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Department of

Primary Industries and


Regional Development

Recreational
fishing guide
2017/18

Includes Statewide bag and size limits


for Western Australia, and Recreational
Fishing From Boat Licence information
PUBLISHED JULY 2017
7177/16
Contents
Fish for the future ........................................... 1
Using this guide.............................................. 1
Your licence fees at work................................. 2
Changes to the rules....................................... 3
Bag and size limits explained........................... 4
Bag and size limits tables................................ 8
FishWatch..................................................... 34
Finfish possession limits................................ 35
Crabs, prawns and molluscs........................... 38
Fishing licences............................................. 41
Closed seasons and protected areas.............. 42
General fishing rules...................................... 46
Fishing safety................................................ 47
Care for your catch........................................ 49
Get involved! ................................................ 52

Important disclaimer
The Chief Executive Officer of the Department of Primary
Industries and Regional Development and the State of
Western Australia accept no liability whatsoever by reason
of negligence or otherwise arising from the use or release
of this information or any part of it.
This publication is to provide assistance or information.
It is only a guide and does not replace the Fish Resources
Management Act 1994 or the Fish Resources Management
Regulations 1995.It cannot be used as a defence in a
court of law. The information provided is current at the
date of printing but may be subject to change. For the
most up-to-date information on fishing and full details of
legislation contact your local Fisheries office or visit
www.fish.wa.gov.au

Copyright Department of Primary Industries and


Regional Development, 2017

Illustrations R. Swainston/anima.net.au 7177/16


Fish for the future
Western Australia is home to some of the
most exciting and varied recreational fishing
opportunities in the world. With almost 700,000
people fishing recreationally, it is part of our
lifestyle. It also makes a contribution to our
economy and attracts thousands of visitors to
regional WA each year.
With growing fishing and environmental
pressures, we need to manage our highly valued
aquatic resources sustainably to ensure there
are fish for the future. You can play your part
by sticking to the rules, which are based on
extensive research and monitoring.
Please note that penalties apply for fishing
offences.
Interfering with another persons fishing gear
or catch, selling recreationally caught fish and
other similar offences can result in penalties of
up to $400,000, imprisonment for four years
and loss of boats, vehicles and equipment.
Offenders may also lose the privilege of
engaging in a licensed fishing activity.

Using this guide


Throughout this guide we identify when additional
information is available. You can obtain it from:
your local Fisheries office
(see back cover); and
the recreational fishing section of the Fisheries
website at www.fish.wa.gov.au/recfishing
Information is available on request in
appropriate alternative formats including Braille,
audio tape and disc.

7177/16 Using this guide 1


Your licence fees at work
Each year, recreational fishing licence fees
contribute about $8.5 million to managing
recreational fishing in Western Australia.
The State Government contributes another
$11.5 million.

A tagged mulloway being prepared for release as part of a


recreational fishing licence fee-funded stocking program at
popular fishing locations on the Mid West coast. The program
will also help assess the potential for mulloway restocking in
the metropolitan area.

The revenue from recreational fishing licences


is spent on a range of projects that benefit
recreational fishers, with 25 per cent set aside
for new initiatives and 15 per cent going towards
funding Recfishwest, WAs peak recreational
fishing body, to represent the interests of the WA
recreational fishing community. The rest is spent
on recreational fishing management, research
and compliance.
Recreational fishing initiatives funded from
licence fees include:
artificial reefs and fish attracting devices;
restocking projects for prawns, mulloway and
barramundi;
the future fisheries leaders program;
research projects into popular recreational
species such as blue swimmer crabs, black
bream and squid; and
the Statewide recreational boat fishing survey.

2 Your licence fees at work 7177/16


Changes to the rules
Helping recreational rock lobster fishers
You must only be in possession of whole rock
lobsters (immediately before consumption).
However, you may now possess lobster tails (shell
on) at your principal place of residence (which
does not include a tent, vehicle, boat or caravan,
unless you live permanently in the caravan).
Rock lobsters may only be transported whole.
For this reason, you may not take stored tails
away from your principal place of residence.
The specifications for lobster pots have
been simplified. A pot must now not exceed
1,000mm in diameter or width at its widest
point and 500 mm in height.

Perth metropolitan southern garfish fishing closure


Taking southern garfish (also known as southern
sea garfish) is prohibited in Perths Metropolitan
waters between 31 south (just north of
Lancelin) and 33 south (near Lake Preston/
Myalup) until further notice to protect the
breeding stock.
Fishers are still able to take robust garfish from
the closed area. Robust garfish (also known
as storm garfish) can be identified by a dark
blotch below the dorsal fin and a longer lower
tail fin lobe than that of southern garfish (see
illustration on page 27).

Notifying us when travelling to the Abrolhos


The master of a vessel is legally required to notify
us before travelling to the Abrolhos Islands. Visit
www.fish.wa.gov.au/visiting-the-abrolhos for more
information and to notify us online, or contact
your local Fisheries office.

7177/16 Changes to the rules 3


Bag and size limits explained
Bag and size limits help ensure our aquatic
resources remain sustainable for future
generations. Bag limits assist in sharing the
resource and contribute to the sustainable
management of the States fish stocks. Size
limits allow fish to reach maturity to complete
their breeding cycle. Measure all your fish and
return undersize or excess fish alive to the water
(see care for your catch on page 49).

Finfish categories
For bag and size limits, finfish are categorised
according to their aquatic environment (see
diagram below).
200 mile Economic Exclusion Zone
The boundary of WAs legal control
of marine resources

PELAGIC

FRESHWATER
ESTUARINE
20m
NEARSHORE

DEMERSAL

In some cases there are rules that applyto


specific biological regions the North Coast
Bioregion, Gascoyne Coast Bioregion, West
Coast Bioregion and South Coast Bioregion
(see map).

4 Bag and size limits explained 7177/16


Western Australias marine bioregions
114 50' E
North Coast
(Pilbara/Kimberley)
Kununurra
Gascoyne
Coast Broome

Port Hedland
21 46' S
Karratha
Onslow
As
hbu
Exmouth r ton
Rive
r

Carnarvon
Denham
27 S

Kalbarri
Geraldton

West
Coast Eucla
Perth

Esperance
Augusta
Black Point
Albany South Coast
115 30' E

Mixed species daily bag limit


This is the combined maximum number of
fish of any species within one category (such
as demersal or large pelagic) that a fisher
may take or bring on to land in any 24-hour
period (from midnight to midnight, except from
midday to midday for marron, prawns and when
recreationally netting).
For example, demersal finfish in the West Coast
Bioregion has a total mixed bag limit of two fish.
2 fish = 1 baldchin groper + 1 pink snapper
OR
2 fish = 2 pink snapper (but no other demersal fish)

Note: Within the mixed daily bag limit, you


cannot exceed the stated individual species
limit (see below). For example, you may only
take a maximum of one coral trout per day.

7177/16 Bag and size limits explained 5


For rules about fish kept and stored beyond 24
hours, see the finfish possession limits section
(page 35).

Individual species daily bag limit


This is the maximum number of an individual
species you may take within your total mixed
species daily bag limit.

Boat limit
A boat limit is the maximum number of fish of
a species or group of species that may be on a
boat or attached to a boat at any one time. This
limit applies regardless of how long the vessel is
at sea.
Boat limits apply for dhufish, blue swimmer crabs,
mud crabs, squid, octopus, greenlip/brownlip
abalone, cuttlefish and rock lobster (see bag
and size limit tables on pages 8-31 for more
information). Specific licences are required to
take abalone and rock lobster.
To legally take the boat limit for dhufish, blue
swimmer crabs, mud crabs, squid, octopus or
cuttlefish on a powered vessel, there must be
two or more people who hold a Recreational
Fishing from Boat Licence (RFBL) on board. This
includes boats used for recreational crabbing.
For example, in the West Coast Bioregion you
can have a maximum of two dhufish or 20 blue
swimmer crabs on board. But if the vessel is
a powered boat, and only one person on board
holds an RFBL, only the individual bag limit can be
taken one dhufish or 10 blue swimmer crabs.
For species without a specific boat limit, bag
limits apply. A fisher who does not hold an
RFBL can fish with the use of a powered boat if
at least one person on board the boat has an
RFBL. This is allowed provided the total catch of

6 Bag and size limits explained 7177/16


everyone on board stays within the bag limit(s) of
the one or more fishers who hold an RFBL.
Note: This only applies to the RFBL and not to
other fishing licences.
The master of the boat must ensure these rules
are followed. See page 41 for more information
about the RFBL and other fishing licences.

Possession limits and transporting fish


A finfish possession limit is the maximum
quantity of finfish either whole or in pieces
that a person may have in their control/
ownership (see page 35 for more information).
Recreationally caught fish cannot be transported
unaccompanied (see page 37).
When filleting fish at sea, a minimum fillet length
of 300 mm applies only to fish with a minimum
size limit. Fish with a maximum size limit need to
be landed whole (see page 37).

Size limits
To check if your catch is of a legal size, measure
finfish from the point of the snout to the tip of
the tail. Pick up a free fish ruler sticker from
Fisheries offices or participating retail stores.

7177/16 Bag and size limits explained 7


Bag and size limits tables
8
Bag and size limits tables

Demersal finfish bag and size limits


High vulnerability long-lived and slow-growing West Coast South Coast, Gascoyne,
Bioregion North Coast bioregions
TOTAL mixed species
daily bag limit per fisher
This is the combined number
of demersal finfish you can
take (see page 5 for details).
2 5
Closed season 15 Oct No demersal closed
15 Dec season in these
(inclusive) bioregions.
Individual species daily bag limit per fisher Individual
This is the maximum number of individual species species daily
you may take within your total mixed bag limit. bag limit
West Other
Species Minimum legal size Coast bioregions
Baldchin groper
Choerodon rubescens. Additional closed 400 mm 2 3
seasons apply see page 43

Tuskfish*
Choerodon spp. (Pictured: Blackspot tuskfish)
Blackspot and blue tuskfish: 400 mm 2 3

Barramundi cod
Cromileptes altivelis N/A 2 3

Blue morwong (queen snapper)


Nemadactylus valenciennesi 410 mm 2 3

Cods* Estuary cod: 400 mm


Family Serranidae (Pictured top to bottom: Breaksea cod: 300 mm
Breaksea cod, estuary cod, Malabar cod,
Estuary and Malabar cod 2 3
western wirrah, harlequin fish)
Bag and size limits tables

All species including grey banded rockcod over 1,000 mm or 30 kg


and Rankin cod except Chinaman cod are protected (recreational fishers only)

Coral trout*
Plectropomus spp.
(Pictured top to bottom: Common coral 450 mm 1 1
trout, barcheek coral trout, vermicular cod)
* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
9
10 Bag and size limits tables

Demersal finfish West


Coast
Other
bioregions

bag and size limits (continued) TOTAL mixed species


daily bag limit per fisher 2 5 Individual species
daily bag limit
West Other
Species Minimum legal size Coast bioregions
Coronation trout N/A 1 1
Variola louti

Dhufish, West Australian 500 mm


West Coast: boat limit of 2 dhufish 1 1
Glaucosoma hebraicum (6 on charter)
Boarfish*
N/A 2 3
Paristiopterus spp. (Pictured: Giant boarfish)

Dory, John 2 3
N/A
Zeus faber

Dory, mirror
Zenopsis nebulosa N/A 2 3

Emperors and seabream*


Family Lethrinidae Spangled: 410 mm
All species including spangled emperor 2 3
Other emperor: 280 mm
(pictured), red throat and Robinsons sea bream
except blue-lined emperor (black snapper)

Emperor, blue-lined (black snapper) 2 5


320 mm
Lethrinus laticaudis

Foxfish* N/A 2 3
Bodianus spp.

Pigfish* N/A 2 3
Bag and size limits tables 11

Bodianus spp. (Pictured: Goldspot pigfish)

Hapuku N/A 2 3
Polyprion oxygeneios

Bass groper N/A 2 3


Polyprion americanus
* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
May be taken during the closed season

7177/16
12 Bag and size limits tables

Demersal finfish West


Coast
Other
bioregions

bag and size limits (continued) TOTAL mixed species


daily bag limit per fisher 2 5 Individual species
daily bag limit
West Other
Species Minimum legal size Coast bioregions

Trevalla*
Family Centrolophidae N/A 2 3
(Pictured: Blue-eyed trevalla)

300 mm
Red snapper* (Bight redfish pictured, #Except for the South Coast where you may take
and swallowtail) 2 N/A#
8 Bight redfish and 8 swallowtail, PLUS mixed
Family Berycidae
daily bag limit of 5 other demersal finfish.

Pearl perch*
Glaucosoma spp. (other than Glaucosoma N/A 2 3
hebraicum West Australian dhufish)

Pink snapper 500 mm


Applies in the West Coast Bioregion south of 2 2
Pagrus auratus
31S latitude (just north of Lancelin) (Shark
Additional rules apply see page 43 for
and in the inner gulfs of Shark Bay. Bay)
details
All other areas: 410 mm 2 3
Tropical snappers and sea perch*
Family Lutjanidae
All species including red emperor (top),
crimson sea perch, scarlet sea perch,
Red emperor: 410 mm 2 3
Chinaman fish (upper middle), jobfish,
Bag and size limits tables 13

ruby snapper (lower middle) and goldband


(bottom) except fingermark, mangrove jack,
stripey seaperch

Western blue groper


500 mm 1 1
Achoerodus gouldii

* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
14 Bag and size limits tables

Large pelagic finfish bag and size limits


Moderate vulnerability Statewide

TOTAL mixed species


daily bag limit per fisher
This is the combined number of
large pelagic finfish you
can take (see page 5 for details).
3
For example, 3 fish = 2 Spanish mackerel and 1 Mahi Mahi
OR 3 Spanish mackerel OR 2 Mahi Mahi and 1 yellowfin tuna.

Minimum Minimum
Species Species
legal size legal size
Amberjack Mackerel, school
Seriola dumerili 600 mm Scomberomorus 500 mm
queenslandicus

Samson fish Mackerel, shark


600 mm Grammatorcynus 500 mm
Seriola hippos
bicarinatus
Yellowtail kingfish
600 mm Mackerel, Spanish
Seriola lalandi
(narrow barred)
900 mm
Barracuda Scomberomorus
N/A
Sphyaena barracuda commerson
Barracouta Mackerel, spotted
N/A 500 mm
Thyrsites atun Scomberomorus munroi
Cobia
750 mm
Rachycentron canadum Mahi Mahi (dolphinfish)
Bag and size limits tables 15

500 mm
Coryphaena hippurus
Gemfish
N/A
Rexea solandri Marlin*
Mackerel, grey Family Istiophoridae
(broad barred) (Pictured: Blue marlin) N/A
750 mm
Scomberomorus Individual species daily
semifasciatus bag limit = 1
* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
16 Bag and size limits tables

Large pelagic finfish Statewide

bag and size limits (continued) TOTAL mixed species


daily bag limit per fisher 3
Minimum Minimum
Species Species
legal size legal size
Sailfish
Istiophorus platypterus Trevally, giant N/A
N/A Caranx ignoblis
Individual species daily
bag limit = 1
Trevally, golden
Swordfish* Gnathanodon N/A
Family Xiphiidae N/A speciosus
Individual species daily
bag limit = 1
Tuna, big eye N/A
Sharks and rays West and South Thunnus obesus
Class Chondrichthyes Coast bioregions:
(Pictured: Gummy shark) Whaler sharks Tuna, dogtooth
max. size N/A
700mm Gymnosarda unicolor
(interdorsal fin
length) Tuna, longtail
N/A
Thunnus tonggol
Whaler sharks: Interdorsal fin length is the measurement
from the front of the first dorsal fin to the insertion of the Tuna, mackerel
second (rear) dorsal fin. Due to concentrations of heavy N/A
Euthynnus affinis
metals, large sharks over this length are unsuitable for
human consumption.
Tuna, skipjack
Common whaler shark species include dusky shark, bronze N/A
Katsuwonis pelamis
whaler, bull shark and tiger sharks.
700 mm
maximum size limit Tuna, southern bluefin
N/A
Thunnus maccoyii
Bag and size limits tables 17

Tuna, yellowfin
N/A
Thunnus albacares

Wahoo
Insertion of the second 900 mm
(rear) dorsal fin. Acanthocybium solandri

* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.

7177/16
18 Bag and size limits tables

Nearshore/estuarine finfish bag and size limits 


Moderate vulnerability Statewide

TOTAL mixed species


daily bag limit per fisher
This is the combined number of
nearshore/estuarine finfish you
16
Photo: Shannon Conway

can take (see page 5 for details).

For example, 16 fish = 8 tailor (individual species limit = 8),


4 Western Australian salmon (individual species limit = 4)
and 4 snook.

Individual species
Species Minimum legal size daily bag limit
Barramundi 550 mm 2
Lates calcarifer (Max. size 800 mm Possession
recreational fishers only) limit = 2

250 mm
Bream, black (pictured top), silver (tarwhine)
Yellowfin: 300 mm
(pictured bottom), northwest black, yellowfin, etc.* 6
(Only 2 black bream over 400 mm in
Acanthopagrus spp., Rhabdosargus sarba
Swan and Canning rivers)

Bonito (all species) and albacore tuna*


Cybiosarda elegans, Sarda orientalis (pictured), N/A 8
Thunnus alelunga

Catfish*, marine and estuarine 8


Estuarine cobbler (pictured): 430 mm
Families Ariidae and Plotosidae
Bag and size limits tables 19

Cod, Chinaman (Charlie Court) 4


N/A
Epinephelus rivulatus

Dart* N/A 8
Trachinotus spp.

* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
20 Bag and size limits tables

Nearshore/estuarine finfish Statewide

bag and size limits (continued) TOTAL mixed species daily


bag limit per fisher 16
Individual species
Species Minimum legal size daily bag limit
Fingermark
300 mm 4
Lutjanus johnii

Flathead*
300 mm 8
Family Platycephalidae
Flounder*
Pseudorhombus spp. 250 mm 8
(Pictured: Smalltoothed flounder)

Javelinfish* 8
300 mm
Family Haemulidae (Pictured: Spotted javelinfish)
Sweetlips* 300 mm 8
Family Haemulidae (Pictured: Painted sweetlips)

Leatherjacket*
Family Monacanthidae 250 mm 8
(Pictured: Six-spined leatherjacket)
Mulloway (caught primarily south of Exmouth Gulf) 2
500 mm
Argyrosomus hololepitotus

Black jewfish (northern mulloway) 2


700 mm
Protonibea diacanthus

Mangrove jack 2
300 mm
Lutjanus argentimaculatus

Pike, long finned


Bag and size limits tables 21

300 mm 8
Dinolestes lewini

Sea sweep 4
N/A
Scorpis aequipinnis

Snook (pictured)* 8
300 mm
Family Sphyraenidae

* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
22 Bag and size limits tables

Nearshore/estuarine finfish Statewide

bag and size limits (continued) TOTAL mixed species daily


bag limit per fisher 16
Individual species
Species Minimum legal size daily bag limit

Stripey seaperch 300 mm 4


Lutjanus carponotatus

Tailor 300 mm
8
Pomatomus saltatrix (Only 2 fish over 500 mm)

Threadfin, giant 450 mm 2


Polydactylus macrochir

Threadfin, other species*


Polydactylus spp. other than Polydactylus N/A 4
macrochir (Pictured: Blue threadfin)

Trevally and queenfish (all other species not


specifically mentioned in these tables* except
needleskin queenfish and yellowtail scad) Silver trevally: 250 mm 8
Family Carangidae (Pictured top to bottom:
Silver trevally (skipjack/skippy), queenfish)

Tripletail 300 mm 2
Lobotes surinamensis

Western Australian salmon 300 mm 4


Arripis truttaceus
Bag and size limits tables 23

Whiting, King George 280 mm 12


Sillaginodes punctata

Wrasse and parrotfish (all other species not


specifically mentioned in these tables)* N/A 8
Family Labridae (Pictured top to bottom: female
western king wrasse, male western king wrasse)
* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.

7177/16
24 Bag and size limits tables

Freshwater finfish bag and size limits


Statewide

TOTAL mixed species


daily bag limit per fisher
This is the combined number of freshwater
finfish you can take (see page 5 for details).
4
Species Minimum legal size
Trout, rainbow (pictured top), brown (pictured bottom)
Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta 300 mm
(see our Recreational freshwater angling guide for more details)

Freshwater catfish (cobbler)


Families Plotosidae and Ariidae N/A
(see our Recreational freshwater angling guide for more details)

Sooty grunter
Grunter (all freshwater species)
Family Terapontidae (Hephaestus
(Pictured: Sooty grunter) fuliginosus):
250 mm
NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.

Feral freshwater species


Families Cyprinidae and Cichlidae, such as carp, tilapia, cichlids and goldfish, and redfin perch (Perca
fluviatilis, pictured). No bag limit do not return to the water. Dispatch humanely.
Bag and size limits tables 25

7177/16
26 Bag and size limits tables

All other species of finfish bag and size limits


Statewide

TOTAL mixed species

30
daily bag limit per fisher
This is the combined number of all other unlisted
species of fish (not in the previous four categories
or in the protected species table) you can take.

No minimum size limits apply to these species.


This category excludes baitfish and feral freshwater species.

Species includes Individual species daily bag limit

Australian herring
12
Arripis georgianus

Blue mackerel
30
Scomber australasicus

Whiting (excluding King George)*


Family Sillaginidae 30
(Pictured: Yellowfin whiting)

Garfish*
Family Hemiramphidae 30
(Pictured top to bottom: NEW Perth metropolitan southern garfish closure see page 45
southern garfish, robust garfish)

Mullet*
Family Mugilidae 30
(Pictured: Yelloweye mullet)
* Bag limit applies to each individual species in this group. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
Bag and size limits tables 27

Baitfish
Species Daily bag limit
Baitfish sardine, anchovy and hardy head (pictured top)
A combined daily bag limit of
Families Clupeidae, Engraulidae and Atherinidae
9 litres
(mulies, whitebait, scaly mackerel pictured bottom)
NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
28 Bag and size limits tables

Crustaceans bag and size limits


NOTE: Statewide possession limit of 24 rock lobster per person.
Species Minimum legal size Daily bag limit Boat limit
Cherabin N/A 9 litres N/A
Macrobrachium spp.
Crab, blue swimmer#
127 mm 20 40
Portunus armatus; formerly P. pelagicus
(See pages 38 & 44 and our recreational (carapace width)
crabbing guides for more details) West Coast: 10 West Coast: 20

Crab, mud (all species combined) Green: 150 mm


Scylla spp. Brown: 120 mm 5 10
(Pictured: Brown mud crab) (carapace width)

Marron#
80 mm 8
Cherax spp. (See our Recreational fishing
(carapace length) Trophy waters: N/A
for marron guide for more details about
Trophy waters: 90 mm 5
specific rules that apply to these species)

Prawns (all species combined)#


Family Penaeidae
N/A 9 litres N/A
(Pictured: Western king prawn)
(See page 40 for more details)

Redclaw N/A N/A N/A


Cherax quadricarinatus

Rock lobster# (all species) 8 24


Panulirus and Jasus spp. of which no of which no more than
(See our Recreational fishing for rock 76 mm more than 4 12 may be tropical
lobster guide for more details about Southern rock lobster: may be tropical lobsters. (At least three
specific rules that apply to these species) 98.5 mm licensed fishers must be
Bag and size limits tables 29

lobsters.
(Pictured top to bottom: western rock on board actively fishing
lobster, tropical ornate rock lobster) NEW to take the boat limit.)
10 N/A
Other crustacean species not specifically
mentioned (combined) N/A Pest species, including yabbies,
(Pictured: Gilgie) have no bag or boat limit.
Do not return to the water.
# Closed seasons apply. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
30 Bag and size limits tables

Molluscs and other invertebrates bag and size limits


Minimum Daily Boat
Species legal size bag limit limit
Abalone, Roes# Haliotis roei (See our Recreational fishing for 20
60 mm N/A
abalone guide about specific rules that apply to this species)
West Coast: 15
Abalone, greenlip Haliotis laevigata (pictured)/brownlip Haliotis
conicopora (combined)#
140 mm 5 10
(See our Recreational fishing for abalone guide about specific
rules that apply to this species)

Ark shells, cockles and pipis (pictured) (combined)


N/A 2 litres N/A
Families Arcidae, Cardiidae and Donacidae

Clams
Tridacna spp. N/A 2 N/A

Mussels 9 litres
Family Mytilidae N/A N/A
(shell on)

Oysters
Family Ostreidae (Pictured: Native oyster)
Recreational harvesting of pearl oysters (Pinctada maxima) N/A 20 N/A
is prohibited
Razorshell
N/A 20 N/A
Family Pinnidae
Scallops N/A 20 N/A
Family Pectinidae
Sea urchins# N/A 20 N/A
Class Echinoidea
Specimen shell (cowries, volutes, conch) (combined) N/A 10 N/A
Families Cypraeidae, Volutidae and Strombidae
Bag and size limits tables 31

Squid, cuttlefish and octopus (combined)


Family Cephalopoda N/A 15 30
(Refer to the website for further information on octopus trigger traps)
Bloodworms (bait) N/A 1 litre N/A
Other molluscs and invertebrate species not specifically Trochus:
10 N/A
mentioned (combined) (Pictured: Mud whelk) 65 mm
# Closed seasons and additional rules apply. NOTE: If fishing from a boat, see page 41 for licence rules.
7177/16
32 Bag and size limits tables

Protected species
These species are protected and may NOT be taken
Grey nurse shark Potato cod
Carcharius taurus Epinephelus tukula

White shark Queensland groper


Carcharodon carcharias Epinephelus lanceolatus
Juvenile

Speartooth shark Humphead Maori wrasse


Glyphis spp. Cheilinus undulatus

Whale shark Weedy seadragon


Rhincodon typus Phyllopterxy taeniolatus

Sawfish all species Leafy seadragon


Family Pristidae Phycodurus eques

Rays and skates Hamelin Bay Native freshwater fish species


Protection Area only (from top to bottom)
All ray and skate species are Balstons pygmy perch
protected in Hamelin Bay. Nannatherina balstoni,
western trout minnow
Black stingray (left) Galaxias truttaceus,
Dasyatis thetidis and smooth mud minnow
stingray (right) Galaxiella munda,
Bag and size limits tables 33

Dasyatis brevicaudata black-stripe minnow


Protected from recreational Galaxiella nigrostriata,
fishing in the South Coast and pouched lamprey
West Coast bioregions. Geotria australis,
salamanderfish
Coral and live rock Lepidogalaxias salamandroides,
Order Scleractinia little pygmy perch
(Pictured: Goniopora tenuidens) Nannoperca pygmaea

7177/16
FishWatch 1800 815 507
The FishWatch phone line provides
a quick and easy way to report
sightings or evidence of:
illegal fishing;
aquatic pests; and
aquatic diseases (including fish kills).

Illegal fishing or activity


Illegal fishing or activity could include someone
netting in the river, exceeding their bag or
possession limits, taking undersize fish, fishing
in a closed area, having more fishing gear in
the water than they should or illegally selling
recreationally caught fish.
Before you call FishWatch, note:
How many people you saw.
Who they were. Did you hear/know any of
their names?
What they were doing.
Where it happened; the nearest known
landmark or intersection of the closest road.
What type of equipment, cars or boats,
registration numbers and descriptions.
When it happened time and date. Is it
something that is happening right now, while
you are making a report, or was it something
you observed previously?
Your reports are treated in strict confidence.
We recommend you do not approach anyone
you think is involved in illegal activity relating
to fish or fishing.
If you dont wish to contact us through FishWatch
you can pass information to your local Fisheries
office or to Fisheries Officers.

34 FishWatch 7177/16
Aquatic pests and diseases
To help keep WAs waters pest and disease free,
please clean and dry all boating and fishing gear,
and practise good vessel maintenance. If you
think you have seen an aquatic pest or disease,
report it to FishWatch or through WA PestWatch
on our website, the free WA PestWatch app, our
Biosecurity Section on 6551 4444 or your local
Fisheries office.

Finfish possession limits


The maximum quantity of finfish (includes
scalefish, sharks and rays) you may have in your
possession either whole or in pieces is:
20 kg of fish fillets; or
10 kg of fish fillets and one days bag limit of
whole fish or fish trunks; or
two days bag limit of whole fish or fish trunks.
At the Abrolhos Islands the possession limit is:
10 kg of fish fillets; or
one days bag limit of whole fish or fish trunks.
For more information see our Abrolhos Islands
Information Guide available from Fisheries offices.
In Shark Bays Freycinet Estuary Management
Zone, the possession limit is:
5 kg of fish fillets; or
one days bag limit of whole fish or fish trunks.
For more information and a map, visit the Fisheries
website or Denham District Office (see back cover)
or holiday accommodation sites inside the zone.
Fillet means any particular piece of a finfish,
other than a whole fish, fish trunk, head, tail,
fin, backbone or wing. For these pieces to be
excluded from the possession limit they must be

7177/16 Finfish possession limits 35


entirely removed from the fillet. Trunk means a
fish that has had its head and tail removed.
These limits apply throughout WA, including
permanent and temporary places of residence.
The following baitfish are not included in
the finfish possession limit: hardyhead
(Atherinidae), sardines/pilchards (Clupeidae),
whitebait (Engraulidae), garfish (Hemiramphidae)
and mullet (Mugilidae). Commercially purchased
fish are not included, but you may be asked for
proof of purchase.
Some species have a specific possession limit
(see bag and size limit tables on pages 8-33).
Note: Unless it can be proven otherwise, you are
assumed to be in possession/control of the fish
if you are using/in control of a vessel, vehicle,
refrigerator, freezer, icebox or other storage
device in which fish are found.

Labelling stored fish


If the quantity of fish stored in a single
container/freezer exceeds one persons
possession limit, the fish must be clearly
labelled with the name of the owner(s).
Labels, of at least 75 mm long and 25 mm
wide, must be securely attached to each
container or package of fish. The full name of
the owner must be legibly written on the label
and be clearly visible for inspection.
Labels are not needed if:
You are within your daily bag limit and still
on your fishing trip.
The fish are in the possession and under
the direct physical control of the person who
took the fish and are not stored with anyone
elses fish.

36 Finfish possession limits 7177/16


Landing filleted or processed fish
Fish with a minimum size limit can be carried at
sea and landed:
as fillets, skin and scale on, a minimum
30cm length;
trunked, skin and scale on, a minimum
30cm length; or
whole (can be gutted and gilled).
Unless they are being prepared for immediate
consumption or being eaten, estuary cod,
Malabar cod and barramundi (which all have
a maximum size limit) must be carried whole
at sea (although can be gutted and gilled), on
estuaries and on rivers and landed whole.
Fish without a size limit can be carried at sea
and landed:
filleted, skin on;
trunked, skin on; or
whole (can be gutted and gilled).
Note: These rules also apply if you are returning
from an island.

Transporting of unaccompanied fish


Unaccompanied recreationally caught fish, no
matter what the species, cannot be transported
by commercial couriers (or any other person).
You must accompany your fish if transporting it
by land, sea or air.

7177/16 Finfish possession limits 37


Crabs, prawns and molluscs
Crabs
You can legally catch crabs by:
hand;
wire hook you can use a hand-held blunt
wire hook to catch crabs. Hooks must not be
capable of piercing the crab;
drop net they must be no wider than
1.5 metres in diameter. There is a maximum
limit of 10 drop nets per person or 10 drop
nets per boat, regardless of how many
people are aboard; or
scoop net hand-held wire or plastic scoop
nets must be bowl-shaped, made of rigid mesh
that is not capable of entangling a crab, have
an internal diameter no bigger than 375mm,
and a depth of no more than 210mm.
Catching crabs by any method other than those
listed above is illegal.

How to measure a crab


Crabs must be measured
across the widest part of 127 mm

the shell, from tip to tip


of the carapace spikes.

Keeping crabs
All uncooked crabs must be kept in whole
form, unless being prepared for immediate
consumption.

Totally protected crabs


Undersize or berried (egg-carrying, see picture)
crabs are totally protected. They must be
returned to the water immediately.
You must release any protected crabs you have
caught before attempting to catch another crab.

38 Crabs, prawns and molluscs 7177/16


Identifying mud crabs
The two species of mud crab caught in WA are
the green mud crab and the brown mud crab.
You need to be able to tell them apart as they
have different legal sizes (see below).
Claw spines Claw spines
GREEN MUD CRAB

BROWN MUD CRAB

large and reduced or blunt


distinct prominences

More than one prominent One small blunt spine or no


sharp spine on the elbow spines at all on the elbow

Cherabin (freshwater prawns found in the North


Coast Bioregion)
Can be legally caught using:
no more than six drop nets;
a single pole snare;
a single hand-scoop net; or
a single throw net that is no longer than
three metres (measured from the centre
retrieval line to the lead line) and a mesh of
not more than 25 mm.

7177/16 Crabs, prawns and molluscs 39


For rules relating to fishing for redclaw
(freshwater crayfish) in Lake Kununurra visit
your local Fisheries office.

Prawns
Can be legally caught using:
single hand-dip net;
single hand-scoop net;
single hand-throw net. Note: throw nets
are not permitted in some areas such as
the Swan and Canning rivers see our
recreational net fishing guide for details; or
single prawn hand-trawl (drag) net that is not
more than four metres across with a mesh
of not less than 16 mm, and must not be
attached to a boat or set.
Any crabs caught when fishing for prawns must
be returned to the water immediately.
You may not use, or leave unattended, a prawn
hand-trawl net in these areas (all in the West
Coast Bioregion):
Harvey Estuary and its tributaries;
Peel Inlet and its tributaries;
Peel Inlet channel entrance;
Dawesville Cut;
Leschenault Estuary and its tributaries; and
Swan River within 100 metres of any part of
the Pelican Point Nature Reserve; or within
100 metres of the Milyu Nature Reserve.

Landing molluscs
All edible molluscs (except oysters) must be
landed whole and kept in the shell until you
are more than 200 metres inland from the high
water mark.
Note: It is illegal to use abalone as bait due to
the risk of spreading disease.

40 Crabs, prawns and molluscs 7177/16


Fishing licences
In WA, licences are required for:
use of a powered boat to fish or to transport
your catch or fishing gear to or from a land-
based fishing location (Recreational Fishing
from Boat Licence RFBL);
rock lobster;
abalone;
marron;
South-west (south of 29S) freshwater
angling; and
net fishing (set, haul and throw nets).
With the exception of the above, you do not
require a licence to fish from the shore.
Separate brochures covering five of the licensed
recreational fisheries listed above are available
from your local Fisheries office or the website.
For the RFBL, the details are below.
Apply for a new licence, or renew an existing
licence online at the Fisheries website.
Alternatively, application forms are available from
Fisheries offices and the website.
Note: Fishing licences issued in other states are
not valid in WA.

Recreational Fishing from Boat Licence


You need a Recreational Fishing from Boat
Licence (RFBL) for any fishing activity from a
powered boat including:
line fishing (handline, rod and line, squid
jigging);
catching crabs;
spearfishing;
catching octopus;
dip-netting for prawns; and
fishing by diving and/or snorkelling.

7177/16 Fishing licences 41


You require an RFBL for these fishing activities
even if you are returning your catch to the water.
You also require an RFBL when a powered boat
is used to transport your catch or fishing gear to
or from a land-based fishing location, including an
island or sandbar. You must produce your licence
when requested by a Fisheries and Marine Officer.
You dont need an RFBL if you are:
fishing from a boat without a motor, such as
a row boat;
fishing from a licensed fishing tour operators
vessel or fishing charter boat;
fishing with a person who holds an RFBL (see
page 6 for more information); or
taking part in a fishing activity for which you
already hold a current licence, such as rock
lobster or abalone fishing. For example, if you
have a licence to fish for rock lobster and
that is the only fishing activity that is taking
place on the boat, you dont need an RFBL.
The RFBL database of boat fishers helps us
determine who is fishing, where and what they are
catching. This information assists us in managing
our fisheries so there are fish for the future.
The RFBL covers a 12-month period from the
date of issue and costs $35 or $17.50 for
concessions. See page 41 for details on buying
or renewing your licence.

Closed seasons and protected areas


Seasonal closures
Seasonal closures provide additional protection
for fish species that are vulnerable during
times when they aggregate (group together) to
reproduce. Large-scale seasonal closures are
also used to reduce the total time spent fishing
(referred to as fishing effort) and therefore the
total number of fish captured.

42 Fishing licences 7177/16


Demersal finfish
Demersal finfish live on or near the ocean floor
usually in depths of more than 20 metres.
West Coast Bioregion: Closed season
15October 15 December (inclusive). Fishing
for demersal finfish resumes on 16 December.
The take or landing of demersal finfish (listed on
pages 8-11) is prohibited within the West Coast
Bioregion (north of Kalbarri to east of Augusta)
during this period. If you catch a demersal finfish
from a boat or from shore in this area during the
closed season you must return it to the water as
soon as possible.
Unlike the Cockburn Sound pink snapper closure
and the Abrolhos Island baldchin groper closure,
which are designed to protect aggregations of
spawning fish, the demersal finfish closure is one
of several management measures to reduce the
recreational catch in this area by at least
50 per cent. This reduction was required following
independently reviewed research that showed
demersal species, like dhufish, pink snapper and
baldchin groper, were being overfished.
The seasonal closure and other management
measures will be reviewed as the latest stock
assessment and catch information becomes
available.

Pink snapper
Shark Bay: An important breeding aggregation
area for pink snapper. The following seasonal
closures apply.
Eastern Gulf: Closed season
1 May 31 July (inclusive).
Freycinet Estuary: Closed season
15 August 30 September (inclusive).
More information and maps are available from
your local Fisheries office or the website.

7177/16 Closed seasons and protected areas 43


Cockburn and Warnbro sounds: Closed season
1October 31 January (inclusive).
Cockburn Sound is the site of the largest known
aggregations of pink snapper in the West Coast
Bioregion and is critical for sustaining adequate
breeding stocks of these long-lived and slow-
growing fish.
It is illegal to be in possession of pink snapper
while fishing in the waters of Cockburn and
Warnbro sounds during the closed season.
However, pink snapper taken outside the sounds
may be transported through, and immediately
landed, within the area during the closed season.

Baldchin groper
Abrolhos Islands: Closed season
1 November 31 January (inclusive).
Taking, landing or possessing baldchin groper
is prohibited within the Abrolhos Islands Fish
Habitat Protection Area during the closed
season. These fish aggregate in shallow areas
in the Abrolhos area to spawn as the water
temperature rises.
Note: The take or landing of baldchin groper at
the Abrolhos Islands is also prohibited during the
West Coast Bioregion closed season for demersal
finfish (see page 43), beginning on 15 October.

Blue swimmer crabs


Cockburn Sound: Closed until further notice.

The Cockburn Sound crab fishery was


closed in May 2014 after research showed
a significant decline in the number of
crabs. The fishery will remain closed until
stocks recover.

Peel-Harvey Estuary: Closed season


1September 31 October (inclusive).

44 Closed seasons and protected areas 7177/16


The Peel Inlet (including the channel entrance),
Harvey Estuary, Dawesville Cut and all man-made
waterways are closed to all crab fishing during
this period.
The closures protect crab breeding stocks,
allowing females to spawn.

Southern garfish
Metropolitan waters: Closed until further notice.

Taking southern garfish (also known as


southern sea garfish) is prohibited in
Perths Metropolitan waters between
31south just north of Lancelin) and
33south (near Lake Preston/Myalup) until
further notice to protect the breeding stock.
The closure has been introduced to ease
fishing pressure on southern garfish and
allow them to rebuild.

Marine protected areas


Marine protected areas include marine reserves,
fish habitat protection areas and other fishing
closures such as wreck sites. Most of these
areas are subject to additional rules.
Marine reserves, which include marine nature
reserves, marine parks and marine management
areas, are managed by Parks and Wildlife
Service. Information about marine reserves is
available from Parks and Wildlife Service offices
and their website at www.dpaw.wa.gov.au.
In addition to these marine reserves, there are a
number of fish habitat protection areas and other
closed areas which are managed by Fisheries.
Further information about fishing activity allowed
in all marine protected areas is available from your
local Fisheries office or the website.

7177/16 Closed seasons and protected areas 45


General fishing rules
Fishing gear
Legal fishing gear is outlined below; everything
else is illegal.
Rods, lines and hooks you can only use
a maximum of three baits or lures on
each line. Shore-based fishers may use a
maximum of two fishing lines. Rods and
lines must be attended.
Note: To catch barramundi, you are only
permitted to use a single rod, reel and line
or a single hand-held line.
Rock lobster pots fishers (including divers)
must not remove from the water or interfere
with any rock lobster pot that does not belong
to them. Fishers who come across someone
elses pot that appears snagged or with
unmarked floats or without a rope and float
attached, are encouraged to record the GPS
coordinates and report it to a Fisheries officer
or through Fishwatch (see page 34).
Spearfishing generally allowed in ocean
waters, except in some marine protected
areas and around dive wrecks. Further
information on specific restrictions in marine
protected areas is available from your local
Fisheries office or the website.
All inland waters (rivers, tributaries and dams)
are closed to spearfishing. However, the use
of a hand spear (gidgie) is permitted to take
estuarine cobbler in estuaries.
Haul, set and throw fishing nets most of
the State is closed to set and haul netting.
See our Recreational net fishing guide for
details, available from your local Fisheries
office or the website.

46 General fishing rules 7177/16


Release weights required if fishing for
demersal species in the West Coast Bioregion
(see page 51). Also recommended when
fishing for demersal species in other regions.

Protecting fish and their habitats


To protect fish and their habitats in key
environments, some activities are banned.
In particular you are not allowed to:
use fish traps or pots of any kind (except
lobster pots and octopus trigger traps see
the website for further information);
use dredges;
obstruct any bay, inlet, river, creek or any tidal
or inland waters so that fish are enclosed,
left stranded, destroyed or wasted;
be in possession of explosives or noxious
substances (for example, fish poisons);
jag (deliberately foul-hook) fish;
use commercial fishing gear of any kind;
use set-lines; or
attach fish hooks to lobster pots, anchors
and anchor lines or moorings.
Note: Fishing tackle stores may carry gear that
does not meet WA legal requirements. In particular,
the use of crab traps, opera house traps and bait
jigs with more than three hooks is illegal in WA
waters. Check before you make a purchase.

Fishing safety
Boat fishing safety
You need to take care when fishing from the shore
and be properly prepared when fishing from a
boat. Check the seaworthiness of your boat and
that you have the right safety gear, including life

7177/16 Fishing safety 47


jackets, distress beacon (EPIRB), marine radio
transceiver, flares, effective anchor and line, bailer
or bilge pump, fresh water, first aid kit, rope,
toolkit, torch, signalling mirror, fire extinguisher
and alternative power source/spare motor.
Conditions can change quickly. If you are going to
an unfamiliar location, treat the ocean with respect.
Carry a chart of the area where you intend to fish;
study it, and familiarise yourself with the position
of navigational markers and potential hazards.
Check the weather forecast, tide predictions and
watch out for unexpected changes. Take the time
to plan your trip to make sure its a safe one.
Before you leave:
Tell a responsible person your boating plans.
Notify them immediately if plans change
during the voyage.
Always report in when you return.
Bureau of Meteorology:
http://www.bom.gov.au/wa
Department of Transport marine information:
www.transport.wa.gov.au/imarine
WA Coastal Marine Warnings: 1300 659 223
WA Marine Service: 1900 926 150
Volunteer Sea Rescue: These groups use VHF
channel 16 and HF channel 4125. Full details
and alternative channels: www.vmrwa.org.au

Rock fishing safety


Fishing from rocks can be particularly
dangerous. A number of fishers in WA have
drowned in recent years after being swept off
rocks by large or unexpected waves. If you
intend to fish from rocks:
wear a life jacket;
never fish alone;

48 Fishing safety 7177/16


observe where you plan to fish before you
actually start; and
wear appropriate footwear.
Further important advice about rock fishing
safety is available from www.recfishwest.org.au

Shark safety
Keep informed by checking the SharkSmart
Shark Activity Map before you use the water.
The map provides real time information on
reported sightings and tagged shark detections,
plus access to current alerts and warnings.
Remember, not all sharks are tagged or sightings
reported, so follow our SharkSmart safety tips
when using the water. Visit www.sharksmart.com.au
for more information.
Report shark sightings to Water Police on
9442 8600 as soon as possible. This information
is posted to the Shark Activity Map, and sent to
authorities so beaches can be closed if needed.

Care for your catch


Releasing fish and catch care
You can help ensure there will be fish for the
future by taking care of the fish you catch, and
releasing all undersize or excess fish as carefully
and as quickly as possible. To ensure a fishs
healthy return to the water:
Avoid deep-hooking fish by using an appropriate
size and pattern of hook, and avoid treble
hooks. Consider using barbless hooks or
crushing hook barbs using a pair of pliers.
Use long-nosed pliers to remove hooks. But
if gut-hooked, leave the hook in place and cut
the line as close to the mouth or eye of the
hook as possible before releasing the fish.

7177/16 Care for your catch 49


If possible avoid lifting fish from the water to
unhook them. Use a knotless landing net or
place a wet rag under the fishs stomach to
support its vital organs.
Use a wet rag or wet your hands to handle fish.
Treat fish gently to reduce stress and injury
to fragile scales and protective slime.
Release fish as soon as possible.
Revive spent fish by holding them from
above, behind the head, moving them through
the water repeatedly until they kick showing
they are ready to be released.
If you intend to eat the fish, store your catch out
of the sun in either a seawater ice slurry (one
bucket of seawater to two of ice) in an esky, or a
damp open-weave bag.

Dont discard a smaller fish for a bigger one


If you choose to keep a fish and not return it
to the water immediately, you have taken that
fish and it counts towards your daily bag limit.
Discarding a smaller retained fish for a bigger
one is known as high-grading.
High-grading is not a responsible use of our fish
resources and if you have already taken your
daily bag limit, it will result in you exceeding
the daily bag limit.

Poisonous and venomous fish


Some species have venomous spines or
poisonous flesh.
Handle any fish with caution and avoid direct
contact with the fishs spines and gill plates.
Several WA fish species are highly poisonous
to eat, such as members of the blowfish or
pufferfish family.

50 Care for your catch 7177/16


Return captured blowfish to the water!
Please do not leave any dead or dying blowfish
you catch on the shore where you are fishing
put them back in the water instead. Discarded
blowfish are poisonous and pose a threat to dogs,
other animals and small children who might pick
them up and put them in their mouths.

Barotrauma and using a release weight


The term barotrauma refers to damage that
occurs to fish when captured in deep water.
Gases in a fish's body expand due to a sudden
decrease in pressure, causing the stomach to
push out through the mouth or gills and the eyes
to appear popped out. Barotrauma may also
damage the fish's internal organs, which may not
be so noticeable.
Demersal fish species are particularly susceptible
to barotrauma; and mortality levels as a result of
barotrauma are known to increase with depth.
To minimise the effects of barotrauma, 'prevention
is better than cure'. To avoid catching undersize
or excess fish, it is best to stop fishing once
youve reached your bag limit.
When a demersal fish is to be released, a
release weight may help to reduce the effects
of barotrauma.
Fish suffering from barotrauma may not be able
to return to the bottom when released if their
swim bladder remains inflated.
Arelease weight is a weighted barbless hook
for releasing deep-water fish suffering from
barotrauma. It is attached to the fish's upper lip
and designed to be easily detached by tugging
the line once the fish is back on the seabed.

7177/16 Care for your catch 51


Note: If you are boat fishing

Photo courtesy of Recfishwest


for demersal species in
the West Coast Bioregion
you must have a release
weight on board. You dont
need a release weight if a
boat is used exclusively for
spearfishing.

Get involved!
You can give something back and help ensure
there will be fish for the future by assisting some
of our research programs. For more information
on these opportunities visit the website and
search under volunteers.

Send us your skeletons


You can help with vital long-term monitoring of
our valuable fish stocks by sending us your fish
frames (skeletons with the heads and guts intact).
www.fish.wa.gov.au/frames

Anglers log books


Use the log book we provide to record your
ocean, estuary or freshwater fishing activities.
Your information will assist scientists with a
number of projects.

Fish tagging
Scientists tag and release fish to better understand
population structure, movement, growth and
mortality. We need people to report recaptures.

Redmap
Help scientists determine whether marine
species are on the move due to warming oceans.
Report photos of any unusual marine species to
the Redmap website www.redmap.org.au or the
phone app.

52 Get involved! 7177/16


Other ways to hook up
to the rec fishing rules
Its easy to keep up to date with Western
Australias recreational fishing rules. Whether
its for bag and size limits, seasonal closures
or licences, all the rules are at your fingertips.

1. Web
Go to www.fish.wa.gov.au for rules
covering more than 180 fish species.

2. App
The free Recfishwest app
provides access to the
rules even if youre out of
phone range.

Recfishwest
representing your
fishing future
Recfishwest is recognised by the
State Government as the peak body for recreational
fishing in WA. This organisation represents the voice
of recreational fishers wherever decisions affecting
our fisheries, or access to them, are made.
www.recfishwest.org.au (08) 9246 3366

HELP KEEP EVERYONE SAFE


Report shark sightings
to Water Police on
SHARKSMART.COM.A U
9442 8600

7177/16 Get involved! 53


FISHERIES
Gordon Stephenson House,
140 William Street, Perth WA 6000
T: (08) 6551 4444
customerservice@fish.wa.gov.au

ALBANY DISTRICT OFFICE GERALDTON DISTRICT OFFICE


(and Southern Regional Office) (and Midwest Regional Office)
88 90 Stead Rd 69 75 Connell Rd
Albany WA 6330 Geraldton WA 6530
(08) 9845 7400 (08) 9920 8400
BROOME DISTRICT OFFICE HILLARYS DISTRICT OFFICE
(and Northern Regional Office) Western Australian Fisheries and
Port of Pearls House Marine Research Laboratories
401 Port Drive 39 Northside Drive
Broome WA 6725 Hillarys WA 6025
(08) 9193 8600 (08) 9203 0111
BUNBURY DISTRICT OFFICE JURIEN BAY DISTRICT OFFICE
96 Stirling Street Jurien Boat Harbour
Bunbury WA 6230 Breakwater Drive
(08) 9721 2688 PO Box 449
Jurien Bay WA 6516
BUSSELTON DISTRICT OFFICE
(08) 9652 1048
48A Bussell Highway
Busselton WA 6280 KARRATHA DISTRICT OFFICE
(08) 9752 2152 Unit 1/17 19 Crane Circle
Karratha WA 6714
CARNARVON DISTRICT OFFICE
(08) 9144 4337
(and Gascoyne Regional Office)
59 Olivia Terrace KUNUNURRA DISTRICT OFFICE
Carnarvon WA 6701 C/O Parks and Wildlife Service
(08) 9941 1185 Lot 248 Ivanhoe Road
PO Box 2483
DENHAM DISTRICT OFFICE
Kununurra WA 6743
Knight Terrace
(08) 9168 4243
Denham WA 6537
(08) 9948 1210 MANDURAH DISTRICT OFFICE
107 Breakwater Parade
ESPERANCE DISTRICT OFFICE
Mandurah Ocean Marina
Bandy Creek Boat Harbour
Mandurah WA 6210
Esperance WA 6450
(08) 9583 7800
(08) 9071 1839
EXMOUTH DISTRICT OFFICE
7177/16

10 Maley Street
Exmouth WA 6707
(08) 9949 2755
FREMANTLE DISTRICT OFFICE
(and Metropolitan Regional Office)
14 Capo DOrlando Drive
South Fremantle WA 6162
(08) 9432 8000

www.fish.wa.gov.au

7177/16
ABN: 18 951 343 745