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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

2015

SECRETARY-GENERAL
ON CHILDREN AND

ARMED CONFLICT

SUMMARY
20 SITUATIONS OF CONFLICT THE IMPACT OF ARMED
WITH PARTIES LISTED IN CONFLICT ON CHILDREN
14 COUNTRIES
59
PARTIES TO CONFLICT LISTED PARTIES TO CONFLICT
LISTED FOR GRAVE VIOLATIONS AGAINST CHILDREN
2015 TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTS:

GOVERNMENT
8 SECURITY FORCES 51 ARMED GROUPS
Syria In 2015, the intensity of grave violations
Afghanistan
Lebanon Iraq against children increased in several situa-
Pakistan
Israel and the
State of Palestine tions of conflict. In SYRIA, thousands of chil-
Syria Afghanistan Myanmar
Lebanon Iraq Libya India
dren have been killed during over five years
Pakistan

the HIGHEST
Israel and the

Yemenof war. AFGHANISTAN recorded


State of Palestine
Mali India
Myanmar
Thailand
Libya
Sudan Philippines
Mali
Sudan Yemen Thailand
Philippines
NUMBER OF CHILD DEATHS AND
Nigeria
INJURIES since the UN started systematical-
Nigeria
Colombia
South
Sudan South
Colombia Central
African
Somalia
Sudan
Republic
Central Somalia ly documenting civilian casualties in 2009. In
Democratic
African
50% INCREASE in the
Republic of Countries with parties listed
the Congo
Republic
Other situations SOMALIA, there was a
Democratic number of recorded violations against chil-
Republic of dren. In SOUTH SUDAN, children were victims of
THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL
the Congo
HAS IDENTIFIED 5 TRIGGERS gruesome violations, particularly during brutal
FOR LISTING PARTIES TO CONFLICT: military offensives against opposition forces.

Recruitment and use of children


In YEMEN, the situation was particularly worri-
resolution 1379 adopted in 2001, first listings in 2002
some in 2015 with a FIVE-FOLD INCREASE
7 government security forces
58 parties to conflict 51 Armed groups
of the number of children recruited and used
SIX TIMES MORE CHILDREN KILLED
and

Killing and maiming children AND MAIMED. Violations committed by


resolution 1881, adopted in 2009, first listings in 2010 the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL)
continued to have a devastating impact on
3 government security forces
18 parties to conflict 15 Armed groups
children, including persistent child recruit-
ment and use and boys featured as child sol-
Rape and other forms of sexual violence diers in social media and in some cases as ex-
resolution 1881, adopted in 2009, first listings in 2010 ecutioners. In NIGERIA, Boko Haram increased
2 government security forces suicide attacks, including by using 21 GIRLS
14 parties to conflict
12 Armed groups AS SUICIDE BOMBERS in crowded pub-
lic spaces. The armed group spread its activi-
Attacks on schools and hospitals ties from northeastern Nigeria to neighboring
resolution 1998, adopted in 2011, first listings in 2012 countries, causing a significant number of ca-
1 government security forces sualties among civilians and large-scale dis-
9 parties to conflict 8 Armed groups
placements.

First listings for Abduction The proliferation of actors involved in armed


resolution 2225, adopted in 2015, first listings in 2016
conflict became a particular concern. Interna-
1 Government security forces tional coalitions, or individual Member States
6 parties to conflict 5 Armed groups
conducting cross-border aerial operations,
particularly in populated areas, resulted in
highly complex environments for the protec-
# of former child soldiers released in 2015: over 8000
tion of children.
ATTACKS ON SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS AND PROTECTED PERSONS
Attacks on schools and hospitals were prevalent in 2015 and documented in 19 out of 20 situations of conflict.
The increasing use of airstrikes and explosive weapons in populated areas had a detrimental impact on schools
and hospitals. Medical and education personnel continued to be threatened or attacked.

ABDUCTION
With the adoption of resolution 2225 in June 2015, the UN Security Council requested the Secretary-General
to list parties that engage in patterns of abduction of children. Boko Haram, the Lord’s Resistance Army, ISIL,
Al-Shabaab, the Taliban and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army are named in the report for this violation.

REDUCING THE IMPACT CHILDREN DISPLACED


OF VIOLENT EXTREMISM BY ARMED CONFLICT
Children have been significantly affected by violent An ever-growing number of people are being dis-
extremism and were often the direct targets of acts placed by armed conflict, including millions of chil-
intended to cause maximum civilian casualties and dren, many of whom are unaccompanied or separat-
terrorize communities. Efforts to counter extreme vi- ed from their families during displacement. These
olence must be carried out in full compliance with children are at a high risk of grave violations in and
international humanitarian, human rights and refugee around camps, and other areas of refuge. Action is ur-
law. In addition, children allegedly associated with gently required to alleviate the plight of children dis-
armed groups have been considered security threats placed by armed conflict and the Secretary-General
and detained for extended periods of time without encourages Member States to respect the rights of
due process in conflict situations such as Afghani- displaced and refugee children and to provide them
stan, Somalia and Iraq. with necessary support services.

CHILDREN, NOT SOLDIERS


In 2015, the campaign Children, Not Soldiers by the Secretary-General for recruitment and
continued to gather momentum. The global use of children in their security forces are now
consensus that children do not belong in se- engaged in an Action Plan process and there
curity forces in conflict was consolidated in was notable progress in Afghanistan, the Dem-
March 2016 with the signature by the Govern- ocratic Republic of the Congo and Myanmar.
ment of Sudan of an Action Plan to end and Despite prior commitments by their Govern-
prevent the recruitment and use of children by ments, children in Somalia, South Sudan and
its security forces. All Governments identified Yemen faced challenging conflict situations.

ENGAGEMENT WITH NON-STATE ARMED GROUPS


In 2015, there was strong engagement with non-State armed groups, within or outside the framework of peace
processes, in the Central African Republic, Colombia, Mali, Myanmar, the Philippines, Sudan and South Sudan. This
engagement led to the release of over 8,000 children.
EXCERPTS FROM THE SECRETARY-GENERAL’S RECOMMENDATIONS:
I urge Member States to ensure that their engagement of the child. It is crucial that there are appropriate
in hostilities and responses to all threats to peace and resources for the reintegration of the children sepa-
security, including in efforts to counter violent ex- rated from parties to conflict, with attention given to
tremism, are conducted in full compliance with inter- psycho-social support and the needs of girls.
national humanitarian, human rights and refugee law.
I call upon Member States to treat children associated
I urge Member States to handover children encoun- with armed groups, including those engaged in vio-
tered during military operations to civilian child pro- lent extremism, as victims entitled to full protection
tection actors as soon as possible in accordance with of their human rights and to urgently put in place al-
their international obligations and the best interests ternatives to detention and prosecution of children.

ACTION PLANS UNDER IMPLEMENTATION

AFGHANISTAN SOUTH SUDAN


Afghan National Police, Sudan People’s Liberation Army
including the Afghan (Recruitment and use, all grave
Local Police violations against children)

(Recruitment and use) Sudan People’s Liberation


Movement/Army in Opposition
(Recruitment and use, killing and maiming)

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC SUDAN


OF THE CONGO Government security forces,
Forces armées including the Sudanese Armed
de la République Forces, the Popular Defense
démocratique du Congo Forces and the Sudan Police Forces
(Recruitment and (Recruitment and use)
use, sexual violence)

MYANMAR YEMEN
Tatmadaw Kyi, Government forces, including the
including integrated Yemeni Armed Forces, the First
border guard forces Armoured Division, the military
(Recruitment and use) Police, the special security forces
and Republican Guards
(Recruitment and use)

SOMALIA PHILIPPINES
Somali National Army Moro Islamic Liberation Front
(Recruitment and use,
(Recruitment and use)
killing and maiming)

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