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OCTOBER 2, 2014 • PAGE 6

PROGRAM DOSSIER

Program Dossier: F-16 Fighting Falcon


Definition: The F-16 "Fighting Falcon" (known as "Viper" 1,004 F-16C/Ds remaining in service.
to its operators) is a U.S. single-engine, multirole fighter.
It was initially produced by General Dynamics and is now U.S. Upgrades: The most extensive upgrade package for
produced by Lockheed Martin. U.S. Air Force aircraft, the Combat Avionics Programmed
Extension Suite (CAPES), would have offered an AESA ra-
Features: The original F-16A/B Block 1 variant that dar, an ALQ-213 EW system with single-point access, au-
reached Initial Operational Capability (IOC) in 1979 was tomated controls; an Integrated Broadcast system (IBS)
developed as a low-cost, lightweight daytime fighter to that combines multiple intelligence broadcasts and fuses
complement the F-15. The aircraft was manufactured by receive terminals; higher-resolution MFDs; and better
the U.S. and a consortium of NATO partners - Belgium, Den- reliability and maintainability. However, the CAPES ef-
mark, the Netherlands and Norway — that became known fort was terminated in the fiscal 2015 White House budget
as the European Participating Air Forces (EPAF). The design request due to funding constraints and higher Air Force
made the F-16 one of the most capable dogfighters of its gen- priorities.
eration, boasting a high thrust-to-weight ratio, low wing Still, U.S. Falcons are receiving limited upgrades under
loading, rapid acceleration, small size, a tight turn radius separate programs. An Auto Ground Collision Avoidance
and a seat tilted back 30 degrees for better G-tolerance. The System (GCAS) is scheduled to field in mid-2014. In late
design included minimal electronics. The fighter’s APG-66 2014, the latest software package will arrive with updates
radar had a limited beyond visual range (BVR) combat capa- to the GPS/INS navigation system, compatibility with the
bility and it could carry only IR-guided AIM-9 Sidewinder AIM-120D missile and the new Joint Mission Planning
a i r -t o - a i r System. Another software update scheduled for fiscal 2016
missiles will likely include a Universal Armament Interface (UAI)
(AAMs). for easier integration of smart weapons and AIM-9X Block
From the II compatibility. The Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Mis-
start, im- sile - Extended Range (JASSM-ER) is scheduled for integra-
provements tion in mid-2018.
to the origi- Research also is underway into a Service Life Extension
nal F-16 de- Program (SLEP) for U.S. Block 40-52 F-16s. These aircraft
sign have are currently certified to 8,000 flight hours. In Spring
occurred 2015, the Air Force will award an Engineering and Manu-
under vari- facturing Development (EMD) contract to determine what
ants, blocks parts would have to be replaced or reworked to prevent
and even fatigue damage and maintain flight safety and aircraft
sub-blocks. availability.
Over time, various equipment was added to make the Fal-
con more adept at BVR combat and air-to-ground operations Content Note: The full F-16 profile, with complete block
breakdown and delivery history for all 27 operating coun-
U.S. Air Force Production: The F-16 is currently the tries, is available to Aviation Week Intelligence Network
most widely used fighter in the world. Over 4,540 have (AWIN) subscribers and included in the upcoming Aviation
been produced in 138 versions for 27 countries. This num- Week Guide to Combat Aircraft e-publication, soon to be
ber includes the 2 YF-16s that competed in the Air Combat available at http://aviationweek.com/store.
Fighter competition as well as 8 full-scale development
aircraft - 6 F-16As and 2 F-16Bs. Five nations - the U.S., —Dan Katz
Belgium, the Netherlands, Turkey and South Korea - have
produced the fighter. Production is expected to continue
through at least 2017.
In total, the U.S. Air Force (USAF) has ordered 2,230 F-16s
- 1,900 single-seaters and 330 two-seaters - of every type
except the Block 50/52+, Block 60 and Mid-Life Update. All Program Dossier data is excerpted from
From 1978 to 1985, the Air Force received 785 F-16A/Bs, the Aviation Week Intelligence Network
ranging from Block 1 to Block 15. From July 1984 to 2004, (awin.aviationweek.com). To learn how to
the Air Force received 1,444 F-16C/Ds of Blocks 25, 30, 32, receive full access to dozens of updated online
40, 42, 50 and 52. The last F-16A/B was withdrawn from profiles of major international defense programs, call +1
Air Force inventory in 2008. As of 2013, the service had 703.997.0275 or email mark.hyer@aviationweek.com.

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MARKET BRIEFING
OCTOBER 2, 2014 • PAGE 7

Specifications: F-16
Designation: F-16A/B Block 1, 5, 10, 15 20 F-16C/D Block 25, 30/32, 40/42 F-16C/D Block 50/52 F-16E/F Block 60
Name: Fighting Falcon Fighting Falcon Fighting Falcon Desert Falcon
Manufacturer: General Dynamics General Dynamics Lockheed Martin Lockheed Martin
Category/Type: Multi-role Fighter Multi-role Fighter Multi-role Fighter Multi-role Fighter
Crew: 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2
IOC: 1979 1981 1994 2005

Dimensions and Weights


Length: 49 ft. 6 in. including nose probe 49ft 3in. (15.0 m) 49 ft. 5 in. (15.0 m) 49 ft. 4 in. (15.0m)
(15.1 m)
Wingspan: 31ft; 32ft 10in. incl. wingtip 31ft; 32ft 10in. incl. wingtip AIM-9s 31ft; 33ft 1in. incl. wingtip 31ft; 33ft 1in. incl. wingtip
AIM-9s AIM-120s AIM-120s
Height: 16 ft. 8.5 in. 16 ft. 8.5 in. 16 ft. 10 in. 16.7 ft. (5.09m)
Wing Area: 300 ft.2 (27.87m2) 300 ft.2 (27.87m2) 300 ft.2 (27.87m2) 300 ft.2 (27.87m2)
Aspect Ratio: 3.0 3.0 3 3.2
Weight (empty) A: 16,670 lb. (1, 5, 10, 15) / C: 17,348 lb. (25) / 18,347 lb. (30) C: 19,097 lb. (50) 20,300 lb.
17,326 lb. (20) / 17,555 lb. (32)
17,326 lb. (20) 18,992 lb. (40) / 18,277 lb. (42- 18,888 lb. (52)
P&W220) / 18,808 lb. (42-P&W229)
B: 17,550 lb. (1, 5, 10, 15) D: 18,090 lb. (25) / 18,871 lb. (30) D: 19,691 lb. (50)
/ 18,273 lb. (32)
18,179 lb. (20) 19,549 lb. (40) / 18,887 lb. (42- 19,462 lb. (52)
P&W220) / 19,366 lb. (42-P&W229)
Weight (max take-off) 35,400 lb. (1, 5, 10, 15) 37,500 lb. (25, 30/32) 37,500 lb. (16,875 kilograms) 48,000 lb. (21,772kg)
37,500 lb. (20) 42,300 lb. (40/42) Advanced:' 48,000lb.
Fuel Capacity (Inter- A: 7,290 lb. (10, 15), with 24/48 A: 7,290 lb. (25 - 32), with 24/48 C: 7,160 lb. (50/52), with E: 10,220 lb. (JP-8), incl.
nal): lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8) lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8) 48/48 lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8) 4,160 lb. in CFTs
7,160 lb. (20), with 48/48 lb. 7,160 lb. (25 - 42), with 48/48 lb. 7,120 lb. (50/52 CFT-capa-
Chaff-Flare Chaff-Flare (JP-8) ble), with 48/96 lb Chaff-
Flare
B: 6,050 lb. (10 - 15), with B: 6,050 lb. (25 - 32), with 24/48 D: 5,920 lb. (50/52), with
24/48 lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8) lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8) 48/48 lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8)
5,920 lb. (20), with 48/48 lb. 5,920 lb. (25 - 42), with 48/48 lb. 5,870 lb. (50/52 CFT-capa-
Chaff-Flare Chaff-Flare (JP-8) ble), with 48/96 lb Chaff-
Flare
Fuel Capacity (Ex- 300-gal (2,040 lbs.) under fuse- 300-gal (2,040 lbs.) under fuselage, 300-gal (2,040 lbs.) under 300-gal (2,040 lb.) under
ternal) lage, 370-gal (2,520 lb.) under 370-gal (2,520 lb.) under each wing fuselage, 600ga. (3,960 lb.) fuselage, 600-gal (3960
each wing - 7,080 lbs. total - 7,080 lbs. total under each wing - 9,960 lb. lb.) under each wing -
(JP-8) total 9,960 lb. (JP-8) total
Fuel Capacity (Max A: 14,370 lb. (10, 15) (JP-8) C: 14,370 lb. (25 - 32), with 24/48 C: 17,120 (50/52), with E: 19,960 lb. (JP-8)
Total) lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8) 48/48 lb. Chaff-Flare
14,240 lb. (20) (JP-8) 14,240 lb. (25 - 42), with 48/48 lb. 20,170 lb. (50/52 CFT-capa-
Chaff-Flare (JP-8) ble), with 48/96 lb Chaff-
Flare
B: 13,130 lb. (10, 15) (JP-8) D: 13,130 lb. (25 - 32), with 24/48 D: 15,880 lb. (50/52), with
lb. Chaff-Flare (JP-8) 48/48 lb. Chaff-Flare
13,000 lb. (20) (JP-8) 13,000 lb. (25 - 42), with 48/48 lb. 18,920 lb. (50/52 CFT-capa-
Chaff-Flare (JP-8) ble), with 48/96 lb Chaff-
Flare

Performance
Engines: F100-PW-100(3) Block 25: F100-PW-200E Block 50: F100-PW-229 F110-GE-132
Block10: F100-PW-200/220 Block 30/40: F-100-PW-220 Block 52: F110-GE-129
Later: F100-PW-220E Block 32/42: F110-GE-100
Thrust: 25,000 lb. 25,000 lb. F100-PW-229: 29,000 lb. 32,500 lb.
F110-GE-129: 29,500 lb.
Max Speed: Mach 2 - 1,319 mph (2123 km/h) Mach 2 - 1,319 mph (2123 km/h) at 1,500 mph (Mach 2 at 40,000 1,500 mph (Mach 2 at
at 39, 870 ft (12,000 m) 39, 870 ft (12,000 m) ft.)  40,000 ft.) 
Service Ceiling: 50,000 ft. (15,400 m) 50,000 ft. (15,400 m) 50,000+ ft. (15,400 m) 50,000+ ft. (15,400 m)
Range: 1,260 mi 1,260 mi 1,260 mi 2000+ mi.
Source: Aviation Week Intelligence Network Continued

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2014 PENTON
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MARKET BRIEFING
OCTOBER 2, 2014 • PAGE 8

Specifications: F-16
Designation: F-16A/B Block 1, 5, 10, 15 20 F-16C/D Block 25, 30/32, 40/42 F-16C/D Block 50/52 F-16E/F Block 60
Ferry Range: 2,415+ mi 2,415 mi 2,000+ mi (1,740 nautical
miles) 
Combat Radius: 575+mi. Block 40: 852 mi. hi-lo-lo-hi attack 1,093 mi. linear Combat Air
profile (2x2,000lb. Bombs, 2xAIM-9, Patrol (2xAIM-120; 2xAIM-9;
three tanks - dropped when empty) three tanks - dropped when
empty)
Block 40: 392 mi. hi-lo-lo-hi attack
profile (4x4,000lb. Bombs, 2xAIM-9,
three tanks - retained)
Block 40: 230 mi. CAP with 2h. 10
min. on station (2xAIM-7, 2xAIM-9,
three fuel tanks)
Block 40: 818 mi. point intercept
(2xAIM-7, 2xAIM-9, three fuel
tanks)
G-limit: +9.0/-3.0 +9.0/-3.0 +9.0/-3.0 +9.0/-3.0
l 1.1 to 1 1.1 to 1 1.03 to 1 (no stores)

Weapons
Cannon: One M-61A1 20mm multibarrel One M-61A1 20mm multibarrel can- One M-61A1 20mm multibar- One M-61A1 20mm mul-
cannon with 500 rounds non with 500 rounds rel cannon with 500 rounds tibarrel cannon with 500
rounds
Hardpoints: 9 (1 centerline, 3 under each 9 (1 centerline, 3 under each wing, 9 (1 centerline, 3 under each 9 (1 centerline, 3 under
wing, 1 for AAM at each wingtip) 1 for AAM at each wingtip) + 1 for wing, 1 for AAM at each wing- each wing, 1 for AAM
+ 1 for sensor pods on each side sensor pods on each side of inlet tip) + 1 for sensor pods on at each wingtip) + 1 for
of inlet each side of inlet sensor pods on each side
of inlet
Max External Stores: 15,200 lbs. 15,200 lbs. 15,200 lbs. 15,200 lbs.
Weapons Compat- AIM-9J/L Sidewinder AIM-9; AIM-7 AIM-9; AIM-132; Magic 2; AIM-9; AIM-132; Magic 2;
ibility: Python Python
Mk 82/83/84 - 500, 1,000, 2,000 AIM-120 AIM-7; Skyflash; AIM-120; AIM-7; Skyflash; AIM-120;
lb. General Purpose Bombs Rafael Derby Rafael Derby
Block 15: AGM-65 Maverick AGM-65 Maverick; Al Hakim AGM-65 Maverick; Al
Hakim
AIM-7 Sparrow ; Sky Flash Block 30/32 GBU-10/12/15/22/24/27 GBU-10/12/15/22/24/27
Paveway II/III LGBs Paveway II/III LGBs
Block 15 OCU AGM-45 Shrike GBU-31/32/38 JDAMs GBU-31/32/38 JDAMs
AIM-120 AMRAAM Block 40/42 CBU-87/89/97 Cluster Bombs CBU-87/89/97 Cluster
Bombs
AGM-65 Maverick GBU-10/12/15/22/24/27 - Paveway CBU-103/104/105 Wind Cor- CBU-103/104/105 Wind
II/III LGBs rected Munitions Dispensers Corrected Munitions Dis-
pensers
Mid-life Update Aircraft AGM-154 JSOW, AGM-158 AGM-88 HARM
JASSM, Rafael Derby
AIM-120C AMRAAM AGM-45 Shrike, AGM-88 AGM-84 Harpoon
HARM
GBU-12 Paveway II LGB AGM-84 Harpoon Block 61:
AGM-65H/K Maverick AGM-154 JSOW, AGM-84K
SLAM-ER
Typical Armament: 2xAIM-9J/L on wingtips; 4 under 2xAIM-9J/L on wingtips; bombs, 2x 2,000lb. Bombs; 2 x AIM-
wings; 2x370ga drop tanks on in- cluster bombs, air-to-surface 9, 2x AIM-120; 2x600-gal.
board stations; 300ga drop tank missiles or flare pods on the four external fuel tanks
or 2,000 lb. bomb at centerline outer wing stations; 370ga tanks
on inboard stations; 300ga tank on
centerline station;

Avionics
Radar: APG-66 APG-68 APG-68 - multiple variants APG-80
Block 20: APG-66(V3) / APG-83 Block 40/42: APG-68(V) - multiple later APG-68(V9)
variants
Radar Warning Re- ALR-69 ALR-69; later ALR-74 ALR-56M and others
ceiver
Electronic Counter- Provision for AN/ALQ-119, 131 Provision for AN/ALQ-119,131 or Provision for ALQ-131 or 184; Northrop Grumman Falcon
measures: (later)184 ALE-50V(2) towed decoy Edge
Source: Aviation Week Intelligence Network Continued

COPYRIGHT © 2014 PENTON


MARKET BRIEFING
OCTOBER 2, 2014 • PAGE 9

Specifications: F-16
Designation: F-16A/B Block 1, 5, 10, 15 20 F-16C/D Block 25, 30/32, 40/42 F-16C/D Block 50/52 F-16E/F Block 60
Block 40/42: AAR-57 Common Mis-
sile Warning System
Chaff/ Flare Dispens- ALE-40 / ALE-47 ALE-47 ALE-47 ALE-47
ers:
Other Avionics: Pave Penny Laser Designator Block40/42: AAQ-13/14 LANTIRN ASQ-213 HARM Targeting ASQ-32 Internal FLIR and
System Targeting System (IFTS)
Some Mid-life Update Aircraft: US Block 40/42s employ Sniper and AAQ-13/14 LANTIRN Joint Helmet Mounted Cue-
Litening pods ing System
Multifunctional Information Dis- CCIP: Link16 CCIP: Link16 Joint Mission Planning
tribution System - Low Volume System
Terminal
CCIP: Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing CCIP: Joint Helmet Mounted
System Cueing System
US Block 50/52s employ
Sniper and Litening pods
Unit cost: $5.16 million flyaway (FY75 offer $18.8 million (FY98) $25.9M flyaway (FY98 for $50-55 million - estimate
to NATO countries, based on total purchase of 3 US aircraft)
production run of 2,000 aircraft)
$14.6 million (FY98) $26.9M gross (FY98 for pur-
chase of 3 US aircraft)
$16.8 million (FY13 for 12 used
Block 15 MLU aircraft purchased
by Romania from Portugal)
Source: Aviation Week Intelligence Network

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