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Math Lesson Plan 4: Patterns

Teacher: Jenna Graziadei Grade Level: 1

I. Content and Standards

Connecticut State Standards:

1.G.1: Distinguish between defining attributes versus non-defining attributes; build and draw
shapes to possess defining attributes.

Content Standards: Students will grasp the concept of identifying defining and non-
defining attributes of shapes through their learning within the topic of patterns. This will
enhance their skills in geometry that will serve as an introduction to the more advance
topics that are to be covered in the shapes and patterns unit. The focus will be on using
different colors, sizes, and shapes to complete and design original patterns. They will be
able to explore their developing understanding in a hands-on activity, and collaborate
with peers to further understand the purpose of their learning. The concepts will be
grasped to use in future mathematics and other relevant endeavors within and outside of
school.

II. Prerequisites

In order for this lesson to be approached and completed in a successful manner, the
students must have been previously exposed to the concept of geometric shapes and
worked through properly identifying them through visual means. The students should
also have knowledge of colors and identification of sizes based on the comparison of two
or more items. These are all skills that will be useful in the lesson because the students
will be looking at the shapes more closely to study their defining and non-defining
attributes in order to create patterns.

III. Essential Questions

1. What are patterns?


2. Why is it important to understand the concept of patterns?
3. What characteristics contribute to the design of a pattern?

IV. Instructional Objectives

At the end of this lesson the students will be able to do the following:

1. Show an understanding of the defining and non-defining attributes of shapes through


collaborative discussions.
2. Create patterns based on the defining and non-defining attributes of shapes.
3. Explain why it is important to understand patterns.

V. Instructional Procedures

Prior to the lesson, the materials required for the activity will be organized into packets
to ensure that each child has all that he or she will need.
The students will sit on the floor in the area in front of the Smart Board. They will have
their white boards and dry erase markers with them to remain actively involved in the
lecture portion of the lesson.
Slide 1- The teacher will ask the students what patterns are. The students will turn and
talk to their partners about their ideas that will be shared when the class reconvenes and
students raise their hands. Others will show support of their peers ideas with sign
language. If necessary, the teacher will use prompting to guide the students towards
acknowledging that patterns show repetition, or alternating shapes, colors, and sizes
based on the examples on the slide.
Slide 2- The teacher will read the definition of a pattern and have the students turn and
talk to their partners to discuss what the word repeating means in this context.
Through raising their hands, ideas will be shared and sign language will be used to
show support. The students will be guided to acknowledge that when looking at
patterns, there are things that are alike and different. These key words will be
emphasized on other occasions.
Slide 3- The teacher will discuss how patterns are fun to look at and create, but the
question will be posed as to why they are important to understand. The students will be
urged to look around the classroom for help. After raising their hands, sharing ideas,
and using sign language for support, the teacher will guide the students to realize that
patterns can be found in many places in their daily lives. The teacher will do this by
pointing out patterns seen within the classroom setting.
Slide 4- The teacher will ask the students to turn and talk to their partners about patterns
that see on the images. These ideas will be shared. The teacher will summarize that
patterns can be found on clothing, animals, in nature, in the food we eat, and other
items we use daily such as dinnerware and instruments. The teacher will emphasize that
since patterns are all around us, it is important to know what they are and how they are
created.
Slide 5- The teacher will ask the students to name things that they noticed to be
repeating in the patterns they have looked at so far. The class will review colors first.
The teacher will refer back to previous slides for reference. The students will read aloud
the different colors in unison to display their prior knowledge of them. The students
will show with their hands an understanding of big versus small.
Slide 5- An in depth conversation will take place about shapes given that this is the
main idea associated with the learning objectives. Triangles will be examined first. The
students will turn and talk with their partners about why each example on the board is a
triangle. After listening to ideas, the teacher will ensure that the students understand
that a triangle has three sides and three corners, but the sides can be alike or different
lengths. The teacher will ask the students to draw a triangle on their board to show that
they understand the defining attributes. Pertaining to non-defining attributes, the
teacher will guide the students to refer back to the fact that triangles can come in
different colors and sizes as well.
Slide 5- Circles will be examined next. The students will turn and talk with their
partners about why the shape on the board is a circle. After listening to ideas, the
teacher will ensure that the students understand that a triangle is round and does not
have any corners. The teacher will ask the students to draw a circle on their board to
show that they understand the defining attributes. Pertaining to non-defining attributes,
the teacher will guide the students to refer back to the fact that circles can come in
different colors and sizes as well.
Slide 5- Rectangles will be examined next. The students will turn and talk with their
partners about why each example on the board is a rectangle. After listening to ideas,
the teacher will ensure that the students understand that a rectangle has four sides and
four corners, with two sides being longer and alike in length, while the remaining two
sides are shorter and alike in length. Thus, the side pairs are different lengths. The
teacher will ask the students to draw a rectangle on their board to show that they
understand the defining attributes. Pertaining to non-defining attributes, the teacher will
guide the students to refer back to the fact that rectangles can come in different colors
and sizes as well.
Slide 5- Squares will be examined next. The students will turn and talk with their
partners about why the example on the board is a square. After listening to ideas, the
teacher will ensure that the students understand that a square has four sides and four
corners, with all sides being alike in length. The teacher will ask the students to draw a
square on their board to show that they understand the defining attributes. Pertaining to
non-defining attributes, the teacher will guide the students to refer back to the fact that
squares can come in different colors and sizes as well.
Slide 6- The teacher will have the students review the three attributes that can vary
within patterns. The students will read them out loud in unison. They will also read and
emphasize that the colors, sizes, and shapes can be alike or different.
Slide 7- This will be an opportunity for the students to practice analyzing patterns
before creating them. The first pattern will appear on the board. This first pattern is
focused on a consistent shape, but differing colors. The students will be asked to draw
the next shape in the pattern on their white boards. Given that they will not all have the
correct color marker, they will be instructed to write the color the circle should be or
share it with the teacher upon discussing their solutions. Students will be called on who
raise their hands to share their thought processes for determining the next shape in the
pattern. They will be able to come to the board to show their work to their peers. The
teacher will guide the student to circle the portion of the pattern that is repeating. Using
sign language, students will show if they agree and understand, or hands will be raised
to ask questions.
Slide 7- The second pattern will appear on the board. This second pattern is focused on
a alternating shapes. The students will be asked to draw the next shape in the pattern on
their white boards. Students will be called on who raise their hands to share their
thought processes for determining the next shape in the pattern. They will be able to
come to the board to show their work to their peers. The teacher will guide the student
to circle the portion of the pattern that is repeating. Using sign language, students will
show if they agree and understand, or hands will be raised to ask questions.
Slide 7- The third pattern will appear on the board. This third pattern is focused on a
alternating sizes. The students will be asked to draw the next shape in the pattern on
their white boards. Students will be called on who raise their hands to share their
thought processes for determining the next shape in the pattern. They will be able to
come to the board to show their work to their peers. The teacher will guide the student
to circle the portion of the pattern that is repeating. Using sign language, students will
show if they agree and understand, or hands will be raised to ask questions.
Slide 7- The fourth pattern will appear on the board. This fourth pattern is focused on a
combination of all three characteristics of patterns with different and alike sizes, shapes,
and colors. The students will be asked to draw the next two shapes in the pattern on
their white boards. Given that they will not all have the correct color markers, they will
be instructed to write the color the shapes should be or share it with the teacher upon
discussing their solutions. Students will be called on who raise their hands to share their
thought processes for determining the next shape in the pattern. They will be able to
come to the board to show their work to their peers. The teacher will guide the student
to circle the portion of the pattern that is repeating. Using sign language, students will
show if they agree and understand, or hands will be raised to ask questions.
Slide 8- The students will be asked to create their own pattern on their white boards.
They will be instructed to turn and talk to their patterns about the patterns created. They
should discuss the alike and different colors, sizes, and shapes used. The teacher will
allow one or two students to come to the board to draw and share their patterns with
their peers, while explaining their creations.
The teacher will check for understanding to ensure that the students understand what
patterns are and how they are created. Further instruction will be provided if necessary.
Slide 9- The teacher will read aloud the context for the lessons activity. The teacher
will use prompting to remind the students of how many feathers they should be creating
for the turkey, and that they will be designing different patterns for each feather.
Slide 9- The teacher will model a quick example on a copy of the activity worksheet
using the foam shapes that the students will be using. This modeling will help the
students understand the process expected of them. The teacher will ask the students if
they understand the activity and if there are any questions that remain.
The students will be strategically sent to their desks and materials will be passed out.
The students will be asked to make moose ears to prevent them from touching the
materials until the final instructions have been stated.
The teacher will show the students that the backs of their worksheets have reminders of
how to create patterns if they need to use the resource. The teacher will tell the students
that they should take their time through the process, and after each pattern is made, they
should stop using the materials to show and discuss them with the peers in their desk
groups. The students will be told that after they create one pattern, they should raise
their hand to have it checked by the teacher so that he or she can ensure that they are
going about the task properly. They will be urged to raise their hands if they have
questions, or need any help throughout the activity.
The students will begin working. The teacher will move about the classroom discussing
the thought processes of the students, using prompting to deepen their thinking related
to the key terms from the lesson, and provide any additional assistance to students who
would benefit or appear to be struggling.
If students complete the activity early and exhibit mastery of the learning objectives, a
game will be played. One student will create a pattern on the back of their worksheet
that will be hidden. The partner will ask yes or no questions about colors, sizes, and
shapes to guess what the pattern is. With this guessing, the partner should try to create
the pattern on their paper. Questions should be asked until the pattern is correct. Once
correct, the students will trade roles and begin the process again.
If students complete the activity early, but exhibit a need for additional practice, they
will be asked to create additional original patterns on the backs of their worksheets with
blank spaces for peers in their desk group to complete. Slide 7 will be projected on the
board again for the students to reference for the process. This is to give these students
more practice and work collaboratively with their peers to enhance their understanding.
When all students have completed the activity, they will be asked to pass in their
worksheets and return to their desks with all materials away except for a pencil. The
teacher will ask the students if they can look for patterns around them when they go
home that day. The teacher will ask the students to share places that they can look for
patterns by raising their hands. This will remind the students of the importance of
understanding patterns because they are found all around them.
The teacher will ask the students to say out loud together the three characteristics of
patterns that can be alike or different. They will then be asked to make moose ears
while the exit slip is passed out.
The teacher will instruct the students that they are to complete the patterns on the
worksheet to show that they understand what patterns are and how they are made.
The teacher will ask the students to turn in their exit slips and sit in their places in front
of the Smart Board as their peers finish working.
The teacher will review what each stage of the student rubric represents. The students
will show on their fingers numerically how they feel about their learning and
understanding after this lesson.

VI. Materials and Equipment


A slideshow will be used by the teacher within the short lecture portion of the lesson to help
communicate and explain concepts that are necessary for the students to be able to engage in
the lesson. This will also entail practice examples that will help prepare the students to
approach the lessons activity.
A Smart Board will be used to project the slideshow on. This interactive board will allow the
students to write their ideas for all to see during the appropriate points of the lesson, which can
serve to further engage them in the discussion.
An activity worksheet will be provided to each student to complete the lessons task to practice
creating patterns, which will also function as an information sheet because the reverse side of
the page will include reminders of the types of repetition that can be found in patterns.
Foam shapes will be provided for the students to use to create various types of patterns on their
worksheets. They will be glued on to design the new feathers for the turkey.
A student-centered rubric will be utilized by the teacher as an informal assessment for the
purpose of gathering information about how the children felt upon the completion of the
lesson.
The teacher will have a packet that contains a blank table and a rubric guideline. Notes will be
taken during the lesson while walking around listening and interacting with the students. The
remaining parts of the table will be complete at a later point in time when assessing students on
their efforts.
Based on the progress exhibited in the lessons activity and other information gathered
throughout, the teacher will use the trajectory rubric to make judgements about each students
progress.

VII. Assessments/Evaluations

Exit Slip: Students will be asked to complete a short worksheet on which the students
must complete several patterns to display that they understand the learning objectives
and can use their new knowledge in an abstract manner.
Student Rubric: The student rubric will include various levels of understanding that the
children can use to assess how they feel about their completion of the lesson.
Anecdotal Notes: The teacher will walk around the classroom checking on the progress
of the students. He or she will take notes as they listen to the children communicating to
complete the assignment. The students can explain to the teacher how they are going
about finding the solutions with the project given. This will help to get a perspective of
their thought processes. Notes will be taken on any questions students may have
because if one child has a misunderstanding, it is highly probable that other students
will as well. In the case that help is needed, guidance will be provided through
prompting so that students can arise to the correct answers themselves. This will help
assess the students understandings of using persuasive text to discuss topics associated
with diversity.
Teacher Rubric: A rubric specifically designed for the assignment will be used to assess
each students focus, safety, collaboration, assignment completion, assignment
accuracy, and understanding of the lesson. This will help assess the students ability to
correctly structure their informative texts to introduce, explain, and conclude their
reasonings for the topics they selected to discuss.
Trajectory Rubric: A rubric that has been created based on the learning trajectory
associated with shapes and patterns will be used to analyze the development
progression of skills related to the topic that will enhance each students mastery of the
new concepts.
Portfolio for the full-time teacher: A portfolio would be used to assess each students
overall development and progress throughout the unit and school year, as well as
analyze their use of their new skills in future situations. Through the use of a spiral
curriculum, the educator can track the childs utilization of skills developed in this
lesson and thereafter. The portfolio would be comprised of all projects and activities
created within each subject area. It would be created and bound by the students as to
make a final product that can be used and discussed during conferences. The finalized
portfolio would be graded with a rubric with defined guidelines to give the student the
appropriate score and provide some written feedback.

VIII.Differentiation

The materials used in this lesson, including the slideshow contain word banks and key words
that are highlighted or colored. This is intended to help ELLs and students with special needs
by guiding them to focus on the terms necessary for them to be able to execute the lessons
assignment. It also serves as a way to stress the particular ELA vocabulary that they should
learn to be familiar with as they progress through the subject of ELA.
By performing an example with the class, ELLs and students with special needs will be able to
visually understand what is being expected of them.
As I walk around the classroom while the students work on the assignment, I will put some
extra attention on any ELLs and students with special needs to ensure that they understand the
task and procedure.
I can offer alternative phrasing or methods for what they are being asked to do and guide
them through additional examples.
If I am aware of these key terms in the main language spoken by the child, I can help them
to associate the words with the English translations.
I will utilize any accommodations that could benefit the students with special needs to
maintain their activeness in the lesson.
Beyond my guidance, other students will be able to collaborate with ELLs and students with
special needs that can possibly present the information in a different manner that the child can
better understand.
If necessary and available, I may have the opportunity to have a language specialist teacher
within the classroom during the period who can provide further guidance to the ELLs, as well
as a special education teacher to guide the students with special needs.
By reading the exit slip and rubric directions aloud, the students with individualized
educational needs can better understand the task and be more capable of completing it.
For students who exhibit mastery of the learning objectives associated with this lesson with
time remaining, they will be provided with a differentiated activity that is more advanced and
will allow them to continue to develop their knowledge associated with the topic of patterns.

IX. Technology

A slideshow will be used to expose students to the information and skills necessary to be able to
learn about generating questions while reading to enhance their reading comprehension skills.
The Smart Board will be used to present the slideshow that will allow the students to further
interact with the lesson by including them in brainstorming tasks during the lecture portion of the
lesson. They will have opportunities to volunteer to write on the board as ideas are gathered.

X. Self-Assessment

Exit Slip: The teacher can use the information from the student exit slip to analyze
who may need additional explanations of the material, if the teaching method needs to
be altered, and how to conduct a review in the lessons over the following days to
gradually expand upon and advance the skills of the students.
Student Rubric: The teacher can use the information from the student rubric to make
swift determinations about any necessary review or lesson approaches for the following
days.
Anecdotal Notes: Observations gathered from the teachers anecdotal notes provide a
context for any questions, confusions, or individual student challenges that should be
addressed in future lessons. The teacher can use this information to structure review
sessions for skills and concepts.
Teacher Rubric: The teacher can use information about each students focus, safety,
collaboration, assignment completion, assignment accuracy, and understanding of the
lesson to ensure that learning objectives were met and skill development associated
with the defined standard took place. If the teacher acknowledges any lack of progress
or concerns in within any of the grading categories for a single student or several, plans
can be made to address them the following day and guide improvements for students.
Trajectory Rubric: The teacher can use this information to analyze the progress of each
student across the trajectory associated with shapes and patterns. It will allow him or
her to track their development of prior knowledge related to the topic as they approach
mastery of all of the skills that will lead to mastery of shapes and patterns. This will
help ensure that they their mathematical knowledge is developing appropriately, or
identify students who require additional instruction.