Sie sind auf Seite 1von 33

Post

Be the first to comment

Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
327
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Application of Electrical Heating in Enhanced Oil Recovery(EOR)
1. 1. Electrical Heating Present By: Saeid Javidi Course Instructor: Dr.B.Sedaee Sola Autumn
2015 1
2. 2. Introduction Electrical Heating for heavy­oil recovery is not a new idea but the
commercialization and wider application of this technique require detailed analyses to
determine optimal application conditions. 2
3. 3. Introduction • Electrical Heating is a thermal process which can be applied to a well to
increase its productivity. The productivity increase is substantial and comes about because of
the removal of thermal adaptable skin effects(Visco­Skin for Example) and the reduction of oil
viscosity in the vicinity of the wellbore. • DHEH allows production enhancement and thus
improvement of recovery factor, with significantly lower investment costs when compared with
those typically associated with the implementation of thermal technologies such as steam
injection 3
4. 4. Conventional steam injection candidates such as steam injection and hot water injection are
limited to relatively shallow, thick, permeable, and homogenous sands that are onshore. 4
5. 5. Figure 1 describes how the process works. 5
6. 6. The essential components of an electrical heating system are: • power supply, • power
delivery system, • Electrode assembly, • ground return. 6
7. 7. This technology uses a three­phase system designed to provide a defined wattage according
to different application and type of cables. The heat section is set downhole and is connected to
the surface with a power cable. It generates heat to near wellbore region, decreasing viscosity
and friction and consequently increasing oil mobility. 7
8. 8. Salient features of the process are: • It is a continuous, not a cycle process. Electrical Heating
occurs simultaneously with production of fluids. • Low frequency Power(not microwave
frequency) is used. • All the downhole equipment can be contained within a single wellbore. 8
9. 9. The variable frequency(2 to 60 Hz), power supply(Isted,1992), is capable of delivering up to
300 kW of power. The power delivery system may consist of tubing , cables or a combination
of both. The electrode assembly consist of bare casing pipe with fiberglass electrical isolation
joints attached to the ends. The length of electrode and location in the reservoir is a matter of
engineering design. The current return or ground can be the casing string above the fiberglass
insulation. 9
10. 10. Current leaves the power supply and is conducted down the power delivery system to the
electrode assembly. The electrode is in electrical contact with reservoir formation. From the
electrode, the current is forced to flow through the reservoir and return to the power supply up
the casing. The electrical path in the reservoir is primarily electrolytic because the conducting
path is through the connate water in the reservoir. The connate water is heated by electrical
losses and the remaining fluids and rock are heated by thermal conduction. The heated radius,
the distance at which the oil viscosity is much reduced, can be three to seven
meters(Vermeulen,1988) 10
11. 11. The amount of power to stimulate the well effectively is governed by the production rate as
cooler fluids flow from the reservoir towards the well as the hot fluids are produced. Too much
power can result in excessive temperatures and can damage the electrode assembly. The use of
reservoir simulation to define operating power for a particular flow rate is therefore critically
important. 11
12. 12. Visco­Skin The visco­skin is a zone of high oil viscosity that develops in the low pressure
region near the wellbore. It occurs in most naturally producing oil wells, but is especially
prevalent in saturated heavy oils of 10 to 24° API gravity(McGee, 1989). Visco­Skin can best
described by reference to figure 2. 12
13. 13. 13 Figure 2
14. 14. Radially approaching the wellbore from the reservoir, the pressure decreases rapidly to the
producing pressure. As the pressure drops, more and more gas evolves from the oil into the
gaseous phase. A result of gas evolving from the oil is a viscosity profile like that shown in
Figure 2. The oil viscosity reaches the maximum at the wellbore and decreases rapidly to the
original oil viscosity in the Reservoir. The region of high oil viscosity usually extends only 1 to
2 meters into the reservoir. 14
15. 15. As a result, flow is impaired. The magnitude of the productivity decrease(Visco­Skin)
depends on the ratio of oil viscosity at the wellbore to live oil viscosity,(viscosity parameter
Pμ). In heavy oil reservoirs, Pμ is typically grater than 10 and productivity decrease caused by
Visco­Skin is typically two or three times(McGee,1991). 15
16. 16. Field Case Comparison The well was drilled into the sparky formation in the Frog Lake area
and completed for electrical heating in June 1988. The oil there is heavy and oil can be
produced under primary conditions. Figure 3(5) Shows the production history of the well. Peak
production was 7.1 ᵅ3 ᵅᵄᵆ and declined to 3.0 ᵅ3 ᵅᵄᵆ before electrical heating. The well
produced for 153 operating days and then was electrically stimulated immediately the
production rate increased to over 12 ᵅ3 ᵅᵄᵆ. The input power during stimulation averaged
15kW. 16
17. 17. Figure 3 17
18. 18. 18
19. 19. Field Case Comparison The development and subsequent removal of the visco­skin in the
near wellbore region is one explanation to account for the oil production during primary
production and the rapid increase in production after a short period of thermal stimulation. 19
20. 20. 20 Figure 4
21. 21. The extent of the visco­skin during primary production had to be calculated. The simulator
was set to compositional mode and the oil viscosity distribution after 153 days was calculated
and is shown in figure(4). As shown in the figure, the region of high oil viscosity is within one
meter of the wellbore. The viscosity parameter is to be about ten, which is based on
experimental work of Beal(Beal,1946). At the onset of electrical heating more than a threefold
increase in production was observed in the field. This was achieved at initial power rates of less
than 5kW. When the electrical heating option was turned on in the simulator, a production
response match was attained. The simulator verified the removal of visco­skin as a mechanism
of production stimulation. 21
22. 22. It is important to estimate the operating temperature of the electrode during electrical
heating since the downhole equipment may fail at temperatures above 100°C. Figure(5) shows
that the calculated temperature distribution in the reservoir around the electrode. These
calculations are based on oil flow of 10 ᵅ3 ᵅᵄᵆ and input power of 30kW. 22
23. 23. 23 Figure 5
24. 24. Since the flowrate changes during the life of the well, a curve showing the input power
necessary for an electrode temperature of 100°C for various flowrates is required. This curve is
shown in Figure 8, and is referred to as the P­Q Curve (Power Flowrate). Operating the system
above the line will result in peak temperatures greater than 100°C. 24
25. 25. 25 Figure 6
26. 26. A reservoir simulator , Tetrad, has been modified to incorporate the electrical heating
equations. The simulator includes treatment of the electrical conductivity as a function of
temperature, salinity and saturation. The simulator was validated against analytical calculations
and field data. It has been used to design several electrode completions and assist in developing
operating strategies for field implementation of the electrical heating process. The simulator
verified the existence of a visco­skin in the near wellbore region of a heavy oil well and the
subsequent response of the well to electrical heating and removal of the visco­skin. 26
27. 27. Field Case Comparison “Tetrad” is a commercial numerical reservoir simulator that can
operate in four main modes; a) Black Oil b) Multicomponent c) Thermal d) Geothermal It is the
simulator which was modified to incorporate electrical heating. 27
28. 28. The simulations showed that the DHEH cable will increase the temperature of the
surrounding fluid and that the heat transferred will increased production as a function of
reducing the viscosity and allowing the fluid to flow better. In addition to the improved flow
conditions and as a result of the reduced viscosity, bottomhole heating has been reported to
produce several benefits, such as less friction inside the production tubing above the pump. This
allows the pump to work more efficiently, with lower backpressure. Case studies have
demonstrated that formation heating stimulates the mobility of oil by the thermal expansion
experienced by gaseous phase of crude. The heated oil liberates dissolved gases in the solution.
This process forms a layer of gas that, when heated, will expand, pushing the fluid upward.
Likewise, water, when present in a limited amount in the reservoir, will be converted to steam,
which in turns expands and increases bottomhole pressure, also acting as a pushing agent. 28
29. 29. It is important to note that flow rates have a significant impact on the temperature obtained.
Oil that is static will absorb thermal energy, as opposed to oil that is moving away from the heat
source. As a result, the higher the flowrate, the lower the amount of heat that is absorbed, and
thus there is a smaller impact on production. The balance between heat input and oil produced is
delicate. 29
30. 30. Conclusions The calculations also indicate the electrical heating process can substantially
increase production from a well. Because of the small heated radius, the process is more a
wellbore stimulation process than a reservoir heating scheme. However, since the visco­skin is
tightly bound to the wellbore, the process is effective in increasing productivity. 30
31. 31. References 1. K.VINSOME, B.C.W.McGEE, F.E.VERMEULEN, F.S.CHUTE, Electrical
Heating, PETSOC­94­04­04 2. Downhole Electrical Heating for Enhanced Heavy­Oil
Recovery, SPE­ 0314­0132­JPT 31
32. 32. Thanks For Your Attention 32

Recommended
Oillect
oilandgasalert

SMART GRID USING WSN
Jaganya Naina

Role of Enhanced Oil Recovery
princeslea79

Electrical maintenance engineer application letter
jonhsdiss

Electrical foreman application letter
jonhsdiss

The Outcome Economy
Helge Tennø

The Six Highest Performing B2B Blog Post Formats
Barry Feldman
English
Español
Português
Français
Deutsch

About
Dev & API
Blog
Terms
Privacy
Copyright
Support

LinkedIn Corporation © 2016

Share Clipboard

Email

Enter email addresses
Add a message
From  
Send
Email sent successfully..

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+

Link 

Public clipboards featuring this slide

×
No public clipboards found for this slide

Save the most important slides with Clipping
Clipping is a handy way to collect and organize the most important slides from a presentation.
You can keep your great finds in clipboards organized around topics.

Start clipping
No thanks. Continue to download.

Select another clipboard

Looks like you’ve clipped this slide to already.

Search for a clipboard
Create a clipboard

You just clipped your first slide!
Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later. Now customize the
name of a clipboard to store your clips.

Name*  Best of Slides  
Description  Add a brief description so others know what your Clipboard is about.
 
Visibility
Others can see my Clipboard 
Cancel   Save
Save this presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Oillect
Loading in …1