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1) INTRODUCTION

The term inventory refers to the goods or materials used by a firm for the purpose of
production and sales. It also includes the items, which are used as supportive material to
facilitate production.

Inventory management is primarily about the specifying of the size and placement
of stocked goods. Inventory management is required at different location within a facility
or within multiple location of a supply network to protect the regular and planned course of
production against the random disturbance of running out of materials or goods.

COCA-COLA, the product that has been given the world its best-known taste was
born in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 8, 1886. COCA-COLA Company is the world’s leading
manufacturer, marketer and distributor of non-alcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups,
used to produce nearly 400 beverage brands. It sells beverage concentrates and syrups to
bottling and canning operators, distributors, fountain wholesalers. The company’s beverage
products comprises of bottled and canned soft drinks as well as concentrates, syrups and
not-ready-to-drink powder products. In addition to this, it also produces and markets sports
drink, tea and coffee. The COCA-COLA Company began building its global network in the
1920s. Now operating in more than 200 countries and producing nearly 400 brands, the
COCA-COLA system has successfully applied a simple formula on a global scale:”provide
a moment of refreshment for a small amount of money-a billion times a day”.

The COCA-COLA Company and its network of bottlers comprise the most
sophisticated and pervasive production and distribution system in the world. More than
anything, that system is dedicated to people working long and hard to sell the products
manufactured by the company. This unique worldwide system has made the COCA-COLA
Company the world’s premier soft-drink enterprises. For more than 115 years, COCA-
COLA has created a special moment of pleasure for hundreds of millions of people every
day.

The company aims at increasing shareowner value over time. It accomplishes this
by working with its business partners to deliver satisfaction and value to consumers through
a worldwide system of superior brands and services, thus increasing brand equity on a global
basis. They aim at managing their business well with people who are strongly committed to
the company values and culture and providing an appropriately controlled environment, to
meet business goals and objectives. The associates of this company jointly take

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responsibility to ensure compliance with the framework of policies and protect the
company’s assets and resources whilst limiting business risks.

Company Profile origin The first Coca-Cola recipe was


invented in Covington, Georgia, by JOHN STITH PEMBERTON,
originally as a coca wine called “Pemberton's French Wine Coca’ in
1885. It incorporated in 1892 as Coca-Cola Company (the current
corporation). The first sales were made at Jacob's Pharmacy in
Atlanta, Georgia, on May 8, 1886, and for the first eight months only
nine drinks were sold each day.

1.1) Preface of the study

The Coca-Cola Company established The Coca-Cola Company Supplemental


Benefit Plan (the “Supplemental Benefit Plan”) effective January 1, 1984. The Coca-Cola
Company Supplemental Pension Plan (the “Plan”) is a successor plan to the Supplemental
Benefit Plan and constitutes the supplemental pension component previously provided
pursuant to the Supplemental Benefit Plan.

The Plan is an unfunded supplemental retirement plan for eligible employees and
their beneficiaries as described herein. The Plan is designed to provide certain retirement
benefits primarily for a select group of management or highly compensated employees
which are not otherwise payable or cannot otherwise be provided under the terms of the tax-
qualified retirement plans maintained by The Coca-Cola Company as a result of the
limitations set forth under certain applicable sections of the Internal Revenue Code or on
account of an employee’s deferral of compensation under The Coca-Cola Company
Deferred Compensation Plan.

The plan was most recently amended and restated effective January 1, 2008 (the
“Prior Plan”). This amendment and restatement is effective January 1, 2010.

On January 1, 2010, the Company amended and restated the Qualified Pension Plan
and also renamed the pension plan as The Coca-Cola Company Pension Plan. Also effective
January 1, 2010, the pension formula under the Qualified Pension Plan changed. Prior to
January 1, 2010, the Qualified Pension Plan’s benefit formula provided a monthly benefit
based on age, compensation, and length of service. For convenience, this benefit is referred
to as the “FAE Benefit.”

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Beginning January 1, 2010, the Qualified Pension Plan formula changed to a “Cash
Balance Benefit.” The cash balance benefit is based on a hypothetical account established
under the Qualified Pension Plan for each eligible participant (known as the “cash balance
account”). Amounts are credited to each eligible participant’s cash balance account based
on the participant’s compensation and other factors. Amounts representing interest are also
credited to the cash balance account.

As a result changes of the changes to the Qualified Pension Plan, amendments were
required to the Plan as reflected in this amendment and restatement.

Effective at midnight on December 31, 2009, the Company froze future accruals
under the Supplemental Retirement Plan for The Coca-Cola Company Pilots (“Pilots’
Plan”). In addition, the Company transferred the liabilities associated with the Pilots’ Plan
to this Plan. Accordingly, the Plan was amended as part of the January 1, 2010 amendment
and restatement to add a new Appendix B to reflect the transfer of liabilities from the Pilots
Plan to this Plan.

1.2) OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

The present study revolves around the following broad objectives:-

 To understand the objective of inventory management.


 To indentify how much inventory of bottles of COCA-COLA is maintained.
 To understand the inventory management system of COCA-COLA.

1.3) SCOPE OF THE STUDY

Many companies use inventory system in their production or retail operations.


Inventory management provides the foundation to meet customer demands and
composes one of the largest assets owned by the company. Companies incorporate
inventory system as a way of managing inventory level. Each inventory system falls
within a specific scope and experiences certain limitations. Management needs to
understand the scope of each in order to choose the best inventory system for the
company. The scope of an inventory system considers which needs the inventory
system addresses. These include:

 Valuing the inventory, measuring the change in inventory and planning for future
inventory levels.

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 The value of the Inventory at the end of each period provides a basis for financial
reporting on the balance sheet.
 Measuring the change in inventory allows the company to determine the cost of
inventory sold during the period.
 The inventory level and changes allow the company to plan for future inventory
needs.

1.4) Methodology

Data collection

Two types of data are collected, one is primary data and second one is secondary
data. The primary data were collected from the Department of finance, COCA-COLA
COMPANY. The secondary data were collected from the Annual Report of COCA-COLA
COMPANY, its website, etc.

Place of study:-

The project study is carried out at the Finance Department of COCA-COLA


COMPANY Corporate office Situated at KHORDHA, ORISSA. The study is undertaken
as a (MBA) MASTERS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION OF BIJU PATNAIK
UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, ODISHA in the form of summer placement.

1.4.b) Period of Study

I have done my project from 2nd june,2014 to 20th july,2014 In Khordha plant of
Hindustan coca- cola Beverages Pvt. Limited.

1.4.c) limitations

There may be limitations to this study because the study duration (summer
placement) is very short and it’s not possible to observe every aspect of inventory
management and control system practices.

1. Interest on invested capital.

2. Physical handling.

3. Accounting.

4. Depreciation and determination.

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2. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS

Inventory consists of stock of raw materials, work-in-progress, spare pa


consumables for production and finished goods for sale. Thus, inventory com includes
control over raw materials, spare parts, consumables, partly finished goods, and finished
goods. The following are the common techniques of inventory control:

1. Determination of various levels of materials.

2. Economic Order Quantity.

3. ABC Analysis.

4. Perpetual Inventory System.

1. Determination of various Levels of Materials :

The store-keeper plays an important role in deciding upon the various levels
materials. In order to ensure that the optimum quantity of materials is purchased stocked
neither less nor more, the store keeper applies scientific techniques of materials
management. Fixing of certain levels for each item of materials in one of techniques.

These levels are not permanent but require revision according to the change in the
factors which determine these levels. The following levels are generally fixed.

(a) Re-order Level.


(b) Maximum Level.
(c) Minimum Level.
(d) Average Level.
(e) Danger Level

(a). Re-order Level :

This level is that level of material at which it is necessary to initiate purchase


requisition for fresh supplies. This is normally the point lying between the maximum and the
minimum levels. Fresh orders must be placed before the actual stocks touch the minimum
level.

This level is fixed in such a manner that the quantity of materials represented by the
difference between the re-order level and the minimum level will be sufficient to meet the
requirement of production till such time as the order materializes and materials are delivered.
The following factors are taken into account for fixing the Re-order level:

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(i). Rate of consumption of material.

(ii). Lead time i.e. time required to receive the delivery of fresh purchase.

(iii). Re-order quantity.

(iv). Minimum level.

Re-order level can be calculated by applying the following formula:

Re-order level = Minimum level + Consumption during period required to get fresh
delivery.

Another formula for Re-order level is:

Re-order level = Maximum consumption x Maximum Re-order Period.

Illustration- 1

Calculate Re-order level for a material from the following information: Minimum
level – 1,000 units Maximum level – 6,000 units Time required to get fresh delivery
-15 days. Daily consumption of the material -100 units.

Solution:

Re-order level = Minimum Level + Consumption during the period required to get
fresh delivery.

=1,000 units + (100x 15) = 2,500 units.

(b). Maximum Level:

The maximum level is that level of stock which can be held at any time. In other
words, it is the level beyond which stock should not be maintained. The purpose is
to avoid over-stocking and thereby using working capital in a proper way. This level
is fixed after taking into account the following factors:

(i). Rate of consumption.


(ii). Lead time.
(iii). Availability of capital.
(iv). Storage capacity.
(v). Cost of maintaining stores including insurance cost.
(vi). Nature of commodity.
(vii). Possibility of price fluctuation.

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(viii) Possibility of change in fashion, habit, etc.
(ix) Restorations imposed by Govt., local authority or trade associations.
(x). Re-order level it.
(xi). Re-order quantity.

Maximum level can be calculated by applying the following formula.

Maximum level = Re-order level + Re-order Quantity – (Minimum consumption x


Minimum Re-order period)

(c) Minimum Level:

This is the level below which the stock of an item should not fall. This is known as
safety or buffer stock. An enterprise must maintain minimum quantity of stock so
that the production is not hampered due to non-availability of materials. This level
is fixed after considering the following factors.

(i). Re-order level.

(ii). Lead time.

(iii). Rate of consumption.

The formula for calculating minimum level is:

Minimum level = Re-order level – (Normal consumption x Normal Re-order period)

(d) Average Level:

Average level can be calculated by applying the following formula:

Maximum level + Minimum Level Average Level = ……………………………..

Or Average level = Minimum level + of Re-order Quantity.

(e) Danger Level:

Usually stack should not be lower than the minimum level. But if for any reason,
stock comes down below the minimum level, it is called danger level. When the stock
reaches danger level, it is necessary to take urgent action on the part of the management for
immediate replenishment of stock to prevent stock-out situation. The danger level can be
calculated by applying the following formula:

Danger Level = Average consumption x Maximum Re-order period for emergency


purchases.

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From the following particulars, calculate the maximum level, minimum level, re-
order level and average level:

Normal consumption – 300 units per day.

Maximum consumption -420 units per day.

Minimum consumption -240 units per day.

Re-order quantity – 3,600 units.

Re-order period -10-12 days.

2. Economic Order Quantity (EOQ):

The economic order quantity, known as EOC, represents the most favorable quantity
to be ordered each time fresh orders are placed. The quantity to be ordered is called
economic order quantity because the purchase of this size of material is most economical.
It is helpful to determine in advance as to how much should one buy when the stock level
reaches the re-order level. If large quantities arc purchased, the carrying costs would be
large.

On the other hand, if small quantities are purchased at frequent intervals she ordering
costs would be high. The economic order quantity is fixed at such a level as to minimize the
cost of ordering and carrying the stock. It is the size of the order which produces the lowest
cost of material ordered.

While determining the economic order quantity, the following three cost factors are
taken into consideration:

(i). the cost of material.

(ii) The inventory carrying cost.

(iii). the ordering cost.

Carrying costs are the costs of holding the inventory in the stores. These are:

(i). Rent for the storage space.

(ii) Salaries and wages of the employees engaged in store keeping department.

(iii) Loss due to pilferage and deterioration.

(iv) Insurance charges.

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(v) Stationary used in the stores.

(vi) Loss of interest on the capital locked up in materials.

Ordering Costs are the costs of placing orders for the purchase of materials. These are:

(i) Salaries and wages of the employees engaged in purchasing department.

(ii) Stationary, postage, telephone expenses, etc. of the purchasing department.

(iii) Depreciation on equipments and furniture used by the purchasing department.

(iv) Rent for the space used by the purchasing department.

While placing orders for purchasing materials, the total cost to be incurred is kept in
view. As discussed earlier, if an order is placed for a large quantity at a time, the ordering
cost is less but the carrying cost would be more.

On the other hand, if orders are placed for small quantities, the ordering cost is more
but the carrying cost would be less. Thus the economic order quantity is determined at a
point when the ordering costs and the carrying costs are equal. Only at this stage the total of
ordering cost and carrying cost is minimum.

Where, EOQ= Economic order quantity.

C= Annual consumption or usage of material in units.

0= Cost of placing one feeder including the cost of receiving the goods.

1= Cost of carrying one unit of inventory for one year.

Assumptions in the Calculation of Economic Order Quantity:

The economic order quantity is based on the following assumptions:

 Quantity of the item to be consumed during a particular period is known with


certainty.

 The pattern of consumption of material is constant and uniform throughout the


period.

 Cost per unit is constant and known and quantity discount is not involved.

 Ordering cost and carrying cost are known and they are fixed per unit and will remain
constant throughout the period.

Illustration-4

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From the following information, calculate the economic order quantity. Annual
consumption -10,000 units cost of material per unit- Rs.10 Cost of placing and receiving
one order – Rs.50 Annual carrying cost of one unit -10% of inventory value.

Solution:

Where, C=Annual consumption of materials in units = 10,000 units.

O=Cost of placing one order including the cost of receiving =Rs.50 I=Carrying cost
per unit per annum =10% of Rs.10= Re.1.

Economic order quantity can also be calculated by using the tabular method. A
comparison of total costs at different order sizes is made to determine the economic order
quantity. The order size having the least total cost is accepted as economic order quantity.
At this point, both carrying costs and ordering costs would be equal.

3. ABC Analysis:

This technique of inventory control is also known as always Better Control


technique. ABC analysis is an analytical method of control which aims at concentrating
effects on those areas where attention is needed most.

This is a principle of selective control. The emphasis of ABC analysis technique is


that the management should concentrate its energy in controlling those items that mostly
affect the organizational objects. Manufacturing concerns find it useful to group the
materials into three classes on the basis of investment involved.

According to this approach to inventory control high value items are more closely
controlled than low value items. Each item of inventory is given A, B or C denomination
depending upon the amount spent for that particular item. “:A” or the highest value items
should be under the tight control and under responsibility of the most experienced personnel,
while “C” or the lowest value may be under simple physical control.

It may also be clear with the help of the following examples:

“A” Category – 5% to 10% of the items represent 70% to 75% of the money value.

“B” Category – 15% to 20% of the items represent 15% to 20% of the money.

“C” Category – The remaining number of the items represent 5% to 10% of the
money value.

Advantages of ABC Analysis:

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 Close and strict control of costly items is ensured.

 Investment in inventory can be regulated and funds can be utilized in the best
possible way.

 Economy is achieved in respect of stock carrying cost.

 It helps to keep enough safely stock for “C” category items.

 Clerical cost can be reduced and inventory is maintained at optimum level.

 Scientific and selective control helps in maintenance of high stock turnover rate.

4. Perpetual Inventory System:

Another method of inventory control is the maintenance of inventory control on a


continuous basis. After the material are received into the stores, the storekeeper will arrange
for the storing of each item in the allotted rack, bin, shelf or other receptacles and attach a
card to each bin for the purpose of making entries there in relating to the receipt, issues and
balance. The bin card or the locker card, this becomes a perpetual inventory record for each
item of stores. Thus the perpetual inventory is a method of recording store balance after
every receipt and issue to facilitate regular checking and to obviate closing down for stock
locking.

Under this method of stocktaking, the verification of the whole of the stock and its
valuation are accomplished only once at the close of the financial year and difference in
stock is adjusted only once. Nevertheless, the periodic inventory has its own disadvantage.
In the first place, it becomes necessary to close down the factory on the day of stock taking.
Secondly, discrepancies in stock cannot be corrected by an executive action immediately as
and when they occur. Thirdly, since all the items are checked only once in a particular day,
a surprise verification will not be possible. Lastly, reason for the discrepancies cannot be
found out because of the long interval between two consecutive verifications.

The advantages of a continuous stocktaking where perpetual inventory records are


maintained may thus be summarized as follows:

(i) The elaborate and costly work involved in periodic stock taking can be avoided.
(ii) The stock verification can be done without the necessity of closing down the factory.

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(iii) The preparation of interim financial statement becomes possible.
(iv) Discrepancies are easily located and corrected immediately.
(v) It ensures a reliable check on the stores.
(vi) It exercises a moral influence on the stores staff.
(vii) Fast and slow moving items can be distinguished and the fixation of proper stock
levels prevents not only over-stocking, but under-stocking also.
(viii) A perpetual inventory record of the nature of the bin cards enables the storekeeper
to keep an eye on the stock levels and replenish the stock of every item whenever
the limit falls to the recorded level.
(ix) It provides reliable information to the management of the number of units and the
value of every item of stores.
(x) It ensures secrecy of the items that are verified.

Pricing of Raw Materials:

When issues are made out of various lots purchased at varying prices, the problem
arises to which of the receipt price should be adopted for valuing the materials requisitions.

1. First in first out :

Materials received first will be issued first. The price of the earliest consignment if
taken first and when that consignment is exhausted the price of the next consignment
is adopted and so on. This method is suitable in times of falling prices, because the
material charge to production will be high while the replacement cost of materials
will be low.

2. Last in first out :

Materials received last will be issued first. The price of the last consignment is taken
first and when that consignment is exhausted the price of the second last
consignment is adopted and so on. In timing of rising prices this method will show
a charge to production, which is closely related to current price levels provided that
the last purchase is made recently.

3. Weighted average cost method :

Under this method material issued is priced at the weighted average cost of material
in stock.

WAC= Value of material in stock / quantity in stock.

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4. Standard price method :

Under this method a standard price is predetermined. The price of issues


predetermined for a stated period taken into account all the factors affecting price
such as anticipated market trends, transportation charges, and normal quantity of
purchase. Standard prices are determined for each material and material requisitions
are priced at standard irrespective of the actual purchase price. Any difference
between the standard and actual price results in materials price variance.

5. Current Price :

According to this method, material issued is priced at their replacement or realizable


price at the time of issue. So the cost at which identical material could be purchased
from the market should be ascertained and used for valuing material issues.

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3. COMPANY PROFILE

Past and Present


1894 .A modest start for a bold idea
In a candy store in Vicksburg, Mississippi, brisk sales of the new fountain beverage
called COCA-COLA to sell using a common glass bottle called a Hutchinson. Biedenharn
sent a case to Asa Griggs Candler, who owned the company. Candler thanked him but took
no action. One of his nephew’s already had urged that COCA-COLA be bottled, but Candler
focused on fountain sales.
1899 . The first bottling agreement
Two young attorneys from Chattanooga, Tennessee believed they could build a
business around bottling COCA-COLA. In a meeting with Candler, Benjamin F.Thomas
and Joseph B. Whitehead obtained exclusive rights to bottle COCA-COLA across most of
the United States (specifically excluding Vicksburg) for the sum of one Dollar. A third
Chattanooga lawyer, John T. Lupton, soon joined their venture.
1900-1909…. Rapid Growth
The three pioneer bottlers divided the country into territories and sold bottling rights
to local entrepreneurs. Their efforts were boosted by major progress in bottling technology,
which improved efficiency and product quality by 1909, nearly 400 COCA-COLA bottling
plants were operating. Most of them family-owned business. Some were open only during
hot-weather months.
1916 Birth of the contour bottle
Bottlers worried that the straight-sided bottle for Coca-Cola was easily confused
with imitators. A group representing the Company and bottlers asked glass manufacturers
to offer ideas for a distinctive bottle. A design from the Root Glass Company of Terre Haute,
Indiana won enthusiastic approval in 1915 and was introduced in 1916. The contour bottle
became one of the few packages ever granted trademark status by the U.S. Patent Office.
Today, it's one of the most recognized icons in the world - even in the dark!
1920s … Bottling overtakes fountain sales
As the 1920s dawned, more than 1,000 Coca-Cola bottlers were operating in the U.S.
Their ideas and zeal fueled steady growth. Six-bottle cartons were a huge hit after their 1923
introduction. A few years later, open-top metal coolers became the forerunners of automated

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vending machines. By the end of the 1920s, bottle sales of Coca-Cola exceeded fountain
sales.
1920s and 30s … International expansion
Led by longtime Company leader Robert W. Woodruff, chief executive officer and
chairman of the Board, the Company began a major push to establish bottling operations
outside the U.S. Plants were opened in France, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Belgium,
Italy, Peru, Spain, Australia and South Africa. By the time World War II began, Coca-Cola
was being bottled in 44 countries.
1940s … Post-war growth
During the war, 64 bottling plants were set up around the world to supply the troops.
This followed an urgent request for bottling equipment and materials from General
Eisenhower's base in North Africa. Many of these war-time plants were later converted to
civilian use, permanently enlarging the bottling system and accelerating the growth of the
Company's worldwide business.
1950s … Packaging innovations
For the first time, consumers had choices of Coca-Cola package size and type the
traditional 6.5-ounce contour bottle, or larger servings including 10-, 12- and 26-ounce
versions. Cans were also introduced, becoming generally available in 1960.
1960s … New brands introduced
Following Fanta® in the 1950s, Sprite®, Minute Maid®, Fresca® and TaB® joined
brand Coca-Cola in the 1960s. Mr. Pibb® and Mello Yello® were added in the 1970s. The
1980s brought diet Coke® and Cherry Coke®, followed by POWERADE® and DASANI®
in the 1990s. Today hundreds of other brands are offered to meet consumer preferences in
local markets around the world.
1970s and 80s … Consolidation to serve customers
As technology led to a global economy, the retailers who sold Coca-Cola merged
and evolved into international mega-chains. Such customers required a new approach. In
response, many small and medium-size bottlers consolidated to better serve giant
international customers. The Company encouraged and invested in a number of bottler
consolidations to assure that its largest bottling partners would have capacity to lead the
system in working with global retailers.

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1990s … New and growing markets

Political and economic changes opened vast markets that were closed or
underdeveloped for decades. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Company invested heavily
to build plants in Eastern Europe. And as the century closed, more than $1.5 billion was
committed to new bottling facilities in Africa.

21st Century …

The Coca-Cola bottling system grew up with roots deeply planted in local
communities. This heritage serves the Company well today as people seek brands that honor
local identity and the distinctiveness of local markets. As was true a century ago, strong
locally based relationships between Coca-Cola bottlers, customers and communities are the
foundation on which the entire business grows.

ABOUT THE COMPANY

COCA-COLA was the leading soft drink brand in India until 1997, when it left rather
than reveals its formula to the Government and reduces its equity stake as required under
the foreign regulation Act (FERA) which governed the operations of foreign companies in
India. COCA-COLA reentered the Indian market on 26th October 1993 after a gap of 16
years, with its launch in Agra. An agreement with Parle group gave the company instant
ownership of the top soft drink brands of the nation. With access to 53 of Parle’s plants and
a well set bottling network, an excellent base for rapid introduction of the company’s
international brands was formed. The COCA-COLA company acquired soft drink brands
like Thumps-up, Gold spot, Limca, Mazza, which were floated by Parle, as these products
had achieved a strong consumer base and formed a strong brand image in Indian market
during the re-entry of COCA-COLA in 1993.Thus these products became a part of range of
products of the COCA-COLA company.
In the new liberalized and deregulated environment in 1993, COCA-COLA made its
re-entry into India through its 100% owned subsidiary, HCCBPL , the Indian bottling arm
of the COCA-COLA company. However this was based on numerous commitments and
stipulations which the company agreed to implement in due course. On such major
commitment was that, the Hindustan COCA-COLA Holdings would invest $5 billion in
India from 2012 to 2020 to capture the Indian market.
COCA-COLA is made up of 7000 local employees, 500 managers, over 60
manufacturing location, 27 companies owned bottling operation (COBO), 17 Franchisee

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Owned Bottling Operations (FOBO) and a network of 29 contract packers that facilitate the
manufacture process of a range of products for the company. It also has a supporting
distribution network consisting of 15, 00,000 retail outlets and 15000 distributors. Almost
all goods and services required to cater to the Indian market are made locally, with help of
technology and skills within the company.
“Think local, act local”, was the mantra that COCA-COLA follows, with punch lines
like “Life has to aisi” for the urban India and “Thanda matlab COCA-COLA” for the Rural
India. The resulted in a 37% growth rate in rural India visa-vie 24% growth seen in urban
India between 2011 and 2012, the per capita consumption of cold drinks doubled due to the
launch of the new packaging of the 200 ml returnable glass bottles which were made
available at price of Rs.10 per bottle. This new market accounted for over 80% of India’s
new COCA-COLA drinkers. At COCA-COLA, they have a long standing belief that
everyone who touches their business should benefit, thereby including them to upload these
values, enabling the company to achieve success, recognition and loyalty worldwide.
1: Mission
To create consumer products, services and communications, customer services and
bottling system strategies, processes and tools in order to create competitive advantage and
deliver superior value to;
 Consumer as a superior beverage experience.
 Consumer as on opportunity to grow profits through the use of finished drinks.
 Bottlers as on opportunity to grow profits in volumes.
 Bottles as a trademark enhancement and positive economic value added.
 Suppliers as an opportunity to make reasonable profits when creating real value
added un an environment of system wide team work, flexible business system and
continuous improvement.
 Indian society in the form of contribution to economic and social development.

2: Vision

To provide exceptional strategic leadership in the COCA-COLA India system


resulting in consumer and customer preference and loyalty, through COCA-COLA’s
commitment to them and in a highly profitable COCA-COLA corporate branded beverage
system.

The vision of Coca-Cola is the framework for their guides of every aspect of its
business. It is presented in 6Ps:

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1. PEOPLE: Be a great place to work where people are inspired to be the best they can
be.

2. PORTFOLIO: Bring to the world a portfolio of quality beverage brands that


anticipate and satisfy people's desires and needs.

3. PARTNERS: Nurture a winning network of customers and suppliers, together we


create mutual, enduring value.

4. PLANET: Be a responsible citizen that makes a difference by helping build and


support sustainable communities.

5. PROFIT: Maximize long-term return to shareowners while being mindful of our


overall responsibilities.

6. PRODUCTIVITY: Be a highly effective, lean and fast-moving organization.

3: Value

The values that the employees in the company are expected to keep up to and work
by regularly are as follows:

 LEADERSHIP: To take an initiative and lead, motivate and drive the team with
energy and zeal, to deliver outstanding result.
 INNOVATION: To continuously strive for progress and reach the next level of
excellence in everything we do.
 PASSION: To be deeply committed and display drive and energy in the quest to
deliver outstanding performance.
 TEAMWORK: To unit for greater strength and work collectively as a group towards
the achievement of common goals.
 OWNERSHIP: To think and act like owners at all levels; to have decision taken at
the lowest appropriate level.
 ACCOUNTABILITY: To be individually and transparently accountable to our
colleagues for delivering agreed targets and goals.

21
Hindustan COCA-COLA Beverage Pvt. Ltd, Khordha Plant

Company Overview:-

Hindustan COCA-COLA Beverage Pvt. Ltd. Khordha. It is one of the bottling plants
of “COCA-COLA “under the Khordha plant there is another bottling plant in Rourkela,
where only RGB production happens. HCCBPL, Khordha plant was established in the year
2000 under the authority of COCA-COLA, India. This plant is the 3rd largest plant after
Ahmadabad and Rurki in term of production of finished goods. The production plant is
situated in Khordha Industrial Estate, where the production and distribution work are done.
Both Odisha and Jharkhand zone come under this region. Jharkhand is fully depending on
Khordha plant because no production plant is there.

So from Khordha plant, goods are sent to distributor in two ways, one is from directly
from its plant and another is through its Depot. Because to the long distance route they are
sending to their depot. Mainly Khordha plant has 6 locations for Odisha region for
distribution and production and 4 locations for Jharkhand for only distribution.

In HCCBPL, Khordha there are 5 production lines which are presently operating.

These are

1. Krones 600 BPM

2. MZ RGB 600 BPM

3. CSD 600 BPM

4. PET 140 BPM

5. WTR 75 BPM

Proposed expansion plan is about the inventory management of all these which is
the subject of my study. These are the list of manufacturing plant and depot of Khordha
division:-

ODISHA

F1- Khordha: - In this plant production as well as distribution of finished goods to


distributors does.

F2- Rourkela (Direct Depto): - It is one of the depots of HCCBPL, Khordha where goods
are directly distributed by the company to the retailer.

22
F3- Rourkela (Indirect Depto):- From here goods are sending to the distributor point.

F4- Mancheswar (Direct Depto):- From here goods are sending from the F1 plant and
distributed to the retailer.

F5- Bhawanipatana: - This is same like all indirect depots, goods are sending from
Khordha plant to here and from there goods are sending to the distributor point.

F7- (Rourkela CO-pack):- It is one of the RGB bottling plants of HCCBPL, Khordha.
Here production happens and finished goods are sending to the F2 and F3 location.

JHARKHAND

X4- Jamshedpur: - From the F1 location goods are send here and dispatch to the
distributor.

X6- Deogarh: - This is also same as X4 depot.

X8- Ranchi (Direct Depto):- Goods are sending from F1 location to here and distributed
to directly retailer.

X9- Ranchi (Indirect Depto):- Goods are sending from F1 location to here and distributed
to distributor.

23
24
4) DATA ANALYSIS

1. How inventory control works in Coca-Cola?


a) By efficiently tracking qualities across storage location.
b) By common application
c) By popular transaction
d) By improve accuracy

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 a 12 60
2 b 03 15
3 c 03 15
4 d 02 10
Total 20 100

How inventory control works in Coca-Cola

10%

15%

15% 60%

a b c d

Interpretation:

25
2. Are policies and procedures current in waiting and properly approved in Coca-Cola?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 15 75
2 No 05 25
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Policies and procedures current in waiting


and properly approved in Coca-Cola
0%

25%
Yes
No
Can't Say
75%

Interpretation:

26
3. Do this policies and procedures clearly systematically communicated to the employees
in Coca-Cola?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 18 90
2 No 02 20
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Policies and procedures clearly systematically communicated


to the employees in Coca-Cola

0%

10%

Yes
No
Can't Say

90%

Interpretation:

27
4. Do the department compare qualities received against receiving reports etc. in Coca-
Cola?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 15 75
2 No 05 25
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Qualities received against receiving reports etc. in Coca-Cola

0%

25%

Yes
No
Can't Say
75%

Interpretation:

28
5. Are inventory records reconciled to advantage reports on a regular basis in Coca-Cola?
6.

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 19 95
2 No 01 05
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Inventory records reconciled to advantage reports on a regular


basis in Coca-Cola

0%
5%

Yes
No
Can't Say

95%

Interpretation:

29
6. Does management review the reconciliation of physical inventory counts to the
7.
inventory records?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 12 60
2 No 04 20
3 Can’t Say 04 20
Total 20 100

Management review the reconciliation of physical inventory


counts to the inventory records

20%

Yes
No
20% 60% Can't Say

Interpretation:

30
7. Are adequate provision made for cutoff of receipts and issues?
8.

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 13 65
2 No 02 10
3 Can’t Say 05 25
Total 20 100

Adequate provision made for cutoff of receipts and issues

10%

Yes
25%
No
65% Can't Say

Interpretation:

31
8. Is there physical segregation and proper accounting control of merchandise on hand
9.
that is not property of the entity?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 20 100
2 No 00 00
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Physical segregation and proper accounting control of


merchandise on hand that is not property of the entity

0%

Yes
No
Can't Say

100%

Interpretation:

32
9. Is a perpetual inventory system (including quantities and value) in use as to all major
classes of inventory?

7.

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 19 95
2 No 01 05
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Perpetual inventory system (including quantities and value)


in use as to all major classes of inventory

0%
5%

Yes
No
Can't Say

95%

Interpretation:

33
10. Are perpetual inventory records update promptly?

8.

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 18 90
2 No 02 10
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Inventory records reconciled to advantage reports on a


regular basis in Coca-Cola

0%

10%

Yes
No
Can't Say

90%

Interpretation:

34
11. Does internal control appear adequate for the inventory system overall?

9.

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 16 80
2 No 04 20
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Internal control appear adequate for the inventory system


overall

0%

20%

Yes
No
Can't Say
80%

Interpretation:

35
12. Does your Organization have a written mission statement?

10.

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 17 85
2 No 03 15
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Organization have a written mission statement

0%

15%

Yes
No
Can't Say
85%

Interpretation:

36
13. Do these individuals know how to access the people soft on-line-financial folders that
14.
are made available monthly?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 19 95
2 No 01 05
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Individuals know how to access the people soft on-line-


financial folders

0%
5%

Yes
No
Can't Say

95%

Interpretation:

37
14. Does your department prepare an annual financial report? Are managers hold
15.
accountable for financial performance?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 18 90
2 No 02 10
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Department prepare an annual financial report

0%

10%

Yes
No
Can't Say
90%

Interpretation:

38
15. Has the department established cross-training or contingency plans for significant
16.
changes in personal?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 14 70
2 No 05 25
3 Can’t Say 01 05
Total 20 100

Department established cross-training or contingency plans


for significant changes in personal

5%

25% Yes
No
Can't Say
70%

Interpretation:

39
16. Has your department posted information on how to report suspected instances of
17.
scientific misconduct?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 18 90
2 No 02 10
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Department posted information on how to report


suspected instances of scientific misconduct
0%

10%

Yes
No
Can't Say

90%

Interpretation:

40
17. Does your department maintain any confidential employee/student and human subject
18.
research records that requires special treatment for privacy protection?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 20 100
2 No 00 00
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Department maintain any confidential employee/student and


human subject research records

0%

Yes
No
Can't Say

100%

Interpretation:

41
18. Have employees been trained for workplace safety by the Environmental Health &
safety officer (EH&C) to comply with the appropriate regular for requirements for their
19.
job responsibilities?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 17 85
2 No 03 15
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Employees been trained for workplace safety by the


Environmental Health & safety officer (EH&C)

0%

15%

Yes
No
Can't Say

85%

Interpretation:

42
19. Do your believe that department personal are sufficiently informed about important
federal and state laws and regulations that govern activities performed within your
20.
department?

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 14 70
2 No 06 30
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Department personal are sufficiently informed


about important federal and state laws and
regulations
0%

30% Yes
No
Can't Say
70%

Interpretation:

43
20. Are you satisfied the entire inventory process and control system of Coca-Cola?
21.

Sl. No. Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


1 Yes 20 100
2 No 00 00
3 Can’t Say 00 00
Total 20 100

Satisfied the entire inventory process and control system of


Coca-Cola

0%

Yes
No
Can't Say

100%

Interpretation:

44
45
Inventory

Barcode

Quality Archery
Design (QAD)

Goods Received Notes


(GRN)

Sales Received Notes (SRN)

46
47
(How to use inventory system)

Raw Material- first the raw material is procured by the company. In a particular quantity for
production process.

Bar Code- Bar code is a machine which check the raw material which has been procured by
the company. The main work of bar code is to detect the raw material.

QAD Software- Quality Archery design is a software. Software which plays vital role in
COCA-COLA plant . it is uses in all over the plant for better control and operation.

GRN/SRN- Till GRN(Goods Received Note) has approved the goods cannot be received by
the company and same with SRN(Sells Received Note).

Head of the inventory department received the goods. After production the finished
goods goes to the sales department and the sales manager receives it. At last the finished goods
goes to the market for sale.

167 Coca-Cola PET 750ml CS 2,148.00 0 30 0 2,118.00


1067 Kinley Soda PET 750ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0
220 Fanta O PET 2000ml CS 871 0 47 0 824
222 Fanta O PET 1250ml. CS 1,640.00 0 20 0 1,620.00
120 Coca-Cola PET 2000ml CS 1,629.00 0 5 0 1,624.00
267 Fanta O PET 750ml CS 1,410.00 0 10 0 1,400.00
522 Thums Up PET 1250ml. CS 8,976.00 0 495 0 8,481.00
520 Thums Up PET 2000ml. CS 691 0 167 0 524
316 Sprite PET 600ml. CS 4,133.00 0 15 0 4,118.00
320 Sprite PET 2000ml CS 4,318.00 10,540.00 0 0 14,858.00
322 Sprite PET 1250ml CS 11,165.00 0 873 0 10,292.00
Sprite PET 400ml -
364 24Bottle. CS 5,754.00 0 420 0 5,334.00
1016 Kinley Soda PET 600ml. CS 3,815.00 0 50 0 3,765.00
367 Sprite PET 750ml CS 10 0 10 0 0
516 Thums Up PET 600ml. CS 1,629.00 0 10 0 1,619.00
567 Thums Up PET 750ml CS 160 0 135 0 25
Thums Up PET
5220011 1250ml750ml KWAT free CS 2,608.00 0 0 0 2,608.00

48
Coca-Cola PET 400ml -
164 24Bottle. CS 1,042.00 0 130 0 912
Thums Up PET 400ml -
564 24Bottle. CS 12,794.00 0 325 0 12,469.00
501 Thums Up RGB 200ml CS 3,628.00 0 3,084.00 0 544
503 Thums Up RGB 300ml. CS 1,937.00 0 90 0 1,847.00
303 Sprite RGB 300ml. CS 4,277.00 0 135 0 4,142.00
301 Sprite RGB 200ml. CS 12,442.00 8,000.00 3,836.00 0 16,606.00
601 Limca RGB 200ml. CS 8,289.00 0 684 0 7,605.00
901 Maaza -M- RGB 200ml CS 18,345.00 6,000.00 744 0 23,601.00
902 Maaza -M- RGB 250ml CS 378 0 6 0 372
201 Fanta O RGB 200ml CS 2,676.00 0 696 0 1,980.00
1003 Kinley Soda RGB 300ml. CS 820 0 0 0 820
101 Coca-Cola RGB 200ml. CS 2,410.00 0 1,197.00 0 1,213.00
953 Maaza -M-TPK 200ml CS 7,731.00 0 0 0 7,731.00
3353 MMNF TPK 200ml CS 59 0 0 0 59
MM Mixed Fruit
4653 DrinkTetrapack 200ml CS 1,319.00 0 180 0 1,139.00
MM Mango Tetrapack
4853 200ml. CS 1,807.00 0 0 0 1,807.00
533 Thums Up Can 300ml CS 2,328.00 0 251 0 2,077.00
434 Diet Coke Can 330mlSleek CS 50 0 0 0 50
433 Diet Coke Can 300ml. CS 1,193.00 0 149 0 1,044.00
334 Sprite Can 330ml Sleek CS 129 0 0 0 129
133 Coca-Cola Can 300ml. CS 353 0 155 0 198
134 Coca-Cola Can 330mlSleek CS 0 0 0 0 0
234 Fanta O Can 330ml Sleek CS 104 0 0 0 104
233 Fanta O Can 300ml CS 287 0 50 0 237
Schweppes Ginger Ale
2533 Can300ml CS 22 0 22 0 0
Schweppes Soda
4933 WaterSleek Can 300ml. CS 147 0 0 0 147
633 Limca Can 300ml CS 627 0 60 0 567
534 Thums Up Can 330ml Sleek CS 171 0 0 0 171

49
333 Sprite Can 300ml. CS 1,759.00 0 260 0 1,499.00
Thums Up
544 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 3 0 0 0 3
Sprite CnstrPOS18Postmix
344 18L EA 3 0 0 0 3
Fanta O
244 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 11 0 0 0 11
Coca-Cola
144 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 3 0 0 0 3
9913 IceBox EA 28 0 0 0 28
9920 Paper Cup 200 Ml EA 4,000.00 0 0 0 4,000.00
9130 CO2 Cylinder - 30KG. EA 7 0 0 0 7
9906 Paper Cup 100ml EA 15,000.00 0 0 0 15,000.00
9922 Paper Cup Lid 300 EA 3,000.00 0 0 0 3,000.00
9930 Paper Cup 300 EA 2,000.00 0 0 0 2,000.00
322 Sprite PET 1250ml CS 618 0 5 0 613
1267 Kinley Water PET 750ml CS 14 0 10 0 4
122 Coca-Cola PET 1250ml CS 0 0 0 0 0
Sprite PET 400ml -
364 24Bottle. CS 222 0 0 0 222
116 Coca-Cola PET 600ml. CS 2 0 0 0 2
516 Thums Up PET 600ml. CS 39 0 0 0 39
120 Coca-Cola PET 2000ml CS 0 0 0 0 0
522 Thums Up PET 1250ml. CS 329 0 0 0 329
267 Fanta O PET 750ml CS 87 0 87 0 0
MM Mixed Fruit
4670 Drink1000ml PET. CS 257 0 15 0 242
220 Fanta O PET 2000ml CS 27 0 0 0 27
216 Fanta O PET 600ml. CS 268 0 239 0 29
320 Sprite PET 2000ml CS 504 0 0 0 504
316 Sprite PET 600ml. CS 45 0 0 0 45
Thums Up PET
5220011 1250ml750ml KWAT free CS 55 0 0 0 55
616 Limca PET 600ml. CS 21 0 0 0 21

50
567 Thums Up PET 750ml CS 197 0 5 0 192
Thums Up PET 400ml -
564 24Bottle. CS 181 0 0 0 181
916 MZ-M-PET 600ml CS 2,140.00 0 15 0 2,125.00
Maaza-M-PET
918 1000+200mlFree CS 551 0 170 0 381
520 Thums Up PET 2000ml. CS 242 0 0 0 242
964 Maaza -M-PET 400ml - 24 CS 11,952.00 0 663 0 11,289.00
367 Sprite PET 750ml CS 293 0 0 0 293
1016 Kinley Soda PET 600ml. CS 111 0 0 0 111
1215 Kinley Water PET 500ml CS 1,396.00 0 363 0 1,033.00
1220 Kinley Water PET 2000ml. CS 2,110.00 0 60 0 2,050.00
Kinley
1223 WaterPET1000ml(15B) CS 3,519.00 0 749 0 2,770.00
Free1 Kinley Water
12670002 750mlwith 1Bt CSD 1.2 CS 87.5 0 0 0 87.5
222 Fanta O PET 1250ml. CS 12 0 0 0 12
RIM ZIM Masala
5264 Soda400ml CS 47 0 20 0 27
3364 MMNF PET 400ml CS 3 0 0 0 3
3664 MMPO PET 400ml - 24 CS 18 0 0 0 18
3670 MMPO PET 1000ml CS 73 0 30 0 43
MM Mixed Fruit Drink
4664 400ml PET. CS 1,000.00 0 40 0 960
4817 MM Mango PET 1000ml. CS 187 0 15 0 172
MM Mango PET 400ml
4864 24Bottle. CS 307 0 30 0 277
301 Sprite RGB 200ml. CS 11,003.00 0 0 0 11,003.00
101 Coca-Cola RGB 200ml. CS 697 0 0 0 697
303 Sprite RGB 300ml. CS 38 0 0 0 38
1003 Kinley Soda RGB 300ml. CS 5 0 0 0 5
901 Maaza -M- RGB 200ml CS 2,174.00 0 0 0 2,174.00
601 Limca RGB 200ml. CS 30 0 0 0 30
503 Thums Up RGB 300ml. CS 33 0 0 0 33
501 Thums Up RGB 200ml CS 8,268.00 0 0 0 8,268.00

51
3353 MMNF TPK 200ml CS 548 0 548 0 0

953 Maaza -M-TPK 200ml CS 2,123.93 0 0 0 2,123.93

1270001 Coke 1.75 Lt + 250mlfree CS 10 0 0 0 10

216 Fanta O PET 600ml. CS 19 0 0 0 19

3664 MMPO PET 400ml - 24 CS 4.00000032 0 0 0 4.00000032

3670 MMPO PET 1000ml CS 0.33333332 0 0 0 0.33333332


MM Mixed Fruit Drink
4664 400ml PET. CS 8.87500071 0 0 0 8.87500071
MM Mixed Fruit
4670 Drink1000ml PET. CS 2.24999991 0 0 0 2.24999991
MM Apple
4764 Drink400mlPET. CS 3.83333364 0 0 0 3.83333364
MM Apple Drink 1000
4770 mlPET. CS 3.58333319 0 0 0 3.58333319
MM100% Orange
4053 Juice200mlTetrapack CS 12.22221 0 0 0 12.22221

233 Fanta O Can 300ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

633 Limca Can 300ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

133 Coca-Cola Can 300ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

134 Coca-Cola Can 330mlSleek CS 0 0 0 0 0

433 Diet Coke Can 300ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

434 Diet Coke Can 330mlSleek CS 0 0 0 0 0

334 Sprite Can 330ml Sleek CS 0 0 0 0 0

333 Sprite Can 300ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

533 Thums Up Can 300ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

534 Thums Up Can 330ml Sleek CS 0 0 0 0 0

234 Fanta O Can 330ml Sleek CS 0 0 0 0 0


Thums Up
544 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 0 0 0 0 0
Coca-Cola
144 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 0 0 0 0 0
Thums Up PET 400ml -
564 24Bottle. CS 0 0 0 0 0

52
1067 Kinley Soda PET 750ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

222 Fanta O PET 1250ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

322 Sprite PET 1250ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

120 Coca-Cola PET 2000ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

167 Coca-Cola PET 750ml CS 0 0 0 0 0


Sprite PET 400ml -
364 24Bottle. CS 0 0 0 0 0
Coca-Cola PET 400ml -
164 24Bottle. CS 0 0 0 0 0

367 Sprite PET 750ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

516 Thums Up PET 600ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

3670 MMPO PET 1000ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

3664 MMPO PET 400ml - 24 CS 0 0 0 0 0

520 Thums Up PET 2000ml. CS 0 1 0 0 1

522 Thums Up PET 1250ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

320 Sprite PET 2000ml CS 3,800.00 6,740.00 10,540.00 0 0

316 Sprite PET 600ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

1215 Kinley Water PET 500ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

1016 Kinley Soda PET 600ml. CS 68 0 0 0 68

567 Thums Up PET 750ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

916 MZ-M-PET 600ml CS 0 0 0 0 0


Maaza-M-PET
918 1000+200mlFree CS 1,000.00 0 0 0 1,000.00

3364 MMNF PET 400ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

1267 Kinley Water PET 750ml CS 0 0 0 0 0


Kinley
1223 WaterPET1000ml(15B) CS 0 0 0 0 0

1220 Kinley Water PET 2000ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

901 Maaza -M- RGB 200ml CS 6,000.00 6,089.00 6,000.00 0 6,089.00

53
902 Maaza -M- RGB 250ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

301 Sprite RGB 200ml. CS 12,100.00 9,900.00 8,000.00 0 14,000.00

101 Coca-Cola RGB 200ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

303 Sprite RGB 300ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

1003 Kinley Soda RGB 300ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

201 Fanta O RGB 200ml CS 2,500.00 0 0 0 2,500.00

601 Limca RGB 200ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

501 Thums Up RGB 200ml CS 2,900.00 0 0 0 2,900.00

503 Thums Up RGB 300ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

953 Maaza -M-TPK 200ml CS 32,563.00 0 0 0 32,563.00


MM Mixed Fruit
4653 DrinkTetrapack 200ml CS 0 0 0 0 0
MM Mango Tetrapack
4853 200ml. CS 11,131.00 0 0 0 11,131.00

534 Thums Up Can 330ml Sleek CS 0 0 0 0 0

533 Thums Up Can 300ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

633 Limca Can 300ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

133 Coca-Cola Can 300ml. CS 1,014.00 0 0 0 1,014.00

134 Coca-Cola Can 330mlSleek CS 156 0 0 0 156

333 Sprite Can 300ml. CS 507 0 0 0 507

233 Fanta O Can 300ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

234 Fanta O Can 330ml Sleek CS 0 0 0 0 0

334 Sprite Can 330ml Sleek CS 0 0 0 0 0

433 Diet Coke Can 300ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

434 Diet Coke Can 330mlSleek CS 0 0 0 0 0


Fanta O
244 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 0 0 0 0 0

9922 Paper Cup Lid 300 EA 0 0 0 0 0

54
9920 Paper Cup 200 Ml EA 6,000.00 0 0 0 6,000.00

9130 CO2 Cylinder - 30KG. EA 0 0 0 0 0

9906 Paper Cup 100ml EA 2,000.00 0 0 0 2,000.00

116 Coca-Cola PET 600ml. CS 810 0 0 0 810

216 Fanta O PET 600ml. CS 231 0 0 0 231

916 MZ-M-PET 600ml CS 410 0 0 0 410


Maaza-M-PET
918 1000+200mlFree CS 750 0 0 0 750

1215 Kinley Water PET 500ml CS 450 0 0 0 450

1220 Kinley Water PET 2000ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0


Kinley
1223 WaterPET1000ml(15B) CS 1,908.00 0 0 0 1,908.00

1267 Kinley Water PET 750ml CS 780 0 0 0 780

3670 MMPO PET 1000ml CS 0 0 0 0 0

3364 MMNF PET 400ml CS 200 0 0 0 200

3664 MMPO PET 400ml - 24 CS 300 0 0 0 300


MM Apple
4764 Drink400mlPET. CS 300 0 0 0 300
RIM ZIM Masala
5264 Soda400ml CS 539 0 0 0 539
Coca-Cola PET
1220012 1250ml750ml KWAT free CS 46 0 0 0 46

122 Coca-Cola PET 1250ml CS 254 0 0 0 254

301 Sprite RGB 200ml. CS 0 0 0 0 0

901 Maaza -M- RGB 200ml CS 0 0 0 0 0


MM Apple Drink
4753 Tetrapack200ml CS 1,460.00 0 0 0 1,460.00
Schweppes Soda
4933 WaterSleek Can 300ml. CS 109.45762 0 0 0 109.45762

333 Sprite Can 300ml. CS 6.0416664 0 0 0 6.0416664


Schweppes Ginger Ale
2533 Can300ml CS 39.9583334 22 0 0 61.9583334

3032 Burn Can 250ml CS 8 0 0 0 8

55
3033 Burn Can 300ml CS 1.8750001 0 0 0 1.8750001

234 Fanta O Can 330ml Sleek CS 12 0 0 0 12

133 Coca-Cola Can 300ml. CS 2.8333335 0 0 0 2.8333335

134 Coca-Cola Can 330mlSleek CS 25.5416666 0 0 0 25.5416666

233 Fanta O Can 300ml CS 6.1250003 0 0 0 6.1250003

433 Diet Coke Can 300ml. CS 2.3333333 0 0 0 2.3333333

634 Limca Can 330ml Sleek CS 6.6250051 0 0 0 6.6250051

633 Limca Can 300ml CS 6.1666663 0 0 0 6.1666663

533 Thums Up Can 300ml CS 37.125 0 0 0 37.125

534 Thums Up Can 330ml Sleek CS 57 0 0 0 57

434 Diet Coke Can 330mlSleek CS 149.375 0 0 0 149.375


Schweppes Tonic
2233 WaterCanSleek 300ml. CS 12 0 0 0 12
Thums Up
544 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 1 0 0 0 1
Fanta O
244 CnstrPOS18Postmix 18L EA 5 0 0 0 5
Schweppes NRGB
1362 Soda250ml. CS 2 0 0 0 2
MMNF PET 1000mlMRP
33700001 35 Rs.10/- Off CS 34.3333317 0 0 0 34.3333317

Fanta O PET 400ml -


264 24Bottle. CS 702 0 0 0 702

56
57
FINDINGS

Improve data accuracy

Perfect inventory levels record is maintained. The best way to do that is by using mobile
wireless devices and product barcodes. Scanning barcodes is faster and more accurate than
typing product information by hand. the inventory management solution choosen uses mobile
barcode scanner so it is not tied to a desktop computer. it should be able to update the inventory
records from anywhere.

Increase efficiency

One of the main purposes of using inventory management software is to save time and
make your company more efficient. With the right inventory software , your company should
see a decrease in the amount of time it takes to place orders, receive products and pick. Then
pack it and ship products to customer.

 In COCA-COLA company there are various products like in Cola section Thumps
up, Sprite, Mazza, Limca, Fanta, Minute Maid and in water section only one
product is Kineley.
 They use QAD(Quality Archery Design) software to maintain inventory
management system.
 They also maintain GRN(Goods Received Note) and SRN(Sells Received Note).
 Very soon they sifted there new software SAP.

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SUGGESTIONS

Inventory management system is the best choice for replacing the current system. The
current system which is used in cola system by using inventory management system transaction
and any other thing will run more efficient and effective with any data loss. Form run group
point of view inventory management system should be implemented not for this but also the
others and e-scan will be used in office fact deal with warehousing like cargo, container, factory
etc.

Inventory management system will be better if it improved with programmed. That deal
with website, so the customer by home can communicate with the clerk and accountant of the
shop and ask products available then, it should deal transaction delivery to home. The use of
inventory management system, it suggest they need to be trainee well in order to maintain
wrong input of data may be trouble in daily report. If there are new updates of inventory
management system we suggest that each office or organization always follow the update show
the current system will not let behind.

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CONCLUSION

Company which does not have in management system will get problem when check.
There are very much important to produce Finished Goods(FG) at a right time because if the
Finished Goods(FG) are not produce at a right time then there will be a shortage of stock at
retailer shop. Then the retailer doesn’t satisfy to your service. Then the profit showing very
less. It’s totally depends upon the management system. If the management teams don’t give
the raw material at a perfect time then the production teams don’t produce the Finished Goods
(FG) at the right time.

There is a linkage between the Finished Goods (FG), demand and inventories of Raw
material Packaging Material (RMPM) and spares and other which required for day to day
smooth operation of a organization. They all are related to each other. If there is no Raw
Material (RM) then there is no Finished Goods (FG). If the machines are not in good conditions
then the production will be stop. Then the Finished Goods (FG) are not produce at the right
time.

Now the company use QAD software but very soon sifted to the SAP software because
to improve their inventory system. It also enhances the strength of the company. I found the
management should be very much perfect and the teams do his work in a proper way. My heart
full gratitude to the staff and employees of Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Pvt. Ltd
(HCCBPL) to co-operate with me throughout my internship period.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Websites:

1. http://www.coca-colaindia.com

2. http://www.coca-cola.in

Books:

1. Inventory Management by D. Chandra Bose.

2. Cost & Management Accounting by S.P. Jain & K. L. Narang.

3. Cost & Management Accounting by Dr. S. N. Maheswari.

4. Modern Cost & Management Accounting by M. Hanif.

Others:

1. Company Annual Report

2. News Papers

3. Company Profile

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