You are on page 1of 7

GRADE 2 YEAR PLAN

Grade 2 September October November December January February March April May June
Non Christmas Break Christmas Break Spring Break:
Instructional 17- 31 1-2 10-17
Events
CNY: Jan.25-Feb.
5

Important Dates 24-28: 7-10: Student 16- Noon Dismissal 9: Last 22: Pink Shirt Day 28-31: Student
Multicultural Success Meetings for Winter Break Assessment day Success
Week (3:30-5:30 p.m.) for RC1/ Marks Conferences
entered by 8am

PD days 28 - Workshop 26 – Workshop 18th – PD @ DSC


(3:20 – 4:00 p.m.)
Themes Fall Fall/Halloween Winter Easter/Spring Spring Bugs

FIELD TRIP and 28 – PE Field Trip 27 – Disneyland. Science Fair *Discovering Food Fair
In Class Events Build a Magnetic Canada by Boat *instructional
Toy Travel Brochure writing (recipes)
/ Design & Build *SS: Culture &
a boat Traditions
* Field trip – Hong
Kong History
Museum
*yet to be confirmed.

Field trip inquiries: HK History Museum, Maritime Museum.


SCIENCE
Timing of Delivery September - October (8 weeks) October – December (8 weeks) December – February March – April (8 weeks) May-June (8 weeks)
(8 weeks)
General Outcome Exploring Liquids Hot and Cold Temperatures Magnetism Buoyancy and Boats Small Crawling and Flying
2–5 Describe some properties of water and other liquids, and recognize 2–9 Recognize the effects of heating and cooling, 2–8 Describe the interaction 2–7 Construct objects that will float on Creatures
the importance of water to living and nonliving things and identify methods for heating and cooling of magnets with other and move through water, and evaluate 2–10 Describe the general structure and life
magnets and with common various designs for watercraft habits of small crawling and flying animals;
2–6 Describe the interaction of water with different materials, and apply materials e.g., insects, spiders, worms, slugs; and apply
that knowledge to practical problems of drying liquid this knowledge to interpret local species that
have been observed.

SLEs 1. Recognize and describe characteristics of liquids:



1. Describe temperature in relative terms, using 1. Identify where magnets are 1. Describe, classify and order materials on the 1. Recognize that there are many different
recognize and describe liquid flow expressions, such as hotter than, colder than. used in the environment and basis of their buoyancy. Students who have kinds of small crawling and flying animals, and
• describe the shape of drops 2. Measure temperature in degrees Celsius (°C). why they are used. achieved this expectation will distinguish identify a range of examples that are found
• describe the surface of calm water. 3. Describe how heating and cooling materials can often 2. Distinguish materials that are between materials that sink in water and those locally.
2. Compare water with one or more other liquids, such as cooking oil, change them; e.g., melting and freezing, cooking, attracted by a magnet from that float. They will also be aware that some 2. Compare and contrast small animals that
glycerine or water mixed with liquid detergent. Comparisons may be burning. those that are not. “floaters” sit mostly above water, while others are found in the local environment. These
based on characteristics, such as colour, ease of flow, tendency of drops 4. Identify safe practices for handling hot and cold 3. Recognize that magnets sit mostly below water. The terms buoyancy and animals should include at least three
to form a ball shape (bead), interactions with other liquids and materials and for avoiding potential dangers from heat attract materials with iron or density may be introduced but are not required invertebrates—that is, animals such as insects,
interactions with solid materials. sources. steel in them; and given a as part of this learning expectation. spiders, centipedes, slugs, worms.
3. Compare the amount of liquid absorbed by different materials; e.g., 5. Recognize that the human body temperature is variety of metallic and non- 2. Alter or add to a floating object so that it 3. Recognize that small animals, like humans,
students should recognize that some forms of paper are very absorbent relatively constant and that a change in body temperature metallic objects, predict those will sink, and alter or add to a non-floating have homes where they meet their basic
but other forms of paper are not. often signals a change in health. that will be attracted by a object so that it will float. needs of air, food, water, shelter and space;
4. Evaluate the suitability of different materials for containing liquids. 6. Identify ways in which the temperature in homes and magnet. 3. Assemble materials so they will float, carry a and describe any special characteristics that
Students should recognize that materials such as writing paper and buildings can be adjusted; e.g., by turning a thermostat up 4. Recognize that magnets have load and be stable in water. help the animal survive in its home.
unglazed pottery are not waterproof and would not be suitable as or down, by opening or closing windows, by using a space polarity, demonstrate that poles 4. Modify a watercraft to increase the load it 4. Identify each animal’s role within the food
containers; but that waxed paper and glazed pottery are waterproof and, heater in a cold room. may either repel or attract each will carry. chain. To meet this expectation, students
thus, could be used in constructing or lining a liquid container. 7. Describe, in general terms, how local buildings are other, and state a rule for when 5. Modify a watercraft to increase its stability should be able to identify the animals as plant
5. Demonstrate an understanding that liquid water can be changed to heated: poles will repel or attract each in water. eaters, animal eaters or decomposers and
other states: • identify the energy source or fuel other. 6. Evaluate the appropriateness of various identify other animals that may use them as a
• recognize that on cooling, liquid water freezes into ice and that • recognize that most buildings are heated by 5. Design and produce a device materials to the construction of watercraft, in food source.
on heating, it melts back into liquid water with properties the circulating hot air or hot water that uses a magnet. particular: 5. Describe the relationships of these animals
same as before • describe how heat is circulated through the 6. Demonstrate that most the degree to which the material is waterproof to other living and nonliving things in their
• recognize that on heating, liquid water may be changed into school building and through their own homes. materials are transparent to the (not porous) habitat, and to people.
steam or water vapour and that this change can be reversed on 8. Describe the role of insulation in keeping things hot or effects of a magnet. A magnetic • the ability to form waterproof joints 6. Identify and give examples of ways that
cooling cold, and identify places where some form of insulation is field will pass through such between parts small animals avoid predators, including
• identify examples in which water is changed from one form to used; e.g., clothing, refrigerator, coolers, homes. materials, whereas other • the stiffness or rigidity of the material camouflage, taking cover in burrows, use of
another. 9. Identify materials that insulate animals from the cold; materials interact with a • the buoyancy of the material. keen senses and flight.
6. Predict that the water level in open containers will decrease due to e.g., wool, fur and feathers; and identify materials that magnet. 7. Develop or adapt methods of construction 7. Describe conditions for the care of a small
evaporation, but the water level in closed containers will not decrease. are used by humans for the same purpose. 7. Compare and measure the that are appropriate to the design task. animal, and demonstrate responsible care in
7. Predict that a wet surface will dry more quickly when exposed to wind 10. Design and construct a device to keep something hot strength of magnets. 8. Adapt the design of a watercraft so it can be maintaining the animal for a few days or
or heating and apply this understanding to practical situations, such as or cold. propelled through water. weeks.
drying of paints, clothes and hair. 11. Describe ways in which temperature changes affect us 9. Explain why a given material, design or 8. Identify ways in which animals are
8. Recognize that water is a component of many materials and of living in our daily lives. component is appropriate to the design task. considered helpful or harmful to humans and
things. to the environment.
9. Recognize human responsibilities for maintaining clean supplies of
water, and identify actions that are taken to ensure that water supplies
are safe.

Learning Activities - Water cycle triorama - Build a thermos - Classroom Science - Discovering Canada by boat - Bug report
- Various related Experiments from EPSB guide *keep the ice cube from melting. fair - Build a boat that floats. - What is an insect?
- Comparison of temperatures - Uses of magnets - Explain & present project - Make your own insect.
(HK, 3 Communities) - Building a Magnetic - Tech link: Design and print a boat - Research an insect - create a
- We are particles dance Toy. - 3D boats Web Poster
- States of matter Song - Various related - Various related Experiments from - Various related Activities from
- Various related Experiments from EPSB Experiments from EPSB guide EPSB guide
guide EPSB guide

Assessments - Activities/Experiments, Quizzes, Work samples (Projects), Participation in experiments both individually &with partners/groups, SAM (Science Assessment Manual) Activities
SOCIAL STUDIES
Timing of September - November - December (7 weeks) January – February (7 weeks) March (4 weeks) April - June (8 weeks)
Delivery November (9 weeks)

UNITS Looking At: People Places & Work Looking At: People Places & Work Looking At: People Places & Work Looking At: People Places & Work Looking at You
(How My Community
Started)

General 2.1 CANADA’S DYNAMIC COMMUNITIES 2.2 A COMMUNITY IN THE PAST


Students will: demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of how geography, culture, language, heritage, economics and resources shape and change Canada’s communities Students will demonstrate an understanding and
Outcome appreciation of how a community emerged, and of
how the various interactions and cooperation
among peoples ensure the continued growth and
vitality of the community.

Specific Introduction to Canada & the Cimate & Geography of the 3 Inuit Community Prairie Community Comparison of all 3 Specific Outcomes
Places. Iqaluit Saskatoon communities Values and Attitudes Students will:
Outcomes - compare all 3
Students will: Students will: 2.2.1 appreciate how stories of the past connect
2.1.1 appreciate the physical and human geography of the Students will: 2.1.1 appreciate the physical and human communities individuals and communities to the present (C, I,
communities studied 2.1.1 appreciate the physical and human geography of the communities studied studied in terms
TCC)
Acadian geography of the communities studied Students will: of: economics,
resources, 2.2.2 appreciate how Aboriginal and Francophone
Meteghan Students will: 2.1.2 investigate the physical geography of an
language, peoples have influenced the development of the
Students will: 2.1.2 investigate the physical geography of an Inuit community in Canada.
2.1.2 investigate the physical geography of an Acadian Inuit community in Canada. 2.1.3 investigate the cultural and linguistic heritage etc. student’s community (C, CC, I)
community in Canada. 2.1.3 investigate the cultural and linguistic characteristics of an Inuit community in (GO2.1) 2.2.3 appreciate the importance of collaboration
2.1.3 investigate the cultural and linguistic characteristics of an characteristics of an Inuit community in Canada. and living in harmony (C, PADM)
Acadian community in Canada. Canada. 2.1.4 investigate the economic characteristics 2.2.4 appreciate how connections to a community
2.1.4 investigate the economic characteristics of communities in 2.1.4 investigate the economic characteristics of communities in Canada. contribute to one’s identity (I)
Canada. of communities in Canada. 2.2.5 appreciate how cultural and linguistic
exchanges connect one community to another (CC)
Knowledge and Understanding Students will:
2.2.6 analyze how the community being studied
emerged.
2.2.7 examine how the community being studied
has changed.

Learning - What makes up a Where’s Meteghan Build an Inukshuk Traditions pocket - Triple Venn
Activities
community Climate & Geography Where’s Meteghan Saskatchewan through a window diagram - Field Trip: HK MUSEUM - HK HISTORY
- Our community Daily Life ticket map Discussions about Climate & Geography Let’s learn Ukrainian - Compare and - Food Fair (culture & traditions) – recipie
- Maps What to do there: look at Daily Life – compare school life there to here – Early days flipbook contrast the cards* store bought food?*
- describe own community’s different geographical Venn diagram If I worked in Saskatchewan… climate, life,
geographical/special features What to do there: look at different Spinner Review activity resources and
- Research a community contributor
features of own Traditions: dance, music, geographical features Flag activity – what are the flags jobs in each
community language, celebrations – flip Traditions – create a file book Ukranian eggs (Drawing/Paper Mache) community
- Play Game: Whose Life Is flap Food Research a recipe
it Anyways? Food Tourism
Tourism Natural resources circle map
- Dress for the Weather Natural resources circle map Goods chart
Game Goods chart Jobs ( Build a Lobster trap)
Jobs ( Build a Lobster trap) Journal entries about community contributors
Retell an inuit legend

Resources • Student Textbooks (Our World, Nelson), Many Voices Grade 2 (Pearson) Teacher’s Guide, Big Books, Websites (2learn.ca), Online videos (TVO kids), Virtual tours (e.g. Fort Edmonton) Field Trip
MATH

Timing of Delivery September – October (6 October – November (5 weeks) December January-February (6 weeks) February- March March - April (5 May-June 6
weeks) (5 weeks) (5 weeks) weeks) Weeks

Units of Study Unit 7: Data


Unit 3: Addition and Unit 5: Addition and
Unit 1: Patterning Unit 2: Numbers to 100 Unit 4: Measurement Unit 6: Geometry Analysis
Subtraction to 18 Subtraction to 100

General Outcome/ Patterns & Relations Developing Number Sense Developing Number Sense Developing Number Sense Shape & Space Shape & Space Statistics &
-Use patterns to describe the Use direct and indirect Describe the Probability
Strand world and to solve problems measurement to solve problems. characteristics of 3-D Collect, display and
-Represent algebraic expressions objects and 2-D shapes, analyze data to
in multiple ways and analyze the solve problems.
relationships among them.

Specific Outcomes 1. Demonstrate an understanding of 1. Say the number sequence 0 to 100 by: 8. Demonstrate and explain 9. Demonstrate an understanding of 1. Relate the number of days to a 6. Sort 2-D shapes and 3-D 1. Gather and record
repeating patterns (three to five elements) • 2s, 5s and 10s, forward and the effect of adding zero to, addition (limited to 1- and 2-digit week and the number of months to a objects, using two attributes, data about self and
by: backward, using starting points that are or subtracting zero from, numerals) with answers to 100 and year in a problem-solving context. [C, and explain the sorting rule. others to answer
•describing multiples of 2, 5 and 10 respectively any number. [C, R] the corresponding subtraction by: CN, PS, R] [C, CN, R, V] questions. [C, CN, PS,
•extending • 10s, using starting points from 1 to 10. Apply mental • using personal strategies for 2. Relate the size of a unit of measure 7. Describe, compare and V] [ICT: C4–1.3, C7–
•comparing 9 mathematics strategies, adding and subtracting with and to the number of units (limited to construct 3-D objects, 1.1]
•creating patterns using manipulatives, • 2s, starting from 1. [C, CN, ME, R] such as: without the support of manipulatives nonstandard units) used to measure including: 2. Construct and
diagrams, sounds and actions. [C, CN, PS, 2. Demonstrate if a number (up to 100) is • using doubles • creating and solving length and mass (weight). [C, CN, ME, • cubes interpret concrete
R, V] even or odd. [C, CN, PS, R] • making 10 problems that involve addition and R, V] • spheres graphs and
2. Demonstrate an understanding of 3. Describe order or relative position, using • one more, one less subtraction 3. Compare and order objects by • cones pictographs to solve
increasing patterns by: ordinal numbers (up to tenth). [C, CN, R] • two more, two less • using the commutative property of length, height, distance around and • cylinders problems. [C, CN, PS,
•describing 4. Represent and describe numbers to 100, •building on a known double addition (the order in which numbers mass (weight), using nonstandard • pyramids. [C, CN, R, R, V] [ICT: C7–1.3]
• reproducing concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, •thinking addition for are added does not affect the sum) units, and make statements of V]
•extending CN, V] subtraction for basic •using the associative property of comparison. [C, CN, ME, R, V] 8. Describe, compare and
•creating numerical (numbers to 100) and 5. Compare and order numbers up to 100. addition facts and related addition (grouping a set of numbers in 4. Measure length to the nearest construct 2-D shapes,
non-numerical patterns using [C, CN, ME, R, V] subtraction facts to 18. [C, different ways does not affect the nonstandard unit by: including:
manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and 6. Estimate quantities to 100, using CN, ME, PS, R, V] sum) •using multiple copies of a unit • triangles
actions. [C, CN, PS, R, V] referents. [C, ME, PS, R] •explaining that the order in which •using a single copy of a unit • squares
3. Sort a set of objects, using two 7. Illustrate, concretely and pictorially, the numbers are subtracted may affect (iteration process). [C, ME, R, V] • rectangles
attributes, and explain the sorting rule. meaning of place value for numerals to the difference. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V] 5. Demonstrate that changing the • circles. [C, CN, R, V]
[C, CN, R, V] 100. [C, CN, R, V] orientation of an object does not alter 9. Identify 2-D shapes as
4. Demonstrate and explain the meaning of the measurements of its attributes. parts of 3-D objects in the
equality and inequality, concretely and [C, R, V] environment. [C, CN, R, V]
pictorially. [C, CN, R, V]
5. Record equalities and inequalities
symbolically, using the equal symbol or the
not equal symbol. [C, CN, R, V]

Learning Activities Handouts, Make Makes Sense work book, centers, songs, manipulatives, board games, Mathletics, online review games

Assessment observations- anecdotal notes, completion of activities, classroom participation, math journal, quizzes, rubrics, small group tasks, conferences, reflections, self- assessments, performance
based assessment tasks
Resources Math Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide & Student Workbook, NCTM Illumination Classroom Discussion, Open Strategy Sharing, Literature with math connections, Mathletics, Online Resources
Dates ART Outcomes Performance Resources
Unit/
Concept
Assessment(s)
Drawing & REFLECTION Art projects
Septembe Elements of Component 1 - ANALYSIS: Students will notice commonalities within classes of natural objects or forms. Visual Journals
r art Concepts
A. Natural forms have common physical attributes according to the class in which they belong.
Rubric – teacher
assessment
DEPICTION Self-assessments
Component 4 MAIN FORMS AND PROPORTIONS: Students will learn the shapes of things as well as develop decorative styles.
Drawing & Concepts Art projects Activities/Resources
October Elements of A. All shapes can be reduced to basic shapes; i.e., circular, triangular, rectangular. Visual Journals
Art B. Shapes can be depicted as organic or geometric.
C. Shapes can be made using different procedures; e.g., cutting, drawing, tearing, stitching. Rubric – teacher Grade 2 – art blogs/
Seasonal assessment online education
projects D. Animals and plants can be represented in terms of their proportions
COMPOSITION Self-assessments sites. (ArtinEd)
Liney Dots
Component 7 EMPHASIS: Students will create emphasis based on personal choices.
Sketching
Concepts
Crazy Hair A. An active, interesting part of a theme can become the main part of a composition.
Fall trees B. The main part of a composition can be treated thoroughly before adding related parts
Colour Component 10 (ii) SUBJECT MATTER: Students will develop themes, with an emphasis on personal concerns, based on: E. People
wheel Concepts A. Drawing
Ice creams . • Use drawing tools to make a variety of lines—curved, straight, thick, thin, broken, and continuous.
Haunted • Use drawing tools to make a variety of shapes—open, closed forms; straight, curved forms; geometric (rectangles, squares, circles and triangles) and free form.
Houses • Make drawings from direct observation.
Mini B. Painting
Monsters • Learn simple brush skills: holding and unloading the brush, applying paint, cleaning the brush
Pumpkin . • Experiment with the medium to explore its possibilities.
• Work primarily with tempera paint or tempera paint with additives, using large brushes to paint.
Sculptures
• Mix primary colours and lighten and darken colours.
Component 6 QUALITIES AND DETAILS: Students will represent surface qualities of objects and forms.
Concepts C. Primary colours can be mixed to produce new hues.
D. Colour can be lightened to make tints or darkened to make shades. These tints or shades are also referred to as tone or value.
D. Sculpture • Make two- and three-dimensional assemblages from found materials. • Learn the care and handling of clay, and explore the modelling possibilities. •
Use simple clay modelling techniques of rolling, pinching, adding, pressing, making coils, texturing. • Create three-dimensional forms, using paper sculpture
techniques of folding, scoring, cutting, curling, weaving, rolling, twisting, joining. • Cast plaster of Paris relief sculptures in sand moulds.

November Canadian REFLECTION Art projects National Art Galleries


Artist study: Component 1 - ANALYSIS: Students will notice commonalities within classes of natural objects or forms. Visual Journals for Indigenous &
Ted Harrison Concepts Rubric – teacher Northern art
Northern A. Natural forms have common physical attributes according to the class in which they belong. assessment Artist Website
Landscapes DEPICTION Self-assessments Art Materials
Component 4 MAIN FORMS AND PROPORTIONS: Students will learn the shapes of things as well as develop decorative styles.
Concepts
A. All shapes can be reduced to basic shapes; i.e., circular, triangular, rectangular. Virtua Canadian art Yukon Dreams
D. Animals and plants can be represented in terms of their proportions
A. All shapes can be reduced to basic shapes; i.e., circular, triangular, rectangular.
D. Animals and plants can be represented in terms of their proportions
December Canadian Art projects National Art Galleries
E. A horizontal line can be used to divide a picture plane into interesting and varied proportions of sky and ground.
Artist Study Visual Journals for Indigenous &
COMPOSITION
Ted Harrison Rubric – teacher Northern art
Component 7 EMPHASIS: Students will create emphasis based on personal choices.
& Norval assessment Artist Website
Concepts
Morriseau
A. An active, interesting part of a theme can become the main part of a composition. Self-assessments Art Materials
Seasonal Art
Winter Trees B. The main part of a composition can be treated thoroughly before adding related parts Ojibway art
Component 10 (ii) SUBJECT MATTER: Students will develop themes, with an emphasis on personal concerns, based on: A. Plants & Animals, B. Environment & Places
Mini
Concepts A. Drawing
Scetchies
. • Use drawing tools to make a variety of lines—curved, straight, thick, thin, broken, and continuous.
• Use drawing tools to make a variety of shapes—open, closed forms; straight, curved forms; geometric (rectangles, squares, circles and triangles) and free form.
• Make drawings from direct observation.
B. Painting • Learn simple brush skills: holding and unloading the brush, applying paint, cleaning the brush. • Experiment with the medium to explore its
possibilities. • Work primarily with tempera paint or tempera paint with additives, using large brushes to paint. • Mix primary colours and lighten and darken
colours. • Paint using experimental methods, including without a brush. • Paint directly without preliminary sketching. • Use paint in combination with other media
and techniques. • Make small group and/or large group murals.
Component 8 UNITY: Students will create unity through density and rhythm. Concepts A. Families of shapes, and shapes inside or beside shapes, create harmony. B.
Overlapping forms help to unify a composition. C. Repetition of qualities such as colour, texture and tone produce rhythm and balance.
Component 9 CRAFTSMANSHIP: Students will add finishing touches. Concepts A. Finishing touches (accents, contrasts, outlines) can be added to make a work more
powerful. B. Stepping back from a work helps in judging how it can be improved.

January Print Making Component 10 (ii) SUBJECT MATTER: Students will develop themes, with an emphasis on personal concerns, based on: A. Plants & Animals, B. Environment & Places Art projects Grade 2 – art blogs/
Symbols C. Print Making • Use frottage (texture rubbings). • Make lifts or transfers, using wax crayon or fabric crayon. • Explore the use of print-making materials and the Visual Journals online education
Personal application of paint, using brushes and rollers (brayers). • Explore found object printing and the making of pattern through stamping. • Use print-making images in Rubric – teacher sites. (ArtinEd)
Canadian making pictures or compositions. assessment That artist woman –
Nature Self-assessments blog
Seasonal Art

February Fabric Arts E. Fabric Arts • Decorate fabric, using print-making techniques of relief printing, stamping, stencilling. • Use collage techniques for picture making with fabric. • Art projects Grade 2 – art blogs/
Culture Learn the basics of thread and needle manipulation, and use simple stitchery (running stitch and blanket stitch) for decoration and picture making. • Use a simple, Visual Journals online education
Banner/ handmade loom to weave plain or tabby pattern. • Braid wool or cloth strips to be used as enhancements. • Tie-dye using one colour of dye. • Use simple batik or Rubric – teacher sites. (ArtinEd)
Small resist dyeing using a safe resist such assessment That artist woman –
Animal Self-assessments blog
Puppets

March Sculpture Component 10 (ii) SUBJECT MATTER: Students will develop themes, with an emphasis on personal concerns, based on: A. Plants & Animals, B. Environment & Places, Art projects Grade 2 – art blogs/
(Inuksuk) D. Manufacted or Human Made things E. People Visual Journals online education
Picasso D. Sculpture • Make two- and three-dimensional assemblages from found materials. • Learn the care and handling of clay, and explore the modelling possibilities. • Rubric – teacher sites. (ArtinEd)
Portrait Use simple clay modelling techniques of rolling, pinching, adding, pressing, making coils, texturing. • Create three-dimensional forms, using paper sculpture assessment That artist woman –
Masks techniques of folding, scoring, cutting, curling, weaving, rolling, twisting, joining. • Cast plaster of Paris relief sculptures in sand moulds. Self-assessments blog

April Photography F. Photography and Technographic Arts • Take advantage of the visual art implications of any available technological device, and explore the Art projects Grade 2 – art blogs/
& potential of emerging technologies. Included at this level: − simple camera for documentation and sequencing of events − overhead projector for Visual Journals online education
Technograph experimenting with shapes, colours, compositions and the relating of a story using cutout shapes, real objects or drawings on acetate rolls − Rubric – teacher sites. (ArtinEd)
ic Arts computer software packages and devices, such as the light pen and the mouse, to explore, design and compose − copying devices for recording assessment That artist woman –
* Daily Life images and textures − slides: handmade using ink, crayon, acrylic paint or felt pen for exploring line and shape − emerging technologies, as available Self-assessments blog
Photographi
c Journal and applicable. • Employ technological media techniques, practices and capabilities to promote art
- Blackout
poetry
- acrostic
poem book
May Painting & Component 10 (ii) SUBJECT MATTER: Students will develop themes, with an emphasis on personal concerns, based on: A. Plants & Animals, B. Environment & Places Art projects Grade 2 – art blogs/
Drawing Concepts A. Drawing Visual Journals online education
- Artist . • Use drawing tools to make a variety of lines—curved, straight, thick, thin, broken, and continuous. Rubric – teacher sites. (ArtinEd)
Mashup • Use drawing tools to make a variety of shapes—open, closed forms; straight, curved forms; geometric (rectangles, squares, circles and triangles) and free form. assessment That artist woman –
(Pastels) • Make drawings from direct observation. Self-assessments blog
Landscape B. Painting • Learn simple brush skills: holding and unloading the brush, applying paint, cleaning the brush. • Experiment with the medium to explore its
Inchies possibilities. • Work primarily with tempera paint or tempera paint with additives, using large brushes to paint. • Mix primary colours and lighten and darken
Surreal colours. • Paint using experimental methods, including without a brush. • Paint directly without preliminary sketching. • Use paint in combination with other media
Skylines and techniques. • Make small group and/or large group murals
(Canadian
Landmark/
Scenery/
Mural)

June Sculpture & Component 10 (ii) SUBJECT MATTER: Students will develop themes, with an emphasis on personal concerns, based on: A. Plants & Animals, B. Environment & Places Art projects Grade 2 – art blogs/
Drawing Concepts A. Drawing Visual Journals online education
. • Use drawing tools to make a variety of lines—curved, straight, thick, thin, broken, and continuous. Rubric – teacher sites. (ArtinEd)
Animal Life • Use drawing tools to make a variety of shapes—open, closed forms; straight, curved forms; geometric (rectangles, squares, circles and triangles) and free form. assessment That artist woman –
Cycles • Make drawings from direct observation. Self-assessments blog
D. Sculpture • Make two- and three-dimensional assemblages from found materials. • Learn the care and handling of clay, and explore the modelling possibilities. •
Life Cycles Use simple clay modelling techniques of rolling, pinching, adding, pressing, making coils, texturing. • Create three-dimensional forms, using paper sculpture
techniques of folding, scoring, cutting, curling, weaving, rolling, twisting, joining. • Cast plaster of Paris relief sculptures in sand moulds.