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REGRADED UNCLASSIFIED BY ORDER OF SEC ARMY BY USAMHI PER

DECLASSIFIED

FILE

IANUAL

"LIBRARY

1:1AR

3

1352

ARMY WAR COLLEGE

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY FM 30-30 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AFM 50-40 DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OPNAV 32P-1200

CORRECTED COPY

CHANGE

AIR FORCE MANUAL!

No. 50-40F

J

AFM 50-40F

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE WASHINGTON, 1 January 1955

TRAINING

Aircraft Recognition Manual

AFM 50-40, May 1949, including Changes 50-40A, June 1950; 50-40B, June 1951; 50-40C, June 1952; 50-40D, June 1953; and 50-40E, June 1954, is changed as follows:

1. When the following portions have been removed, this Manual and its supplements may be declassified:

a. The photograph and description of the Chase XC-123 aircraft in the addenda section of Supplement No. 2.

b. The photograph and description of the Douglas C-132 aircraft in

the addenda section of Supplement No. 4.

c. All references to USSR aircraft "Type-Number" designations

appearing in the Manual and its supplements, including the description of Soviet aircraft type designations in Supplement No. 2 which appears on the

third page of the USSR section following the USSR tab. 2. After necessary action, this Change will be filed in the front of the Manual.

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE:

OFFICIAL:

E. E. TORO Colonel, USAF Air Adjutant General

DISTRIBUTION:

Zone of Interior and Overseas:

N. F. TWINING Chief of Staff, United States Air Force

 

150

Headquarters Major air commands

,-_--_--_--

-----.-_--_--_-----

-_

5

Except Alaskan Air Command

36

Subordinate air commands

-

-

-

5

 

2

Except Services Squadrons.--_-

------_-

----

(1 each dayroom and orderly room file)

-

---_-

2

Except AFROTC units---

-

---_---_---_

1

Miscellaneous:

Air Division, National Guard Bureau-_--

-_-_-

--

---

1

LIBRARY U.S. ARMY WAR COLTEGJB

AUTHORITY

DEC 11 1958

COPY

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1955

O 337379

FILE

RECOGNITION

DEC. 1956

MANUAL

SUPPLEMENT

NO.

DEC

1956

6

DEPARTMENT

OF

THE ARMY FM

30-30

DEPARTMENT

OF

THE

NAVY

OPNAV

32P-1200/6

DEPARTMENT OF

THE

AIR

FORCE

AFM 50-406

The

Aircraft Recognition Manual

was produced jointly

by

the

Army, Navy

and Air

Force for

the guidance

and in

SUPPLEMENT

DECEMBER

NO. 6

1956

struction

of personnel within

||

the Department

of Defense.

FM

OPNAV 32P-1200/6

AFM

30-30

50-40G

FM

30-30

This manual and all supplements

OPNAV-32P-I200

thereto supersede FM 30-30,

1

April

1943,

including

AFM 50-40

Sup

plements

1,

2,

3,

4,

and

5,

and

Recognition Pictorial Manual, Navy

Department

No. AN-

OPNAV-P32-100

(BuAer

3)

AIRCRAFT

RECOGNITION

MANUAL

 

FM 30-30

SUPPLEMENT NO. 6

OPNAV 32P-I200/6

DEPARTMENTS

OF

THE

ARMY,

THE

WASHINGTON

NAVY,

25,

D.

C.

AND THE

AIR FORCE

AUTHENTICATION INFORMATION

(REVISED

FM 30-30_OPNAV 32P-1200 AFM

50-40, Aircraft

Recognition

thereto,

are

published for the

information

and

guidance of all concerned.

BY

ORDER OF

THE

SECRETARIES

OF

THE ARMY, THE

NAVY,

AND

THE AlR

DECEMBER

Manual

FORCE

and

1956)

MAY

1949

all

supplements

OFFICIAL :

JOHN

A.

KLEIN

Major General,

United States Army

The Adjutant General

OFFICAL :

G.

United States Navy

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Administration)

L.

RUSSELL

Vice Admiral,

OFFICAL :

E.

E. TORO

Colonel, United States Air Force Air Adjutant General

MAXWELL

D.

TAYLOR

General,

Chief of Staff

United States Army

ARLEIGH

BURKE

Chief of Naval Operations

N.

F.

TWINING

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force

DISTRIBUTION :

 

ACTIVE ARMY:

CNGB

 

(1)

;

Tec

Svc,

DA

(1)

;

Tec Svc,

Bd

(1)

;

Hq

CONARC

(20)

;

Army AA

Comd

(5)

;

OS

Maj

Comd

(5) ;

OS

Base

Comd

(2) ;

Log Comd

(2)

;

MOW

(5)

;

Armies

(5)

;

Corps

(2) ;

Div

(5)

;

Regt

(2) ;

Bn

(2) ;

AAA

Co

(1)

;

Fr & Cp

(2)

;

USMA

(5)

;

Gen &

Br

Svc

Sch

(2)

;

PMST

(1) ;

Mil

Dist

(3).

NG:

State AG (6).

 

USAR:

AAA

Regt

(1);

AAA

Bn

(1);

AAA

Co

(1).

For

explanation

of

distribution

symbols, see

 

SR

320-5-1.

 

NAVY:

(SNDL) 21,

22, 23,

24,

28A,

29,

30,

31, 32,

42, 46,

G1A,

GIB, G1D

(5 copies) ;

G3A, G3B,

G3C,

G3D, G3E

(20 copies)

; G4A,

G5B

(5 copies)

;

G5C,

G5D

(20 copies)

;

G6A,

G7A, G7C,

G8B, G8H,

G8K, G8M,

G8P,

G8T,

G9V,

G8X, G8Y,

G9, G13,

G14, G16,

G17, G18,

G19, G21,

G22,

G23,

G7B,

J3,

J28, J34,

J60,

J79,

J84,

J94, J95,

J105

(5

copies).

 

AIR FORCE Zone of Interior and Overseas: Headquarters USAF (300); Major Air Commands

Alaskan

Services, MATS (2);

Units

Air

Command

(36),

State

Adjutants, ANG

(0);

Subordinate

Air Commands

(5), Except:

Except:

(5),

Squadrons (1 each day room and orderly room file) (2), Except: ANG (0), AFROTC

NGB (1).

(1); Miscellaneous: Air Division,

SUPPLEMENT

NO.

DECEMBER

1956

6

IV

FM 30-30

OPNAV

AFM

32P-1200/6

SO-40G

FM 30-30

AIRCRAFT

RECOGNITION

MANUAL

OPNAV

32P-1200/6

SUPPLEMENT NO. 6

CONTENT

AND ARRANGEMENT

AFM 50-40G

The Aircraft Recognition Manual covering air

craft of the United

States

and

Foreign

Countries

terial.

is

1956,

a complete in-line assembly arrangement of the

The following listing, as of December

contains recognition

information

available

on an

publication.

Insert the new

sheets in their proper

unclassified basis.

sections.

Numbered

pages are to

replace

corre

Principal air forces are grouped in the Aircraft

sponding

superseded

pages. In

the Addenda sec

Recognition Manual by

section

index tabs,

and

it

tion, following the tab, new sheets are to be added

is

to be

noted that pagination is

not

employed in

by

country

or

miscellaneous

as

marked

in

upper

this part of the manual.

In its

stead, within each

left and lower left corners. Black dots

(

)

repre

section, aircraft have been

arranged according to

sent new and revised Aircraft Recognition

Sheets

the

Uniform

Classification

for

Combining

U.S.

to be

inserted

in the proper

section

and

sequence

Air Force,

U.S. Navy,

and Foreign Aircraft. The

as

indicated. Superseded

or deleted

pages are

to

lesser

air forces

of the

world

are

included

under

be destroyed.

It

is

important

that

the

standard

a miscellaneous tab

in alphabetical order.

continuity

be

maintained at

all times

in

order

This supplement, the sixth to be published, pre

ma

sents

new

up-to-date

aircraft

recognition

Title

Page

_

Promulgating Letter

Content

Introduction

Uniform Classification of Aircraft

and

Arrangement

. . -

Designation of Air Force Aircraft

Designation of

U.

Manufacturers of Foreign Aircraft

Aircraft

Naval Aircraft

S.

Aircraft Names

and Designations

Engines .-

Propulsion

Designation of Service Aircraft Engines

International

bols

Glossary

Recognition

Illustrated Recognition Features

.

Aircraft

-

-

-

Registration Sym

-

-

.

_

-.-

~

Features of Gun Calibers

Annotated Aircraft Illustrations

National Military

Addenda

(TAB)

Aircraft Markings

USAF

(TAB)

Air Force

Aircraft Illustrated:

Bomber

!

y

»IV " V 6'

^

Vlll ^

1

2

4

10

14

16

17

19

20

22

27

28

29

30

39

B-52

B-36 --- B-47 - B-57 -

B-45- B-50 -

F-47 - F-51 -

June

June

June

June

June

1954

1951

1952

L

*

1954'

1953

:

M&y 1949':

B-29

B-17

B-25

B-26

B-58

B-66

May

May

Fighter

1949-/

1949'/

F-r86D

F-86H

May

1949

June 1950 "

May

May

«Dec

«Dec

June

Dec

1949'

1949'//

1956^

1956 'J

1953

1956 V

Insert latest sheets and destroy superseded sheets.

SUPPLEMENT

DECEMBER

NO.

1956

6

that

revisions

and

supplements

without delay or confusion.

may

be entered

F-80 -_--

F-82

F-84

F-84F

RF-84F

F-86

Fighter (Continued)

June-1951/

May 1949^

May 1949^

V

June

June

June

1953

1954

1952

^

F-89 -

F-94F

F-94C --

F-100

F-101A-.

F-102

F-104

June

June

June

June

Dec

Dec

Dec

1952/"'

1952^

1954^

1954/

1956" 1956''

1956

'

C-46/R5C

C-47/R4D

C-47F/

R4D-8

C-54/R5D

C-74

C-82

C-97

C-118B/

R6D

Ma;j,

May

June

May

May

May

May

June

C-119/R4Q June

T-6/SNJ

T-28

L-5

_

L-13

L-16

L-17

June

June

June

May

May

May

Cargo-Transport

1949^

1949^

1953.

1949

1949

1949

1949

1951

1952

.

C-119H

C-121

C-121C/

R7V --

C-122

C-123

C-124

C-125

C-131

C-133A

EC-185

Trainer

1951

1950

T-29

T-33/

TV-2

-

June

May

1953'

1949

June

1953

^

June 1950 ^

June 1950 J'

1950"

1950^

June

June

June

«Dec

Dec

1954^

1956^

1956

June

1950

June 1950

Liaison

1950

-J

1949-,

1949

1949

'

'

L-19/OE

L-20

June 1952

June 1952^ June 1952 Tr-:

/

LC-126^, x

V-

\t,,.

,

/' -,

/

^J

,']

FM

OPNAV 32P-I200/6

AFM

30-30

50-40G

US

NAVY (TAB)

Navy

Aircraft

Illustrated:

Patrol and Transport

PB4Y-2/1

,

PBY-6A

May

1949^

(P4Y)

May

1949

PBM

May

1949^

P4M

May

1949 /

P5M

June 1952 y

PVr v

Mayi¥i.a^

1949"*.v±a

,

P5M-2-- wiix «

June

v uii

1954^

 

_

P2V

June

1953^

P6M-1

«Dec

1956

'

P2V-7

iDec

1956 ^

R3Y/P5Y

June

1954'

Search and Attack

TBM

May

1949

f

AF

June 1952^

SB2C

May

1949 f

AJ

June

1953'

AD

June 1953"

A3D

June

1953'

 

_

AD-5

June

1953'7

A4D-1

Dec

1956 ^

AM

May

1949^

 

Figh ter

 

F4U

May

1949

FH

/ May

1949

F6F

May

1949

F2H

' June 1953 "

-

F2H-3

June

1953

F9F-6

--

June

1952^

 

_

F3H

June

1953

'

FJ

-

May

1949 l

F3H-2N

Dec

1956 J

FJ-2

June

1953,

F7F

May

1949 ',

F7U .-

-.

June

1953'

F8F

May

1949 '

F8U-1

Dec

1956 </

F9F

-

June

1952"

F3D

June

1950^

F9F-8

Dec

1956 l/

F4D

June 1954 '".

F11F-1

Dec

1956

J

F5D-1

. Dec

1956

^

R60/

Miscellaneous SC -.---

May

1949'7 ,

(R6V)

May

1949 v<

UF/SA-16

June

1952

y

JRM

May

1949 /

 
 

Helicopter

 

HRP-2/H-

 

H04S/

 

21

June

1950^

H-19

June

HRP-1

June

195(K

HSL

June

1953

HUP/H-25 June

1950

v

HTE/H-23 June

1953

HO3S-

HOK

June

1953

l/H-5

June

1950v

HTK

June

1953

s7

H-12

HTL-2/H-

13B

June

June

1950

1950x

v

flying

-

H-32

Platform

-_

«Dec

»Dec

1956

1956

"

v:

1956-'

H05S/

H-34A

«Dec

H-18

June

1950

"

H-37A

«Dec

1956^

Lighter Than Air

ZPN

June

1953'

ZPK

June

1953

'

ZPM

June 1953

/

ZPG

-

June

1953

y

BRITISH

COMMONWEALTH

(RAF

The

British

Royal Air

Force,

Fleet

TAB)

Air Arm,

and

their

Equipment.

Australian, Canadian,

In

dian,

New

Zealand, Pakistan,

South African Air

Forces

Designations.

and

their

Equipment.

British

Aircraft

Insert latest sheets and destroy superseded sheets.

SUPPLEMENT NO.

DECEMBER

1956

6

VI

RAF

Aircraft

Illustrated:

Bomber

Lincoln

Mk.

2

--

-

-

May

1949

"

Shackleton

.-

-

-

-

--_

 

-

June 1950 u

Vulcan

-

-

-

-.

-

June

1954'

Victor

-

_-

June

1954

""

Valiant

-

---

-_-_-

--.-

June

1954

~

Canberra

 

June

1951

,

Mosquito

-_

May

1949

Sunderland

 

May

1949

"

-

-

-

 

-

-

 

--

Fighter

 

Spitfire

Mk.

24

May

1949^

Meteor Mk.

4

May

1949'

Meteor F.

Mk.

8

Meteor N. F.

Vampire

Mk.

Venom

Hunter

Mk.

Mk. 11

1

3

-

-

-

Swift

-

-.-

_-

-.

_-_-

-

-.-

-

-

-.-_

.-

-_-

-

-.-

-

-

--

-.-.

-

-

-

Javelin -.-. .- - -- - D. H. 110 Midge (Gnat) - - English Electric
Javelin
-.-.
.-
-
--
-
D.
H. 110
Midge
(Gnat)
-
-
English Electric
P-l
-
-
Cargo-Transport
Britannia
-
-
York
-
-
-
- - -
Hastings
-
-.-_-
-
-
-_-
-
Tudor
Mk.
4
-
Comet
-
-
-
-
Viscount
-
,-
-_-
-
-
_
_-.-
-_
Marathon -
-_-
-
-_-
Freighter
-
-
- -
Ambassador
Valetta
-_-
-
-
-
-
Varsity T. Mk.
Dove/Devon -
1
_-
-
-
Trainer-Liaison
Balliol T.
Mk. 2
Chipmunk
-
-_-_-
-
-
Athena T.
Mk.
2
Provost
-
_-
-
-_-.
-
Auster A.
0. P.

June 1951 >/ June 1951 ~"

May

June

June

/

1949 -/

1950

1954-

June 1954 "'

 

June

1954^

*Dec

1956

^

-_-

Dec

1956^'

«Dec

1956 t/'

»Dec

1956^

 

May

1949"

May

1949 *

May

1949 ;

 

June

1953

^

-

June

1953

^

June

1953

"

June

1953

;

June

1951".,

May

1949

June 1950 "

May

1949

^

June

1950'^

June 1950 ^

June

1950

/

.

June

1953

v

June 1952 V

ROYAL

NAVY (TAB)

Fleet

Air Arm

Aircraft

Attack

Illustrated:

Brigand Mk.

 

1

May

1949^

Firebrand Mk.

 

5

-

-

.

May

1949

Firefly Mk.

4 -

 

-

-

.

May

1949

Gannet

-

June 1952 V

-_-

Sea Mew

 

,

,-

June 1954^'

 

FM 30-30

 

OPNAV 32P-I200/6

AFM

50-40G

 

Fighter

K ;,-,,_-r-'

,Seafire Mk.

47

^:_/r:

'_".!_

June 1951^

Seafury

 

June

1953

Sea Hornet

 

May

1949"

Sea

Vampire

June

1951/

Sea Venom _

 

June

1952

/

Attacker

 

June

1952'

Sea

Hawk

 

June

1950'

Wyvern

_

June

1954'

 

Utility

Sea

Prince

 

June 1951 ^

Sea

Otter

-.

June 1953

 

R. C. A. F.

Aircraft Illustrated:

?CF-100

Canuck

Fighter

1:

June 1951'"°

U. S. S. R.

(TAB)

The

Soviet

Air

Forces,

and their Equipment.

Aircraft Designations

S. A.

F. Aircraft Illustrated:

Bomber Barge Bull (Tu-4) Pe-8 _ _ Badger _ - Buck (Pe-2) Buck (Pe-3) Bat
Bomber
Barge
Bull
(Tu-4)
Pe-8
_
_
Badger _ -
Buck
(Pe-2)
Buck (Pe-3)
Bat (Tu-2)
Bob
(11-4)
Butcher
(11-28)
Bosun
_-_-
_-
-
-_-
-
-
Bison
.
_
-
_
_-
-
Bear
Patrol
Mop
(GST)
_
.
_
_
Mug
(MDR6)
Mote
(MBR-2)
Attack
Bark (11-2)
_
Beast
(11-10)
Box
(A-20)
,
Fighter
P-39
Airacobra
Fred
(P-63A)
La-5
-,
_
_
_ -_
Fin
(La-7)
Fritz
(La-9)
Fank
(La-11)
Yak-3
-_-
-
-_-
-
Frank
(Yak-9)
-
Yak-15
Feather
(Yak-17)
Insert
latest
sheets
and
destroy
superseded
sheets.
SUPPLEMENT
NO.
6
DECEMBER
1956

June 1954'

June

June

1954'

1949 ^

June 1954^

June

June

June

June 1954^

June 1954:

June 1954 ^

1954

1954 -

1954'

«Dec

1956*^

«Dec

1956^

June 1954 /

June

June 1954'

1954'

June 1954

June 1954

June

1954

June

1951'

-^

June

1954

June

1949^

June

1954y

June

1954V

June

1954^

June

1949

17

June

June 195V

June 1954

 

VII

Fighter (Continued)

Flora

(Yak-23)

June

1954

*""

Fargo

(MIG-9)

June

1954lX

-Eagotr (MIG-15)

^^"

r

!

-

June

1954^

Fresco

June

1954'

Fantail

 

June 1954

 

Flashlight

«Dec

1956'

Farmer

 

-

«Dec

1956"

_-

_-

Cargo-Transport

 

Camel

(Tu-104)

Dec

1956^

Cab

(Li-2)

June

1954^

Coach

(11-12)

June 1954^

Clam

(11-18)

June

1954^

Cart

(Tu-70)

June

1954^

Colt

(An-2)

June

1954

Trainer

Midget

(UMIG-15)

June 1954^

Magnet

(UYak-17)

June 1954^

Mule

SWEDEN (TAB)

(Po-2)

The

Royal Swedish

Air

Force

R. S. A. F. Aircraft

Illustrated:

Bomber

June

1954^

and Equipment.

B-18

 

-

-

-

-

May

1949 '-

 

Fighter

 

J-21

 

May

1949'

J-21R

May

1949

''

J-22

May

1949"

J-29

June

1951

^

 

Attack

 

A-32

 

June 1954^

 

Cargo-Transport

 

,

SAAB-90

 

May 1949

Trainer-Liaison

 

,

SAAB-91

Safir

June

1954 17

FRANCE

(TAB)

 

The French

Air

Force

and Equipment.

 

F. A. F.

Aircraft Illustrated:

 
 

Fighter

 

^

M.

D.

450

-

June 1953 /

S.

0. 4045

 

June

1954 j

M.

D.

452

»Dec

1956

 

Cargo-Transport

 

j

Caravelle

M.

S.

D. 315

0.

30

-

Nord 1400

Nord

2501

-

MISCELLANEOUS

-

-_--

-

-

(TAB)

--

-_-

-

--

-

»Dec

1956

1953^,

,

'J

June

June 1953^

June 1953

1954

Jtine

Other

Air Forces

of

the

world,

listed alpha

betically,

and

their

equipment.

FM

OPNAV 32P-1200/6

30-30

AFM

50-40G

INTRODUCTION

Visual recognition of aircraft will be important

airplanes. Electronic devices

fighter

aircraft,

as long as men fly in

can

seek

out

other

track

the

of their particular shapes, be avoided:

but two pitfalls

should

(1)

Minor

details,

no

matter

how distinctive,

airplane

to within

firing range,

and

even auto

should not

be emphasized

as they

are

un

matically

fire

the

rockets

or

cannon,

but

the

likely

to

be

visible

at worth-while

dis

PILOT

can best

determine whether

the

target

tances.

aircraft is

FRIEND

or FOE

and permit or

abort

(2)

In analyzing an airplane part by part,

care

the final destruction.

gunners

can track and

must

be taken

not to

lose sight

of

the

Antiaircraft

fire effec

 

plane's over-all configuration. Each element

tively

at low flying, plainly visible aerial vehicles,

should

be examined not

as

a

recognition

but

someone determines

whether

the target is

feature in

itself but as

an integral part of

FRIEND

or

FOE

before

the order

"Open,

Fire"

the plane's

general design.

is given!

Although

the substance

of an airplane

is only

"But with supersonic aircraft we will not have

time

ment often heard. Experienced combat pilots who

have time or

craft

aircraft 98%

before firing range is

of the time during supersonic passes

recognize target

to recognize

say that

target airplanes," is

one state

air

flight experience in

it

is

possible to

supersonic

reached. And they

say with

a summation of its parts,

its appearance evolves

not

nents but also from the way such components are

be found

much

single

to try

than

visually

the appearance

of

only from

related

an airplane

to keep

the characteristics of its compo

each other.

It will

to remember

as

a

separately

integrated

unit

the character

in mind

to

less difficult

supersonic

flight experience and

aircraft

recog

istics of all its major parts.

nition

training, 100%

in

aircraft recognition

is

this way

is not

Learning the airplane but infinitely more

only easier

possible!

The closure rates

for supersonic combat

effective

when

the

time comes

for

putting

the

are not high, between

mit positive identification from all types of passes

(except head-on) before the point of break-away.

50

and

100 knots,

and per

So increased aircraft speeds mean only that recog

nition

tice.

will

demand greater effort

and more prac

knowledge to work.

In recognition,

is

skill endures only with practice.

permanently checked out

need

no

by

an

longer

to the

Constant

study.

aroused interest and en

as

long as

the recognition

No one

extent that

review

thusiasm is

ever

he

sparked

essential

Airplanes

like automobiles

do

differ.

Trained

requirement exists.

 

observation

can

detect

their

underlying

differ

With this

thought in mind the members

of the

ences.

on complete familiarity with aircraft appearances.

Success

in aircraft recognition depends up

U.

S.

Armed Forces can

improve

their acquaint

ance with the

military

and

naval aircraft

of the

This

can

be achieved

only

by continued

study

United States and the aircraft produced and flown

aided

by

a

number

of training

devices available

by

the nations of

the world.

In addition, com

for

the Aircraft

Recognition Manual to supplement the use of such

and to provide a convenient volume

training

this purpose.

aids

It

is

the aim

of

mercial aircraft which are seen on all airways will

for

aircraft

it

be of military interest to

the armed

services,

is

a certainty that

any commercial

of reference.

which

can be used as

military

transports,

liaison

Airplanes must be studied in detail

in order to

or

observation

planes will be

so utilized

by the

gain familiarity with

SUPPLEMENT NO. 6 DECEMBER 1956

the distinguishing features

VIM

enemy

if the

need should

ever arise.

FM

OPNAV 32 P-1200/6

AFM

30-30

50-40G

DECLASSIFIED

CLASSIFICATION

OF AIRCRAFT

Uniform Classification

Airplanes

Bomber

a. Heavy or Heavy Patrol

b. Medium or Medium Patrol

c. Light or Light Patrol

d.

Attack

2. Fighter

a. Interceptor

b. All Weather

c. Penetration

3. Reconnaissance

a. Strategic

b. Support/Tactical

for

Use

in Combining USAF, Navy

and

Foreign Aircraft

(c) Light

b. Non-military

(1)

(2)

(3)

5. Trainer

Heavy

Medium

Light

a. Advanced

b. Basic

Primary and

6.

7. Communications/Utility

8. Special Research

Search and

Rescue

Other

Aircraft

Transport

 

9.

Target

a.

Military

 

a. Capable of carrying pilot

 

(1)

Combat

b. Not capable of carrying pilot

 

(a)

Heavy

10.

Pilotless Aircraft

(b)

Medium

a. Capable of carrying pilot

(c)

Light

b. Not capable of carrying pilot

 

(2)

Non-combat

11.

Guided Missiles

 

(a)

Heavy

12.

Glider

(b)

Medium

13.

Lighter-than-air Craft

Information

1. Basic Configuration

a. Fixed Wing

b.

c. Autogiro

Helicopter

2. Number of Engines

3.

Type

a. Propeller

of Propulsion

(1)

Reciprocating engine

(2)

(a) Pusher

(b) Tractor

Turbo-Prop

 

(a)

Pusher

(b)

Tractor

b. Turbo-Jet

c. Rocket

d.

Ram Jet

e. Pulse Jet

 

f.

Combination

4. Guidance

of Above

a. Piloted

b. Remotely Controlled

Useful

(1)

Beam Rider

(2)

Command Guidance

(3)

Celestial Navigation

(4)

Homing

(Specify)

5.

Type

of Base

in

Subclassification

of the

Above

b.

(4)

(5)

Ship

(1)

(2)

c. Water

Tricycle

Conventional-tail

support

Carrier Non-carrier (specify type)

(1)

(2)

Pontoons

Hull

d. Amphibian

e. Parasitic

6. Specialized Equipment

a. Anti-submarine

b. Early Warning

c. Radar/Radio Countermeasures

d. Control of Remotely Controlled Aircraft

7. Missile Aircraft

a. Air-to-Air

b. Air-to-Surface

c. Air-to-Underwater

d. Surface-to-Air

e. Surface-to-Surface

f. Surface-to-underwater

8. Guided Missile

a. Air-to-Air

b. Air-to-Surface

c. Air-to-Underwater

d. Surface-to-Air

a.

Land

e. Surface-to-Surface

(1)

Skis

f. Surface-to-underwater

(2)

Tractor

g. Underwater-to-Air

(3)

Bicycle

h. Underwater-to-Surface

MAX 1949

DECLASSIFIED

AFM

OPNAV32P-1200

50-40

CLASSIFICATION

AND DESIGNATION OF

Designation of Air

1. Definitions:

Force Aircraft (AFR

65-60)

U. S.

AIRCRAFT

a.

"Type"

as

applied

to

aircraft

designates

the

original

design

purpose

of

an

aircraft,

i.e.,

bombardment, fighter,

cargo,

etc.

b.

"Model"

as

applied

to aircraft

designates those

aircraft

of

a given

type

which

are

alike

in general

c.

configuration,

construction,

equipment,

and

performance.

"Series"

as

applied

to

aircraft

designates those

aircraft of a given type and

model having,

for

all

practical

purposes,

interchangeable

parts

and identical tactical

usefulness.

2.

Designator Assignment.

Aircraft will be assigned a basic type

designator in

accordance

with

the

function for which they

are basically

designed.

When a type of aircraft is modified to perform a function

other than its basically designed

function,

the basic

type

designator will be prefixed by

the

appropriate

auxiliary

symbol.

a. Type.

The

basic

type

designation

will consist

of one

letter

as

follows:

 

Type

(1)

Amphibious

A

(2)

Bomber

B

(3)

C

(4)

Fighter.

F

(5)

Glider

G

(6)

Rotary Wing (Helicopter)

H

(7)

Liaison

L

(8)

Target Aircraft and Drones

Q

(9)

Reconnaissance

R

(10)

Search and Rescue

S

(11)

T

(12)

Special Research or Experimental

X

b.

Model.

A particular model

of a given

type will be

designated by a

arated from the preceding type letter or letters by

a dash,

such as B-50.

number

or numbers

sep

 

c.

Series.

Following the model number there

will always

be

a

series letter;

such

as

B-50A. The

letters

"0" and

"I"

will

not be used. The

series letters of a model will be changed when: