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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Republic of the Philippines


Department of Education
Region III

A Compendium of Daily Lesson Plans and Resource Materials in

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT,
SOLIDARITY, AND
CITIZENSHIP
The compendium of DLPs and resource materials was collaboratively developed and
reviewed by educators of Region III HUMSS Teachers (Class F) during the
Mass Training of Senior High School Teachers
May 4 – 24, 2017
San Fernando City, Pampanga

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) i
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

INTRODUCTION

The Department of Education, in its continuing effort to uphold the vision and

mission of the K to 12 Program, particularly the Senior High School (SHS) conducted the

Mass Training of Teachers as stated in the Regional Memorandum no. 43 series 2017 to
further equip the SHS teachers with the needed skills, knowledge, expertise and most of

all confidence in developing lifelong learners and preparing graduates for tertiary

education, entrepreneurship, and employment.


The HUMSS (Humanities and Social Sciences) teachers, armed with great

dedication, passion and skills felt the need to collaborate and produce teaching guides

specifically DLPs (Daily/Detailed Lesson Plans) with appendices and enhanced with

varied methodologies and strategies patterned to the interest and personality of the
millennials on the course Community Engagement, Solidarity and Citizenship (CSC). This

will aid teachers in facilitating activities and questions as well as to understand the

content areas and competencies deeper.


In addition, the DLPs look forward to empowering not only the teachers but the

learners as well as to become independent, confident and self-directed as they engage

fully in the content areas and competencies.

REGION III HUMSS CLASS F

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) ii
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

THE CONTRIBUTORS

It is with pride and honor to present to the Department of Education Region III the
Compendium of Daily Lesson Plans (DLPs) and Resource Materials in

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

as output of
18-day Mass Training of Senior High School Teachers for HUMSS-C
held on May 4-24, 2017 at Orotel, City of San Fernando, Pampanga.

ALTAR, ELIZA T. MAROLLANO, RICHARD


ARAGON, RENZ JEFFREY M. MELEGRITO, ANTONETTE T.
BALINGIT, ROSELLA B. MENDOZA, BETH B.
BATO, JOSEPHINE C. MIRANDA, MARIA CECILIA
BERROY, KAREN JOY C. NAVAL, BENJIE R.
BETE, ESTRELLA A. OSORIO, MARKY P.
BOGNOT, JONNALYN V. PATRON, MARIA CONCEPCION A
BRIGUELA, JR. JAIME MARCELO PECSON, RYAN R.
CORDOVA, MAY N. PEREZ, GRACE P.
CUNANAN, BABY INES LEA N. PINEDA, JOANNE G.
DE OCAMPO, NORVIN D. PODRIDO, JAJE ANGELIKA A.
DE VERA, JASMIN J. PUNDAVELA, JOCELYN B.
DE VERA, MILAGROS M. QUIMSON, ASHER ISRAEL
DIONISIO, CELIA G. RAGANIT, REAGAN V.
ECLEVIA, DANIEL RAMOS, BERNARD C.
ELCA, MERCEDES CECILIA O. RAMY, EDWIN REY J.
FLORES, ARVI S. SALEM, ROSITA B.
GARCIA, KEVIN CEDDIE C. SANCHEZ, RHODA A.
GARINGO, ELSON S. SANTOS, ANDRES VERGEL V.
GONZALES, IRIS RUTH E. SOLOMON, CAROLINE M.
LIBID, SANDYVALJASPER B. TIGLAO, IRENE V.
LINGAT, ALEJANDRO B. TOMANENG, GLENDA LUISA M.
LULU, NATHANAEL G. TORRES, MARIANNE M.
MACTAL, SHERILYN P. VALLAGAR, JOY EMMANUEL S.
MALGAPO, GERBY B. VELASCO, JOSE L.
MAMARADLO, JAYSON A. VILLASIS, VINCENT S.
MANGUNE JR., EMMANUEL M VIVAS, JULIANNE G.
YANGA, EDWIN T.

ANA LIZA R. LEPASANA


Facilitator

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) iii
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………………………………………ii
THE CONTRIBUTORS………………………………………………………………………………………………iii
BUDGET OF WORK………………………………………………………………………………………………….v

THIRD QUARTER
Chapter 1:
Concepts and Perspectives of Community…………………………………………………………..1

Chapter 2:
Community Action…………………………………………………………………………………………………10

Chapter 3:
Core Values and Principles of Community Action Initiatives…………………………….31

FOURTH QUARTER
Chapter 4:
Methodologies and Approaches of Community Actions and Involvements
Across Disciplines……………………………………………………………………………………………………40

Chapter 5:
Community Action Initiatives: Field Practicum……………………………………………………57

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) iv
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

BUDGET OF WORK

NO LEARNING COMPETENCY CODE SCHEDULE


Explain the importance of studying
community dynamics and community action
A.1 HUMSS_CSC12-Iii a-c1 WEEK 1 DAY 1
in relation to applied social sciences and the
learners' future career options.
Compare and contrast the definitions of
community using various perspective, e.g.
A.2 HUMSS_CSC12-IIIa-c 2 WEEK 1 DAY 2-4
Social science, institution, civil society, and
local/ grassroots level
Develop/ affirm sense of shared identity and
A. 3 willingness to contribute to the attainment of HUMSS_CSC12-IIIa-c 3 WEEK 2 DAY 1
the common good
A. 4 Recognize diversities in communities HUMSS_CSC12-IIIa-c 4 WEEK 2 DAY 2-4

Analyze functions of communities in terms


A. 5 HUMSS_CSC12-IIIa-c 5 WEEK 3 DAY 1
structures, dynamics, and processes
Compare and contrast typologies of
A. 6 HUMSS_CSC12-IIIa-c 6 WEEK 3 DAY 2-3
communities
ASSESSMENT (UNIT TEST) WEEK 3 DAY 3
Recognize the value of undertaking
B.7 HUMSS_CSC12-IIId-g-7 WEEK 4 DAY 1-4
community action modalities
Acknowledge interrelationship of self and
B.8 HUMSS_CSC12-IIId-g-8 WEEK 5 DAY 1-4
community in undertaking community action
Identify opportunities to contribute to
B.9 HUMSS_CSC12-IIId-g-9 WEEK 6 DAY 1-4
community development through solidarity
Recognize the importance of solidarity in
B.10 sociopolitical processes in promoting HUMSS_CSC12-IIId-g-10 WEEK 7 DAY 1
national and global community development
Assess selected community-action
B.11 HUMSS_CSC12-IIId-g-11 WEEK 7 DAY 2-3
initiatives
ASSESSMENT (UNIT TEST) WEEK 7 DAY 4

Promote awareness of human rights in


C.12 HUMSS_CSC12-IIIh-j-13 WEEK 8 DAY 1-3
communities among the learners
Appraise the value of social equity and WEEK 8 DAY 4
C.13 gender equality in the context of HUMSS_CSC12-IIIh-j-14
WEEK 9 DAY 1
participatory development

Analyze strategies of empowerment and


C.14 HUMSS_CSC12-IIIh-j-15 WEEK 9 DAY 2-3
advocacy through community action

Develop commitment and conviction to WEEK 9 DAY 4


C.15 participatory development for community HUMSS_CSC12-IIIh-j-16
well-being WEEK 10 DAY 1
Appraise the value of social equity and
C.16 gender equality in the context of HUMSS_CSC12-IIIh-j-17 WEEK 10 DAY 2
participatory development
C ASSESSMENT (UNIT TEST) WEEK 10 DAY 3-4
Explain the processes, methodologies, and
D.17 approaches in applied social sciences HUMSS_CSC12-Iva-d-17 WEEK 11 DAY 1-2
related to community study
WEEK 11 DAY 3
Apply systematic social research methods TO
D.18 HUMSS_CSC12-Iva-d-17
in conducting a community study WEEK 14 DAY 2
Develop a community action plan using
D.19 HUMSS_CSC12-Iva-d-17 WEEK 14 DAY 3
participatory approaches
ASSESSMENT (PRESENTATION OF
D WEEK 14 DAY 4
COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN)
HUMSS_CSC12-IV-e-h- WEEK 15 DAY 1-4
E.20 Implement Community Action Initiatives 20 WEEK 16 DAY 1-4
Appreciate the value of applying social HUMSS_CSC12-IV-e-h-
E.21 21
WEEK 17 DAY 1-3
sciences in community action initiatives

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) v
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Synthesize the integrative experience of HUMSS_CSC12-IV-e-h- WEEK 17 DAY 4


E.22 22
implementing community action initiatives WEEK 18 DAY 1-2
ASSESSMENT (CIMPLEMENTATION OF
E WEEK 18 DAY 3-4
COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN)

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) vi
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendices
in
Community
Engagement,
Solidarity, and
Citizenship

Concepts and Perspectives


of Community

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 1
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

APPENDICES

A. CONCEPTS AND PERSPECTIVES OF COMMUNITY


Appendix A.1.2.1

REVIEW
 Presentation of Homework: SOCIAL MAPPING. Learners will present their maps and make
conclusions based on their observations about the dynamics that exist in their communities.
 Teacher asks 2 or 3 students to answer the following question:
a. Where do you belong along these groups?
b. Ten years from now, where would you be on these groups

Appendix A.1.3.2

REVIEW
 Presentation of Homework: Learners will present their community pictures in PowerPoint.
They will individually describe in 2-3 sentences the pictures.

Appendix A.1.4.3

DEVELOPING MASTERY
I. TRUE OR FALSE. Read each statements carefully. Write T if the statement is true and F if it is
not.

_____ 1. Community is a collection of people in a particular territory.


_____ 2. Collection of people is always synonymous with community.
_____ 3. The daily operations in the community constitute to a feeling of isolation.
_____ 4. Society is another term for community.
_____ 5. Being a part of a community develops a sense of belongingness among individuals.

II. IDENTIFICATION. Identify what is being asked in each statement. Write your answer on the space
provided.
_________________ 1. It is defined as collection of people in a geographical area.
_________________ 2. It is the study of society and social interactions.

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 2
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

_________________ 3. An element of a community which pertains to a geographical area which


pertains to a geographical area which can be under the jurisdiction of the
government.
_________________ 4. It is the study of man.
_________________ 5. It is defined as an established organization.
III. MATCHNG TYPE. Match column A to Column B. Write the letter of your answer on the space
provided.

A.
_______ 1. Pertains to highly industrialize communities.
_______ 2. Consists of agricultural lands, also referred as pre-industrial communities.
_______ 3. A densely populated area usually crowded and has dirty run-down housing.
_______ 4. An area of land that has been divided on smaller areas on which houses were
built.
_______ 5. Refers to the social standing of an individual.
B.
a. Slums
b. Urban
c. Social Status
d. Rural
e. Subdivision
f. Community

Appendix A.2.1.1

 Community Song
 Process Question/s:
a. What is the message of the song? (Presentation of the competencies.)

Appendix A.2.1.2
 Song analysis (Magkaisa)
 Process Question:
a. How can you relate the song to our activity?
 Values Integration: Unity
 Discussion of saying and a bible excerpt.
a. “Together we stand, Divided we fall.” John F. Kennedy
b. “As a body is one though it has many parts and all the parts of the body
c. Though many are one body, so also as Christ.”1 Corinthians 12:12
d. Each part of the body is unique and important. Like us each of us is unique and our
uniqueness can help strengthen our community.

Appendix A.2.2.3
MOTIVATION
 Song analysis ( Mabuting Pilipino by Noel Cabangon)
a. What is the message of the song?
b. Based on the song what are the characteristics of a good citizen?
c. Do you possess these characteristics?

Appendix A.2.3.4

DISCUSSION
 PROCESSING QUESTIONS:
a. Why do you think these show socio-political structure, cultural structure, economics
structure?
b. Is it possible that these elements of the community create differences in the lives of the
people in the community? How? And Why?
c. Do these pictures contribute to the development of society?
d. Do you think these elements can exist on their own without the others?

PowerPoint Presentation:

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 3
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 4
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix A.2.4.5
MOTIVATION
 Concept Sketches Activity
A picture/sketch is shown and let the student give short statements that describe the
processes, concepts, and interrelationships shown in the sketch.

Sketch to Stretch Activity


 Draw/sketch a symbol or an object about a community
without a leader.
Students shall draw the concepts learned individually and
presented in class.

a. Ask the student:


 Where do you think is the center based located?
 Do you think leaders of each organization are important?
 What would happen to a community without a leader? Effects?
 Do you think that we can also lead or manage a small community as it should be?
b. Do you have a specific way or strategy in leading a small organization?

Appendix A.2.4.6
DISCUSSION
 Teacher presents the topic by using power point presentation
 And elucidate the topic about community power and its importance, leadership and types of
leadership. (Reciprocal Questioning)

PowerPoint Presentation:

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 5
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix A.3.2.1

Review
 Before going into today’s discussion, the class will go back to the previous lesson through the
use of pictures prepared by the teacher.

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 6
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix A.3.2.2
Motivation
 The students will view a video presentation regarding the composition of a community.
After viewing the presentation, teacher will ask:
a. What composes the community?
b. How do they work?
c. Do they help one another for the purpose of co-existence?

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pkrQzmGMsg0

Appendix A.3.2.3
Rubric 1
RUBRICS FOR WRITTEN WORK (ESSAY)
RAW SCORE INDICATORS

5 Write the essay nicely and it has appropriate content related to the topic.

4 Correct and appropriate but lack of neatness.

3 Wrong use of capitalization , punctuation marks, indention, etc.

2 Incomplete work.

1 Obviously copied the work of others.

0 Not submitting any work.

Rubric 2

Rubrics for Essay Evaluation


CREDITS TO DEPED TAMBAYAN BLOGGERS TEAM -
http://richardrrr.blogspot.com/
SHARE THIS TO ALL TEACHERS
HOW TO USE THIS RUBRIC? PLS VISIT THIS LINK >> http://bit.ly/rubricsassessment

CRITERIA 1 2 3 4
 includes typed  includes typed  includes  missing
final, prewrite or final, prewrite or typed final, prewrite/outline,
outline, marked outline, marked prewrite/ outline, draft or Works
draft, & Works draft, & Works draft, & Works Cited; insufficient
Format Cited in Cited in Cited, but editing of draft or
prescribed format prescribed insufficient editing outline;
format of draft; several numerous errors
errors in in format
prescribed format
 writing shows  writing shows  writing shows  writing shows
unusual insight strong, clear adequate little or no
Understandin
understanding understanding understanding but understanding of
g of literature/
may be too text
texts
general or
superficial
 presents fresh  presents an  presents a clearly  poorly defined or
thesis in an effective thesis defined thesis, but inconsistent
original manner and developme the development
Idea while displaying nt using a development is of thesis that
Development unusual insight consistent, too general or may displays little
careful manner not be marked by insight
incorporating e independent
xamples thought
 more than  adequate/some  inadequate/severa  inadequate/nume
adequate/correct errors in MLA l errors in MLA rous errors in
Text Support MLA format; format; format; some MLA format;
smooth generally faulty embedding ineffective
embedding smooth embedding

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 7
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

embedding

 strong,  organized; clear  somewhat  no attempt at


interesting; clear beg/middle/end; organized; attempt organization;
beg/middle/end; clear thesis that at beg/middle/end; lacks clear
Organizationa
strong thesis that is marked on thesis is weak or beg/middle/ end;
l Pattern
is marked on draft unclear thesis lacking or
draft  not marked on inappropriate not
draft marked on draft
 fresh/vigorous;  vivid/interesting;  appropriate but not  simple/vague;
contributes to attempt to specific or vivid; appears to lack
"voice" very establish "voice" weak "voice" "voice"
Word Choice limited use of limited use of  weak attempt to  excessive use of
1st and 2ndperson 1stand limit use of 1st and 1stand 2nd person
& "to be" verbs 2nd person & "to 2nd person & "to & "to be" verbs
be" verbs be" verbs
 correct/varied  correct, but  sometimes  frequent errors &
Sentence
lacks variety incorrect & lacks lacks variety
Structure
variety
 smooth &  somewhat  many not smooth  not used &/or
effective; marked smooth & & some errors in frequent errors in
Transitional
on draft generally usage; many not usage; many not
Devices
effective; most marked on draft marked on draft
marked on draft
 very few (if any)  few errors;  several errors;  numerous errors;
Language errors; very well generally well requires additional appears not to
Mechanics proofread proofread proofreading have been
proofread

Appendix A.3.3.4

MOTIVATION
The learners will be given a puzzle activity which is entitled as FIT IT RIGHT! Wherein, students will
be divided into three groups and each group will need to put puzzle pieces as fast as they can.
Note: Each group puzzle will form a picture showing Rural, Urban and Suburban Community. (5
mins.) The learners will give his/her observation regarding the puzzle they made.

RURAL URBAN SUBURBAN

Appendix A.3.3.5

ABSTRACTION
 Collaborative Learning with teacher
Group the class into 3 groups:
Discuss the following questions:
1. Discuss what is the difference between rural and urban/suburban, global and local
community?
2. Give example about rural, urban/suburban, global and local community.
Note: Each group will be given 2-3 minutes to present their output then the teacher will
discuss the comparison and difference between the types of community based on
sociological theories and perspective. Likewise, teacher will give input including;
A. Types of Community
 Rural – consist of agricultural lands, also referred as pre-industrial communities.
 Urban – pertains to highly industrialize communities.
 Sub-urban – relating to or characteristic of or situated in suburbs.

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 8
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix A.3.4.6

UNIT TEST

Name __________________________ Grade & Section _______________

I. TRUE OR FALSE. Read each statements carefully. Write T if the statement is true and F if it is
not.
_____ 1. Community is a collection of people in a particular territory.
_____ 2. Collection of people is always synonymous with community.
_____ 3. The daily operations in the community constitute to a feeling of isolation.
_____ 4. Society is another term for community.
_____ 5. Being a part of a community develops a sense of belongingness among individuals.

II. IDENTIFICATION. Identify what is being asked in each statement. Write your answer on the space
provided.
_________________ 1. It is defined as collection of people in a geographical area.
_________________ 2. It is the study of society and social interactions.
_________________ 3. An element of a community which pertains to a geographical area which
pertains to a geographical area which can be under the jurisdiction of the
government.
_________________ 4. It is the study of man.
_________________ 5. It is defined as an established organization.

III. MATCHNG TYPE. Match column A to Column B. Write the letter of your answer on the space
provided.

A. Terms B. Description / Definition


_______ 1. Pertains to highly industrialize
a. Slums communities.
b. Urban _______ 2. Consists of agricultural lands, also
c. Social Status referred as pre-industrial
d. Rural communities.
e. Subdivision _______ 3. A densely populated area usually
f. Community crowded and has dirty run-down
housing.
_______ 4. An area of land that has been divided
on smaller areas on which houses
were built.
_______ 5. Refers to the social standing of an
individual.

IV. ESSAY (5 pts. each)


1. As a student how can you help lessen the diversity issues now in our society?
2. What type of leadership do you think is suitable in your community? And why did you
choose that type of leadership?

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 9
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendices
in
Community
Engagement,
Solidarity, and
Citizenship

Community Action

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 10
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

APPENDICES

B. COMMUNITY ACTION

Week 4
Appendix B4.1.1
Video URL
Warm up: RePLAY, ReLIVE, ReCREATE - Community Engagement through Sports
Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kI_6quF_sJ4

Appendix B4.1.2
Performance Task Rubric
Group:
Task:
Exceptional Admirable Acceptable Attempted
Criteria Weight
(100% - 80%) (79% - 51%) (50% - 31%) (30%)
 (10) Factual  (8) Factual  (5) Factual  (3)
information is information is information is Information is
accurate mostly somewhat inaccurate
Understanding
50%  (10) Indicates accurate accurate  (3)
of Topic
a clear  (8)Good  (5) Fair Presentation
understanding understanding understanding is off topic
of topic of topic of topic
 (10) Accepts  (8) Accepts  (5) Unwilling to  (3) Group
ideas of most ideas compromise does not work
others; able to without  (10) Few together
compromise negative members  (6) One
 (20) All comments; contribute person does
Cooperation 20%
members able to all the work
contribute compromise
 (15) Some
members
contribute
 (10) Shows  (8) Shows  (5) Unsure of  (3) Portrayal
confidence some responsibility stalls
 (10) confidence  (5) Somewhat  (3) Lacks
Informative  (8) Presents informative information
 (10) some  (5) Engages  (3) Audience
Entertaining; information audience bored
engages  (8) Engages intermittently  (3) Mumbles
Presentation 30% audience audience  (5) Hard to  (3) Body
 (10) Speaks  (8) Can be hear language is
loudly and heard  (5) Some lacking;
clearly  (8) Some use movement inappropriate
 (10) of body
Appropriate language
use of body
language
Comment:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Task Score ___________ x (.10) = Final Score ________________
Evaluator:
____________________________
____________________________

Appendix B4.2.3
Balloon Frenzy

GROUP DYNAMICS GUIDE FOR BALLOON FRENZY

Spatial Requirements: Gym / outdoor space required


Activity Type: Movement / Group
Group Size: 2 or more
Time: 15 minutes

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 11
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Introduction: As students work to keep balloons from touching the ground, they will recognize the
importance of collaboration in achieving goals. They will experience negative change and identify the
feeling of being overwhelmed. This activity will help them understand that success often depends on the
help we receive from others.

Materials:
 Enough filled balloons for each member of the group to have at least two balloons.

Activity:
To begin, hand each student one filled balloon, and ask them to wait for instructions. Gather the
remaining balloons into a pile for you and other facilitators to add to the game later.

Note: There should be enough student facilitators in the room to observed the game and identify when a
balloon touches the ground.

Tell students the goal of the game is to keep the game going as long as possible. To keep the game
going. They must keep all of the balloons in the air. Students can use any part of their body during play,
but once a balloon has touched the ground they are not to pick it up. Students can assist or receive help
from other students to keep their balloons in the air. IF a student’s balloon touches the ground, they can
assist their classmate in keeping his/her balloon in the air. IF five balloons in the group touch the ground,
the game is over.

Begin the game. After a short time, you and the other facilitators should add another balloon for each
student. Remind students that the goal is to keep all of the balloons in the air. If the student drops a
balloon, remind them not to pick it up.

The game is stopped when five balloons touch the ground.

Processing the Experiences:


 Was it easy to keep one balloon from touching the ground?
 How did you feel when the second balloon was added?
 How were you able to keep both balloons up?
 Did you ever need someone else’s help to keep your balloons from touching the ground?
 Did you ever help someone else to keep his or her balloon from touching the ground?
 At what point did you realize you were dependent on the other group members to succeed at
keeping all of the balloons in the air
 Did you feel a responsibility toward the other group members to keep all of the balloons in the
air?
 Why did you feel this way?
 How does this relate to your own life?
 In life, is it easier to juggle life’s challenges alone or with the help of other.

Appendix B4.2.4
Essay Assessment Rubric

Needs
Performance Excellent Good Unacceptable
Improvement
Areas 10 - 7 6-4 1-0
3-2
Essay has a Central idea is Unable to find Essay had no
specific central vague; somewhat specific central idea or
Content / idea that is clearly sketchy and non- supporting details; supporting details.
Development stated in the supportive to the more than 4 errors
opening topic; lacks focus. in information.
paragraph.
Essay is logically Essay somewhat Central point and Ideas were
organized and digresses from the flow of essay is unorganized and
well-structured central idea; ideas lost; lacks vague; no
displaying a do not logically organization and particular flow was
Organization
beginning, a boy follow each other. continuity. followed.
and a conclusion.
Critical thinking
skills are evident
Writing is smooth, Sentences are Lacks creativity Writing is
coherent, and varied and and focus. confusing, hard to
consistent with the inconsistent with Unrelated word follow. Contains
central idea. central idea, choice to central fragments and/or
Style
Sentences are vocabulary and idea. Diction is run-on sentences.
strong and word choices. inconsistent. Inappropriate
expressive with diction.
varied structure.

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 12
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Diction is
consistent and
words well
chosen.
Written work has Written work is Written work has Written work has
no errors in word relatively free of several errors in serious and
selection and use errors in word work selection persistent errors
sentence selection and use, and use, sentence in word selection
Mechanics structure, spelling sentence structure, spelling, and use, sentence
punctuation and structure, spelling, punctuation, and structure, spelling,
capitalization punctuation, and capitalization (3-4 punctuation, and
capitalization error) capitalization.
(1-2 errors)

Appendix B4.3.5
Citizenship

GROUP DYNAMICS GUIDE FOR CIVIL SOCIETY AND CITIZENSHIP

Spatial Requirements: Classroom


Activity Type: Cognitive / Group
Group Size: 2 or more
Time: 15 minutes

Introduction: While many people may take citizenship for granted, anyone need only turn on the news to
see just how important it is. This lesson plan will help make sure your students understand not only
citizenship, but also their role in civil society.

Materials:
 Cartolina or Manila paper and Marker for the student output.

Activity:

Break your class into 4-5 groups.

Have each group come up with their own list of rights and responsibilities for citizens. Then discuss
among the class.

Now let's focus more on civil society. Have your students break into smaller groups this time, around 2-3
people per group.

Have students generate a list of civil society activities that they have been involved in or would like to
participate in. Once their list is generated (each group should have at least contribution per student), have
students choose which civil society activity they believe would be the most beneficial to their community.

Once their group choice is made, have students research how they might participate in said activity in
their own community. For instance, if students decide their community would benefit from a soup kitchen,
have them research volunteer opportunities in your town/city.

Have students share with the class their choice of activity and what kind of opportunities exist in the
community to meet that need.

Processing the Experiences:


 Was it easy to list own right and responsibility for your citizens? Why?
 How did you come up with this list of rights and responsibilities?
 What are the civil society you come up with?
 Why you choose those create those civil society?
 How did you come up with activities for this civil society?
 At what point did you realize that this civil society is important to your life? If not why?
 Did you feel a responsibility toward the civil community you want to participate?
 Why did you feel this way?
 How does this activity relate to your own life?

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 13
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix B4.3.6
Citizenship

TRUE OR FALSE
_________1. To be naturalized, a foreigner must have lived for at least 3 consecutive years in the
Philippines.
Answer: False
_________2. Filipino citizenship can be lost if the person is naturalized in another country.
Answer: True
__________3. Filipino citizenship cannot be lost or taken away
Answer: False
__________4. Foreigners can acquire Filipino citizenship through the process of Naturalization.
Answer: True
__________5. Citizenship is when a person who is entitled to the rights and protections afforded by a
state and owes the state certain duties,
Answer: True

Appendix B4.4.7
Summative Assessment

Name: _______________________________________________ Score: _________________


Section:_______________________________________________ Date: _________________

A. Read the following questions carefully. Then, choose letter of your answer in your paper.

Multiple Choice Question (2 points each)


1. What’s the best explanation of citizenship?
a. A person who is resident of a state
b. A person who is a resident of a country
c. A person who is entitled to the rights and protections under a state
d. A person who is entitled to the rights and protections afforded by a state and owes the state certain
duties*
e. None of the answers are correct
2. Which of the following is incorrect about citizenship in the Philippines?
a. You can obtain citizenship simply by being born in the Philippines
b. You can obtain citizenship through naturalization process
c. Philippines does not permit dual citizenship*
d. None of the choices are incorrect
e. All of the choices are incorrect
3. Which of the following is part of civil society?
a. A for-profit business*
b. A Local Government Unit
c. Office under the President
d. Office under the Vice President
e. c and d

True or False
__________1. To be naturalized, a foreigner must have lived for at least 3 consecutive years in
the Philippines. *false
__________2. Filipino citizenship can be lost if the person is naturalized in another country. *true
__________3. Filipino citizenship cannot be lost or taken away. *false
__________4. Foreigners can acquire Filipino citizenship through the process of Naturalization.
*true
__________5. Citizenship is when a person who is entitled to the rights and protections afforded
by a state and owes the state certain duties. *true

Enumeration
1. Give five (5) example of duties and responsibility of a Filipino citizen?
2. Give four (4) example of civic communities?

Short Answer (5) points


1. Based on your understanding of the lesson, define of citizenship.

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 14
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Week 5
Appendix B5.1.1
Triple Venn Diagram

Differences:
A - Community Engagement
B - Solidarity
C - Citizenship

Similarities:
D - Community Engagement and Citizenship
E - Community Engagement and Solidarity
F - Solidarity and Citizenship

Appendix B5.1.2
Texts for Group Activity
Group 1: Self-Involvement to Community Engagement
People can get involved in many ways--here are just a few:
 Get involved in planning processes like creating goals or defining the problem
 Donate money or help out with a fundraising effort
 Volunteer to staff the office, answer phones, put together mass mailings, or make phone calls
 Doing research, writing grant proposals, or handling correspondence
 Attend public events like rallies, community hearings, or fundraising events
 Serve on committees that focus on specific problems or activities
 Take leadership roles in a community partnership
Source: Community Tool Box (2016). Section 7. Involving People Most Affected by the Problem.
Retrieved 10 May 2017 from http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/participation/encouraging-
involvement/involve-those-affected/main

Appendix B5.1.3
Inputs of the Teacher
COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION
Concepts concerning community participation offer
one set of explanations as to why the process of
community engagement might be useful in
addressing the physical, interpersonal, and cultural
aspects of individuals’ environments. The real value
of participation stems from the finding that
mobilizing the entire community, rather than
engaging people on an individualized basis or not
engaging them at all, leads to more effective results
(Braithwaite et al., 1994). Simply stated, change "...
is more likely to be successful and permanent when
the people it affects are involved in initiating and Source: https://www.quotemaster.org/leadership+model#&gid=1&pid=8
promoting it" (Thompson et al, 1990, p. 46). In other
words, a crucial element of community engagement
is participation by the individuals, community-based organizations, and institutions that will be affected by
the effort.

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 15
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

This participation is "a major method for improving the quality of the physical environment, enhancing
services, preventing crime, and improving social conditions" (Chavis et al., 1990,
p.56). There is evidence that participation can lead to improvements in neighborhood and community and
stronger interpersonal relationships and social fabric
(Florin et al., 1990). Robert Putnam notes that
social scientists have recently "...unearthed a wide
range of empirical evidence that the quality of public
life and the performance of social
institutions...are...powerfully influenced by norms
and networks of civic engagement." Moreover,
"researchers in...education, urban poverty,...and
even health have discovered that successful
outcomes are more likely in civically engaged
communities" (Putnam, 1995, p.66). For example,
Steckler’s CODAPT model, for "Community
Ownership through Diagnosis, Participatory
Planning, Evaluation, and Training
(for Institutionalization)," suggests that when
community participation is strong throughout a
program’s development and implementation, long-
term program viability, i.e., institutionalization, is
more likely assured (Goodman et al., 1987-88).
The community participation literature suggests
that: Source:
· People who interact socially with neighbors are https://www.pinterest.com/pin/488288784575981479/
more likely to know about and join voluntary
organizations.
· A sense of community may increase an individual’s feeling of control over the environment, and
increases participation in the community and voluntary organizations.
· Perceptions of problems in the environment can motivate individuals (and organizations) to act to
improve the community (Chavis et al., 1990).
"When people share a strong sense of community they are motivated and empowered to change
problems they face, and are better able to mediate the negative effects over things which they have no
control," Chavis et al., (1990, p. 73) write. Moreover, "a sense of community is the glue that can hold
together a community development effort" (Chavis et al., 1990, p. 73-74). This concept suggests that
programs that "...foster membership, increase influence, meet needs, and develop a shared emotional
connection among community members" (Chavis et al.,1990, p. 73) can serve as catalysts for change
and for engaging individuals and the community in health decision-making and action.

Main Source:
Community Engagement: Definitions and Organizing Concepts from the Literature. Retrieved from
http://chl.berkeley.edu/images/stories/conference/f6%201%20community%20engagement%20-
%20definitions%20and%20organizing%20concepts.pdf

Appendix B5.1.4
Rubrics for Group Presentation

Group #/Name: ______________________ Date: ______________


Grade Level / Section: ________________ Score: _____________
Criteria 4 3 2 1 Points
Presentation Presentation Presentation Content Did
had an had a good had moments the
Content exceptional amount of where valuable presentation
Did the amount of material and material was have valuable
presentation valuable benefited the present but as material?
have valuable material and class. a whole content
material? was extremely was lacking.
beneficial to the
class.
The teammates The teammates The teammates The
never worked sometimes worked from teammates
Collaboration
from others’ worked from others’ ideas always worked
Did everyone
ideas. It seems others’ ideas. most of the from others’
contribute to the
as though only a However it time. And it ideas. It was
presentation?
few people seems as seems like evident that all
Did everyone
worked on the though certain every did some of the group
seem well
presentation. people did not work, but some members
versed in the
do as much people are contributed
material?
work as others. carrying the equally to the
presentation. presentation

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 16
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

The There were The The


Organization presentation minimal signs of presentation presentation
Was the lacked organization or had organizing was well
presentation organization and preparation. ideas but could organized, well
well organized had little have been prepared and
and easy to evidence of much stronger easy to follow.
follow? preparation. with better
preparation.
Presenters were Presenters were Presenters Presenters
unconfident and not consistent were were all very
Presentation
demonstrated with the level of occasionally confident in
Did the
little evidence of confidence/ confident with delivery and
presenters
planning prior to preparedness their they did an
Speak clearly?
presentation. they showed the presentation excellent job of
Did the engage
classroom but however the engaging the
the audience?
had some presentation class.
Was it obvious
strong was not as Preparation is
the material had
moments. engaging as it very evident.
been
could have
rehearsed?
been for the
class.

Retrieved from: http://pbl101.weebly.com/uploads/3/1/3/1/31318861/group_presentation_rubric.pdf

Appendix B5.1.5
SWOT Analysis Matrix

Group #/Name: _______________________ Date: ______________


Score: _____________
A. Given Community Situation / Activity
________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

B. Description (1 to 2 sentences)
________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

C. Analysis (At least one description per area)


Area Description

Strength/s

Weakness/es

Opportunity/ies

Threat/s

Appendix B5.1.6
Rubrics for Photo Essay 1

Name: _____________________________ Date: ______________


Grade Level / Section: ________________ Score: _____________

Criteria 4 3 2 1 Remarks
Provides unique Some unique Interesting No evidence
and interesting aspects elements of unique or
Creativity approach to evident which support the interesting
subject in the add to story story elements that
photography, message. message, but connect to the

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writing and story are not story


message. unique.
All story Most of the While some Few elements
elements relate story elements of present which
compelling story elements story evident, do not
(setting, evident which they do not support a
Storytelling
character, plot, still provide a support a coherent,
exposition, compelling compelling compelling
conflict, climax, story story story.
resolution)
Proper structure, Technically Writing has Multiple
grammar, well written technical technical
punctuation with some problems, but problems with
used to not only interest to overall narrative
Writing
link images and support the message is which
story, but also story. supported. detracts from
enhance overall overall story
message. and message.

Note: This is the rubric if the student does not take photos of their own.

Appendix B5.1.7
Rubrics for Photo Essay 2

Name: _____________________________ Date: ______________


Grade Level / Section: ________________ Score: _____________
Criteria 4 3 2 1 Remarks
Provides unique Some unique Interesting No evidence
and interesting aspects evident elements of unique or
approach to which add to support the interesting
Creativity subject in the story message. story elements that
photography, message, but connect to
writing and story are not the story
message. unique.
All story Most of the While some Few elements
elements relate story elements elements of present which
compelling story evident which story evident, do not
(setting, still provide a they do not support a
Storytelling
character, plot, compelling support a coherent,
exposition, story compelling compelling
conflict, climax, story story.
resolution)
Proper Technically well Writing has Multiple
structure, written with technical technical
grammar, some interest to problems, but problems with
punctuation support the overall narrative
Writing used to not only story. message is which
link images and supported. detracts from
story, but also overall story
enhance overall and
message. message.
Lighting, angles, Lighting, Either quality Neither photo
composition, angles, of photos are quality or
cropping and composition, not consistent story support
Photography content in all cropping and or they do not is evident in
photos support content in all support the images
story. Variety of photos support story provided.
images. story

Note: This is the rubric if the student takes photos of their own.

Judging Criteria:
• Creativity is the original, fresh, and external expression of the imagination of the maker by using the
medium to convey an idea, message or thought. Compelling essays evoke laughter, sadness, anger,
pride, wonder or another intense emotion. The use and control of light to create dimension, shape, and
roundness in an image or the way the creator uses words to express thoughts and emotions can be
considered.
• Storytelling refers to the Essay's ability to evoke imagination, create a feeling, tell a story, or visually
illustrate an idea. The images should tell the story in a visual way creating interest by capturing the

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 18
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

moment. Images can better illustrate the story and keep the viewer's interest with variety, angles,
lighting, color, etc.
• Writing should be creative using proper technique and mechanics. The writing should evoke the
emotion and wonder of the reader leaving them to want more by the time they reach the end. Does the
story have a conflict, a climax, and an end?
• Photography includes impact, creativity, technical excellence, composition, lighting, style, color, and
storytelling. The photos should provide variety, interesting angles, imagination, and properly illustrate
the story being told.

Retrieved from:
http://projects.kydataseam.com/photojournalism/CommunDetails_files/photoessayrubric.pdf

Appendix B5.2.8
Images for Photo Analysis

Picture A Picture B Picture C

SOLIDARITY IN THE COMMUNITY:


Solidarity is the acceptance of our social nature and the affirmation of the bonds we share with all our
brothers and sisters.
Social Virtue of Solidarity: The willingness to practice participation while striving for social justice in the
community.

Appendix B5.2.9
Paper and Pencil Test
Direction. Identify to which kind of solidarity each item falls under. Choose the letter of the correct answer
in the box.

A. Family B. Community C. Church D. School E. individual

_______1. We are called to be a rich expression of that love and solidarity and a witness
of the same to the world and put aside all the differences and remember that
a family will always stand behind one another in any circumstance.
_______2. It is the recognition of the common fatherhood of God and brotherhood in
Christ that will ensure the realization of this important principle.
_______3. This yields a healthy society, a thriving economy, and care for those on the
margins, and structures that protect the family.
_______4. This fully achieved when the reciprocal differences of men and women are
seen as an affirmation of the equal dignity of each person.

Appendix B5.3.10
CITIZEN’s SOCIAL PARTICIPATION
1. Community Activists: Work with others on local
problems, form a group to work on local problems, active
membership community organizations, contact officials on
social issues.
2. Apathetic Inactive: no participatory activity, not even
voting.
3. Passive Supporters: vote regularly, attends patriotic
parades, pay all taxes but don’t indulge in social projects.
4. Protesters: Join in public street demonstration, protest
vigorously if a government does something morally wrong,
attend protest meetings, or refuse to obey unjust laws.
5. Communicators: Keep informed about the state of the
nation, engaged in discussions, write letters to newspaper
editors, send support or protest messages to national and
local leaders.

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 19
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

6. Volunteerism: It is an essence of democracy which refers to the principle or system of supporting or


doing something by voluntary efforts or actions. It comes from the word voluntariness or the quality of
being free in the exercise of one’s free will; and that such act or deed is performed without
valuable/material consideration.

Appendix B5.4.11

Survey Questionnaire for the Involvement of Students in Community Action*

Dear Student,

This survey intends to determine your initial level of involvement as students in community
engagement.
In view of this, your utmost honesty, cooperation, and participation by answering all the items the
needed information in this questionnaire are hereby requested. Rest assured that your answers will be
treated confidentially and will be used solely for enriching the lesson.
Your cooperation will be highly appreciated.

Truly yours,

_______________________
Teacher

Name (Optional) : ____________________________________________________

Part I. Reasons for Involvement


Direction: This evaluation is to appraise your reasons for prospective involvement in a community action
by encircling the appropriate score. Choose your answer from the listed alternatives:
Weighted Mean Point Scale Descriptive Rating Interpretation
4.21 – 5.00 5 Always Highly Considered
3.41 – 4.20 4 Often Considered
2.61 – 3.40 3 Fair Moderately Considered
1.81 – 2.60 2 Seldom Less Considered
1.00 – 1.80 1 Never Not Considered

Indicators Scale
1. Make important networking contacts 5 4 3 2 1
2. Learn or develop skills 5 4 3 2 1
3. Teach your skills to others 5 4 3 2 1
4. Enhance your résumé 5 4 3 2 1
5. Gain work experience 5 4 3 2 1
6. Build self-esteem and self-confidence 5 4 3 2 1
7. Improve your health 5 4 3 2 1
8. Meet new people 5 4 3 2 1
9. Feel needed and valued 5 4 3 2 1
10. Express gratitude for help you may have received in the past from an organization
5 4 3 2 1
11. Communicate to others that you are ambitious, enthusiastic and care about the
5 4 3 2 1
community
12. Make a difference in someone’s life 5 4 3 2 1
13. Improves the likelihood you’re your children will volunteer as an adult 5 4 3 2 1
14. Other ________________________ 5 4 3 2 1

Part II. Interests


Direction: This evaluation is to appraise your interests for having a prospective involvement in a
community action by encircling the appropriate score. Choose your answer from the listed
alternatives:
Weighted Mean Point Scale Descriptive Rating Interpretation
4.21 – 5.00 5 Always Highly Interested
3.41 – 4.20 4 Often Interested
2.61 – 3.40 3 Fair Moderately Interested
1.81 – 2.60 2 Seldom Less Interested
1.00 – 1.80 1 Never Not Interested

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 20
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Indicators Scale
1. Politics 5 4 3 2 1
2. Energy / Environment 5 4 3 2 1
3. Advocacy 5 4 3 2 1
4. Education 5 4 3 2 1
5. Health Care 5 4 3 2 1
6. Housing / Homeless 5 4 3 2 1
7. Veterans 5 4 3 2 1
8. Children 5 4 3 2 1
9. Animals 5 4 3 2 1
10. Conservation 5 4 3 2 1
11. Safety and Security 5 4 3 2 1
12. Other ________________________ 5 4 3 2 1

Part III. Skills


Direction: This evaluation is to appraise your skills beneficial in conducting a prospective involvement in
a community action by encircling the appropriate score. Choose your answer from the listed
alternatives:
Weighted Mean Point Scale Descriptive Rating Interpretation
4.21 – 5.00 5 Always Highly Skilled
3.41 – 4.20 4 Often Skilled
2.61 – 3.40 3 Fair Moderately Skilled
1.81 – 2.60 2 Seldom Less Skilled
1.00 – 1.80 1 Never Not Skilled

Indicators Scale
1. Computer literate 5 4 3 2 1
2. Typing 5 4 3 2 1
3. Sales 5 4 3 2 1
4. Construction 5 4 3 2 1
5. Teaching 5 4 3 2 1
6. Proficient in American Sign Language 5 4 3 2 1
7. Engine Repair 5 4 3 2 1
8. Management 5 4 3 2 1
9. Artistic 5 4 3 2 1
10. Athletic 5 4 3 2 1
11. Cooking 5 4 3 2 1
12. Other ________________________ 5 4 3 2 1

Part IV. Special Needs


Direction: This evaluation is to appraise your special needs in conducting a prospective involvement in a
community action by encircling the appropriate score. Choose your answer from the listed
alternatives:
Weighted Mean Point Scale Descriptive Rating Interpretation
4.21 – 5.00 5 Always Highly Needed
3.41 – 4.20 4 Often Needed
2.61 – 3.40 3 Fair Moderately Needed
1.81 – 2.60 2 Seldom Less Needed
1.00 – 1.80 1 Never Not Needed

Indicators Scale
1. No crowds/ loud noises 5 4 3 2 1
2. Accessibility 5 4 3 2 1
3. Medical Needs – equipment, medicines, etc. 5 4 3 2 1
4. Stamina 5 4 3 2 1
5. Other ________________________ 5 4 3 2 1

* Adapted from “Making a Difference: How to Become and Remain Active in Your Community”. Retrieved
from http://www.state.sc.us/dmh/client_affairs/volunteer_guide.pdf

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 21
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix B5.4.12
Graffiti Wall Template

Source: http://www.istockphoto.com/photo/white-stone-brick-wall-gm517850584-8969321

WEEK 6
Day 1
Appendix B6.1.1 – Graphic Organizer

Appendix B6.1.2 – Images

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 22
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix B6.1.3

Day 2
Appendix B6.2.4 Rubrics for Essay

Day 3
Appendix B6.3.5 Paper Tower Building

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 23
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix B6.3.6 Brainstorming Process Guide

Day 4
Appendix B6.4.7 Rubrics for Presentation

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 24
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix B6.4.8 Rubrics for Essay


- Appendix B6.2.4 (page 23)

Week 7
Day 1
Appendix B7.1.1 The Puzzle

Appendix B7.1.2 Video Presentation


- The Animal Team Work (1:23 mins.)
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7gF3hDoUqk

Appendix B7.1.3
The Importance of Solidarity
(Graham’s Grumbles)

SOLIDARITY IS MORE THAN UNIONS

SOLIDARITY IS DEFYING BOUNDARIES

SOLIDARITY IS FROM COMMUNICATION TO ACTION

SOLIDARITY IS MORE THAN UNIONS


Solidarity is about more than Unions. Its about working with people on the things that matter to them. It is
also about removing the boundaries that prevent us from working together. It is about believing that what
hurts my neighbour also hurts myself, that when I need a neighbour I have no right to expect help if I have
not first helped others. It is both an emotion and a goal, a process and a state of being. I try to tear down
the fence that prevents others from experiencing the wealth and opportunities I experience, but I also act
for them here and now.

It’s certainly true that when Solidarity goes wrong, it usually ends in patronisation or some kind of
corruption. If I say I’m acting in Solidarity with the First Nations most directly affected by Tar Sands, by
way of an example, am I first and foremost asking them what they think the priorities are? There is room

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 25
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

for initiative, but to show solidarity, one must meet as equals and listen. There is Solidarity with those
closest to me, but this is merely helping out my friends; to misquote Jesus, even the Tories do that!

SOLIDARITY IS DEFYING BOUNDARIES


These boundaries that get in the way can be race, nation, gender, wealth, indeed anything upon which a
segregation can be created. These walls create several effects. First, that people on one side cannot
experience the privileges that are largely arbitrarily awarded to people on the other side. Second, that
those on the latter side cannot appreciate life on the first side, and therefore feel they are justified in their
current position. Third, it creates resentment, often both ways.

SOLIDARITY IS FROM COMMUNICATION TO ACTION.


So Solidarity can flow from communication, but it requires action to become a real and present force.

Sometimes that action needs to be confrontational, to improve the lot of one group relative to another,
and sometimes it needs to be conciliatory, taking down the walls and bringing people together as equals. I
can’t claim to be an expert in deciding which is which. What I do know is that without Solidarity, without
considering the needs of the other, without looking at what I have and realizing there are few valid
reasons that I should have so much when others have so little, is a necessary step towards creating a
more civilized world. The endless pursuit of profit at the expense of others, or the maintenance of these
divides simply prevents us from relating to each other properly as humans. As such, they prevent us from
experiencing life in all its fullness.

DAY 2
Appendix B7.2.4
CHARACTERISTICS OF SHORT AND LONG TERM COMMUNITY ACTION INITIATIVES

PICTURES OF DIFFERENT COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES

FEEDING
PROGRAM DISASTER MANAGEMENT

CLEAN UP DRIVE LIVELIHOOD PROJECTS


DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SHORT-TERM & LONG-TERM PROJECTS
by Tara Duggan

Generally speaking, short-term projects take a few hours, days or weeks to complete. Long-term projects
take months or even years to finish. Typically, companies require more documentation and infrastructure
for longer-term efforts. Decisions about project governance usually depend on budget, resources
required, business impact, and the scope the project. Effective project managers start by assessing the
project need and determining how much time is needed to meet the desired outcomes.
Budget
Short-term projects typically require less money to complete than long-term efforts. An exception might
occur for a short-term disaster recovery effort or other unplanned event that requires immediate, all-out
attention. Because short-term projects typically cost less, they usually require fewer approvals to get
started and completed. Short-term project leaders may simply keep track of expenditures in a

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

spreadsheet, while larger, more complex projects might require the use of more sophisticated accounting
software packages to track and monitor forecasting and spending.
Resources
The number of resources required for a short-term project typically depends on the type of product or
service being developed. Short-term projects usually require specialized expertise. For example, you
might institute a short-term project to analyze a recurring product problem and devise a solution. Large,
complicated T development projects typically require numerous resources over the course of the project
life cycle to initiate, plan, execute, control, and close the project.
Impact
Short-term projects typically have a limited impact. You may initiate a project to handle a specific problem
or react to a situation. Once the problem is solved, the project team disbands. Longer-term projects tend
to have a larger impact on the business, community or employees. For example, you might institute a
long-term project to analyze complex problems and make sweeping changes that affect your entire
company. Project team members typically commit to working on the project for the duration of the effort.
This ensures consistency and continuity.
Scope
Long-term projects tend to be complex. Project plans describe multiple objectives, business needs and
interdependent requirements. Long-term projects may be divided into smaller projects to make them more
manageable and to produce more immediate results. Short-term projects typically focus on a single goal.
Evaluating short-term projects requires less effort and analysis than larger projects. Your company may
require a formal scope statement for projects that last more than a month. Establishing this type of
governance ensures that the number of features and requirements of the project is documented early on
to prevent miscommunication, misunderstandings and cost overruns later.

CHARACTERISTICS SHORT TERM COMMUNITY LONG TERM COMMUNITY


ACTION INITIATIVES ACTION INITIATIVES
BUDGET LOCAL FUNDS NATIONAL FUNDS
RESOURCES COMMUNITY OFFICIALS BUREAUS/GOV’T AGENCIES
IMPACT SPECIFIC NEEDS OF THE COMMON NEEDS OF THE
COMMUNITY COMMUNITIES
SCOPE LIMITED LARGER

Day 3
THE INFOGRAPHICS

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix B7.3.5 THE SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ASSESSMENT OF COMMUNITY ACTION

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

For access on the online survey questionnaire and softcopies, contact:

Andres Vergel V. Santos, andresvergel.santos@deped.gov.ph

Ryan R. Pecson, ryan.iamateacger@gmail.com

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 30
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendices
in
Community
Engagement,
Solidarity, and
Citizenship

Core Values and Principles


of Community-action
Initiatives
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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

APPENDICES

C. CORE VALUES AND PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNITY-ACTION INITIATIVES

Appendix C 8.1.1
The learner will watch video clip about human rights.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwTeqyxOxo4

After watching the video, teacher will ask:


1. What have you observed on the video?
Ans. It talks about Human rights
2. Which is the most basic among the rights presented in the video?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_life

Appendix C 8.1.2

HUMAN RIGHTS is defined as


the supreme, inherent, and
inalienable rights to life, to dignity,
and to self-development. It is
concerned with issues in both areas
of civil and political rights and
economic, social and cultural rights
founded on internationally accepted
human rights obligations

One major issue that pro-life groups


stress is abortions unfairness to the
babies

Pro-life supporters say that it is murder


because the babies have a heartbeat.

Pro-life activists say that if a criminal is


convicted of murdering two people, if a
woman is pregnant, what is the
difference if you have an abortion?

ABORTION ISSUES
An issue of abortion is that of mandatory
notification and consent. Some believe that a RIGHT TO LIBERTY
pregnant minor should not be allowed to abort THE RIGHT TO BE FREE,HUMAN
her pregnancy without the consent of a parent or RIGHT(LAW)ANY BASIC RIGHT OR FREEDOM
guardian.
TO WHICH ALL HUMAN BEINGS ARE ENTITLED
Likewise, some believe that consent of the
woman's husband or the child's biological father AND IN WHOSE EXERCISE A GOVERNMENT
should be required. MAY NOT INTERFERE(INCLUDING RIGHTS TO
Not only is it unfair to the unborn child, but it LIFE AND LIBERTY AS WELL AS FREEDOM OF
could be unfair to the father who might want to THOUGHTS.
have the baby.

Right to property
property rights refer to the theorotical and legal
ownership of specific property by individuals and
the ability to determine how such property is
used…in economics,property rights form the basis
for all market exchange,and the allocation of
property rights in a society affects the efficiency
of resource use.

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix C 8.2.3
Listen to the song “Ang Bayan Ko”
Learners answer the questions.
1. What is the message of the song?
2. What basic right is stressed in the song?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCJHq9iDr1k
(5 minutes)

Appendix C 8.2.4
Mapping Human Rights in Our Community

Overview
Participants work cooperatively to create a map of their community and identify the rights associated with
each major institution.
Time: 1 hour (but could extend over several days)
Materials: Art supplies, chart paper
Copies of the UDHR, complete or simplified version
Setting: Elementary school - Adult groups
Procedure
1. Divide participants into small groups and ask them to draw a map of their town (or neighborhood in the
case of larger communities). They should include their homes, major public buildings (e.g., parks, post
office, city hall, schools, places of worship) and public services (e.g., hospitals, fire department, police
station) and any other places that are important to the community (e.g., grocery stores, cemetery,
cinemas, gas stations).
2. When the maps are complete, ask participants to analyze their maps from a human rights perspective.
What human rights do they associate with different places on their maps? For example, a place of
worship with freedom of thought, conscience, and religion; the school with the right to education; the
post office with the right to information, to privacy, and to self-expression. As they identify these rights,
they should look up the relevant article(s) in the UDHR and write the article number(s) next to that
place on the map.
3. Ask each group to present its map to the whole group and summarize its analysis of human rights
exercised in the community.
 Did any parts of your map have a high concentration of rights? How do you explain this?

Appendix C 8.3.5
A Human Rights Tree

Overview
Participants work cooperatively to create an image that helps to define human rights and human needs.
Time: 10+ minutes
Materials: Art supplies, chart paper
Setting: Elementary school - Adult groups
A good follow-up or alternative to Activity 1, Human
Links:
Beings/Human Rights
Procedure
1. Ask participants, working in small groups, to draw a tree on large chart paper.
 Write on the tree (in the form of leaves, fruits, flowers, or branches) those human rights that they
think all people need to live in dignity and justice.
 A human rights tree needs roots to grow and flourish. Give the tree roots and label them with the
things that make human rights flourish. For example, a healthy economy, the rule of law, or
universal education.
2. When drawings are complete, ask each group to present its tree and explain its reasons for the items
they have included.
Going Further
1. Match the fruits, leaves, and branches with articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and
write the number of the article next to each item.
2. Display these trees in the classroom or in public places.
3. Identify rights concerns that are of particular concern to you and your community.
Source: Amnesty International-Austria

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Appendix C 8.3.6

Appendix C. 8.3.7
The learners will answer the following with the phrases: “in every case”, in most cases”, and “in some
cases”.
1. Killing is wrong.
2. All people should be treated equally.
3. All people have the right to medical help if they are ill.
4. All people have a right to education.
5. People should be allowed to travel and leave the country if they wish.
Answer Key:
1. In every case
2. In every case

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

3. In every case
4. In every case
5. In some cases

Appendix C9.1.1
(Video Presentation)
DOES SOCIAL JUSTICE EXIST? The learner will guest what is the video all about. The learner will take
down note all the important details/ information from the video.

Appendix C9.1.2
GALLERY WALK
The learner will explain their answer in class base on how they understand the existence of social justice
and it’s important.
`

C9.1.3 CYCLE ARROW PROCESS

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Exist Social Justice


1.
2.
3.

Importance of Social
Justice
1.
2.
3.

Community
1.
2.
3.

Appendix C9.1.4
MODOFIED TRUE OR FALSE
Direction: TRUE OR FALSE Read and understand the statement below, write capital latter T if the
statement is true and write capital latter F if the statement is false. Write your answer in the
given space before the number.
___1. Social justice is the reasonable relationship between the individual and society.
___2. Practicing equal treatment to each and every one in a community is an example of existing social
justice.
___3. Enjoy being a wealthy man is a form of social justice.
___4. Giving alms to the poor for your political agenda is good practice of social justice.
___5. Having a productive community is the important of social justice.

Appendix C9.2.5 Picture of Violence against Women

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix C9.2.6
Picture of Kilusan mayo Uno

Appendix C9.2.7
Film Clip of Violence against Children (0.41 secs) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v+MjnAoCyLf5M

Appendix C9.2.8
Video Feed/News of Freedom from Debt Coalition (1.51 mins.)
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v+SeuUCE6aWdl

Appendix C9.2.9
Activity: Dama ko! Sigaw ko!
Rubrics for Slogan Making

Appendix C9.2.10
Insert Slide Presentation of a man looking at a community
(The Teacher can make a Slide Presentation of the following:

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix C9.3.11
ACT LIKE A MAN/ ACT LIKE A WOMEN ACTIVITY

Write down what might people Act Like A Man Jobs one would choose if
“say” or “do” if someone does not they acted like the
act like a man or woman as descriptions listed in the
defined in the middle column. middle column.

Appendix C9.4.12 Definition of Terms

Appendix C9.4.13

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix C10.1.1 PICTURES

Appendix C10.1.2
Answer Key for the Summative Test:
1. T
2. T
3. T
4. F
5. T
6. T
7. Violence against Women
8. Freedom from Death Coalition
9. Participatory Development
10. Advocate
11. In every case
12. In every case
13. In every case
14. In every case
15. In some case
16-25. Essay (It’s up to the teacher based on the results of the rubrics)

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendices
in
Community
Engagement,
Solidarity, and
Citizenship

Methodologies and
Approaches of Community
Actions and Involvements
Across Disciplines
HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 40
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

APPENDICES

D. METHODOLOGIES AND APPROACHES OF COMMUNITY ACTIONS AND INVOLVEMENTS


ACROSS DISCIPLINES

Appendix D11.1.1

Republic of the Philippines


Department of Education
Region III
Schools Division of ___________
_____________ National High School
________________

EVALUATION FORM FOR


ELEMENTS OF THE COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN

_ (Project Title)_

Section: _______________
Group: ______________

ELEMENTS OF THE MORE EFFECTIVE SOMEWHAT LESS EFFECTIVE


ACTION PLAN (3) EFFECTIVE (1)
(2)
Plan includes name of
an organization or
community as well as Plan includes name of
the name of a peer an organization or
Plan includes name of
support person and the community as well as
one support person.
WHO name(s) of others from the name of a peer
the community who will support person.
be involved in the action
plan.
RATING:
Plan includes a goal
statement that is clear,
specific, measurable,
and attainable. Also Plan includes a goal
included is a statement statement that is clear, Plan includes a
of purpose that features specific, measurable, statement of what is to
WHAT the development and and attainable be done.
the leadership skills
required to promote the
cause.
RATING:
Plan includes a step-by-
step outline of what is to
be done, and includes a
Plan includes some Plan includes a vague
description of the
detail of what is to be outline of what is to be
leadership skills and
done. done.
HOW development strategies
needed to work toward
the goal and achieve it.
RATING:
Plan includes
justification of why
specific steps are Plan includes a vague
Plan includes some
planned to meet the explanation about why
detail about why some
goal. Possible barriers particular steps are in
WHY steps are in place.
or obstacles are listed, place.
along with ways they
might be overcome.
RATING:
Plan includes start and
end dates as well as
Plan includes start date,
check-in dates and Plan includes start date
end date, and at least
celebration dates. and end date.
the first check-in date.
WHEN Details are included
about dates and times

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

for each step of the


action plan.
RATING:
Plan includes specific
indication of exactly Plan includes scant Plan includes no
where each step of the details about where the indication of where the
WHERE
action plan will occur. action is to occur. action plan is to occur.

RATING:
TOTAL:
FINAL SCORE:

Evaluated by:
___________________ ____________________ _______________________
Evaluator #1 Evaluator #2 Evaluation#3

Noted by:
_______________________
Subject Teacher

Source: https://course1.winona.edu/shatfield/air/saskhealthplan.pdf (Original Format)

Writing a community action plan

What are needed in writing an action plan


1. A clear vision
2. A set of values
3. The strategic framework
4. An overall goal

Appendix D11.2.2
Elements of an Action Plan
1. Statement of what must be achieved – the goal or output
2. Activities that have to be followed to reach the objective or goal
3. Target date for completion or schedule for when each activity must begin/end
4. Identification of the organization/individual who will be responsible for each activity
5. Clarification of the inputs/resources needed to complete the task
6. Identification of indicators which will allow for measurement of progress towards the goals

Parts of a Community Action Plan


I. Cover Page
II. Executive Summary
III. Table of Contents
IV. Community Profile
V. Introduction to the Plan
a. How the plan was developed
b. Who was involved in the development of the plan
c. Who will manage the implementation of the plan
d. Other information that is important to the plan
VI. Action Plan
VII. Appendices and Supporting Documentation

Appendix D11.3.3
PERFORMANCE TASK
TOPIC: Partnership Building with Local Groups

Objective: The learners will be able to identify different groups with the community (i.e., community
based, government based, and faith based).
Day 1
Activity 1:
Part 1 (5 mins.)
1. Group yourselves into four (count 1-4);
2. Share/Identify local groups within your community as to community based, government based, and
faith based.
3. What beneficial do these groups contribute to the community?
a. Part 2 (2 mins. per group)
4. Present your work
Discussion:
1. What is the purpose of forming partnerships?
• To bring about more effective and efficient delivery of programs and eliminate any unnecessary
duplication of effort.
• To pool resources.

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

• To increase communication among groups and break down stereotypes.


• To build networks and friendships.
• To revitalize wilting energies of members of groups who are trying to do too much alone.
• To plan and launch community-wide initiatives on a variety of issues.
• To develop and use political clout to gain services or other benefits for the community
• To create long-term, permanent social change.
• To obtain or provide services.

2. What are the types of partnership?


• Community-based
• Government-based
• Faith-based
3. What are the different methods and approaches in building partnership in the community?
• Coordination
• Cooperation
• Collaboration
• Partnership
http://www.jsi.com/JSIInternet/Inc/Common/_download_pub.cfm?id=14333&lid=3
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_community

Appendix D11.4.4
Activity
1. Stay in your group

Role: Youth advocate promoting unity among religious group, organizations and denominations.
Audience: Religious leaders of different denominations throughout the world.
Situation: There will be an International Conference of the different religious denominations organized by
the United Nations. The objective of this conference is to discuss Ecumenism, promote unity amidst
religious diversity and to end conflict brought about by different beliefs. As youth advocates your group
was invited to present the positive and negative effects of religion and to promote unity despite of having
religious diversity. You are tasked to do it using a compilation or narrative report or a picture slide
presentation consists of articles, photos and editorial coming from credible sources.
Product/ Performance: Narrative Report or Picture slide Presentation.
Standard:
Content 50%
Presentation 40%
Relevance 10%
---------
100%

CHECKRICS
NARRATIVE REPORT/ PICTURE SLIDE PRESENTATION
CONTENT 50%
The content was able to show detailed, reliable unbiased information about the positive
and negative effects of religion in an organized way. Through the presentation they were able to
promote unity amidst religious diversity.
Presentation 40%
They were able to provide all the requirements in the checklist.
Relevance 10%
All information provided are vital for the presentation and it promotes the value of unity.

Appendix D12.1.1
Sample
Community Profile Form
Put a check on the blank of your response or write the corresponding information needed.

Name: ______________________________________ Date: _______________________


Complete Address: ____________________________________________________________

Religion: __________________

Sex: _____ Male ______ Female

Age: _____ 15-16 ______ 17-18 _______ 19 and above

Type of family
____ Nuclear ______ Extended ____ Single Parent

Number of Siblings: ______________________

Family Income per month: ______ Php 2000 ______ Php 5000 ______ Php 8000
_____ Php 10000 _______ Php 15000 ______Php 16000 and above

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Name some business establishments in your community:____________________________


____________________________________________________________________________

Do you have schools in your community? ____ Yes _____None


If yes, ____ Day Care Centers _____Elementary ____ High School ___College

Are health services available in your community? ____ Yes _____ No


If yes, ____ Health Center ___ Clinic____ Public Hospital ___ Private Hospital

Methodologies and Approaches of Community actions and involvements across Disciplines


-Community Profile
Establishing a purpose for the lesson
The class was grouped according to: number of siblings, occupation of father/mother,
membership in an organization, barangay where we live, family income, means of transportation and
religion.

Appendix D12.2.2
Methodologies and Approaches of Community actions and involvements across Disciplines
- Needs Assessment

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Things that help me learn


Put a small box inside the line for your response regarding the things that help you learn.

I understand my learning
I take goals. I ask
responsibility questions
for my when I don’t
choices understand.

I offer help I treat other people


before I am with respect.
asked.

I do my best all the


I finish what I
time.
start.
I help others in my
group.
1. Why do we need to perform an assessment?
Community needs assessment is a process that describes the state of local people, enables
the identification of the actions needed and how to address these.
A plan which delivers the most effective care to those in greatest need; applies the principles
of equity and social justice in practice;

2. What does a community assessment measure?


Community needs assessment measures the strengths and resources available in the community
to meet the needs of the children, youth and families.
3. When should you do needs assessment?
Needs assessment should be done before doing a community-action plan.
4. What does needs assessment contain?
A community assessment contains compilation of demographic data from census records, results
of surveys conducted/ by others and informal feedback from community partners.

Assessing Community Needs and Resources


This toolkit provides guidance for conducting assessments of community needs and resources.
1. Describe the makeup and history of the community to provide a context within which to
collect data on its current concerns.
a. Comment on the types of information that best describes the community (e.g.,
demographic, historical, political, civic participation, key leaders, past concerns, geographic,
assets)
b. Describe the sources of information used (e.g., public records, local people, internet, maps,
phone book, library, newspaper)
c. Comment on whether there are sufficient resources (e.g., time, personnel, resources)
available to collect this information
d. Assess the quality of the information
e. Describe the strengths and problems you heard about

2. Describe what matters to people in the community, including a description of:


a. Issues that people in the community care about (e.g., safety, education, housing, health)
b. How important these issues are to the community (e.g., perceived importance,
consequences for the community)
c. Methods the group will (did) use to listen to the community (e.g., listening sessions, public
forums, interviews, concerns surveys, focus groups)

3. Describe what matters to key stakeholders, including:


a. Who else cares about the issue (the stakeholders) and what do they care about?
b. What stakeholders want to know about the situation (e.g., who is affected, how many, what
factors contribute to the problem)
c. Prioritized populations and subgroups that stakeholders intend to benefit from the effort
d. Methods you will (did) use to gather information (e.g., surveys, interviews)
4. (For each candidate problem/goal) Describe the evidence indicating whether the problem/goal
should be a priority issue, including:
a. The community-level indicators (e.g., rate of infant deaths or vehicle crashes) related to the
issue
b. How frequently the problem (or related behavior) occurs (e.g., number of youth reporting
alcohol use in the past 30 days)

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

c. How many people are affected by the problem and the severity of its effects
d. How feasible it is to address the issue
e. Possible impact and/or consequences of addressing the problem/goal

5. Describe the barriers and resources for addressing the identified issue(s), including:
a. Barriers or resistance to solving the problem or achieving the goal (e.g., denial or
discounting of the problem) and how they can be minimized (e.g., reframing the issue)
b. What resources and assets are available and how the group can tap into those resources to
address the issue
c. Community context or situation that might make it easier or more difficult to address this
issue

6. (Based on the assessment) Select and state the priority issue (or issues) to be addressed by
the group.
What are the things needed in each step?
The things needed in each step are community profile, survey for needs assessment and
priority issue presentation.
What would you do in each step?
In each step the following should be done: describe the make-up history of the community,
describe what matters to people/stakeholders, describe the barriers and resources and select
priority issue.
Why do we need to do a community needs assessment? How can a needs assessment help the
community?
A community needs assessment is needed to describe the condition of the community; identify
the major risk factors and their causes; and enable the identification of the actions needed to
address these.

Rubric: Community Needs Assessment Form


Beginning Developing Accomplished Exemplary
Clarity
The direction and items
are written in clear
manner.
Current action and
organizations
Thoroughly identifies
current action and
organizations taking
action at a variety of
levels.
Content
Thoroughly assesses
the community.
Identifies strengths and
resources as well as
the problems

Appendix D12.3.3
- Community Profile and Needs Assessment
How is community profile different from community needs assessment?
Community profile essentially answers the question, “Where is the community now?” and provides
baseline information on the present situation of the community like population and other unique
characteristics of the community. The information can then be used for planning purposes while
community needs assessment is a systematic process for determining and addressing needs or gaps
between current conditions or wants.

Appendix D12.3.3
Rubric
Essentials Score
Clarity - expressed the essay in an organized manner.
Literature review - identified the priority issue of the community based on the
community profile and needs assessment.
Significance of the topic/issue - selected the most priority issue of the community.

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Sample Needs Survey


Name : _______________________________
Grade and Section: _____________________
4 3 2 1
A. Human Rights Always Often Rarely Never
1. My school is a place where students are safe and secure
2. All students receive equal information and
encouragement about academic and career opportunity
3. No one in our school is subjected to degrading treatment
or punishment.
4. I have the liberty to express my beliefs and ideas
(political, religious, cultural, or other) without fear of
discrimination
5. My school provides equal access, resources , activities ,
and scheduling accommodations for all individuals

B. Social Justice
1. My teachers teach us to become aware of injustices
occurring in society.
2. I am aware of my own power and privileges in society.
3. I am encouraged to question the authorities.
4. I am treated fairly regardless of my economic status or
sexual orientation.
5. My school is fair when identifying punishments for
students ‘misbehavior.

C. Empowerment and Advocacy


1. My teachers encourage me to get involved with different
school activities
2. I have the free will to join the club of my choice.
3. My teachers assign me to do a certain responsibility in
our classroom.
4. My teachers invite me to be an advocate of change.
5. My teachers keep us updated with new the school
training offerings

D. Participatory Development
1. I am inform that the PTA funds go to the school's
development projects
2. I always participate in Brigada Eskwela activities.
3. I frequently volunteer to community service at school.
4. I support my school's proper waste management
campaign.
5. I always observe proper usage of water and electricity in
school

E. Gender Equality
1. My teachers always favor the females in leading the
class.
2. According to my teacher, computer related courses are
intended for male students only.
3. The school authorities are very strict with the male
students' behavior.
4. There is a prescribed school uniform for male and female
in our school.
5. The school practices / promotes fairness to both male
and female students.

APPENDIX D12.4.4
5 Levels of Leadership

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 47
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix D12.4.4
RUBRICS FOR GROUP ACTIVITY

RUBRICS
CRITERIA GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 TOTAL

CONTENT (5)

COHERENCE (5)

RELEVANCE (5)

MECHANICS (5)

Appendix D12.4
Participatory Action Planning
I. Rationale and Definition
Participatory planning is an urban planning paradigm that emphasizes involving the entire community in
the strategic and management processes of urban planning; or, community-level planning processes,
urban or rural. It is often considered as part of community development. Participatory planning aims to
harmonize views among all of its participants as well as prevent conflict between opposing parties. In
addition, marginalized groups have an opportunity to participate in the planning process. (Lefevre,
Pierre; Kolsteren, Patrick; De Wael, Marie-Paule; Byekwaso, Francis; Beghin, Ivan (December
2000). "Comprehensive Participatory Planning and Evaluation" (PDF). Antwerp, Belgium: IFAD.
Retrieved 2017-05-11)
II. The Need for Participatory Action Planning
1. Public distrust of planning based on past practices
Participatory planning is needed when there is public distrust of previous planning practice and/or
where new development may lead to significant conflicts. Research around the globe present
several examples where failures of traditional planning approaches and public distrust of planning
led to innovations and new forms of participatory planning. In South Africa planning had been part
of the apartheid system and so the need to reinvent a new form of planning was overwhelming. In
the Ephrata case study, a planning consultant was brought in as a mediator after litigants had
obtained a court order against the city's plan that had been adopted after a traditional process of
'public participation'. Therefore, public relations consultants have been hired to 'do public
outreach, run community meetings, provide public notices and informational items to get the
public involved'. This sounds less ambitious than many examples encountered in our research,
but the point remains that there is a perceived need to make a step-change from past practices.
2. Governments' desire to improve the co-ordination
Planning needs to change from a narrow, self-enclosed system of regulation to become a means
of delivering development that achieves broader objectives, social justice and other sustainable
development action initiatives. Planning needs to be about integration not about separation -
integration between public and private investment in an area, between different scales of
government and between different agencies. Thus there is a need to rethink the traditional
approach to consultation with stakeholders and other public agencies. It means moving from 'We
have a plan; what do you think about it?' to active integration of the aspirations and intentions of
other players into the preparation of the plan and its structures for implementation. This will
require engagement and negotiation to anticipate and reconcile differences, but it offers the
prospect of eventual shared commitment to the plan and to its implementation. Where conflicting
aspirations between planning and other institutions and agencies with sectoral responsibilities
threaten to block agreement, independent persons such as academics can play a valuable role
as 'informal' mediators in efforts to find consensus.
3. Respect to Grassroots Community
Planning practice needs to engage with the reality of diversity in today's society. This means
being aware of different cultures and ensuring that issues of diversity are addressed throughout
the planning process. Traditional public participation has often failed to do this. Participatory
planning is built around diversity, conflicting interests and the need to listen to the voices of
marginalised groups.
A recognition amongst governments and non-governmental organisations that sustainable
development requires consensus building and engagement with citizens.Grassroots involvement
and local participatory democracy are much more a part of a political culture while in other
country it is a non-political culture, a sense of resistance. Thus, there is a good deal of regional
variability in attitudes toward planning, government, and local activism. Planning is accepted
widely and there is an emphasis on grassroots participation and inclusivity.

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(http://www.chs.ubc.ca/archives/files/Participatory%20planning%20for%20sustainable%20develo
pment.pdf (pp36-42) Retrieved 2017-05-11)
III. Levels of Participatory Action Planning
WHAT ARE THE LEVELS OF PARTICIPATORY PLANNING?
There are a number of ways to consider participatory planning. As demonstrated in the
discussion above of advantages and disadvantages, this kind of process always presents, even at
best, a trade-off between efficiency and inclusiveness. Time pressure, the needs of the community, the
skills and experience of those participating, and the nature of the intervention, among other factors, all
help to dictate the actual shape of the planning process.
So what are the possibilities? Just how participatory do you want to be? David Wilcox, in his excellent
"Guide to Effective Participation," sets out the following as a model of the different possible levels of
participation:
1. Information - The least you can do is tell people what is planned.
2. Consultation - You offer a number of options and listen to the feedback you get.
3. Deciding together - You encourage others to provide some additional ideas and options, and join
in deciding the best way forward.
4. Acting together - Not only do different interests decide together what is best, but they form a
partnership to carry it out.
5. Supporting independent community initiatives - You help others do what they want - perhaps
within a framework of grants, advice and support provided by the resource holder.
Each of these levels may be appropriate in different circumstances, or with different groups,
although only at "deciding together" and above do they really begin to be fully participatory in the
sense that the term is used in this section. (http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/analyze/where-
to-start/participatory-approaches/main)

Evaluation (Week 2; Day 3)

Participatory Action Plan Table

When Potential Communication Monitoring


Implementers
Activities to be Resources Barriers or Plan for and
and Partners
done Resistance Implementation Evaluation
What
What What are Who or what organization or What
Who will be date the possible who are the indicators
What
responsible the available resistance to people should have been
needs to
for the task action and be be informed identified to
be done?
completion? will be needed encountered? about/involved measure
done? resources? How? with these progress?
tasks?

- http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/livable-communities/documents-
2015/AARP%20Action%20Planning%20Webinar%20on%20Age%20Friendly%20%20Communities%2
0v5.pdf
Supplementary sites:
- http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/pdacu835.pdf
- http://tulsagrad.ou.edu/studio/turley/A%20Third%20Place%20Community%20Foundation%20Commu
nity%20Garden%20Park.pdf
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wf_ummoKYWY

Appendix D13.1.1
The Resource Mobilization Cycle
A. Plan- including an assessment and design element;
B. Act- implementation;
C. Reflect- RM lessons learned.

Figure 1

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

A. The Planning Phase


Firstly, a situation analysis of the external resource environment is required in order to discover
what RM opportunities may exist and how best to approach potential resource partners.
Secondly, the resource requirements of the programme or project should be examined and a plan
developed on how to engage the likely resource partners. The planning phase should ideally
establish an RM strategy and action plan (for the immediate term), describing how particular
resource partners will be targeted and for which resources. A communication plan, describing the
various tools for communication with specified resource partners would form an element of this. A
communication plan therefore supports the RM strategy. The resource targets formulated in the
RM strategy or Action Plan are tied to those as specified and prioritized in the programme or
project document.

Appendix D13.1.1
B. The Action or Implementation Phase
This phase is broken into a five- step process.

C. The Reflect Phase


Here, the RM effort (strategy and action plan) is monitored and evaluated, specifically reporting
on successes and failures, and working through lessons learned, in order to tailor and refocus
RM initiatives to maximize success.
(Second Day)
Identify the following if it is under Planning, Action or Reflect Phase.
1. Including an assessment and design element. (Planning)
2. The RM effort (strategy and action plan)is monitored and . (Reflect)
3. This phase is best broken down into a five-step process. (Action)
4. The resource requirements of the programme or project should be examined and a plan
developed on how to engage the likely resource partners. (Planning)
5. Manage and Report (Action)
6. Communicate Results (Action)

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7. Situation analysis of the external resource environment (Action)


8. A communication plan therefore supports the RM Strategy. (Planning)
9. Identify external sources of funding (Action)
10. Engage means involves seizing every opportunity to communicate the programme for which
resources are sought. (Action)

Appendix D13.2.1
REVIEW:
Directions (The parts of the cycle are cut prior to the lesson). Students will have to arrange the
cycle of resource mobilization and explain briefly.

Appendix D13.2.1
Motivation
Write examples for each type of resources

Financial Human Services

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Appendix D13.2.1
Resource Mobilization Hand-outs:
• Resource Mobilization is a process where we identify the Resources essential for the development,
implementation and continuation of works for achieving the organization’s mission.
• It is focused on the relationships with Resource Providers, the skills, knowledge and capacity for
proper use of resources.
Following this concept, we can say that Resource Mobilization is:
 Just a means to the end.
 A team effort
 A set of accountabilities shared by everyone onboard
 A management process that has no quick fixes
 A management process that involves identifying people who share the same values as your
organization and taking the steps to manage that relationship.
 RESOURCE MOBILIZATION is not just about FUNDS and RAISING FUNDS.
The Importance of Resource Mobilization
• Diversifies and expand resources
• Formulates an independent budget (fund),

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 51
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

• Allows spending and utilization of Resources


• Minimizes dependency on others
• Sustains the Organization and its programs
• Maximizes use of domestic capital and skills
• Expands relations
• Fulfills responsibilities for the Community

Short Quiz: (First Day)


True or False.
1. Resource mobilization is a process where we identify the Resources essential for the
development, implementation and continuation of works for achieving the organization’s mission.
(TRUE)
2. Resource mobilization focused on the relationships with Resource Providers, the skills,
knowledge and capacity for proper use of resources. (TRUE)
3. Resource mobilization is an individual effort. (FALSE)
4. Resource mobilization is just a means to the end. (TRUE)
5. A set of accountabilities shared by everyone onboard is one of the concept of Resource
Mobilization. (TRUE)
6. Resource mobilization maximizes dependency on others. (FALSE)
7. Resource mobilization prevent spending and utilization of resources. (FALSE)
8. Resource mobilization limits relations. (FALSE)
9. Resource mobilization fulfils responsibilities for the community. (TRUE)
10. Resource mobilization negates organization and its programs. (FALSE)

Appendix D13.3.2
Motivation
If you are to go on a trip, what are the three important things that you will include in your luggage and
why?

1. Resource mobilization negates organization and its programs. (FALSE)

APPENDIX D13.4.3
PRESENTING EXAMPLES/INSTANCES OF THE NEW LESSON
Directions: Arrange the jumbled words to be able to come up with a sensible word/words. Once it’s
done you have to look for the definition that best describes the word on the blackboard.

1.)

(ACTOR)

2.)

(GOAL)

3.)

(SOCIAL ORIENTATION)

4.)

(NORMATIVE ORIENTATION)

5.)

(ENERGY)

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Appendix D13.4.3
DISCUSSING NEW CONCEPTS:

EVALUATION:

TRUE OR FALSE: (FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT)


______1. Social action can be done by one or more persons. True
______2. There are six elements in social action. False
______3. Social action influence others. True
______4. Energy is the aim or objective for which the action was done. False
______5. In doing social action, it is performed on some social pattern or custom which is called
normative orientation. True

Appendix D14.1.1
REVIEW:

Let’s try to check what you remembered from yesterday’s lesson about social action. I want volunteers to
pick a picture and tell the class what the picture is all about.

Appendix D14.1.1
ESTABLISHING PURPOSE OF THE LESSON:
Watch the video taken from YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=162AJojCNw8).
1. What is the video all about?
2. Do you agree with what the video is showing or saying? Why?

Appendix D14.1.1

PRESENTING EXAMPLE OF THE NEW LESSON


Students will be group into 4 (by birthdate)
Group 1 – 1-8
Group 2 – 9-16
Group 3 – 17-24 involvement?”
Teacher will have to process it making columns in the blackboard and (taking note of the students report)
and use it as a springboard in discussing the topic.
Each group will have a representative to discuss the output.

Group 4 – 25-31

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Each group will have to answer the question “What are your basis or consideration in doing social action
in relation to community

DEVELOPING MASTERY

Appendix D14.1.1
EVALUATION
Rubrics for Essay:
www.ndia.org/about/Documents/WID_EssayRubric.pdf

Appendix D14.2.2
Discussion
A community is “A social, religious, occupational or other group sharing common characteristics
or interests and perceived or perceiving itself as distinct in some respect from the larger society within
which it exists; self-organized network of people with common agenda, cause, or interest, who collaborate
by sharing ideas, information, and other resources
A profile is description of someone or something of all the most important and interesting facts.
A community profile is a data sheet that records information on a broad range of factors (such as
environmental/natural features and management, socio-demographic characteristics, political and

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 54
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

economic structures, local institutions, economic activities and livelihoods, basic household and
community facilities, and social organization)
A community profile is a basic understanding of a community as a whole, information on
particular areas of interest (such as which local institutions might be important for household livelihood
strategies and need to be investigated in more depth)

Steps to Develop Community Profile

Discuss with the group mates


Define the in your class and decide the
community community (ies) you want to
find out about.

Decide what it is that you


want to know then work out
how you can find it out.
Find out if
Find out if you have up-
to-date information about
relevant
your community (ies). information
Before you start working
through the source, check if
someone else has already
Checking if collated the information you
someone already will need to fill the gaps in
collated the your knowledge. This will
information not only save you time and
needed
You may find it necessary to resources but it should also
use more than one source help you to develop
of data in order to ‘complete partnerships.
the picture’.

You might find that some of Getting to


the data is too detailed or is know more
irrelevant to your needs so, about the
Worksheet
ultimately, you may choose local
not to include it in your community
profile.
How to find
the
information
Guide for the Worksheet: yourself
 Natural Resources: What principal natural resources are available in or to the community? Who uses
them and how? Where are these resources located?Which
 Livelihood: What different activities do households
sourcesuse
to to support their livelihoods? Who is involved in
these livelihood activities (differentiated by social and economic group)? How many people and
choose
households depend on these activities? When and where do these activities take place?
 Community structure: How many people and households live in the community? What is the gender
composition and age structure of the community? What are the different social, economic, ethnic, and
cultural groups? How are those groups defined? Where do different social, economic, ethnic, and
cultural groups live?
 Local organizations and associations: What are the formal organizations and associations? What
are the rules, regulations, and customs? Who is affected by them and how?
 Community infrastructure: What services are available in the community (transport, power/water
supply, markets, agricultural extension, health, education, and so on)? Who has access to these
services? How expensive are the user fees?
 Community history: How long has the community been in existence and how was it founded? When
did different social, economic, ethnic, and cultural groups settle in the community? How has the
community changed over time and what has caused those changes?

Generalization
A community profile is a data sheet that records information on a broad range of factors (such as
environmental/natural features and management, socio-demographic characteristics, political and
economic structures, local institutions, economic activities and livelihoods, basic household and
community facilities, and social organization).
A community profile is done through the following steps: defining a community, finding for
relevant information from other organizations and collating them, looking for for information by yourself
and getting to know more of the community.

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D14.4.3
Rubric
Community Profile Grading Rubric:
Criteria for Your Paper Evaluation
Appropriate use of organization
Your profile will cover many aspects of your community. It will be
important to maintain a sense of organization as you move from an
introduction to your community, people perspectives of your
community, and issues confronting your community.
Interesting content
It is a common strategy to begin a profile with an attention getting
introduction.
Introduction and explanation of key issues within your
community
As part of this, assignment is bent towards helping you come up with
a topic for your needs assessment. Identifying controversies or
challenges facing your community will be one of the key features of
your profile. Issues should be adequately explained so someone
not of your community can understand them.
Demonstrate your ability to incorporate primary sources in a
coherent manner. Use proper lead-ins, a mix of paraphrase and
direct quotations, cite page numbers and authors include a works
cited section. Along with your two interview subjects, I am asking
you to provide statistical data on your community using a web or
print based source. Make sure this source is reliable.

5 = excellent document in all key aspects – some slight room for improvement.
4 = good; some aspects of the analysis might be excellent, others will be good. Room for improvement.
3 = acceptable completion of the assignment. No major problems, but room for improvement.
2 = a major aspect of the assignment has not been completed. Elements of the assignment might be
quite good, but with unsatisfactory completion of certain elements, the assignment will remain a D.
1 = incomplete assignment because page length was not met, not completed.

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendices
in
Community
Engagement,
Solidarity, and
Citizenship

Community Action
Initiatives: Field Practicum

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

APPENDICES

E. COMMUNITY ACTION INITIATIVES: FIELD PRACTICUM

Appendix 15.1.1 Group Work Rubric Final


RUBRIC FOR GROUP WORKS

Criteria Apprentice Basic Learned Exemplary

One person Some students Most students


Decision Students contribute
dominates contribute to contribute to
Making to decision-making.
decision- making. decision-making. decision-making.
Students Students respect
Body and/or verbal
frequently Students pay and encourage the
responses indicate
interrupt and/or attention to the group views of others.
active listening
Social put down the discussion. Some Students ask
.Most students ask
Interaction views of others. students ask questions or
questions and build
Students do not questions and build clarification.
on others
ask questions or on others comments. Students build on
comments.
clarification. others comments.

Students do not Students consistently


Some students Most students
contribute in any contribute in a
Contributing contribute positively contribute positively
positive way to positive way to the
to the group work. to the group work.
the group work. group work.

Most students
Students exhibit Students exhibit on- Students exhibit on-
On Task exhibit on-task
on-task behavior task behavior some task behavior
Behavior behavior most of the
inconsistently of the time. consistently.
time.
Students complete a
With assistance,
clear and logical
With assistance, students are able to Students complete a
sequence of steps.
students have sequence steps. sequence of steps.
Complete task with
Group difficulty Rush to complete Complete task on
form and reflection
Structure and sequencing task. Division of time. The leader
and revision.
Functioning steps. Task is not tasks and assigns
Members volunteer
completed on responsibilities if responsibilities and
to take
time. inefficient and wastes tasks.
responsibilities and
time.
roles.

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Appendix 15.2.2 Permission to Conduct Needs Assessment Survey Principal (Long Format)

Department Of Education
Schools Division of Tarlac Province
O’Donnell High School
O’Donnell, Capas, Tarlac

Date

Juan Dela Cruz


Principal
O’Donnell High SchooL

Attention: MARIA AURORA C. CRUZ


Head Teacher
Social Sciences Department

Ma’am/ Sir:

Greetings of peace!

One of the goals of the K-12 Basic Education Curriculum is holistic human development. The Grade 12
students of O’Donnell High School under the HUMSS Strand are taking up Community Engagement,
Solidarity and Citizenship. It focuses on the application of initiatives such as community engagement,
solidarity, and citizenship as guided by the core values of human rights, social justice, empowerment and
advocacy, gender equality, and participatory development.

Hence, this letter intends to ask the permission of your good office to please allow us to conduct needs
assessment survey at _______________________ (name of barangay) on ____________ (date). The
goals of the said activity are to identify the needs of the barangay, to enhance students’ sense of shared
identity and willingness to contribute to the pursuit of the common good of the community and to enable
them to integrate applied social sciences into community-action initiatives.

While waiting for your approval, allow me express my sentiments of high regards and prayerful best
wishes to you and your institution.

Sincerely Yours,

____________________
Class President

Noted:

____________________
Teacher

____________________
SHS Focal Person

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Appendix E.15.2.3
Permission to Conduct Needs Assessment Survey Letter to the Principal (Simple Format)

Department of Education
Division of Nueva Ecija
Bulac National High School
Bulac, Talavera, Nueva Ecija

Date

JUAN DELA CRUZ


School Princiapl I
Bulac National High School

Sir:

Greetings of peace!

We would like to ask the permission of your good office to please allow us to conduct needs assessment
survey at Barangay Poblacion on March 9, 2018. The goals of the said activity are to identify the needs
of the barangay, to enhance students’ sense of shared identity and willingness to contribute to the pursuit
of the common good of the community and to enable them to integrate applied social sciences into
community-action initiatives.

Your approval to conduct the said activity is much appreciated.

Sincerely,

____________________
Class President

Approved:

____________________
Teacher

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Appendix E.15.2.4 Parental Consent (Conduct Needs Assessment Survey)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Division of Zambales
Botolan National High School
Batonlapoc, Botolan Zambales

PARENTAL/ GUARDIAN CONSENT


Date:_________________

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

This is to certify that I allowed my son/ daughter to participate in the conduct of Needs
Assessment Survey as requirement in Community Engagement, Solidarity, and Citizenship (CSC).

Name of Son/ Daughter


Name of Activity
Inclusive Date/s
Place(s) to Visit

Thank you very much!

_____________________________
Parent/ Guardian
(Signature over printed name)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Division of Zambales
Botolan National High School
Batonlapoc, Botolan Zambales

PARENTAL/ GUARDIAN CONSENT


Date:_________________

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

This is to certify that I allowed my son/ daughter to participate in conduct of Needs Assessment
Survey as requirement in Community Engagement, Solidarity, and Citizenship (CSC).

Name of Son/ Daughter


Name of Activity
Inclusive Date/s
Place(s) to Visit

Thank you very much!

_____________________________
Parent/ Guardian
(Signature over Printed Name)

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AppendixE.15.2.5 Waiver (Conduct Needs Assessment Survey)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Division of Zambales
Botolan National High School
Batonlapoc, Botolan Zambales

STUDENT WAIVER

I, Juan Dela Cruz presently enrolled in ____________________ (Track/Strand) present myself to


participate in the community engagement as part of our school activity and do hereby pledge that:

1. I will obey and abide the rules and regulations promulgated, enforced by the school, carried by
the teacher-in-charge for the protection and safety of all;

2. I hereby waive and renounce my rights to all damages, hospitalization, and the like. I will not
hold the school, staff and the teacher concerned responsible for any misfortune, injury, or accident be
slight or serious, that may happen in connection with the activities or requirements. The cause of which
will be attributable to my acts of disobedience, negligence, and the offense of my heading to advice,
warning, precaution, and safety rules that were discussed to me the subject-teacher in charge before the
start of the activity.

The content of this waiver was read and explained to me before I affix my name and signature this
_____th day of _____________, 20___ freely and voluntarily.

Thank you very much!

Yours truly,

______________________________ _____________________________
Name of Student Name of Parent/ Guardian
(Signature over Printed Name) (Signature over Printed Name)

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AppendixE.15.2.6 Permission Letter to Conduct the Activity to Brgy. Captain (Long Format)

Department Of Education
Schools Division of Tarlac Province
O’Donnell High School
O’Donnell, Capas, Tarlac

Date

Juan Dela Cruz


Barangay Captain
Barangay O’Donnell, Capas, Tarlac

Ma’am/ Sir:

Greetings of peace!

One of the goals of the K-12 Basic Education Curriculum is holistic human development. The Grade 12
students of O’Donnell High School under the HUMSS Strand are taking up Community Engagement,
Solidarity and Citizenship. It focuses on the application of initiatives such as community engagement,
solidarity, and citizenship as guided by the core values of human rights, social justice, empowerment and
advocacy, gender equality, and participatory development.

Hence, this letter intends to ask the permission of your good office to please allow us to conduct
______________________(e.g. seminar, training, feeding program, etc.) in your barangay,
_______________________ (name of barangay) on ____________ (date). The goals of the said activity
are to enhance students’ sense of shared identity and willingness to contribute to the pursuit of the
common good of the community and to enable them to integrate applied social sciences into community-
action initiatives.

While waiting for your approval, allow me express my sentiments of high regards and prayerful best
wishes to you and your family.

Sincerely Yours,

____________________
Class President

Approved:
____________________
Teacher

Noted:

___________________
School Head

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Appendix E.15.2.7 Permission Letter to Conduct Activity to Brgy. Captain (Simple Format)

Department of Education
Division of Nueva Ecija
Bulac National High School
Bulac, Talavera, Nueva Ecija

Date

JUAN DELA CRUZ


BARANGAY CAPTAIN
NAME OF BARANGAY

Ma’am/ Sir:

Greetings of peace!

We would like to ask the permission of your good office to please allow us to conduct a seminar on
gender and development for the youth at your barangay on March 9, 2018. This is based on the Needs
Assessment Survey that we have conducted last February 23. The goals of the said activity are to
enhance students’ sense of shared identity and willingness to contribute to the pursuit of the common
good of the community and to enable them to integrate applied social sciences into community-action
initiatives.

Your approval to conduct the said activity is much appreciated.

Sincerely,

____________________
Class President

Approved:
____________________
Teacher

Noted

___________________
School Head

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 64
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Appendix C16.1.1 Community-Based Monitoring System

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Appendix E.16.1.2 Demographic Characteristics of Household


Department of Education
Division of Tarlac Province
IBA HIGH SCHOOL
San Jose, Tarlac

A. Demographic Characteristics of Household

Relationship Educational Attainment Training Type Of


Sex
Number Of To The Head Attended Education Occupation
M=1 Age Level Status
Member Of Household In Last 5 Attended (F)
F=2 (B) (C)
(A) Years (D) (C)

(a) 1. Head of the HH (b) 1. No education (c) 1. Ongoing


2. Spouse 2. Elementary 2. Stopped/ out of school
3. Children 3. High School 3. Graduate
4. Parent 4. Diploma
5. Grandparent 5. College
6. Other relative 6. Post-Graduate
7. Not related

(d) 1. Functional literacy (e) 1. Formal (f) 1. No occupation


2. Agricultural Production 2. Non-Formal 2. Regular office Employee
3. Health and Nutrition 3. Contractual Office Employee
4. Leadership 4. Skilled Laborer
5. Others 5. Farmer
6. Self-Employed
7. Others

B. Education
1. For children currently studying, where are the school located
(a) Elementary (b) Secondary
1. In the Barangay 1. In the Barangay
2. Outside the Barangay 2. Outside the Barangay
3. Not applicable 3. Not applicable
2. How long does it take your children to reach their respective school?
(a) Elementary (b) Secondary
1. Little time (1-15min 1. Little time (1-15min)
2. Moderate time (16-45min) 2. Moderate time (16-45min)
3. A lot of time (more than 45min) 3. A lot of time (more than 45min)
4. Not applicable 4. Not applicable
3. For children not studying, what could be the main reason for this?
1. Financial incapability 4. Children not of school age
2. Child is Physically/mentally ill 5. Not applicable
3. Child lacks interest to study 6. Other (specify) _____________

4. What do you think is the level of education that the majority of your male and
female children should reach?
1. Elementary 4. College
2. Secondary 5. Not applicable
3. Vocational-Technical

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5. What type of employment would you like your children to have?


1. Government employment 4. Overseas worker
2. Non-government employment 5. No Children not applicable
3. Self-employment 6. other (specify) _____________

6. What are your three (3) main sources of information


1. Journal 6. Radio
2. Newspaper 7. Person contacts (w/ friends/relatives)
3. Magazine 8. Do not receive information
4. Leaflet 9. Other (specify) _____________
5. Television
7. What do you consider the top three (3) problems of school in your community?
1. Insufficient number of classroom
2. Insufficient number of teacher
3. Insufficient instructional material
4. High tuition fee
5. Not applicable
6. Other (specify) ___________

8. Who decides whether the children will study or not?


1. Father 2 Mother 3. Children

9. Are male and female children of your household given equal opportunity to study?
1. Yes 2. No

C. Health and Nutrition


1. Where do you go if you and your household members need major medical or heath
attention?
1. Government Hospital/Clinic
2. Private Hospital/Clinic
3. Traditional Hilot
4. Other (specify) ____________

2. Why do you choose this facility instead of the other?


1. Quality service
2. Costs are reasonable
3. Accessible to the household
4. Has well trained personnel
5. All of the above
6. Other (specify)______________

3. How often do children of your household experience the following sickness?


A. Cough E. Diarrhea
B. Colds F. Toothache
C. Fever G. other (specify)_________
D. Skin allergies
1. Not applicable
2. Never
3. Very seldom (1-2 times a year)
4. Occasionally (3-6 times a year)
5. Frequently (less than 6 times a year)
6. Continually (All the time)

4. Among your household members, who is taking care for the sick?
1. Father 2. Mother 3. Son 4. Daughter

5. Who decides to bring the sick household member to the type of medical assistance
preferred by your household.
1. Father 2. Mother 3. Son 4. Daughter

6. Have your children received immunization against the following?


A. Measles F. Cholera
B. Tuberculosis G. Hepatitis A
C. Polio H. Hepatitis B
D. DPT (Diphtheria, Pertussis & Tetanus) I. Other (Specify)_________
E. Mumps
1. Not applicable
2. Yes
7. Who brings the children to the doctor for immunization?
1. Father 3. Son
2. Mother 4. Daughter

8. Were there any deaths in the household for the past two years?

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1. Yes 2. No
If yes, what was the main cause?
1. High blood pressure 4. Sexually transmitted disease
2. Infection 5. Combination of two or more disease
3. Cancer 6. Other (specify) _________________

9. What is your main source of water?


(a) Drinking (b) Bathing
1. Government operated water system
2. Private operated water system
3. Piped deep well
4. Open well
5. Rain water
6. Natural bodies of water (e.g. rivers, lakes, & streams)
7. Others (specify)______________

10. What are your major sewerage and disposal system?


a. Type of toilet
1. Flush/water sealed
2. Closed pit
3. Open pit
4. Public
5. None
6. Others (specify)______________

b. Garbage disposal system


1. Burn
2. Dump in pit
3. Recycle/make into compost
4. Wrap and throw (specify where)
5. Garbage collector
6. Combination of the above
7. Others (specify) _____________

11. What is your household food consumption per week in terms of


a. Rice/rice substitute
b. Fish/sea foods
c. Meat (poultry, pork, beef)
d. Vegetables
e. Fruits
f. Milk
g. Eggs
h. Others (specify) _____________
Frequency (a) Quantity Code (b)
1. Everyday 1. Too much
2. Every other day 2. Too little
3. Once a week 3. Just right
Quantity Indicator for JUST RIGHT level for a household of 6 members:
Rice 14kg/wk
Meat 10.5kg/wk
Vegetable 10kg/wk
Fruits 10.5kg/wk
Milk 7 liters/wk
Eggs 3.5 doz/wk
Fish / sea foods 10.5kg/wk

12. Who is responsible for selecting the kind of food to buy and eat?
a. Food to buy
b. Food to eat
1. Father 3. Son
2. Mother 4. Daughter

13. Did you experience food shortage?


1. Yes 2. No

14. Do you experience food shortage?


1. Yes 2. No
If yes, what main food item do you experience shortage?
1. Rice/rice shortage 6. Milk
2. Fish/ seafood 7. Eggs
3. Meat (poultry, pork, beef) 8. Others (specify)___________________
4. Fruits 9. No Shortage
5. Vegetables

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15. Which of the following is the main course of your food shortage?
1. Not enough production
2. Crop loss due to bad weather/other natural calamities
3. Not enough income
4. High price of food items
5. Others (specify)_______________________
6. Not applicable

D. Community Leadership and Participation


1. Do you know the following?
LEADER IDENTITY ACTIVENESS
(A) (B)
a. Captain
b. Secretary
c. Treasurer
d. Councilor

Identity Code (a) Activeness Code (b)


1. YES 1. Active
2. NO 2. Not Active
3. Don’t Know
2. Do you think men and women are given the same opportunities to run as leader in your village?
a. Yes b. No c. Don’t know
3. Do you know how often does the village council meet?
a. Yes b. No c. Don’t know
4. Do the leaders immediately disseminate to all village residents matters of the council meeting?
a. Yes b. No c. Don’t know

5. In what community programs have you and your household members participated in the past two
years? Kindly give your roles, degree of performance and the limiting factors of your performance
in these programs?
Limiting Factors
Household Program Role Performance
Of Performance
Member (A) (B) (C)
(D)
Father
Mother
Son
Daughter

PROGRAM CODE (A) ROLE (B)


1. Crop production
2. Animal/livestock 1. Project leader
3. Small fishery 2. Assistant Leader
4. Health and nutrition 3. Secretary
5. Dressmaking 4. Treasurer
6. Education 5. Committee Member
7. Handicraft 6. Member/Benefactor
8. Other (specify) ________________________

PERFORMANCE CODE (C) LIMITING FACTOR CODE (D)


1. Poor Performance no benefit to household
2. Fair Performance some benefit to household 1.
No Factor/No comment
3. good performance 2.
Lack of resources
4. very good 3.
Required too much time
5. don’t know/can’t assess 4.
Lack motivation
6. others (specify) ________________ 5.
Poor Local leadership
6.
Need suitable to the need
of community
6. How do you convey your problems/suggestions to your leaders? 7. Others ( specify)_______
1. Personal meeting
2. Phone
3. Suggestion box
4. Bulletin Board
5. Open letter
6. Other (specify) _______________________

7. How often can you directly consult with your leader?


1. Anytime
2. Once a week
3. Once a month
4. Never
5. Do not know

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8. If you have not participated in any community program, can you give at least two reasons why?
1. Do not need. Not interested
2. Do not know such program
3. Poor quality of the program
4. Lack of resource/ time to participate
5. Information was not useful
6. Had a bad experience in the program
7. The program was stopped
8. Not applicable
9. Others (specify)________________
9. What three development programs do you think are needed but not yet available in your
community (Enumerate in order of reference)
1. Crop Production
2. Animal/Livestock
3. Small Fishery Program
4. Health and Nutrition
5. Handicraft/Cottage Industry
6. Education
7. Leadership
8. Others (Specify) ___________________
10. Do you think that members of your community are willing to cooperate with each other n the
implementation of any development program?
1. Yes
2. NO
3. Sometimes
If Not, why
a. Cultural differences
b. Political affiliation
c. Don’t need to cooperate
d. Don’t know
e. Others (Specify) _________________________

E. Income
1. Approximately, how much is your household’s total monthly income?
1. Less than 3, 000
2. 3,001-4,000 pesos
3. 4,001- 5,000 pesos
4. 5, 001- 6, 000 pesos
5. 6, 001- 7, 000 pesos
6. 7, 001- above
2. What are your sources of income?

Approximate amt. of If desirable could


Yes (1)
Sources of Income income each source increase your income
No (2)
(in peso) from this source (a)
Farming Rice
Potted Plants
Fruit Trees
Other Specify

Desirable Code (a)


1. Not Desirable 3. No
2. Yes 4. Don’t Know
Livestock Swine
Ducks
Chickens
Cattle
Others Specify

A. Non- Farming
Regular
Salary Wages
Remittances
Others (Specify)

3. Who is responsible for keeping the income of the household?


1. Father
2. Mother

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3. Son
4. Daughter
4. Monthly Expenditures
1. How much does your household spend on food?
a. P 0- 1000
b. P1001- 3000
c. P3000 above

2. How much do you spend on the schooling of children?


a. None
b. Less than P 50
c. P51- 100
d. P101 and above

3. How much do you spend on clothing of the household?


a. None
b. Less than P100
c. P101-200
d. P201 and above

4. How much do you spend on medicine and medical care of your household?
a. None
b. Less than P50
c. P51-100
d. P100 and above

5. How much does your family spend on housing (which includes rent, maintenance, water,
electricity)?
a. Less than 100
b. P101- 300
c. P301 and above

6. How much does your family spend on transportation?


a. None
b. Less than P 50
c. P51- 100
d. P101 and above

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Appendix E.16.1.3 Oral Participation 2

Rubric for Formal Oral Participation

Components 3-Sophisticated 2-Competent 1-Not yet Competent


Presentation is clear, Presentation is generally Organization is
logical, and organized. clear and well organized. haphazard; listener can
Organization
Listener can follow line A few minor points may follow presentation only
of reasoning. be confusing. with effort. Arguments
are not clear.
Level of presentation is Level of presentation is Aspects of presentation
appropriate for the generally appropriate. are too elementary or
Style audience. Presentation Pacing is sometimes too too sophisticated for
is a planned fast or too slow. audience. Presenter
conversation, paced for Presenter seems slightly seems uncomfortable
audience understanding. uncomfortable at times, and can be heard only
It is not a reading of a and audience if listener is very
paper. Speaker is occasionally has trouble attentive. Much of the
comfortable in front of hearing him/her. information is read.
the group and can be
heard by all.
Communication aids Communication aids Communication aids
enhance presentation. contribute to the quality are poorly prepared or
 The font on the of the presentation. used inappropriately.
visuals is readable.  Font size is mostly  Font size is too
 Information is readable. small to read.
represented and  Appropriate  Too much
Use of
organized to information is information is
Communication
maximize audience included. included.
Aids
comprehension.  Some material is not  Details or some
 Details are supported by visual unimportant
minimized so that aids. information is
main points stand highlighted, and
out. may confuse the
audience.
Content
Speaker provides For the most part, Explanations of
accurate and complete explanations of concepts concepts and/or
explanations of key and theories are theories are inaccurate
concepts and theories, accurate and complete. or incomplete. Little
Depth of Content
drawing on relevant Some helpful attempt is made to tie
literature. Applications applications are theory to practice.
of theory illuminate included. Listeners gain little from
issues. Listeners gain the presentation.
insights.
Accuracy of
Information (names, No significant errors are Enough errors are
Content
facts, etc) included in the made. Listeners made to distract a
presentation is recognize any errors to knowledgeable listener.
consistently accurate. be the result of Some information is
nervousness or accurate but the
oversight. listener must determine
what information is
reliable.
Use of Language
Sentences are complete Sentences are complete Listeners can follow
and grammatical. They and grammatical for the presentation, but they
flow together easily. most part. They flow are distracted by some
Words are well chosen; together easily. With grammatical errors and
Grammar and
they express the some exceptions, words use of slang. Some
Word Choice
intended meaning are well chosen and sentences are halting,
precisely. precise. incomplete, or
vocabulary is limited or
inappropriate.

Freedom from Bias Both oral language and Oral language and body Oral language and/or
(e.g., sexism, body language are free language are free from body language includes
racism, from bias. bias with one or two some identifiable bias.
heterosexism, minor exceptions. Some listeners will be
agism, etc.,) offended.
Responsiveness
to Audience

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Consistently clarifies, Generally responsive to Responds to questions


restates, and responds audience questions and inadequately.
Verbal Interaction
to questions. needs. Misses some
Summarizes when opportunities for
needed. interaction.

Body language reflects Body language reflects Body language reveals


Body Language
comfort interacting with some discomfort a reluctance to interact
audience interacting with with audience.
audience.

Appendix E.16.1.4 Rubric for Written Work

Rubric for Written Work


4 3 2 1
Score
Comprehensive, Mostly Somewhat No
accurate and comprehensive, comprehensive, comprehensive,
Content persuasive accurate and accurate and accurate or
coverage of key persuasive persuasive persuasive
elements coverage of key coverage of key coverage of key
elements elements elements
4 3 2 1 Score
Many details Some details A few details and No details and
Relevant
and examples and examples examples examples from
Theory from research from research research beyond beyond the
beyond the beyond the the textbook textbook
textbook textbook
4 3 2 1 Score
Highest level of Higher level of High level of Lowest level of
Level of
thinking evident thinking evident thinking evident thinking evident
thinking by use of by use of by use of by use of recall
analysis and integration comparison and and knowledge
synthesis contrast only
4 3 2 1
Score
Attention to Attention to Attention to Attention to
detail, lay out, detail, lay out, detail, lay out, detail, lay out,
Format citations and citations and citations and citations and
references references references references
reflect mostly reflect somewhat reflect seldom or do not
guidelines. guidelines. guidelines. reflect guidelines.
4 3 2 1
Grammar/Punct Score
uation/Spelling No errors A few errors Some errors Many errors
(1 or 2) (3 to 5) (over 5)
4 3 2 1
Score
Sentences are Sentences are Sentences are Sentences are
well constructed, mostly well somewhat well not well
Style varied in constructed, constructed, constructed,
structure and varied in varied in varied in
with precise structure and structure and structure and with
words with precise with precise precise words
words words

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Appendix E.17.1.1 BUILD A PYRAMID GAME


Things needed:
 30 pcs. Plastic cups
 5 pcs. Rubber Band
 Yarn

Mechanics of the game.


1. The students will tie the yarn to the rubber band. Each member of the group should hold one tie.
2. The students will going to make a pyramid using the rubber band.
3. Only one hand is allowed to hold the yarn and the other hand will place at the back.
4. The students will pull the yarn altogether to place it to the body of the cup.
5. The first group who build the pyramid is the winner.

Appendix E.17.2.2. Permission Letter to Conduct the Activity to Principal (Long Format)

Department Of Education
Schools Division of Tarlac Province
O’Donnell High School
O’Donnell, Capas, Tarlac

Date

Juan Dela Cruz


Principal
O’Donnell High School

Ma’am/ Sir:

Greetings of peace!

One of the goals of the K-12 Basic Education Curriculum is holistic human development. The Grade 12
students of O’Donnell High School under the HUMSS Strand are taking up Community Engagement,
Solidarity and Citizenship. It focuses on the application of initiatives such as community engagement,
solidarity, and citizenship as guided by the core values of human rights, social justice, empowerment and
advocacy, gender equality, and participatory development.

Hence, this letter intends to ask the permission of your good office to please allow us to conduct
______________________(e.g. seminar, training, feeding program, etc.) at _______________________
(name of barangay) on ____________ (date). The goals of the said activity are to enhance students’
sense of shared identity and willingness to contribute to the pursuit of the common good of the community
and to enable them to integrate applied social sciences into community-action initiatives.

While waiting for your approval, allow me express my sentiments of high regards and prayerful best
wishes to you and your institution.

Sincerely Yours,

_________________
Class President

Approved:

_________________
Teacher

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Appendix E.17.2.3 Parental Consent (Conduct an Activity)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Division of Zambales
Botolan National High School
Batonlapoc, Botolan Zambales

PARENTAL/ GUARDIAN CONSENT


Date:_________________
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

This is to certify that I allowed my son/ daughter to participate in a Seminar on Gender and
Development as requirement in Community Engagement, Solidarity, and Citizenship (CSC).

Name of Son/ Daughter


Name of Activity
Inclusive Date/s
Place(s) to Visit

Thank you very much!

_____________________________
Parent/ Guardian
(Signature over Printed Name)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Division of Zambales
Botolan National High School
Batonlapoc, Botolan Zambales

PARENTAL/ GUARDIAN CONSENT


Date:_________________

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

This is to certify that I allowed my son/ daughter to participate in a Seminar on Gender and
Development as requirement in Community Engagement, Solidarity, and Citizenship (CSC).

Name of Son/ Daughter


Name of Activity
Inclusive Date/s
Place(s) to Visit

Thank you very much!

_____________________________
Parent/ Guardian
(Signature over Printed Name)

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Appendix E.17.2.4 Waiver (Conduct an Activity)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Division of Zambales
Botolan National High School
Batonlapoc, Botolan Zambales

STUDENT WAIVER

I, Juan Dela Cruz presently enrolled in ____________________ (Track/Strand) present myself to


participate in a Seminar on Gender and Development as part of our school activity and do hereby
pledge that:

1. I will obey and abide the rules and regulations promulgated, enforced by the school, carried by
the teacher-in-charge for the protection and safety of all;

2. I hereby waive and renounce my rights to all damages, hospitalization, and the like. I will not
hold the school, staff and the teacher concerned responsible for any misfortune, injury, or accident be
slight or serious, that may happen in connection with the activities or requirements. The cause of which
will be attributable to my acts of disobedience, negligence, and the offense of my heading to advice,
warning, precaution, and safety rules that were discussed to me the subject-teacher in charge before the
start of the activity.

The content of this waiver was read and explained to me before I affix my name and signature this
_____th day of _____________, 20___ freely and voluntarily.

Thank you very much!

Yours truly,

______________________________ _____________________________
Name of Student Name of Parent/ Guardian
(Signature over Printed Name) (Signature over Printed Name)

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Appendix E.17.2.5 Permission Letter to Conduct the Activity to Brgy. Captain (Long Format)

Department Of Education
Schools Division of Tarlac Province
O’Donnell High School
O’Donnell, Capas, Tarlac

Date

Juan Dela Cruz


Barangay Captain
Barangay O’Donnell, Capas, Tarlac

Ma’am/ Sir:

Greetings of peace!

One of the goals of the K-12 Basic Education Curriculum is holistic human development. The Grade 12
students of O’Donnell High School under the HUMSS Strand are taking up Community Engagement,
Solidarity and Citizenship. It focuses on the application of initiatives such as community engagement,
solidarity, and citizenship as guided by the core values of human rights, social justice, empowerment and
advocacy, gender equality, and participatory development.

Hence, this letter intends to ask the permission of your good office to please allow us to conduct
______________________(e.g. seminar, training, feeding program, etc.) in your barangay,
_______________________ (name of barangay) on ____________ (date). The goals of the said activity
are to enhance students’ sense of shared identity and willingness to contribute to the pursuit of the
common good of the community and to enable them to integrate applied social sciences into community-
action initiatives.

While waiting for your approval, allow me express my sentiments of high regards and prayerful best
wishes to you and your family.

Sincerely Yours,

____________________
Class President

Approved:
____________________
Teacher

Noted

___________________
School Head

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 77
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Appendix E.17.2.6 Permission Letter to Conduct Activity to Brgy. Captain (Simple Format)

Department of Education
Division of Nueva Ecija
Bulac National High School
Bulac, Talavera, Nueva Ecija

Date

JUAN DELA CRUZ


BARANGAY CAPTAIN
NAME OF BARANGAY

Ma’am/ Sir:

Greetings of peace!

We would like to ask the permission of your good office to please allow us to conduct a seminar on
gender and development for the youth at your barangay on March 9, 2018. This is based on the Needs
Assessment Survey that we have conducted last February 23. The goals of the said activity are to
enhance students’ sense of shared identity and willingness to contribute to the pursuit of the common
good of the community and to enable them to integrate applied social sciences into community-action
initiatives.

Your approval to conduct the said activity is much appreciated.

Sincerely,

____________________
Class President

Approved:
____________________
Teacher

Noted

___________________
School Head

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 78
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, SOLIDARITY, AND CITIZENSHIP

Appendix E.17.2.7 Memorandum of Agreement

MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT

KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS:

This Memorandum of Agreement entered into and executed by and between:

The OROTEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL - SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT a group of students
taking up Community Engagement, Solidarity and Citizenship, which focuses on the application of
initiatives such as community engagement, solidarity, and citizenship as guided by the core values of
human rights, social justice, empowerment and advocacy, gender equality, and participatory development,
represented by its President, Juan Dela Cruz, hereinafter referred to as “HUMSS-A”;
-and-
The Barangay Council of_____________________, represented by its Barangay Captain
_________________________, hereinafter referred to as the “TARGET BARANGAY,”

WITNESSETH, that:

1. HUMSS-A is a school-based social group that has programs and services that aim to promote:
 awareness of human rights in communities
 social equity
 empowerment and advocacy
 commitment and conviction to participatory development for community well-being
 gender equality

And therefore, intends to bring this programs and services to the TARGET BARANGAY for the benefit
of its indigent residents in the locality;

2. The TARGET BARANGAY will cooperate, support, and assist HUMSS-A in its programs and services
in order that the intended beneficiaries will avail of them;

3. Both will complement each other in identifying problem areas and providing assistance to each other to
ensure the successful completion of its projects;

4. Both will make available manpower and resources in order to mobilize people needed to carry out its
activities and objectives.

EFFECTIVITY OF AGREEMENT
This Memorandum of Agreement shall take effect upon signing hereto by the parties this ______ day of
______ 200_ at Barangay _______________, _____________, ____________.

By:

____________________________ ____________________________
President Barangay Captain

Signed in the presence of:

____________________________ ____________________________
Witness Witness

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Appendix E.18.2.1 Rubrics for Socio-Reconnaissance (Evaluation)

EVALUATION FORM
Venue:
Date:
Time:

Direction: In relation to the activity you have participated in, please check the appropriate box to indicate
your honest and objective assessment of the following:

Criteria System of Evaluation


I. Program of Activities Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
1. Planning
2. Scheduling (adequacy of time
allotted for each activity)
3. Sequencing of topics and
activities (topic/ activity
sequenced according to
importance/ difficulty or other
criteria)
4. Implementation
5. Relevance of topics/ activities to
objectives
6. Adequacy of treatment
II. Exhibits and Film Showing Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
1. Relevant information offered.
2. Personal enrichment gained.
III. Materials Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
1. Quality
2. Content
3. Packaging
4. Adequacy
5. Relevance to the needs of
participants
6. Updated
IV. Secretariat Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
1. Responsiveness of staff to
participants' needs
2. Adequacy of services of staff
3. Professional behavior of staff.
V. Program Objectives Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
1. Objectives are understood well.
2. Objectives are attained.
VI. Meals/ Refreshments Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
1. Quality
2. Schedule of meals
3. Manner of serving
4. Adequacy
VII. Conference Venue
Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
Accommodation
1. Services
2. Facilities (light, water, ventilation,
noise, rest rooms)
3. Accommodation
VIII. Impact of Activities Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
1. To what extent were interaction,
sharing and socialization
gained?

IX. Speakers and Resource Persons: Indicate your assessment of the speaker and resource person
by encircling one of the five numbers that comprise the qualities scale.

4- Very
5- Excellent 3- Good 2- Fair 1- Poor
Good
Relevance
Quality of Content of Materials
Name of Resource Person to the
Presentation Presentation Used
Assigned

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 80
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Topic
12345 12345 12345 12345
12345 12345 12345 12345
Workshop Facilitator
12345 12345 12345 12345
12345 12345 12345 12345

COMMENTS:

COMMUNITY FIELD WORK REPORT


POST- COMMUNITY OUTREACH NARRATIVE REPORT

I. Title/ Name of Community Outreach


________________________________________________________________________
( ) Progress ( ) Project ( )Activities ( ) Services

II. Nature/ Description of the Outreach


_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

III. Date

IV. Travel Time

Mode of Travel Travel


Departure from school

Arrival at venue

Departure from venue

V. Name of Venue/ Community


_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

VI. Respondents/ Clients


A. Number of Respondents :
B. Genders :
C. Age Level :

VII. Project Input


A. Faculty/ Staff/ Student as (1) Lecturer (2) Facilitator
(3) Coordinator (4) Volunteers

Name College/ Department Job Designation

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B. Student Implementors

Name College/ Department Job Designation

VIII. Narrative/ Descriptive Report (in 100 words)

_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________

IX. Problems Encountered: Enumerate the significant problems encountered during the
implementation proper.

Appendix E.18.4.2 Rubrics for Immersion


Group Participation

Excellent Above Average Average Poor Teacher


5 pts. 4 pts. 3 pts. 2pts. Score
Student constantly Student is a
Student is not
engaged in the Student passive
involved with
activity. Students participates in the participant
Active the activities
show awareness activity as needed through the
Involvement around the
of the issues, asks but could use most of the
immersion
and answered more enthusiasm. immersion
trips.
questions. experience.
Student
Student completed
completed Student did
assigned task/role Student has
assigned task/ not complete
and ready with completed
role and is ready required
required materials some of the
with required tasks/ roles.
for the immersion assigned
materials for the Student
Preparation activities. Student tasks/roles
immersion. contributed
has done the basic and ready for
Student has done little or
required the
all assignments nothing at all
assignments and immersion
with best effort to the overall
ready for the most activities.
and ready for the activities.
activities.
activities.
Student is
neutral about
the Student has a
Student is positive immersion negative
about the activities. attitude.
Student is positive
immersion Student Student
about the
Attitude activities being set spreads makes the
immersion
the example for mixed experience
activities.
students around feelings bad for others
him/ her. around the around him/
group both her.
positive and
negative.
Student Student
Body and/or verbal
sometimes frequently
responses indicate
pay attention interrupt
Student respects active
to the group and/or put
Social and encourages listening/participati
discussion. down the
Interaction the views of on. Student asks
Student views of
others. questions and
sometimes others.
build on other
ask Student do
comments.
questions not

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 82
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and build on participate.


others Does not mix
comment. with the
group.

TOTAL

http;//www.rcampus.com/rubrics

Appendix E.18.4.3 Rubrics for Immersion (Individual)


Individual Performance
Needs Competent
Developing Exemplary
Development (GOAL)
Student wants Student realizes
Student has
earnestly to that she/ he can
grasped a deep
Student can "help", but shows learn from those
knowledge of
articulate Student no knowledge of she/ he serves.
solidarity and
systematic demonstrates little the larger Recognizes that
actively engaged in
causes of social to no engagement. historical, poverty linked to
living out her/ his
problems. economic, and larger systematic
commitment to the
socio- political issues occurring in
poor.
problems at play. the world.
Evidence
Student is
cognizant of the Student frequently
importance of Student connected donates his/ her
Student meeting the to (either through time to social
recognizes the needs of people awareness of or causes in his/ her
importance of and the dedication to act community and
Shows little
meeting the environment on behalf of) social sees connection
engagement.
needs of "the through service , causes and issues between what he/
other" through the but fails or surrounding the she can do at home
service. unaware of how people he/ she and how the
to get involved serves. impacts those
with a specific overseas.
cause.
Evidence
Can clearly
articulate what faith
Has religious or
and spirituality
spiritual
mean in his/ her
Student prays conversations with
life. Lives in a
with the group faculty/ staff or
Student explores manner that aligns
Disinterested or but has not other students.
the role of faith with his/ her faith.
unengaged with shown any signs Knows that faith
and spirituality in Clearly connects
spiritual topics that he/ she is and spirituality
service. faith, justice, and
grappling with play an important
spirituality. Can
his/ her faith. role in his/ her life
articulate why his/
and in quest for
her faith compels
justice.
her/ him to act for
justice.
Evidence
Student expresses Student engages
Student articulate
Students engages knowledge of, actively with social
some knowledge
in social justice interest in, and justice issues and
Is disengaged with of social justice
efforts with the concern for social seeks to eliminate
social efforts. efforts, yet does
goal of eliminating justice efforts is injustice in
not see how what
injustice for all. moved to the plight whatever realm he/
is relevant.
of the poor. she can.

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Student can
Student built articulate the
Student can
good importance of
articulate the
Student relationships with building
importance of
understands the Student does not individuals from sustainable
building sustainable
importance of understand the the host while on relationships with
relationships with
building concept of the trip, yet could "the other", but
"the other" and
sustainable "relationships" not articulate the might not grasp
lives his/her life in
relationships with holistically and importance of the importance of
accordance with
"the other" broadly. life-giving and these relationships
these principles.
(community) sustainable at the community,
He/she embodies
relationships with institutional, or
solidarity.
"the other" environmental
level.

Appendix E.18.4.4 Sample Program

PROGRAM

PART 1: REGISTRATION

PART 2: PROGRM PROPER

OPENING PRAYER……………………………………… STUDENT

SINGING OF THE NATIONAL ANTHEM………………. STUDENT

WELCOME REMARKS……….…………………………. BRGY. CAPTAIN

MESSAGE

PRINCIPAL…………………………………………… PRINCIPAL

PUROK LEADER…………………………………….. PUROK LEADER

RATIONALE OF THE COMMUNITY PROJECT………. TEACHER (CSC)

PRESNTATION………………………………………… HUMMS STUDENT

CLOSING REMARKS…………………………………… SHSFOCAL PERSON

____________________________

MASTER OF CEREMONY

HUMSS-C CLASS F REGION 3 MASS TRAINING FOR TEACHERS (MAY 4 to 24, 2017) 84