crime Deaths Statistics

40%

35% 36%

30%
28%
25%

20%

15 %
14%
10 % 10%

5% 6%
4%
2%
0%
20 29 38 47 56 65 74
Age Br a c k e t s

26
Cumulative Frequency Graph
Cumulative frequency graph or ogive is a graph that represents 
the cumulative frequencies for the classes in a frequency 
distribution
Example of Cumulative Frequency Graph (Ogive)
Cumulative Frequency of Crime Deaths

110 %

10 0 % 100%
94%
Frequency Percentage

90%
84%
80%
78% 82%
70%
64%
60%

50%

40%
36%
30%
20 29 38 47 56 65 74

Age Brackets

Interpretation

The graph indicates that ages from 16‐24 has the highest 
number of fatalities at 36% as compared to least number of 
casualties in the age bracket of 52~60 at 2%.  The average age of 
individuals killed was at 31.  

Based on this analysis, it is most likely that men in age bracket 
of 16‐24 indicates that younger individuals have now been 
involved to crimes due to several probable factors such as 
lifestyle, materialistic indulgence and poverty

27
INDIVIDUAL EXERCISE
Make sure that you have a graphing paper, ruler and 
calculator

In a Human Resource behavioural study of employees who 
smoke in a company, the researcher randomly sampled 40 
employees who have smoked at least 5 cigarettes per day.    
The following table shows the number of cigarette sticks 
smoked by an individual.  Determine the average number of 
cigarettes smoked, the most number of cigarettes consumed 
and the least number of sticks smoked.  Present this in a 
frequency distribution table and its corresponding graphical 
representation in histogram, frequency polygon and 
frequency cumulative graph.

INDIVIDUAL EXERCISE
The following is the number of cigarettes smoked of the 
randomly sampled employees

10 6 13 14
22 17 15 12
11 18 27 22
13 15 16 18
8 16 12 11
8 14 25 7
13 25 16 12
9 22 9 8
12 15 5 19
11 11 19 9

28
Frequency Distribution Using 
Microsoft Excel
19 18 70 22 17
Based on Philippine National 
23 25 37 26 24
Police records, a total of 464  47 69 25 55 25
men died from crime related  17 36 30 20 46
incident during the first week  24 29 21 35 37
of July 2010 in the  21 27 20 65 24
27 23 65 27 16
Philippines.  Here are the  40 41 42 75 63
ages of 50 individuals  33 65 23 25 25
randomly selected from that  31 18 33 76 22
population.  Construct a 
frequency distribution table.

FD Using Microsoft Excel
Step 1: Start with your Excel Program.  Enter the following 
data and create a tabular form similar to the following:

29
Maximum Value
Step 2‐1: Find the maximum value and minimum value from the raw 
data.  Starting with the maximum value, place the pointer next to 
the MAX, cell B9, then click the “fx” function, and then search for 
the function of MAX.  This will be followed by “function argument”

Max Value – Function Argument
Step 2‐2: When the function argument appears as shown below, 
highlight the age range from J2 to N11.  The function argument will 
show up in the box of “Number 1” the highlighted ranges of cells J2:N11 
as shown below.   Click OK. You will get 76

30
Minimum Value
Step 3‐1: Find the minimum value by placing the pointer next to the 
MIN, cell B10, then click the “fx” function, and then search for the 
function of MIN.  This will be followed by “function argument”

Min Value – Function Argument
Step 3‐2: When the function argument appears as shown below, 
highlight the age range from J2 to N11.  The function argument will show 
up in the box of “Number 1” the highlighted ranges of cells J2:N11 as 
shown below.  Click OK.  You will get 16

31
Average Value ‐ MEAN
Step 4: Get the MEAN (average) doing the same process by placing the 
pointer in cell B11, and then click the “fx” function AVERAGE.  Value of 
34.48 (round off to 34) will be obtained.

Total Number ‐ COUNT
Step 5: Determine the “n” by placing the pointer in cell B20, and then 
click the “fx” function COUNT.  Value of 50 will be obtained

32
RANGE
Step 6: Determine the Range (R) by placing the pointer in cell D9.  Enter 
the following formula in the formula bar: =B9‐B10 Î 76 – 16 = 60
Highest Value = 76 = cell B9 Lowest Value = 16 = cell B10

NUMBER OF CLASSES
Step 7‐1: Determine the tentative number of classes (k).  Go to cell D10. 
Click the fx function and select “LOG” and then click OK

33
NUMBER OF CLASSES
Step 7‐2: A function argument dialog will appear.  Click the this symbol
at the end of number.  Then this symbol will appear
Click the cell E20, then click the symbol below the X then click OK

NUMBER OF CLASSES
Step 7‐3: In the formula bar, add * to signify multiplication, then click 
cell E21 with the value of 3.32

34
NUMBER OF CLASSES
Step 7‐3: Enclose the formula LOG(E20)*E21 with parenthesis then 
type the “+”, and then click F9.  You will get 6.64. Round off the value 
of 6.64 to 7. Type 7 in cell E10

CLASS WIDTH
Step 8: Find the class width (size) by dividing the range by the number 
of classes. You will get 8.57.  Round this off to 9, and then type 9 to E11

35
LOWER LIMITS
Step 9‐1: Write the classes or categories starting with the 1st lower 
limit (LL) in cell C13 by typing 16.  For the 2nd lower limit, enter the 
following formula as shown below =C13+$E$11 Î 25.  The dollar sign 
for E11 indicates that the value of 9 in E11 is constant.  This will appear 
when you press F4 after clicking E11.  Then copy cell C14 and paste in 
cells C15:C19

UPPER LIMITS
Step 9‐2: For the first upper limit (UL), start with cell D13 by entering 
the following formula: =$E$11‐$F$9+C13 Î 24.  Again, $ sign for cells E11 
and F9 to indicate that the specific values of 9 and 1 are constants.  Then
copy cell D13 and paste in cells D14:D19 as shown below:

36
FREQUENCIES
Step 10‐1: Determine the frequencies.  
Go to cell D2 and type “=”, and then click the cell D13
Copy cell D2 and paste it in cells D3:D8 as shown below:

FREQUENCIES
Step 10‐2: Highlight cells E2:E8, then click the “fx” function, and then 
select the frequency, and then click OK as shown below:

37
FREQUENCIES
Step 10‐3: After clicking OK, a new dialog, showing the “function 
argument” with “Data Array” and “Bins Array”

FREQUENCIES
Step 10‐4: Click the symbol at the end of “Data array” .  A new 
dialog will appear as shown below:
Click the symbol below the X, then highlight cells J2:N11 as shown 
below:

38
FREQUENCIES
Step 10‐5: For “Bins_array”, click the symbol .  A new dialog will 
appear as shown below:
Click the symbol under X, then highlight cells D2:D8 as shown below:

FREQUENCIES
Step 10‐6: Press all together Ctrl, Shift and Enter.  Then release all at the 
same time.  The frequency distributions will automatically be shown in 
cell E2:E8 as shown below

39
FREQUENCIES
Step 10‐7: Go to cell E13, and then type “=”, then click cell E2.  Copy cell 
E13 and paste in cells E14:E19 as shown below:

Relative Frequencies
Step 11‐1: To compute for the relative frequency, divide the frequency 
with the total number of samples (N).  For cell F13, enter the following 
formula Î =E13/$E$20 

40
Relative Frequencies
Step 11‐2: Copy cell F13 and paste in cells F14:F19 as shown below:

Cumulative Frequencies
Step 12‐1: Starting with cell G13, type “=” and click F13 Î 36%
For cell G14, enter this formula: =G13+F14 Î64%; Copy cell G14

41
Cumulative Frequencies
Step 12‐2: After copying cell G14, and then paste in cells G15:G19

CLASS MARKS (midpoints)
Step13‐1: Starting with cell H13, use the function AVERAGE by clicking 
the “fx” function.  Highlight cells C13:D13 as shown below, and then 
click OK Î 20.  

42
CLASS MARKS (midpoints)
Step13‐2: Copy the value of H13 = 20, and then paste in cells H14:H19 as
shown below

ANALYSIS
Step 14: Enter the data for minimum range, 16‐24 (lowest class), 
maximum range, 70‐78 (highest class) and the most range, 16‐24 (the 
class that has the highest frequency), and its corresponding relative 
frequencies as shown below:

Based on this representation, this indicates that out of 464 men that 
died as a result of the crime related incidents during the first week of 
July 2010, the most men that died were between the age of 16 and 24 
at 36% and the least is between the age of 70 and 78 at 6%.  The cause 
of this has yet to be determined

43
FD Using Microsoft Excel
Step 15:Create a separate frequency distribution table for the 
purpose of plotting the graphs as shown below

HISTOGRAM
To create Histogram, you need the values for CLASS and 
FREQUENCIES.  Highlight the columns of CLASS and FREQUENCIES, 
and then click the CHART WIZARD as shown below

44
HISTOGRAM
Select column and select the 3D type as shown below, and then click 
“next”

HISTOGRAM
A new dialog will appear showing what the graph looks like, and then 
click “next”

45
HISTOGRAM
A new dialog will appear for you to type the necessary information for 
title, x‐axis and Y or Z axis

HISTOGRAM
Your graph will look like this.  There will be modifications on this

Num ber of Crim e Deaths

20
15
Num ber of
10
Occurrences
5 Freq
0
16-24 25-33 34-42 43-51 52-60 61-69 70-78
Age Brackets

46
HISTOGRAM
Delete the “Freq” on the right, and adjust the position of “number of 
occurrences”, by clicking the “Format Axis Title”

HISTOGRAM
Click the “alignment tab”, and type 90 in the box for degrees, and 
then click OK

47
HISTOGRAM
Change the color of the wall, remove the grid lines and indicate value 
as shown in the final graph

Number of Crime Deaths

18
16 18
Number of Occurrence

14
12 14
10
8
6 7
4 5
2 3
2 1
0
16-24 25-33 34-42 43-51 52-60 61-69 70-78
Age Brackets

FREQUENCY POLYGON
To create Frequency Polygon, you need the values for RELATIVE 
FREQUENCIES and CLASS MARKS (MIDPOINTS).  First, click the CHART
WIZARD as shown below, and then select LINE, click NEXT

48
FREQUENCY POLYGON
Highlight the values of Relative Frequency as shown below, and then 
click “SERIES”

FREQUENCY POLYGON
After clicking the SERIES tab, the following will appear.  Click the 
symbol in the box next to the “Category (X) axis labels”, and then 
highlight the values of midpoint, then click next

49
FREQUENCY POLYGON
A new dialog will appear for you to input information on the title, x‐
axis and y‐axis, then click finish

FREQUENCY POLYGON
The following graph will appear.  Improvements need to be done on 
the graph such as the wall color, removal of “series” and grid lines

Crim e Death Statistics

40%
Frequency
Percentage

30%
20% Series1
10%
0%
20 29 38 47 56 65 74
Age Brackets

50
FREQUENCY POLYGON
After making all the changes, your frequency polygon should look
like this:
Crim e Deaths Statistics

40%

35% 36%

30%
28%
25%

20%

15 %
14%
10 % 10%

5% 6%
4%
2%
0%
20 29 38 47 56 65 74
A ge B r a c k e t s

Cumulative Frequency Graph
To create Cumulative Frequency Graph, you need the values for 
CUMULATIVE FREQUENCIES and CLASS MARKS (MIDPOINTS)
First, click the CHART WIZARD as shown below, and then select LINE, 
click NEXT

51
Cumulative Frequency Graph
Highlight the values of Cumulative Frequency as shown below, and
then click “SERIES”

Cumulative Frequency Graph
After clicking the SERIES tab, the following will appear.  Click the 
symbol in the box next to the “Category (X) axis labels”, and then 
highlight the values of midpoint, then click next

52
Cumulative Frequency Graph
A new dialog will appear for you to input information on the title, x‐
axis and y‐axis, then click finish

Cumulative Frequency Graph
The following graph will appear.  Improvements need to be done on 
the graph such as the wall color, removal of “series” and grid lines
Crime Death Statistics

120%
Cumulative Frequencies

100%

80%

60% Series1

40%

20%

0%
20 29 38 47 56 65 74
Age Brackets

53
Cumulative Frequency Graph
After making all the changes, your cumulative frequency graph should 
look like this:

Cumulative Frequency of Crime Deaths

110 %

10 0 % 100%
94%
Frequency Percentage

90%
84%
80%
78% 82%
70%
64%
60%

50%

40%
36%
30%
20 29 38 47 56 65 74

Age Brackets

EXERCISE
In 2009, 170 individuals have attended the ISO 9001: 2008 Internal 
Quality Audit Training examination.  At 95% accuracy, 120 samples were 
taken.  The following table shows the IQA scores of the 120 samples.  
At 60% passing mark, determine the percentage of those who failed, 
who passed, the most score bracket and present this in frequency
distribution table with corresponding histograms, frequency polygon 
and cumulative frequency polygon
62 78 56 83 91 82 87 74 80 83
85 79 89 91 69 89 88 81 83 79
92 87 60 87 83 81 82 78 76 69
78 81 66 83 87 73 83 84 54 74
76 83 75 89 85 95 87 55 78 94
86 88 86 88 83 87 93 78 89 68
88 65 78 97 65 86 66 85 72 75
82 86 79 93 87 82 78 88 67 83
87 48 81 95 81 82 86 87 71 81
71 81 88 77 78 79 85 79 65 75
69 82 63 89 91 93 84 89 88 78
88 86 85 81 78 86 87 72 85 77

54
EXERCISE
Enter your data similar to this fashion

Create your frequency table template for computation

55
ORIGINS OF PARETO
ƒ Italian economist, Vilfredo Pareto (1848 – 1923), first thought out the 
Pareto Diagram in 1897
ƒ His famous observation known as 80/20 Rule came from his general
observation back in 1906 that 80% of the properties in Italy were 
owned by 20% of the population
ƒ This forms the principle that 80% of the OUTCOMES come from 20% of 
the INPUTS.
ƒ It was Dr. J. M. Juran who popularizes and applied the principle in 
quality control to classify problems of quality into vital few and trivial 
many, known as PARETO ANALYSIS
ƒ Juran states that in many cases, most defects, and the cost of these 
arises from a relative small number of causes, which became the 
PARETO DIAGRAM

Pareto Diagram DATA

Code
Complaint Freq. REL-Freq Cum.F %
Causes
C1 Too long on hold 157 42.90% 42.90%
C2 No evening/weekend staff 83 22.68% 65.57%
C3 Not knowledgeable 41 11.20% 76.78%
C4 Not courteous 22 6.01% 82.79%
C5 Transferred too many times 20 5.46% 88.25%
C6 Could not locate file 11 3.01% 91.26%
C7 No phone payment option 11 3.01% 94.26%
C8 Hard to understand 9 2.46% 96.72%
C9 Charged more than promised 7 1.91% 98.63%
C10 Others 5 1.37% 100.00%
366

56
Pareto Diagram
Customer Service Complaints

100%
90% 94.26% 96.72% 98.63% 100.00%
Cumulative Frequencies

80% 88.25% 91.26%


82.79%
70% 76.78%
60% 65.57%
50%
40% 42.90%
30%
20%
10%
0%
C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10
Com plaints

Analysis of Data
ƒ Based on the sample Pareto Diagram, this indicates that the three 
biggest complaints by the customer are codes 1, 2 and 3.  It is clear that 
the top three categories of customer complaints are the most 
significant effect on customer service dissatisfaction, which represent 
a cumulative total of 76.78%

ƒ Based on this analysis, the company needs to concentrate on the 
following three top most complaints of the customer to improve the 
customer satisfaction.

ƒ In this case, the company can up with corrective and preventive 
measures by analyzing the root causes of these top three complaints 
of the customer

57
Corrective Action Measures

TOO LONG ON HOLD –

This could be due shortage of staff 

This could be because of poor training on the CSR

Poor supervision by team leaders

Investigate on the three probable causes

Corrective Action Measures

NO EVENING/ WEEKEND STAFF –

ƒ The company only operates during day time – investigate 
on the cost benefit of extending work hours to include 
evening shift and weekends

ƒ This might solve the number 1 problem because if the 
hours of operation is longer, the customers could spread 
out their calling times, thus, putting less strain with the 
CSR

58
Corrective Action Measures

NOT KNOWLEDGEABLE –

ƒ This relates to the first problem and probable cause

ƒ With this third biggest customer complaint, it is 
imperative that CSR are trained and let them know the 
importance of quality and the impact on the business for 
not handling calls efficiently.

Pareto Chart using Excel
Start with the type of problems you want to investigate
For the purpose of this illustration, we will use the example of the 
complaints regarding the customer service
PROBLEM:
A newly established telecommunications company normally 
operates Monday – Friday, 8 AM to 5PM.  In the span of its 3 months 
operation since it started, the company logged 366 customer service 
related complaints.
These complaints were categorized, coded and arranged from the 
most frequent number of complaint to the least as shown below:

59
Pareto Chart using Excel

Pareto Chart using Excel
Compute for the Relative Frequency.  Starting with cell D2, enter the 
formula =C2/$C$12 Î 42.9%.  Copy the value of D2 and paste in cells 
D3:D11.  This should add up to 100% as shown below

60
Pareto Chart using Excel
Compute for the Cumulative Frequency.  Starting with cell E2, type 
“=”, then click on D2 Î 42.90%.  On cell E3, enter the following 
formula: =E2+D3  Î 42.9 + 22.68 Î 65.57%.  Copy the value of cell 
E3, then paste in cells E4:E11.  This should add up to 100% when you 
reached cell E11 as shown below

Pareto Chart using Excel
Make the Pareto Diagram (chart).  Note that code was used in 
making the Pareto table for simplistic reason and for graphical 
presentation.  In Pareto Diagram, you need the values for Categories, 
Relative Frequency and Cumulative Frequencies.  To start with the 
chart, press CTRL when you highlight the values of cells A2:A11,
D2:D11 and E2:E11 as shown below

61
Pareto Chart using Excel
Now, click on the chart wizard icon, and select column, then click next

Pareto Chart using Excel
Next dialog will show up to type the title, x‐axis and y‐axis as shown 
below, then click finish

62
Pareto Chart using Excel
After clicking finish, this will appear.  Note that modifications will 
still have to be made here to make this a Pareto diagram

Pareto Chart using Excel
Click on the graph where the cumulative frequency is as shown 
below.  Click on the right button of the mouse and select chart 
type

63
Pareto Chart using Excel
After selecting the chart type, select the LINE as shown below, then 
click OK

Pareto Chart using Excel
After clicking OK, the Pareto Chart will show up.  Note that 
modification are still needed with this chart

64
Pareto Chart using Excel
After modifications on the chart, the final Pareto Diagram will look like 
this
Customer Service Complaints

100%

90% 98.63%100.00%
94.26% 96.72%

80% 88.25%91.26%
82.79%
70% 76.78%
Cumulative Frequencies

60% 65.57%

50%

40% 42.90%

30%

20%

10%

0%
C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10
Com plaints

EXERCISE
On a human resources behavioural study of tardiness, the following 
data was gathered as the reasons of the employees for coming late to 
work. Create the Pareto Table and Pareto Diagram (Chart) based on 
the following data

Got lost 1
Bad weather 57
Sick 17
Traffic 11
Appointment 4
No parking spot 2
Woke up late 103
Bus late 1
Flat tire 1
Lost keys 3

65
SOLUTION
Tardiness Reason Number %Total Cum%
Woke up late 103 51.50% 51.50%
Bad weather 57 28.50% 80.00%
Sick 17 8.50% 88.50%
Traffic 11 5.50% 94.00%
Appointment 4 2.00% 96.00%
Lost keys 3 1.50% 97.50%
No parking spot 2 1.00% 98.50%
Bus late 1 0.50% 99.00%
Flat tire 1 0.50% 99.50%
Got lost 1 0.50% 100.00%
Totals 200 100.00%

66