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B.

Syllabi of Courses

B. Syllabi of Courses

B.1 Syllabi of Required Engineering Courses


Syllabi of all required engineering courses in our program are given in this section. Lecture hours
of each course are defined in terms of either class periods or class hours, where a class hour is
equivalent to 50 minutes of lecture while a period is equivalent to 75 minutes of lecture. All
required engineering courses are offered every fall and spring semesters. A few are offered in
summer as well.

The required engineering courses are:

1. ENGR 195 Introduction to Engineering Profession


2. ENGR 196 Introduction to Engineering
3. ENGR 197 Introduction to Programming Concepts
4. ME 200 Thermodynamics I
5. ECE 204 Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Systems
6. ME 262 Mechanical Design I
7. ME 270 Basic Mechanics I
8. ME 272 Mechanics of Materials
9. ME 274 Basic Mechanics II
10. ME 310 Fluid Mechanics
11. ME 314 Heat and Mass Transfer
12. ME 330 Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems
13. ME 340 Dynamic Systems and Measurements
14. ME 344 Introduction to Engineering Materials
15. ME 372 Mechanical Design II
16. ME 401 Engineering Ethics and Professionalism
17. ME 414 Thermal-Fluid Systems Design
18. ME 462 Capstone Design
19. ME 482 Control Systems Analysis and Design

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.11


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ENGR 195 Introduction to the Engineering Profession

Catalog Description: Credit 1. Class 1.


This course introduces students to the engineering profession and to campus
resources. The course is designed to help students develop essential
communication and thinking skill along with the study and time-management
skills needed for success in studying engineering. Collaborative techniques
used in engineering practice are utilized.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

Textbook: Raymond B. Landis, Studying Engineering: A Road Map to a Rewarding


Career, Second Edition, Discovery Press, 2000.

Coordinator: Janet Meyer

Goals: The goals of this class are: to continue the student's orientation to the
university experience, to acquaint students with the resources available on the
IUPUI campus including the library, Learning Center and Writing Center, to
assist students in developing those skills and strategies that will support them
in their studies, and to introduce them to the engineering course of study and
the engineering profession.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Utilize a library's online catalogue for information about available resources [k3]
2. Have some familiarity with various search engines used in business and engineering for
information and research purposes [k3]
3. Demonstrate the efficacy of teamwork and collaborative effort in reaching group and
organizational goals. [d]
4. Operate as a member of a team to identify the engineering design steps involved in the making of
a simple product [b, d]
5. Collaborate with others to produce research reports with citations about engineering and other
topics [d, g, k3]
6. Make PowerPoint presentations [g]
7. Articulate a definition of engineering and appreciate the contributions of engineers and
engineering to today's world [h]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcome of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Introduction to the culture of the University (1 class)
2. Student success strategies, including study skills, time-management, note-taking and test-taking
techniques as well as student resources (2 classes)
3. Introduction to the University Library System, database and search engines (2 classes)
4. Collaboration and teamwork strategies (2 classes)
5. Engineering topics such as the design process, careers, and contributions of engineers and
engineering to society (5 classes)
6. Communication skills: PowerPoint and Excel (2 classes)
7. Students register for their second semester (1 class)

Computer Usage: Web search, Front Page, Power Point, Excel

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.12


B. Syllabi of Courses

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, oral presentations, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and
one final exam.

Professional Component: Freshman Engineering (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Janet Meyer

Revised: April 21, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.13


B. Syllabi of Courses

Course: ENGR 196 Introduction to Engineering

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


An overview of the engineering profession and methodologies of engineering
design. Students develop skills using computer aided design and simulation
software for engineering systems. Projects and homework are implemented
and tested in a laboratory environment. The course also introduces the
students to standard computer application software and university network
and software resources.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisites: MATH 151 or 154 or Equivalent

Textbooks: Roger Toogood and Jack Zecher, Pro/ENGINEER Tutorial and Multimedia
CD-Release, Release 2001, Schroff Development Corporation, 2001. ISBN:
1-58503-029-5

William J. Palm, Introduction to MATLAB 6 for Engineers, McGraw-Hill,


2000. ISBN: 0-07-234983-2

Carol L. O'Loughlin, ENGR 196 Electrical Engineering Manual,


Departmental Publication, 2002.

Coordinator: Nancy Lamm

Goals: To introduce the students to methodologies of engineering modeling,


computer simulation, and laboratory experimentation as tools in the design
process.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Use campus email services to communicate, send attachments, and
move files [k3]
2. Use MATLAB to display data and theoretical equations in graphical or
tabular form [k4]
3. Use MATLAB functions to perform computations involving scalars,
vectors and matrices [a2, k4]
4. Write and execute MATLAB script files to solve problems [e]
5. Manage computer files and information on the Windows operating
systems [k3]
6. Use Pro/ENGINEER to create a solid model of an object [k2]
7. Use Pro/ENGINEER to extract two-dimensional engineering drawings
from a solid model [k2]
8. Use PSpice to model circuits [k2]
9. Construct simple circuits in the laboratory [b]
10. Write project reports according to a prescribed format [g]
11. Work in teams to carry out project work and classroom exercises [d]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
Matlab Topics
1. Introduction to MATLAB; scalar operations (1 period)
2. Vectors, arrays, array and matrix operations, polynomials (2 periods)

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B. Syllabi of Courses

3. Script files (1 period)


4. Input/output tables (1 period)
5. Built-in functions (1 period)
6. Plotting (2 periods)
7. Simultaneous equations (1 period)

Pro/Engineer Topics
1. Introduction to Pro/Engineer user interface and model structure (1 period)
2. Solid protrusions, introduction to Sketcher (1 period)
3. Holes and cuts (0.5 period)
4. Intent Manager, design intent (0.5 period)
5. Revolved protrusion, rounds, chamfers (1 period)
6. Changing the model (1 period)
7. Design process, Project descriptions (1 period)
8. Datum planes (1 period)
9. Patterns, copies, mirror images (1 period)
10. 2-D engineering drawings (1 period)
11. Project presentations (1 period)

EE Topics
1. Introduction to analog circuit concepts (3 periods)
2. Introduction to the use of PSpice to solve simple DC and AC circuits (2
periods)
3. Wiring of experimental circuits and use of electronic instruments in a
laboratory setting (3 periods)
4. Functional behavior of an operational amplifier IC in an inverting amplifier
circuit (1 period)
5. Students may optionally do one of two circuit projects as enrichment
exercises.

Computer Usage: PSpice Student Version 9.1, Pro/ENGINEER Release 2001, MATLAB 6
release 1.2

Laboratory Projects: Introductory use of a function generator, analog trainer, and a digital
oscilloscope.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Freshman Engineering (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Nancy Lamm

Revised: April 21, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.15


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ENGR 197 Introduction to Programming Concepts

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 2. Lab 2.


Basic concepts and applications of software programming for solving
engineering problems. Topics include techniques for developing structured
algorithms, data input and output, conditional statements, loops, recursion,
subroutines, arrays and elementary concepts in mathematical programming.
Examples, homework and applications of programming concepts make
extensive use of Matlab and the C programming language.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: MATH 163 Integrated Calculus and Analytical Geometry

Textbooks: H. M. Deitel, P. J. Deitel, C How to Program, Third Edition, Prentice Hall,


2001. ISBN: 0-13-089572-5

William J. Palm, Introduction to MATLAB 6 for Engineers, McGraw-Hill,


2000. ISBN: 0-07-416687-5

Coordinator: Nancy Lamm

Goals: To guide the student in the development of fundamental programming and


algorithmic skills necessary to solve engineering problems with a computer.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of the course, the students should be able to:
1. Develop algorithms using a step-by-step process [e]
2. Use loops, selection structures, arrays, and input/output commands in
structured programs [e]
3. Write programs in MATLAB script files to solve engineering problems [e]
4. Use standard C program development environment [k4]
5. Write computer programs in C language to solve engineering problems [e]
6. Write user-defined functions in MATLAB and C [e]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
Matlab
1. Review of MATLAB topics from ENGR 196 (2 periods)
2. Relational and logical operators and selection structures (2 periods)
3. For loops; while loops (2 periods)
4. Built-in and user defined functions is MATLAB (2 periods)

C Programming
1. Problem solving process (2 periods)
2. Introduction to C; program structure, Microsoft Visual C++ compiler (2
periods)
3. input/output functions; variables; data types (1.5 periods)
4. Arithmetic, relational, and logical operators (1.5 periods)
5. If, if/else, if/else chains; decisions (1 period)
6. For loops, while loops, switch, break, continue (3 periods)
7. Using functions and libraries (3 periods)
8. Arrays (3 periods)
9. Pointers (2 periods)

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B. Syllabi of Courses

10. C characters and strings (1 period)

Computer Usage: Microsoft Visual C++ Version 6.0, MATLAB 6 Release 1.2

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Freshman Engineering (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Nancy Lamm

Revised: April 21, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.17


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course ME 200 Thermodynamics I

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


First and second laws, entropy, reversible and irreversible processes,
properties of pure substances. Application to engineering problems.

Prerequisite: PHYS 152 Mechanics

Corequisite: MATH 261 Multivariate Calculus

Textbook: M.J. Moran and H.N. Shapiro, Fundamentals of Engineering


Thermodynamics, Third Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 1995.

Coordinator: Razi Nalim

Goals: To teach students an understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics


and have them gain the ability to apply these principles to engineering
problems.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concepts of equilibrium, temperature, property, state, and
thermodynamic system [a4]
2. Apply the first law of thermodynamics to closed systems [a4]
3. Apply the first law of thermodynamics to open systems using a control
volume analysis [a4]
4. Calculate the thermodynamic properties of a pure compressible substance in
one or two phases [a4]
5. Apply the Clausius and Kelvin-Plank statements of the second law of
thermodynamics to distinguish between reversible and irreversible processes and cycles [a4]
6. Compare the performance of power cycles and refrigeration cycles with
performance limits imposed by the second law [a4]
7. Use the concept of entropy to compare the actual (irreversible) behavior of
systems with idealized, (reversible) behavior [a4]
8. Analyze all processes in a vapor power system and calculate its
performance [e]
9. Analyze all processes in gas power systems and calculate their performance
[e]
10. Analyze all processes in refrigeration and heat pump systems and calculate
their performance [e]
11. Work in a team to analyze a practical thermodynamic system [c2, d, e, k3]

Note: The letters within brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. First law for closed and open systems (9 periods)
2. Properties of pure substances (3 periods)
3. Second law and entropy (6 periods)
4. Vapor power systems (4 periods)
5. Gas power systems (3 periods)
6. Refrigeration and heat pumps (2 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Thermal-Fluid Sciences (Engineering Topics)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.18


B. Syllabi of Courses

Prepared by: Razi Nalim and Akin Ecer

Revised: March 10, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.19


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 262 Mechanical Design I

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 2. Lab 3.


Basic concepts of the design process. Design case studies. Mechanism
synthesis for motion. Applications from the area of linkage and mechanism
design. Design projects focus on design for motion. Design documentation
and communication. Implementation and use of computer tools in solving
design problems and projects. Hands-on experience with mechanisms in
laboratory.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 197 Introduction to Programming Concepts and 2) ME 270 Basic


Mechanics I

Corequisite: ME 274 Basic Mechanics II

Textbooks: David G. Ullman, The Mechanical Design Process, Second edition, McGraw
Hill, 1992, USA.

C.E. Wilson and J.P. Sadler, Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery, Second
Edition, Harper-Collins, 1993.

Coordinator: Hazim El-Mounayri

Goals:
1. To teach the students the basic steps forming the design process and
demonstrating the fact that design problems are open-ended, require creativity and involve
iterative solutions.
2. To teach the students design methodologies and fundamentals and show
their applications in linkages and mechanisms.
3. To teach the students position analysis as an integral part in the process of
design for motion.
4. To teach the students the design of basic mechanisms, which meet, key
performance requirements.
5. To teach the students the design of mechanisms for different types of output
motions.
6. To introduce the students state-of-the-art CAD/CAE technology (e.g.
Pro/Mechanica and I-DEAS) as powerful computer tools which can aid the problem-solving and
design process.
7. To provide the students with hands-on experience in mechanism design
through lab experiments.
8. To help the students develop effective/professional written and oral
communication skills through report writing and oral presentation.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Implement the design process in mechanical engineering design projects [c1]
2. Identify and compute the motion characteristics of mechanisms [a2, a4, c1]
3. Apply vector algebra, complex number, and numerical methods for motion study of linkages and
mechanisms [a2]
4. Conduct mechanisms’ synthesis for motion [c1, k1, k2]
5. Make analysis-based design decisions to select mechanism types and dimensions [e, c1, k1, k2]
6. Utilize computer-aided design tools in engineering design problems [k1, k2, e, c1]
7. Write organized project reports to communicate accurately and effectively with equations,
drawings and narratives [g]

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.20


B. Syllabi of Courses

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Design process
a. Introduction to the design process (2.5 periods)
b. Problem definition and Planning (2.5 periods)
c. Development of Engineering Specifications (2.5 periods)
d. Concept Generation (2.5 periods)
e. Concept Evaluation (2 periods)
2. Design of Mechanisms
a. Basic concepts in the design of mechanisms and machines (7 periods)
b. Position analysis of linkages (3.5 periods)
c. Design synthesis, including path generation, body motion, and function generation (3.5
periods)

Design Tools: 1. Introduction to Computer Aided Design


2. Tools for development of design programs (e.g., Matlab)
3. CAE tool for modeling, design and analysis (e.g., Prop/Engineer or I-
Deas)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Design

Prepared by: Hazim El-Mounayri

Revised: March 12, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.21


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 270 Basic Mechanics I

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Fundamental concepts of mechanics, force systems and couples, free body
diagrams, and equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Distributed forces;
centroids and centers of gravity of lines, areas, and volumes. Second moment
of area, volumes, and masses. Principal axes and principal moments of
inertia. Friction and the laws of dry friction. Application to structures and
machine elements, such as bars, beams, trusses, and friction devices.

Prerequisite: PHYS 152 Mechanics

Corequisite: MATH 261 Multivariate Calculus

Textbook: F.P. Beer and E.R. Johnston, Jr., E.R. Eisenberg, Vector Mechanics for
Engineers: Statics, McGraw Hill, Seventh Edition, 2004.

Coordinator: Hasan Akay

Goals: To teach students the basic knowledge of equilibrium of particles and smooth
and rough rigid bodies under the action of external forces

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course students should be able to:
1. Draw free body diagrams of particles [a1]
2. Analyze vectors (vector algebra) [a1]
3. Express forces in 3-D space [a4]
4. Apply equilibrium conditions to particles [a1, a4]
5. Draw free body diagrams of rigid bodies [a1]
6. Apply vector algebra to rigid bodies [a1]
7. Analyze rigid bodies for moments, couples, etc. [e, a4]
8. Apply equilibrium conditions to rigid bodies [a1, a4]
9. Determine centroids of lines, areas, and volumes [a4]
10. Analyze structures-trusses, frames and machines [e, a4]
11. Calculate friction forces [a4]
12. Calculate moments and product of inertia [a4]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Introduction to statics, various systems of units (1 period)
2. Vectors and forces, equilibrium of a particle in two or three dimensions (5
periods)
3. Equivalent systems of forces, concept of moment of a force (5 periods)
4. Equilibrium of rigid bodies, concept of free body diagram, and
determination of re-actions (2 periods)
5. Distributed forces, concept of centroids and centers of mass. (3 periods)
6. Distributed forces, moment of inertia of an area, a volume (5 periods)
7. Analysis of structures such as trusses, frames, and machines (4 periods)
8. Equilibrium of rigid bodies under the action of forces (3 periods)
9. Exams (3 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Mechanical Sciences (Engineering Topics)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.22


B. Syllabi of Courses

Prepared by: Hasan Akay and Steve Laymon

Revised: February 9, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.23


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 272 Mechanics of Materials

Prerequisite: ME 270

Catalog Description: Credit 4. Class 3. Lab 2.


Analysis of stress and strain; equations of equilibrium and compatibility;
stress/strain laws; extension, torsion, and bending of bars; membrane theory of
pressure vessels; elastic stability; selected topics. Laboratory experiments
include testing of mechanical properties and failure analysis.

Prerequisite: ME 270 Basic Mechanics I

Corequisite: None

Textbook: F.P. Beer and E.R. Johnston, Jr., Mechanics of Materials, McGraw Hill, Sixth
Edition, 2004.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach students basic knowledge of the behavior of various elastic members
under different type of loading. In the laboratory portion of the course,
students perform basic experiments related to the theoretical part of this
course.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
Lecture Outcomes
1. Employ the strength of materials theory as a tool to approximately solve the
complex stresses and deformations in members of structures and machine elements [a4]
2. Use the factor of safety in design of machine components and structures to
compensate for the unforeseen factors and stress concentrations [a4]
3. Analyze tensile and compressive stresses and deformations in bars subject
to axial loads [a4]
4. Analyze shear stresses and deformations in circular bars subject to torques
[a4]
5. Analyze bending stresses and displacements in beams subject to transverse
loads [a4]
6. Identify the instability of long bars under compressive forces, and thus use
the theory of columns in design of structures and machine components [a4]
7. Employ theory of combined stresses to find maximum tensile, compressive,
and shear stresses in an element and use theories of failure in design of machine components and
structures [a4]
8. Use tensile and torsional test machines in lab experiments [b]
9. Employ the beam bending test, column buckling test machines in lab
experiments [b]
10. Work in teams to perform lab experiments effectively, including data
collection, analysis, interpretation and documentation of lab work in technical reports [b]

LaboratoryOutcomes
1. Measure the material hardness using Rockwell hardness test and apply the
Hardness conversion table [b, k]
2. Measure the torque-twist relation and determine material constants
(Young’s modulus & shear modulus) using the torsional test [b, k]
3. Measure the radius of curvature of a bent beam using the beam bending test
[b, k]

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.24


B. Syllabi of Courses

4. Measure the critical loads of columns with various end conditions using
column buckling test [b, k]
5. Measure the material properties (Young’s modulus, yield stress, ultimate
stress, breaking stress) using the Tensile Test. [b, k]
6. Work in teams in conducting experiments effectively. [b]
7. Compile, analyze, interpret collected experiment data and prepare technical
reports. [b]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Stress and strain in axial loading, Hooke’s law, displacement, Poisson’s
ratio, shear stress and shear strain, generalized stress-strain relationship, strain energy (6 periods)
2. Torsion of bars of solid or hollow circular cross-sections, determination of
shear stresses and angle of twist of such members and torsion of thin-walled hollow members (3
periods)
3. Pure bending of beams, flexure formula, section modulus, shearing stress in
beams (3 periods)
4. Shear force and bending moment in beams, method of cross-sections,
method of differential relations between load, shear force, and bending moment (2 periods)
5. Analysis of plane stress and plane strain, principal stresses and strains,
maximum shear stress, Mohr’s circle (3 periods)
6. Deflection of beams, method of differential equation, boundary conditions
for various types of support, introduction to singularity functions and their applications in
deflection of beams, moment area method (4 periods)
7. Buckling of columns, Euler formula for long columns, various supports,
secant formula, short columns (3 periods)
8. Special topics: combined stresses, and either statically indeterminate
members or pressure vessels (3 periods)
9. Exams (3 periods)

Laboratory Experiments:
1. Tensile Testing
2. Hardness Testing
3. Torsion of Circular Bars
4. Torsion of Prismatic Bars
5. Bending of Beams
6. Buckling of Columns

Computer Usage: Matlab and Excel for lab projects

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, lab reports, two mid-term exams, and one
final exam.

Professional Component: Mechanical Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti and Thomas Katona

Revised: January 9, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.25


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 274 Basic Mechanics II

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Kinematics of particles in rectilinear and curvilinear motion. Kinetics of
particles, Newton's second law, energy, and momentum methods. Systems of
particles, kinematics and plane motion of rigid bodies, forces and
accelerations, energy and momentum methods. Kinetics, equations of
motions, energy and momentum methods for rigid bodies in three-dimensional
motion. Application to projectiles, gyroscopes, machine elements, and other
engineering systems.

Prerequisite: ME 270 Basic Mechanics I

Corequisite: MATH 262 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Textbook: F.P. Beer and E. R. Johnston, Jr., and E.R. Eisenberg, Vector Mechanics for
Engineers: Dynamics, Seventh Edition, McGraw Hill, 2004.

Coordinator: Jie Chen

Goals: To teach students the basic knowledge of kinematics and kinetics for a point
mass, system of discrete masses and a rigid body.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Solve problems of kinematics of a single particle in rectilinear motion [a1]
2. Solve problems of kinematics of a single particle in a curvilinear motion
[a1]
3. Solve problems involving kinetics of a single particle using Newton's
equations of motion [a1]
4. Use the equations of motion to develop the relationship between the work
of external forces and change of kinetic energy for a single particle [a1]
5. Use the method of momentum for solving certain problems involving
kinetics of a single particle [a4, e]
6. Follow the development of general equations of motion for kinetics of a
system of particles and their application for the particular case of rigid bodies [a4, e]
7. Solve problems involving kinematics of rigid bodies [a4, e]
8. Solve problems involving kinetics of a rigid body in plane motion [a4, e]
9. Use the energy method in plane motion for solving dynamic equations of
motion [a4]
10. Follow the development of equations of motion in kinetics of three
dimensional motion of a rigid body and some related introductory examples [a4, e]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Kinematics of a particle: rectilinear and curvilinear motion, rectangular,
path, and cylindrical coordinate systems (4 periods)
2. Kinetics of a single particle, use of various coordinate systems (2 periods)
3. Work and an energy, definition of potential energy for a conservative force
system (2 periods)
4. Linear impulse and momentum for a single particle, angular impulse and
momentum (2 periods)
5. Central force motion, direct and oblique impact (2 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.26


B. Syllabi of Courses

6. Kinetics of a system of particles, derivation of the fundamental equations (1


period)
7. Kinematics of rigid bodies, translation and rotation, relative and absolute
references, general motion (3 periods)
8. Mass moment of inertia review (2 periods)
9. Plane kinetics of rigid bodies, formulation of the necessary equations,
examples, and applications (3 periods)
10. Energy and momentum formulations for plane motion of rigid bodies (4
periods)
11. An introduction to kinetics of three-dimensional motion of rigid bodies and
applications (3 periods)
12. Exams (2 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Mechanical Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Jie Chen and Steve Laymon

Revised: February 9, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.27


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 310 Fluid Mechanics

Catalog Description: Credit 4. Class 3. Lab 2.


Continua, velocity fields, fluid statics, basic conservation laws for systems
and control volumes, dimensional analysis. Euler and Bernoulli equations,
viscous flows, boundary layers, flows in channels and around submerged
bodies, and one-dimensional gas dynamics.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 200 Thermodynamics I and 2) ME 274 Basic Mechanics II

Corequisite: None

Textbook: R. W. Fox and A. T. McDonald, Introduction to Fluid Mechanics, Fourth


Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 1992.

Coordinator: Andrew Hsu

Goals: To teach students the basic knowledge of fluid statics and fluid dynamics for
cases of non-viscous and viscous fluids and for cases of incompressible as
well as compressible flow.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
Lecture Outcomes
1. Describe the scope of fluid mechanics [a4]
2. Determine pressure and forces in fluid statics [a2]
3. Develop and apply control volume forms of basic equations [a4]
4. Use integral control volume formulations to solve mass conservation and
dynamic problems [e, a4]
5. Develop and apply differential forms of basic equations [a4]
6. Apply differential governing equations to simple flow problems [e, a4]
7. Derive the Bernoulli equation from the differential equations [a4]
8. Apply viscous incompressible flow equations to internal flows [a4]
9. Apply the viscous incompressible flows equations to external flow [a4]
10. Apply equations of one-dimensional compressible flows [a4]
11. Apply knowledge to measure static pressure, fluid forces, pipe flow head
losses in the laboratory and apply the Bernoulli equation and control volume concepts to analyze
data. [b]
12. Write laboratory reports to document experiments and analyses [b]

LaboratoryOutcomes
1. Measure static pressure in fluid flows [b]
2. Measure hydrostatic fluid forces and verify experimental results with theory
[b, a4]
3. Measure head losses in pipe flows and apply the Bernoulli equation and
control volume concepts to analyze data [b, a4]
4. Work in teams and write individual laboratory reports to document
experiments and analyses [b]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Fundamental concepts - continuum model, characteristics of fluids (2
periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.28


B. Syllabi of Courses

2. Fluid statics - hydrostatic pressure, forces on submerged surfaces (3


periods)
3. Flow fields and fundamental laws- systems and control volumes,
conservation of mass, momentum equation and the first law of thermodynamics (4 periods)
4. Differential analysis of fluid flow, incompressible inviscid flow (4 periods)
5. Dimensional analysis and similitude (2 periods)
6. Flow in conduits and pipes - fully developed flow in pipes, minor losses,
pipeline problems (7 periods)
7. Boundary layers and flow over objects (4 periods)
8. Introduction to compressible flow - speed of sound, stagnation properties (2
periods)
9. Steady state, one-dimensional compressible flow - basic equations for
isentropic flow, adiabatic flow with friction (2 periods)

Lab Experiments:
1. Hydro-static Force and Center Pressure
2. Jet Reaction
3. Friction Factor of the House
4. Pipe Flow from Open Tank
5. Wind Tunnel
6. Pressure Losses
7. The Fluid Circuit System
8. Falling Sphere Viscometer Experiment
9. Water Tunnel, Delta Wing Effects
10. Orifice and Jet Apparatus

Computer Usage: Matlab and Excel in lab projects

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, lab reports, two mid-term exams, and one
final exam.

Professional Component: Thermal-Fluid Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Andrew Hsu

Revised: February 11, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.29


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 314 Heat and Mass Transfer

Catalog Description: Credit 4. Class 3. Lab 2.


Fundamental principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and
radiation; mass transfer by diffusion and convection. Application to
engineering situations.

Prerequisite: ME 310 Fluid Mechanics

Corequisite: None

Textbook: F.P. Incropera and D.P. DeWitt, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer,
John Wiley & Sons, Fourth Edition, 1996.

Coordinator: Razi Nalim

Goals: To teach students a basic understanding of the laws of heat and mass transfer
and to provide the opportunity to apply these laws to simple engineering
situations.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
Lecture Outcomes
1. Explain the physical origins of heat and mass transfer, identify important
modes of heat transfer in a given situation, and make appropriate assumptions [a1, a4]
2. Calculate heat transfer rate and temperature distribution in steady-state one-
dimensional heat conduction problems [a4, e]
3. Sketch temperature profiles in one-dimensional heat transfer, showing the
qualitative influence of energy generation, non-planar geometry, or time dependence [a4]
4. Calculate the rate of steady heat transfer in fins, and unsteady heat transfer
in lumped-capacitance and semi-infinite solid problems [a4, e]
5. Calculate the rate of mass diffusion in one-dimensional problems, with or
without bulk motion effects [a4, e]
6. Explain the terms in the governing equations for convective heat and mass
transfer [a4]
7. Estimate convective transfer rates on the basis of geometric and dynamic
similarity, and analogy between different convective transport processes [a4, e]
8. Calculate heat and mass transfer rates in external and internal flows,
including flat plates, cylinders, pipes, heat exchangers, and free convection at vertical surfaces
[a4,e]
9. Explain how radiation can be described based on its wavelength, source,
and direction, and explain the basic concepts of blackbody radiation, reflectivity, emissivity, and
absorptivity for surface radiation [a1, a4]
10. Apply the laws of radiation to compute heat transfer rates for surfaces, such
as black bodies and diffuse gray surfaces, with appropriate approximations. [a4, e]
11. Calculate and use the view factor for simple surface combinations, and the
total emissivity for surfaces [a4, e]

Laboratory Outcomes
1. Measure steady heat conduction rate in simple and composite bars, across
fluid layers, and from fins [a4, b]
2. Measure time constant of transient heat transfer for small objects modeled
by lumped capacitance theory [a4, b]
3. Apply control volume analysis to two-dimensional heat conduction and heat
convection in simple objects, using a computer program [a4, b]

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.30


B. Syllabi of Courses

4. Measure steady heat transfer rates in free convection and boiling


phenomena, and in heat exchangers [a4, b]
5. Verify the Stefan-Boltzmann Law of heat radiation, and measure radiant
heat transfer between two plates [a4, b]
6. Work in teams to obtain and process data accurately, and report
experimental work individually [b, d]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Rate equations and conservation laws (1 period)
2. Diffusion of heat and mass (10 periods)
a. The diffusion equation
b. One dimensional steady state conduction
c. Two dimensional steady state conduction
d. Transient conduction
3. Convection (8 periods)
a. Boundary layers, analogies
b. External flow
c. Internal flow
d. Free convection
e. Mixed convection
4. Boiling and condensation (1 period)
5. Heat exchangers (LMTD, NTU methods) (1 period)
6. Radiation (9 periods)
a. Fundamental concepts
b. Radiation exchange between surfaces
7. Multi-mode heat and mass transfer (2 periods)
8. Tests (3 periods)

Lab Experiments:
1. Conduction Along a Simple Bar
2. Conduction Along a Composite Bar
3. Conduction in Fluids
4. Heat Transfer from Fins
5. Lumped Heat Capacitance
6. 2-D Heat Conduction
7. 2-D Heat Convection (numerical)
8. Free Convection
9. Boiling Heat Transfer
10. Heat Exchangers
11. Stefan-Boltzmann Law
12. Radiant Intercommunication

Computer Usage: Matlab and Excel for lab projects

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, lab reports, two mid-term exams, and one
final exam.

Professional Component: Thermal-Fluid Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Sivakumar Krishnan and Razi Nalim

Revised: February 11, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.31


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 330 Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Introduction to dynamic engineering systems; electrical, mechanical, fluid,
and thermal components; linear system response; Fourier series and Laplace
transform.

Prerequisites: 1) ECE 204 Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Systems and 2) MATH
262 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Corequisites: None

Textbook: K. Ogata, System Dynamics, Prentice Hall, Second Edition, 1992.

Coordinator: Dare Afolabi

Goals: This course is designed to teach students the basic concept for modeling the
behavior of dynamic systems. The development of a mathematical modeling
for an engineering system is treated. Basic solution techniques for solving
these problems and the interpretation of system behavior are discussed.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of a system, as well as the inputs and outputs of a
system [a4]
2. Identify the difference between single and multiple inputs and outputs, in
particular, the acronyms: SISO, MIMO, etc. [a4]
3. Formulate the governing differential equations for simple mechanical
systems governed by Newton’s laws of motion and Hooke’s law [e]
4. Formulate differential equations for simple electrical circuits using
Kirchhoff’s and Ohm’s laws [e]
5. Apply the concept of electro-mechanical analogies based on the force-
current analogy and on the force-voltage analogy [e]
6. Solve linear differential equations by using Laplace transform methods, and
partial fraction expansions [e]
7. Derive the State-Space equations for a dynamic system whose linear
ordinary differential equations are given [e]
8. Obtain the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of simple matrices with real
elements using MATLAB [k4]
9. Obtain the frequency response of first and second order systems using
MATLAB [k4]
10. Simulate linear and nonlinear dynamic systems using MATLAB, and
present the results in the time domain, or the frequency domain, or the phase space [k4]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Dynamic system elements (3 periods)
a. Mechanical
b. Electrical
c. Electromechanical
2. Fourier series, fourier transforms and Laplace transforms (4 periods)
3. Analysis of linear systems (4 periods)
a. First order
b. Second order

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.32


B. Syllabi of Courses

4. Transient response of linear systems (4 periods)


5. Sinusoidal steady state analysis (4 periods)
6. System functions, poles, zeros (5 periods)
7. Block diagrams (3 periods)
8. Introduction to state space approach (1 period)

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Systems, Measurements and Controls (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Dare Afolabi

Revised: February 12, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.33


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 340 Dynamic Systems and Measurements

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 2. Lab 2.


Modeling and formulation of differential equations for dynamic systems,
including mechanical vibratory systems, thermal systems, fluid systems,
electrical systems, and instrumentation systems. Analysis of dynamic systems
and measuring devices including transient response and frequency response
techniques, mechanical systems, transducers, and operational amplifiers.
Consideration of readout devices and their responses to constant, transient,
and steady-state sinusoidal phenomena. Calibration and data analysis
techniques are introduced. Both analog and digital computation are included.

Prerequisite: ME 330 Modeling and Analysis of Dynamical Systems

Corequisite: None

Textbook: A. J. Wheeler and A. R. Ganji, Introduction to Engineering Experimentation,


Prentice Hall, 1996.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach students the fundamentals of instrumentation, and the dynamics of


engineering systems. Selection and usage of instrumentation systems, and the
interpretation of experimental results are taught. Simulation and design of
dynamic systems are introduced.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
Lecture Outcomes
1. Apply basic knowledge of measurement systems towards measurements,
including error analysis, interpretation, experimental uncertainty, calibration etc. [a3, a4]
2. Apply basic concepts of measurement systems with electrical signals,
including signal conditioners (gain, attenuation), indicating and recording devices [a2, a4]
3. Conduct team-work experiments with dynamic systems effectively;
compile, analyze, interpret collected data and prepare technical reports [b, k]
4. Apply probability and statistics to interpret experimental data, which has
some variability and randomness [a3]
5. Apply measurement of vibration characteristics in lab experiments [b, k]
6. Apply theory of strain and stress measurement in lab experiments [b, k]
7. Apply measurement of frequency response, gain, damping in lab
experiments [b, k]
8. Apply design and simulation dynamic systems using MATLAB [a1, a2, k4]
9. Apply basic concepts in measurement of strain, stress, displacement,
velocity, acceleration, vibration, force, pressure, temperature and humidity to solution of given
problems [a4, e]
10. Solve engineering problems presented in class textbook, homework and lab;
orally communicate some results in class discussions [a4, g]
11. Analyze dynamic systems and measuring devices including transient
response, frequency response etc. [a4]

Laboratory Outcomes
1. Measure the bending strain and stress in a cantilever beam using resistance
strain gages [b, k]

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.34


B. Syllabi of Courses

2. Measure vibration characteristics (mode shapes & natural frequencies) of a


cantilever beam using vibration test equipment (including vibration exciter, signal generator,
power amplifier) [b, k]
3. Measure dynamic parameters (including inertia, damping and stiffness)
using Rectilinear vibration testing [b, k]
4. Measure of Harmonic frequency response mass-spring system subjected to
oscillating force input [b, k]
5. Use of LabVIEW data acquisition software for vibration analysis [b, k]
6. Work in teams in conducting experiments effectively [b]
7. Compile, analyze, interpret collected experiment data and prepare technical
reports [b]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Introduction (1 period)
2. Standards of measurement (2 periods)
3. Measurement of system response (2 periods)
4. Probability and statistics (4 periods)
5. Uncertainty analysis (2 periods)
6. Signal conditioning (2 periods)
7. Transducers, conditioners and display devices (4 periods)
8. Strain and stress measurement (2 periods)
9. Displacement and dimension (2 periods)
10. Temperature measurement (2 periods)
11. Fluid flow measurement (2 periods)
12. Measurement and motion (2 periods)
13. Acoustics and vibration measurements (2 periods)
14. Digital techniques and instrument interface (2 periods)
15. Simulation and Design of Dynamic Systems (6 periods)

Laboratory Experiments:
1. Introduction to Analog and Digital Computing
2. Solving Space Analysis Ordinary Differential Equations and State
3. Linear Variable Differential Transformer and Transducer
4. Frequency Response
5. Vibration and Spectrum Analysis
6. System Identification of 2nd Order Models
7. System Identification of State-Space Models

Computer Usage Matlab and LabView

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, lab reports, two mid-term exams, and one
final exam.

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti, Peter Orono and Jose Ramos

Professional Component: Systems, Measurements and Controls (Engineering Topics)

Revised: February 11, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.35


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 344 Introduction to Engineering Materials


(Formerly MSE 345)

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Introduction to the structure and properties of engineering materials, including
metals, alloys, ceramics, plastics, and composites. Characteristics and
processing affecting behavior of materials in service.

Prerequisite: Junior standing in engineering with general chemistry.

Corequisite: None

Textbook: R. A. Flinn and P. K. Trojan, Engineering Materials and Their Applications,


Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1990.

References:
1. Encyclopedia of Polymer Science and Engineering.
2. Encyclopedia of Biomedical Science and Engineering.
3. Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology.
4. M. Usmani, Asphalt Science and Technology, Marcel Dekker, 1997.
5. M. Usmani, Diagnostic Polymers, ACS/Oxford University Press, 1994 and
1998.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: Our principal objective is to provide theoretical and practical information on


major materials e.g., polymers, polymeric materials, composites, ceramics,
glasses, metals and alloys, and semiconductors for students to become
problem solvers.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Select materials for consumer goods, industrial products, aerospace
transportation, construction and prosthetic medical devices [a4]
2. Assist in research in the above-referenced applications [a4]
3. Prevent and mitigate material degradation due to corrosion or elements of
nature under service conditions [a4]
4. Assist in predicting lifetime of material [a4]
5. Determine compatibility with other materials including biologics, e.g.,
blood, tissue [a4]
6. Read and comprehend diversified material journals in polymers, polymeric
materials, composites, glasses, ceramics, metals, alloys, and biomaterials. After several years of
experience, the student should be able to provide sound technical approaches and conduct
independent research or contribute in process and production engineering [a4, i]
7. Write design criteria and specifications [c1]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Polymers and Polymeric Materials; Medical Polymers.
2. Composites.
3. Advance Composites.
4. Glasses.
5. Advance Ceramics.
6. Electrochemistry mid Corrosion Engineering.

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.36


B. Syllabi of Courses

7. Electronic Materials; Semiconductors; Superconductors; Molecular and


DNA Chips.
8. Failure Analysis; Mechanical Testing; and Material Characterization.
9. Material Properties.
10. Material Selection.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Mechanical Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti and Naim Akmal

Revised: February 10, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.37


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 372 Mechanical Design II

Catalog Description: Credit 4. Class 3. Lab. 2


Kinematic and dynamic analysis of linkages and mechanical systems.
Analytical and graphical approaches to analysis. Vector loop and relative
velocity/acceleration solutions. Design and analysis of cams and gears. Static
and dynamic balancing. Design for strength of various machine components.
Reliability principles. Design documentation and communication.
Laboratory experiments on mechanical design and strength.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 262 Mechanical Design I, 2) ME 272 Mechanics of Materials, and 3)


ME 274 Basic Mechanics II

Corequisite: None

Textbook: C. E. Wilson and J. P. Sadler, Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery, Second


Edition, Harper Collins College Publishers 1993.

Coordinator: Hazim El-Mounayri

Goals:
1. To teach students velocity and acceleration analysis as an integral part in the process of design
2. To teach students static and dynamic force analysis as an integral part in the process of design
3. To teach students balancing of machines
4. To teach students the design of mechanical components such as cams, gears, springs, screws, and
clutches, which meet given design criteria, including strength requirements
5. To teach students the design of mechanical systems such as cam-followers and gear train, which
meet key performance requirements, including motion and dynamic performance
6. To teach students state-of-the-art CAD/CAE technology (e.g., Pro/MECHANICA and I-DEAS)
and show them how such powerful computer tools which can aid the problem-solving and design
process
7. To provide the students with hands-on experience in the design and analysis of mechanical
systems through lab experiments
8. To help the students develop effective/professional written and oral communication skills through
report writing and oral presentation

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
Lecture Outcomes
1. Identify the mechanical system that satisfies the given engineering requirements [e]
2. Describe the necessary assumptions in designing mechanical systems [a4, j]
3. Apply proper engineering principles and theories to solve open-ended design problems [a4]
4. Perform kinematic and dynamic analyses using both graphical and analytical techniques [a4]
5. Perform mechanism analysis and simulation using computer tools [k1]
6. Evaluate the performance of mechanical systems [b, k1, c1]
7. Design linkages, cams, gears and other machine elements for both motion and strength
requirements [c1, k1, k2]
8. Communicate design work through written report and oral presentation [g]
9. Conduct Library/Internet search of patents and literature [j, k3]
10. Explain the potential of designed mechanical systems on environment and society, including
safety [h]

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.38


B. Syllabi of Courses

Laboratory Outcomes
1. Operate and explain the function of typical mechanical systems, such as cam-follower
systems and planetary gear trains [a4, b].
2. Measure and explain the effect of design parameters on system dynamics and performance,
including the effect of cam profile on the dynamics of a cam-follower system and the effect of
unbalance on the performance of a rotor [a4, k4].
3. Calculate and experimentally measure the speed reduction and the efficiency of planetary gear
systems, and to observe the effect of design configuration on the efficiency [a4, b].
4. Explain failure due to fatigue and measure the effect of design parameters (i.e. material strength)
and operating conditions (i.e. magnitude of cyclic load) on the lifetime of machine elements [a4,
b].
5. Explain the creep phenomenon and predict failure due to creep by generating the extension-time
curve and extracting creep constants from experimental data [a4, b].
6. Explain failure due to resonance (or excessive vibration) through the observation of the
phenomenon of whirling and the measurement/extraction of modal parameters at resonance [a4,
b].
7. Work in teams to conduct experiments effectively and efficiently [b].
8. Collect, process, and analyze data, and write lab reports to document experimental work [g, b].

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Kinematic analysis: velocity and acceleration (7 periods)
2. Static force analysis (2 periods)
3. Dynamic force analysis and balancing (2 periods)
4. Balancing (2 periods)
5. Design and Analysis of Cams (4 periods)
6. Design and Analysis of Gears (3 periods)
7. Planetary gear trains (2 periods)
8. Design for strength (2 periods)

Lab Experiments:
1. CAM
2. Planetary Gear Train
3. Cylindrical Gears
4. Dynamic Balancing
5. Creep
6. Fatigue
7. Whirling

Design Tools: CAE tool for modeling, design and analysis (e.g., I-Deas, Pro/Engineer)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, lab reports, two mid-term exams, and one
final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Design

Prepared by: Hazim El-Mounayri

Revised: February 10, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.39


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 401 Engineering Ethics and Professionalism

Catalog Description: Credit 1. Class 1.


Some ethical, social, political, legal, and ecological issues that a practicing
engineer may encounter. EE 401 and ME 401 are cross-listed courses;
students may not receive credit for both EE 401 and ME 401.

Prerequisite: Senior Standing

Corequisite: None

Textbook: M.W. Martin and R. Schinzinger, Ethics in Engineering, Third Edition,


McGraw-Hill, 1996.

Coordinator: Charlie Yokomoto

Goals: This course is designed to make engineering students more aware of ethical
issues that may arise in their professional careers and to provide tools for
assessing and resolving ethical dilemmas in engineering.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Recognize moral problems and issues in engineering, distinguishing them
from and relating them to problems in law, economics, and physical systems [f, j]
2. Critically assess alternative courses of action and arguments on opposing
sides of moral issues [f]
3. Apply canons and articles from the ABET Code of Ethics to specific
situations involving ethical issues in engineering [f]
4. Identify relevant moral factors and reasons pertaining to moral dilemmas in
engineering, drawing from utilitarian, duty, rights, and virtue theories [f]
5. Identify conflict of interest situations and apply guidelines from accepted
practice in industry, codes of ethics, and case studies to determine acceptable limits [h, f]
6. Assess obligations to employers to keep proprietary information
confidential, distinguishing between proprietary information that is subject to legal protection and
that which is subject to ethical judgment [f]
7. Assess situations involving intellectual property subject to copyright
protection to determine whether such property may be legally and ethically copied [f]
8. Determine ethical obligations of companies with plants in developing
nations with regard to safety, environmental protection, and infrastructure [f, h]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Meaning of ethics and engineering ethics (1 class)
2. Ethical theories as tools in assessing ethical dilemmas (1 class)
3. Codes of ethics of engineering societies as guides in resolving ethical
dilemmas (2 classes)
4. Conflict of interest (2 classes)
5. Intellectual property, patents, trade secrets, confidentiality (2 classes)
6. Whistle blowing (2 classes)
7. Employee Rights (1 class)
8. Global issues (ethical issues for multinational Corporations, environmental
ethics, ethics of weapons development, etc.) (2 classes)
9. Discussion of cases from NSPE Opinions of the Board of Ethical Review
and other case studies (2 classes)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.40


B. Syllabi of Courses

10. Exam (1 class)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Communications and Ethics (General Education)

Prepared by: Charlie Yokomoto

Revised: March 12, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.41


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 414 Thermal-Fluid Systems Design (3 cr.)

Catalog Description: This course provides an opportunity to apply basic heat transfer and fluid flow
concepts to the design of thermal-fluid systems. Emphasis is on thermal
design calculations and methodology. Design experience in thermal-fluid area
such as piping systems, heat exchangers, HVAC, and energy systems. Design
projects are selected from industrial applications and conducted by teams.

Prerequisites: ME 262, ME 310

Corequisite: ME 314

Textbook: Sadik Kakac, Hongtan Liu, Selection, Rating and Thermal Design of Heat
Exchangers 2nd Edition, CRC Press, 2002.

Goals: This course aims at providing the students with design experience in the
thermal-fluid area through real life design problems. Various aspects of
thermal-fluid design, including the design methodology for various
components, teamwork and industrial applications are emphasized.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Develop a sound understanding of thermal-fluid systems engineering design
2. Formulate, analyze and design thermal-fluid systems
3. Apply computer aided engineering principles to thermal design
4. Apply optimization principles in design
5. Design various piping fluid systems
6. Design various heat transfer thermal systems

Topics:
I. Introduction (4 lectures)
1. Computer Aided Engineering
2. Introduction to Minitab
3. One Dimensional System Flow Analysis
a. General applications
b. AFT Fathom Software

II. Piping System Design (8 Lectures)


1. Fluid Mechanics Review
2. Pipe and Tubing Standards
3. Hydraulic Resistance – Wall Friction
4. Hydraulic Resistance – Minor Losses
5. System Behavior & Flow Networks
6. Pump Types & Applications

III. Heat Exchanger Design (12 Lectures)


1. Heat Transfer Review
2. Extended Surface Heat Transfer
a. Longitudinal Fins
b. Spines
c. Fin Performance
3. Heat Exchanger Types
4. Basic Design Method of Heat Exchangers
a. Effectiveness – NTU Analysis
b. Log Mean Temperature Method

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.42


B. Syllabi of Courses

5. Forced Convection Correlations for Heat Exchangers


6. Heat Exchanger Pressure Drop and Pumping Power
7. Fouling of Heat Exchangers
8. Double Pipe Heat Exchangers
9. Shell & Tube Heat Exchangers
10. Compact Heat Exchangers
11. Plate & Shell Heat Exchangers

IV. Design Project Review Sessions (7 Lectures)


1. System Flow Analysis
2. Heat Exchanger Design
3. Full Factorial Design of Experiments (DOE)
4. Multiple Response Optimization Using Minitab

Note: There may be additional team meetings with the instructor depending on the progress of design
projects.

Computer Usage: Matlab, AFT Fathom, and MiniTab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, one final presentation,
and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Design (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Hasan Akay and John Toksoy

Date: January 22, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.43


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 462 Capstone Design (4 cr., class 3, recitation 2)

Catalog Description: Credit 4. Class 3. Recitation 2.


Concurrent engineering design concept is introduced. Application of the
design is emphasized. Design problems from all areas of mechanical
engineering are considered.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 344 Introduction to Engineering Materials, and 2) ME 372 Mechanical


Design II

Corequisites: 1) ME 414 Thermal-Fluid Systems Design and 2) ME 482 Control Systems


Analysis and Design

Textbook: David G. Ullman, The Mechanical Design Process, Second Edition, McGraw-
Hill, 1997.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach the process of design, go generate better quality designs in less time,
the organization within a company, how to be more creative in solving design
problems, and how to design as part of a group activity.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of the course, the students should be able to:
1. Describe the design process [g]
2. Identify design tasks and their objectives [e]
3. Establish a project schedule [c1, g, d]
4. Develop design specifications by completion of a house of quality [c1, f]
5. Generate design ideas based on functional decomposition [c1]
6. Evaluate the ideas based on customer requirement [e, k3]
7. Creatively generate product designs [a, c1]
8. Validate the final design [b]
9. Give technical presentations in the forms of weekly progress report,
proposal, final report, and oral presentation [g]
10. Document the design activities and outcomes (product development file,
drawings, period minutes, and personal design notebook) [g, i]
11. Work as team player by demonstrating his/her participation record in the
personal design notebook [d]
12. Work effectively in a multidisciplinary project team [d]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Introduction to the design process (1 period)
2. Design process and its planning (1 period)
3. Project specification development (1 period)
4. Concept generation (1 period)
5. Concept evaluation (1 period)
6. Product generation (1 period)
7. Product evaluation (1 period)
8. Robust design (1 period)
9. Finalizing product design (1 period)
10. Proposal and presentation preparation (1 period)
11. Oral presentation (1 period)
12. Final report and presentation preparation (1 period)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.44


B. Syllabi of Courses

13. Oral presentation (1 period)

Computer Usage: Matlab, Pro/Engineer, Pro/Mechanica, ANSYS, etc.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final repot
and presentation.

Professional Component: Engineering Design (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti and Jie Chen

Revised: January 22, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.45


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ME 482 Control System Analysis and Design

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Classical feedback concepts, root locus, Bode and Nyquist techniques, state-
space formulation, stability, design applications. Students may not receive
credit for both EE 382 and ME 482.

Prerequisite: ME 340 or ECE 301

Corequisite: None

Textbook: J. Van de Vegte, Feedback Control Systems, Third Ed., Prentice Hall, 1994.

Coordinator: Dare Afolabi

Goals: To teach students more advanced concepts of linear system theory than in the
two preceding courses. System modeling, identification, feedback, control
and stability will be emphasized. This course is the third course in a sequence
of courses on linear dynamic systems ME 330, ME 340, and ME 482).

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of feedback control [a2, a4]
2. Explain the concepts of stability and accuracy for control [a2]
3. Relate the zeros and poles of a system to its time response [a2]
4. Plot root-locus and Bode plots manually and by using Matlab [a2, k4]
5. Design lead, lag and lead-lag compensators for a given system to meet the
given design specifications [c1, a2]
6. Design a control system by using both Bode plots and by root-locus using
Matlab and prepare a written report [c1, g]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Introduction to linear systems (1 period)
2. Modeling, transfer functions and block diagrams (2 periods)
3. Time domain specifications (2 periods)
4. Feedback system properties (2 periods)
5. Stability concepts (3 periods)
6. State space formulation (2 periods)
7. Digital control and optimal control (2 periods)
8. Routh and Hurwitz stability criteria (2 periods)
9. Root locus (2 periods)
10. Bode plots and Nyquist criteria (2 periods)
11. Design applications (8 periods)

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final project
and one final exam.
Professional Component: Systems, Measurements, and Controls (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Dare Afolabi

Revised: January 22, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.46


B. Syllabi of Courses

B.2 Syllabi of Required Non-Engineering Courses

Syllabi of all required non-engineering courses are given in this section. These courses are:

1. CHEM C105 Chemical Science I


2. COMM R110 Fundamentals of Speech and Communication
3. ENG W131 Elementary Composition
4. ECON E201 Introduction to Microeconomics
5. MATH 163 Integrated Calculus and Analytical Geometry I
6. MATH 164 Integrated Calculus and Analytical Geometry I
7. MATH 261 Multivariate Calculus
8. MATH 262 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
9. PHYS 152 Mechanics
10. PHYS 251 Heat, Electricity, and Optics
11. TCM 360 Communication in Engineering Practice
12. Statistics and Probability Elective (one is chosen):
a. STAT 350
b. STAT 511
c. ECE 302

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.47


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: CHEM C105 Principles of Chemistry I

Catalog Description Credit 3. Class 2.5. Recitation: 2.


Inorganic chemistry emphasizing physical and chemical properties, atomic
and molecular structure, states of matter.

Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra, one year of high school chemistry. Students
must take a Placement Exam before enrolling and recommendations are made.

Textbooks: Martin Silberberg, Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change,
(Third Edition) McGraw-Hill (2003).
Student’s Study Guide/Solutions for use with Silberberg, McGraw–Hill, 2003.
Provided in package with text.
ChemSkill Builder® On-line Homework, McGraw-Hill. Provided in package
with text.
Malik, et al., Workshop Chemistry Program: Principles of Chemistry I, 2003-
4 Edition, IUPUI, Tichenor.

Coordinator: D. Malik, Chancellor’s Professor of Chemistry

Goals: To provide a substantive principles-based course with a strong quantitative


problem-solving component. This course in the Principles of Chemistry is
appropriate to the first semester of a standard two semester sequence for
chemistry and other science majors. A standardized exam assesses this
outcome at the conclusion of the one-year sequence (authored by the
Examinations Institute of the American Chemical Society).

Course Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to solve a majority subset of the
following topics:
1. Understand nomenclature for an array of compounds including ionic, covalent, and coordination
species
2. Solve stoichiometric relationships of chemical reactions as gases, liquids, and solids
3. Determine thermodynamic values and heats of chemical reactions and heat transfer
4. Elucidate the structure of atoms, molecules and nuclear species
5. Specify electronic structures of a variety of atoms, ions, and molecules
6. Describe the bonding of a variety of molecular environments
7. Predict geometries and some magnetic properties of a variety of compounds and species
8. Describe the chemical nature of major atmospheric pollutants

Topics:
1. Atoms, molecules, ions
2. Stoichiometry
3. Aqueous solutions and solution stoichiometry
4. Thermochemistry
5. Nuclear chemistry
6. Integrated problem solving
7. Electronic Structure of atoms
8. Basic concepts of chemical bonding
9. Periodic properties of the elements
10. Basic concepts of chemical bonding
11. Molecular geometry and bonding theories
12. Coordination compounds and bonding

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.48


B. Syllabi of Courses

13. Gases

Course Delivery: This course is a combination of Lecture (2.5 hours per week) and a Peer-led
Team Learning Section (1 hour 50 minutes per week). The lecture is
traditional. The PLTL section (sometimes called Workshop) is a small group
recitation of 6-9 students led by a recent successful course completor.
Specific problems are solved in an active group learning format with
mandatory participation by students. Peer leaders are trained weekly for this
section. Introduction of PLTL has led to an average increase in student
success performance by about 40%.
Computer Usage: All of the examinations except the final are interactive examinations using
computers in the Computer Cluster located in a departmental department.
There is an on-line homework system that provides lessons to students on
major topics of course (these can be completed on any computer with internet
access).
Evaluation Methods: On-line homework, lecture quizzes, interactive computer examinations (4),
participation levels in Workshop Chemistry component (PLTL), and written
final examination.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared By: David Malik

Revised: October 20, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.49


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: COMM R110 Fundamentals of Speech Communication

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Theory and practice of public speaking; training in thought process necessary
to organize speech content for informative and persuasive situations;
application of language and delivery skills to specific audiences. A minimum
of 5 speaking situations.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

Textbooks: S.E Lucas, The Art of Public Speaking, 7th ed. Boston, MA, McGraw-Hill
Publishing, 2001.

J. Cochrane and A. Thedwall, The Coursebook to Accompany The Art of


Public Speaking. 5th ed. Boston, MA, McGraw-Hill Custom Publishing.

Coordinator: J. Cochrane, Course Director; Kate Thedwall, Assistant Course Director

Goals: To provide the opportunity for students to practice the art of public speaking
in both informative and persuasive situations and to assist them in developing
critical thinking skill as they listen to the speaking of others. Our goal is to do
these things in the context of the university's Principles of Undergraduate
Learning.

Course Outcomes: Refer to Page 3 of the Student Coursebook to Accompany the Art of Public
Speaking, 5th ed.

Computer Usage: There is use of PowerPoint during speeches and Oncourse usage (posting
homework and online testing.)

Professional Component: Communications and Ethics (General Education)

Prepared by: Jennifer Cochrane

Revised: April 22, 2002

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.50


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: ENG W131 Elementary Composition I

Catalog Description Credit 3. Class 3.


Fulfills the communications core requirement for all undergraduate students
and provides instruction in exposition (the communication of ideas and
information with clarity and brevity). The course emphasizes audience and
purpose, revision, organization, development, advanced sentence structure,
diction, development within a collaborative classroom. Evaluation is based
upon a portfolio of the student’s work.

Prerequisite: Students must place into W131 through the IUPUI Placement Exam or by
passing W130, Principles of Composition.

Textbooks: J. D Ramage, J.C. Bean, and J. Johnson. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to
Writing, 3rd edition. New York: Longman, 2003. ISBN 0-321-10622-9.

Coordinator: Dr. Scott Weeden, Lecturer in English

Goals: To facilitate the practice and learning of written communication for the
academy.

Course Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Think like a writer;
2. Form and support a thesis;
3. Integrate and synthesize other’s ideas with their own and cite information correctly;
4. Develop planning, drafting, and revising processes;
5. Work productively in groups;
6. Edit and revise effectively.

Topics:
1. Writing Process including heuristics, gathering, drafting, collaborating, revising, editing.
2. Role of purpose and audience.
3. Specific and appropriate detail.
4. Thesis development and support.
5. Critical reading and thinking.
6. Analysis of one’s own work and the work of others.
7. Summary.
8. Response to writing – both personal and academic.
9. Organization and logical presentation of material.
10. Synthesis and integration.
11. Collaboration and consensus.
12. Revision strategies.
13. MLA documentation.
14. Stylistic strategies.
15. Editing strategies.
16. Meta-writing.
17. Portfolio assembly.

Computer Usage: Most sections use Oncourse for communication. Some sections meet in a
computer classroom. All sections require formal work be typed.

Evaluation Methods: Midterm and final portfolios.


30% of final grade from midterm portfolio.
10% of final grade from participation.

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.51


B. Syllabi of Courses

60% of final grade from the final portfolio.


No exams are given.

Professional Component: Communications and Ethics (General Education)

Prepared by: Mary Sauer

Revised: October 17, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.52


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course ECON E201-Introduction to Microeconomics

Catalog Description Credit 3. Class 3.


E201 is a general introduction to microeconomic analysis. Discussed are the
methods of economics, scarcity of resources, the interaction of consumers and
businesses in the marketplace in order to determine price, and how the market
system places a value on factors of production.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Corequisite: None

Textbook: M. Parkin, Microeconomics, Addison-Wesley, sixth edition.

Coordinator: Subir K. Chakrabarti, Professor of Economics

Goals: To teach sophomore students in business and economics the basic principles
of microeconomic analysis like supply and demand, pricing behavior and the
principles of gains from trade.

Outcomes:
Upon successful completion students should be able to:
1. Understand supply and demand diagrams and find the equilibrium price and output.
2. Compute the elasticity of demand and supply.
3. Understand the principles of consumer behavior.
4. Understand the relationship between output and costs.
5. Distinguish between the concepts of technical and economic efficiency.
6. Understand how price and output is determined in the four different market structures.
7. Discuss when there is a case for regulating a market.
8. Understand the concept of externalities and of market failure in the presence of externalities.
9. Fully understand the principle of comparative advantage and its role in free trade.
10. Discuss the losses that result from tariffs and quotas.

Topics:
1. Production Possibilities
2. Opportunity Costs
3. Supply and Demand
4. Price Floors and Price Ceilings
5. Elasticity
6. Consumer Behavior
7. Cost curves
8. Short run Competitive supply
9. Long-run Competitive equilibrium
10. Monopoly and Perfect competition
11. Regulation
12. Externality
13. Comparative advantage
14. Tariffs and Quotas.

Evaluation Methods: Four homework assignments, four quizzes, three in class tests and a final.

Professional Component: General Education

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.53


B. Syllabi of Courses

Prepared by: Subir K. Chakrabarti

Revised: November 6, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.54


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: MATH 163 Integrated Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

Catalog Description: Credit 5. Class 5.


Review of plane analytic geometry and trigonometry, functions, limits,
differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, the Fundamental
Theorem of Calculus, and applications of integration.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 151 (or the equivalent) within the past two academic
years with a minimal grade of C, or direct placement via the COMPASS
Mathematics Placement Test taken within the past academic year. College
algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.

Textbook: E. Swokowski, Calculus, Classic Edition, Brooks/Cole Publishing Company,


1991, ISBN 0-534-92492-1.

Coordinator: Owen Burkinshaw, Professor of Mathematical Sciences

Goals: This course is the first of a 3-course calculus sequence for students majoring
in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering. Its focus is on single variable
Calculus. Students should be exposed to some theory, but they must also
certainly be taught how to perform routine calculations and solve applied
problems such as those in the text.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Understand the concept of (one- and two-sided) limit
2. Be able to compute limits for rational and trigonometric functions
3. Understand the concept of continuity
4. Be able to determine where rational and trigonometric functions are continuous
5. Understand the concept of derivative
6. Be able to compute derivatives for rational, algebraic, trigonometric, and composite functions
7. Be able to solve a variety of problems using the derivative (these problem including linear
approximation of functions, related rate problems, optimization of functions, and the graphing of
functions)
8. Understand the concept of integral
9. Be able to compute integrals of polynomial and simple trigonometric functions using the
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
10. Be able to find areas and volumes of various simple solids (such as solids of revolution) using
integration.

Topics:
The following outline is based on 3 periods per week for a 15 week semester (1 period = 85 class
minutes). The number of periods per chapter is only a guide --- the actual number may vary from
section to section. Since many other courses have this course as a co- or prerequisite, all material
described below are covered.
1. A Preview of Calculus (1 period)
2. Functions (3 periods)
3. Limits and Rates of Change (6 periods)
4. Derivatives (10 periods
5. Applications of Differentiation (9 periods)
6. Integration (5 periods)
7. Applications of Integration (5 periods)
8. Slack time, review and exams (6 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.55


B. Syllabi of Courses

Computer Usage: Students will use computers to perform laboratory projects in Maple or
MATLAB (see below).

Laboratory Projects: A set of computer projects (available in hardcopy and on the Internet) will
also be covered. These projects are aimed at illustrating how technology can
be used to do certain exercises and problems, at covering material more
appropriate for a laboratory than a lecture, at covering material of less relative
significance outside class, and at preparing students for things that will be
expected of them in future courses (not just in mathematics and statistics, but
also in science and engineering). Since these projects are a prerequisite for
MATH 164 and MATH 261, they must be covered.

Evaluation Methods: Homework, quizzes, computer projects, 3 semester tests, and a final exam.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Owen Burkinshaw

Revised: November 12, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.56


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: MATH 164 Integrated Calculus and Analytic Geometry II

Catalog Description Credit 5. Class 5.


Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms and
improper integrals, conics, polar coordinates, sequences, infinite series and
power series.

Prerequisites Completion of MATH 163 within the past two academic years with a minimal
grade of C-, or direct placement via the COMPASS Mathematics Placement
Test taken within the past academic year.

Prerequisite by Topics: An understanding of the theory, and an ability to apply, the concepts of limit,
continuity, derivative, and integral. Limit, continuity, and derivative
computations are for rational, algebraic, and trigonometric functions; integral
computations are for polynomial and simple trigonometric functions.

Textbook: E. Swokowski, Calculus, Classic Edition, Brooks/Cole, Publishing Company,


1991, ISBN 0-534-92492-1.

Coordinator: Owen Burkinshaw, Professor of Mathematical Sciences

Goals: This course is the second of a 3-course calculus sequence for students
majoring in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering. Its focus is on the
Calculus of the transcendental functions. Students should be exposed to some
theory, but they must also certainly be taught how to perform routine
calculations and solve applied problems such as those in the text.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Define algebraic and differential properties of the logarithmic and exponential functions (both
natural and general), and the inverse trigonometric functions.
2. Integrate using u-substitution, parts, trigonometric substitution and partial fractions, as well as
approximate an integral using Riemann sums, the Trapezoidal Rule or Simpson’s Rule.
3. Compute arc length and the moments of a planar lamina, to solve problems involving
exponential growth and decay and to solve first-order differential equations using separation of
variables and Euler’s method.
4. Be familiar with parametric equations, polar coordinates and the conic sections.
5. Approximate a function of one variable using Maclaurin or Taylor series and compute its
interval of convergence.

Topics:
The following outline is based on 3 periods per week for a 15 week semester (1 period = 85 class
minutes). The number of periods per chapter is only a guide --- the actual number may vary from
section to section. Since many other courses have this course as a co- or prerequisite, all material
described below will be covered.

1. Logarithmic Functions (5 periods)


2. Inverse functions (3 periods)
3. Techniques of Integration (7 periods)
4. Improper Integrals (4 periods)
5. Infinite Sequences and Series (11 periods)
6. Analytic Geometry (4 periods)
7. Polar Coordinates (4 periods)
8. Slack time, review and exams (7 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.57


B. Syllabi of Courses

Computer Usage: Students will use computers to perform laboratory projects in Maple or
MATLAB (see below).

Laboratory Projects: A set of computer projects (available in hardcopy and on the Internet) will
also be covered. These projects are aimed at illustrating how technology can
be used to do certain exercises and problems, at covering material more
appropriate for a laboratory than a lecture, at covering material of less relative
significance outside class, and at preparing students for things that will be
expected of them in future courses (not just in mathematics and statistics, but
also in science and engineering). Since these projects are a prerequisite for
MATH 261, they must be covered.

Evaluation Methods: Homework, quizzes, computer projects, 3 semester tests , and a final exam.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Owen Burkinshaw

Revised: November 12, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.58


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: MATH 261 Multivariate Calculus

Catalog Description: Credit 4. Class 4.


Spatial analytic geometry, vectors, curvilinear motion, curvature, partial
differentiation, multiple integration, line integrals, Green's theorem.

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 164 within the past two academic years with a minimal
grade of C-, or direct placement via the COMPASS Mathematics Placement
Test taken within the past academic year.

Prerequisite by Topics: An understanding of the theory, and an ability to apply, the concepts of limit,
continuity, derivative, and integral for rational, algebraic, trigonometric,
logarithmic and exponential functions of one variable.

Textbook: E. Swokowski. Calculus, Classic Edition, Brooks/Cole Publishing Company,


1991, ISBN 0-534-92492-1.

Coordinator: Owen Burkinshaw, Professor of Mathematical Sciences

Goals: This course is the third of a 3-course calculus sequence for students majoring
in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering. Its focus is on the Calculus of
several variables. Students should be exposed to some theory, but they must
also certainly be taught how to perform routine calculations and solve applied
problems such as those in the text.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Understand vectors, the geometry of three-space, cylindrical and spherical coordinates.
2. Understand curves in space and able to compute their arc length, velocity and acceleration
vectors and curvature
3. Understand the concept of partial derivative and able to apply it to problems of optimization
(including problems involving Lagrange Multipliers)
4. Understand the concepts of double and triple integrals and be able to apply them to
computation of areas, volumes, masses and moments in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical
coordinates
5. Apply the concept of change of variables for multiple integrals to some elementary
problems
6. Understand the basics of vector calculus, including vector fields, line integrals, the
Fundamental Theorem for Line Integrals, Green’s Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes’ Theorem
and the Divergence Theorem.

Topics:
The following outline is based on 3 periods per week for a 15 week semester (1 period = 85 class
minutes). The number of periods per chapter is only a guide --- the actual number may vary from
section to section. Since many other courses have this course as a co- or prerequisite, all material
described below will be covered.

1. Vectors and the Geometry of Space (7 periods)


2. Vector Functions (4 periods)
3. Partial derivatives (8 periods)
4. Multiple Integrals (9 periods)
5. Vector Calculus (9 periods)
6. Slack time, review and exams (8 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.59


B. Syllabi of Courses

Computer Usage: Students will use computers to perform laboratory projects in Maple or
MATLAB (see below).

Laboratory Projects: A set of computer projects (available in hardcopy and on the Internet) will
also be covered. These projects are aimed at illustrating how technology can
be used to do certain exercises and problems, at covering material more
appropriate for a laboratory than a lecture, at covering material of less relative
significance outside class, and at preparing students for things that will be
expected of them in future courses (not just in mathematics and statistics, but
also in science and engineering). Since these projects are a prerequisite for
subsequent courses, they must be covered.

Evaluation Methods: Homework, quizzes, computer projects, 3 semester tests, and a final exam.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Owen Burkinshaw

Revised: November 12, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.60


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: MATH 262: Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Catalog Description Credit 4. Class 4.


First-order equations, higher-order linear equations, initial and boundary value
problems, power series solutions, systems of first-order equations, Laplace
transforms, applications. Requisite topics of linear algebra: vector spaces,
linear independence, matrices, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.

Prerequisites: Completion of MATH 164 within the past two academic years with a minimal
grade of C-. Corequisite: MATH 261. Prerequisites by topic: Transcendental
functions, methods of differentiation and integration, partial differentiation
and integration, implicit functions, power series, improper integrals.

Textbook: D.G. Zill, First Course in Differential Equations, Classic 5th Ed., 2001,
Brooks/Cole, ISBN 0-534-37388-7

Coordinator: Michael Frankel, Professor of Mathematical Sciences

Goals: In this course, the student will acquire knowledge of specific mathematical
techniques in Differential Equations, and develop basic modeling and
problem-solving skills. The student will also be exposed to some abstract
reasoning in a mathematical context.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Identify and solve Initial Value Problems for the First Order DE including Separable, Linear,
Exact, Homogeneous and Bernoulli type equations
2. Set up and solve some application problems leading to First-Order Differential Equations
3. Solve a Higher-Order Linear Homogeneous and Non-Homogeneous equations with
Constant Coefficients and of Cauchy-Euler type using Reduction of Order, Undetermined
coefficient and Variation of Parameters. Solve some nonlinear second-order equations of special
type using appropriate substitutions
4. Ser up and solve some basic application problems leading to Second-Order DE (mostly harmonic
oscillators in mechanical or electrical circuit context with or without forcing free or damped.
Solve some basic Sturm-Liuville problems
5. Find a power series solutions of Second-Order Differential Equations about ordinary points.
6. Find Laplace transform and inverse Laplace transform of various functions using operational
properties, solve Initial Value Problems using Laplace transform
7. Learn basic operations on matrices, determinants, inverses, Gauss-Jordan elimination,
differentiation and integration, solve eigenvalue problems.
8. Solve systems of Ordinary Differential Equations. Solve non-homogeneous systems using
fundamental matrices and variation of parameters.

Topics:
The following outline is based on 3 periods per week for a 15 week semester (1 period = 85 class
minutes). The number of periods per chapter is only a guide --- a rather large amount of slack/review
time allows a greater degree of flexibility for the instructor to extend the lectures or discussions on the
topics that the students may find particularly difficult, or to briefly review a concept or a method from
Calculus.
1. Introduction to Differential Equations (2 periods)
2. First-Order Differential Equations (2.5 periods)
3. Modeling with First-Order Des (1.5 periods)
4. Differential equations of Higher Order (3.5 periods)
5. Modeling with Higher Order Des (1.5 periods)
6. Series Solutions of Linear Equations (1.5 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.61


B. Syllabi of Courses

7. Laplace transform (3 periods)


8. Introduction to Matrices (.5 periods)
9. Systems of Linear First-Order Des (3 periods)
10. Numerical Methods for Ordinary Differential Equations (3 periods)
11. Slack time, reviews and exams (7 periods)

Computer Usage: Maple and MATLAB packages and supervision are available for the students
at the Department of Mathematical Sciences computer lab. The instructor
may use a computer in the class to illustrate some modeling applications and
numerical methods. (see below).

Laboratory Projects: No specific projects are assigned. However, the students are encouraged to
use the Maple or MATLAB ODE Solvers and other packages available at the
Department of Mathematical Sciences computer lab. This is mostly aimed at
illustrating how technology can be used to obtain numerical solutions for the
problems that are impossible to solve analytically or for graphical
illustration/representation of solutions that can be obtained explicitly.

Evaluation Methods: Homework, quizzes, a midterm and a final exam.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Michael Frankel

Revised: November 10, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.62


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course PHYS 152 Mechanics

Catalog Description: Credit 4. Class 3. Lab 2.


Statics, uniform and accelerated motion; Newton's Laws; circular motion;
energy, momentum, and conservation principles; dynamics of rotation;
gravitation and planetary motion; properties of matter; simple harmonic and
wave motion.

Prerequisite: MATH 164

Textbook: H.D. Young and R.A. Freedman, University Physics, Addison-Wesley (10th
Edition), 2000. ISBN 0-201-60322-5.

Coordinator: Frederick W. Kleinhans, Associate Professor of Physics.

Prerequisites by Topic: Algebra, trigonometry, one variable differential and integral calculus.

Goals: To teach students of science and engineering the uses and applications of
Newton’s laws of mechanics.

Course Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Recognize the difference between scalar and vectorial quantities. Be able to
solve problems with both.
2. Solve problems involving the motion of a body in one dimension, under
different conditions (uniform velocity, uniform acceleration, varying acceleration).
3. Solve problems associated with the motion of a body under the effect of
gravity (projectile motion).
4. Determine the motion of a body in different frames of reference.
5. Graphically analyze a problem by drawing its free body diagrams.
6. Solve problems using Newton’s three laws of motion.
7. Solve problems using the equivalence between work and energy.
8. Distinguish between conservative and non-conservative forces. Be able to
associate a potential energy with a conservative force.
9. Solve collision problems in one and two dimensions by using conservation
of momentum.
10. Solve problems involving the rotation of bodies.
11. Use conservation of angular momentum to explain the rotational motion of
different bodies.
12. Describe the motion of a mass attached to a spring and other examples
involving simple harmonic motion.
13. Determine all the forces acting on a rigid body in equilibrium.
14. Solve problems where a body is elastically deformed under the action of
external forces.
15. Solve problems using Newton’s law of gravitation.
16. Determine periods, radii, and orbits of celestial bodies and satellites.
17. Use Pascal’s principle, Arquimides’s principle and Bernoulli’s equation to
solve problems involving static and moving fluids.
18. Determine the speed of a wave in a mechanical medium.
19. Determine the interference patterns arising when two or more waves are
present on a medium.
20. Determine the normal modes of oscillation in a medium of simple geometry.
21. Solve problems involving sound waves in air.

Topics:

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.63


B. Syllabi of Courses

1. Vectors (1 period)
2. Motion in one dimension and free falling bodies (2 periods)
3. Motion in two dimensions (2 periods)
4. Newton’s laws and applications (2 periods)
5. Work, mechanical energy and power (2 periods)
6. Potential energy (1 period)
7. Momentum, conservation of momentum and collisions (2 periods)
8. Rotation of rigid bodies (1 period)
9. Dynamics of rotational motion (1 period)
10. Angular momentum, conservation of angular momentum and precession (1 period)
11. Oscillatory motion and simple harmonic motion (2 periods)
12. Equilibrium and elasticity (2 periods)
13. Gravitation and orbits (2 periods)
14. Fluids: static and dynamics (2 periods)
15. Mechanical waves. Speed of waves, interference and normal modes (2 periods)
16. Sound (1 period)

Computer Usage: Most of the assignments are submitted electronically. The students also learn
to use computers to acquire data, to analyze errors occurring during the
measurement process, and to make simulations of physical problems.

Laboratory Projects:
1. Introduction to motion
2. Kinematics
3. Projectile motion
4. Error analysis
5. Newton’s laws
6. Mechanical energy
7. Collisions in two dimensions
8. Rotations
9. Simulations using Microsoft Excel®
10. Simple harmonic motion
11. Equilibrium and statics
12. Space mission (web based laboratory)
13. Waves

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Ricardo S. Decca and Frederick W Kleinhans

Revised: March 29, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.64


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: Physics 251 Heat, Electricity and Optics

Catalog Description Credit 5. Class 4. Lab 2.


Heat, kinetic theory, elementary thermodynamics, heat transfer. Electrostatics,
Electrical Currents and devices. Magnetism and electromagnetic radiation.
Optics.

Prerequisite: PHYS 152 Mechanics

Corequisite: MATH 261 Multivariate Calculus

Prerequisites by topic: Calculus-based mechanics

Textbook: H.D. Young and R.A. Freedman, University Physics, Addison-Wesley, 2000.
ISBN 0-201-60322-5

Coordinator: Andrew D.Gavrin, Associate Professor of Physics.

Goals: To teach science and engineering majors the fundamentals of classical physics
beginning with electrostatics and ending with geometrical optics.
Thermodynamics is also included beginning with the definitions of heat and
temperature and ending with the second law of thermodynamics.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Learn basic terminology of heat, electricity, and optics
2. Learn fundamental physical laws and the skills needed for heat,
electricity, and optics
3. Solve kinetic theory, elementary thermodynamics, and heat transfer
problems
4. Solve electrostatics and electrical current problems and devices
5. Solve magnetism and electromagnetic radiation problems
6. Solve optics problems.

Topics:
1. Electric Charge
2. Electric Field and Force
3. Properties of Electric Conductors and Insulators
4. Gauss’s Law
5. Electric Potential and Potential Energy
6. Capacitance
7. Dielectrics
8. Electric Current
9. Resistance and Resistivity
10. Electromotive Force
11. Direct Current Circuits
12. RC Circuits
13. Magnetic Forces and Fields
14. Biot-Savart Law and Ampere’s Law
15. Faraday’s Law and Lenz’s Law
16. Electromagnetics Induction Phenomena
17. Inductance and RL circuits
18. Alternating Current Circuits
19. Electromagnetic Radiation
20. Reflection, Refraction, Dispersion and Polarization of Light

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.65


B. Syllabi of Courses

21. Geometric Optics


22. Temperature and Heat
23. Kinetic-Molecular Theory of Gases
24. The First Law of Thermodynamics
25. The Second Law of Thermodynamics

Computer Usage: Students use computers in lab to acquire, analyze and display data, and to
perform simulations of physical systems. Students use a web-based system to
download and submit homework. Students interact with faculty and other
students through a course web site.

Laboratory Projects:
1. Mathematical Exploration and Review (3 weeks)
2. Introduction to Electronics (1 week)
3. Use of Excel to Simulate Physical (1 week)
4. DC Circuits (simulation) (1 week)
5. DC Circuits (implementation) (1 week)
6. Magnetic Fields (1 week)
7. Introduction to Oscilloscope (1 week)
8. AC Circuits (2 weeks)
9. Optics (1 week)
10. Thermodynamics (2 weeks)

Evaluation Methods: Tests, HW and lab reports.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Andrew D. Gavrin

Revised: April 30, 2002

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.66


B. Syllabi of Courses

Required Course: TCM 360 Communication in Engineering Practice

Catalog Description: Credit 2. Class 1. Recitation 2.


The application of rhetorical principles to written and oral communication in
the engineering professions. Planning, drafting and revising professional
engineering reports; planning and delivering oral presentations; organizing
information; developing persuasive arguments.

Prerequisites: ENG W131, COMM R110, Junior Standing or Consent of Instructor.

Textbook: T.E. Pearshall, The Elements of Technical Writing, 2nd Edition, Allyn and
Bacon, 2002. ISBN 0-205-31873-8

Coordinator: Dr. Wanda L. Worley, Assistant Professor of Technical Communications

Goals: To improve junior and senior engineering students’ ability to select, organize
and present technical information to audiences in organizational settings –
both in writing and orally.

Course Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Describe the circumstances for a written or oral communication activity in an
organizational setting.
a. Identify the audience(s) for a communication activity and describe
them, noting, in particular, their informational needs, their levels of technical and
organizational knowledge and other factors about them which might affect their participation
in and response to the communication activity.
b. Narrate the events which preceded the communication activity and
which are likely to follow it, nothing previous necessary or important and which may affect
the outcome of the communication activity.
2. Prepare and present effective oral and written reports for the audiences and
organizational circumstances students have identified. Such reports will be characterized by:
a. Information appropriate for the audience members’ needs and the
writer/speaker’s purposes,
b. Organizational patterns that support the content and purposes of the
report.
c. Language and visual elements that are appropriate in register and
technical detail for the audience and the situation.
d. Layout in written documents and delivery in oral presentations that
facilitate audience understanding of the writer/speaker’s purposes and content.
3. Provide helpful feedback to classmates on drafts of documents, rehearsals of
speeches and final speech performances.
4. Describe own processes and strategies for analyzing situations and
developing written reports and oral presentations and identify own need for assistance or further
development.
5. Manage communication projects in an effective and efficient manner.
6. Use current technology to prepare written reports and visual aids to support
oral presentations.
7. Hone general communication skills, including standard English
communication conventions.

Topics:
1. Principles of technical writing (2 periods)
2. Communication context (2 periods)
3. Report purposes, audiences, formats (4 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.67


B. Syllabi of Courses

4. Peer response to written documents (4 periods)


5. Oral presentations
6. Grammar, punctuation, usage, style, sentence structure, tone (4 periods)
7. Visual elements in reports (1 period)
8. PowerPoint to supplement oral reports (1 period)
9. Group project (7 periods)
10. Criteria in comparison reports (.5 periods)
11. Specific report formats:
a. Problem-Solution (7 periods)
b. Comparison Using Criteria (7 periods)
12. Application resume and cover letter (5 periods)
a. Content
b. Design & Layout
c. Digital
d. IUPUI career placement resources
e. Interviewing skills
f. Letter format, style, tone, etc.
13. Email etiquette (5 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Written reports, oral presentations.

Professional Component: Communications and Ethics

Prepared By: Wanda L. Worley

Revised: November 21, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.68


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective STAT 350 Introduction to Statistics (3 cr.)


(one of the three Statistics and Probability electives)

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


A data-oriented introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of
applied statistics. Intended primarily for majors in the mathematical sciences
(Mathematics, Actuarial Sciences, Mathematics Education). The objective is
to acquaint the students with the essential ideas and methods of statistical
analysis for data in simple settings. It covers material similar to that of STAT
511 but with emphasis on more data-analytic material. Includes a weekly
computing laboratory using Minitab.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 163 within the past two academic years with a minimal
grade of C-.

Prerequisite by Topic: Transcendental functions, methods of differentiation and integration, partial


differentiation and integration.

Textbook: A.C. Tamhane and D.D. Dunlop, Statistics and Data Analysis from
Elementary to Intermediate, 2000, Prentice Hall Publishing, (ISBN 0-13-
744426-5).

Coordinator: Dr. Benzion Boukai, Professor, Stat Group, Mathematical Sciences

Goals: Application of basic probability models and appropriate statistical


methodologies for data analysis in scientific research. This is introductory
statistics course (calculus based) for students majoring in Mathematics,
Sciences, and Engineering.

Course Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students should:
1. Become familiar with the axioms and rules of probability including the long-run interpretation.
2. Become familiar with description and properties of frequently used discrete and continuous
random variables and distributions used to model various applied phenomenon.
3. Know the notions of population, sample, types of variables and appropriate method of presenting
quantitative information in tables and diagrams
4. Learn the notion of sampling distribution of a statistic as a thought experiment of obtaining values
of the statistic by repeated independent sampling.
5. Learn who to estimate basic population characteristics based on random samples, and develop an
appreciation for the random error inherent in such estimation by constructing confidence intervals.
6. Learn the proper approaches for constructing significant test of (scientific) statistical hypothesis.
7. Apply statistical tests of significance in comparing two or more subpopulations, and in relation
between two or more variables (continuous or discrete).

Topics:
The following outline is a week by breakdown of topics. There are 2 periods per week (1 period = 75
class minutes), for a 15-week semester.
1. Probability axioms, properties and interpretation. Counting techniques, Conditional Probability
and Bayes Formula, independence.
2. Random variables; discrete and continuous. Expected values
3. Joint Distributions-Independence, Chebyshev’s Inequality and the WLLN. More on random
variables, transformations, sums and independence

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B. Syllabi of Courses

4. Useful random variables and their distributions. The Binomial and Normal distributions.
5. Collecting Data and Sampling Design. Describing data: measures of centrality and variability.
6. Displaying data: basic graphical methods. Summarizing Bivariate Data, exploring relationship.
7. Sampling distributions of statistics. The Central Limit Theorem.
8. Review and Examination.
9. Introduction to Statistical Inference. Point Estimation. Estimation of the mean of a normal
population and proportion in a dichotomous population
10. Estimation with Confidence. Tests of Hypotheses.
11. Inference about the population mean.
12. Comparing two population means, paired and independent.

Computer Usage: Students use computers to perform laboratory projects with the Statistical
software MINITAB.

Laboratory Projects: A set of 6-7 computer projects with Minitab will be covered. These projects
are primarily designed to give the student a taste of how statistical work is
done in practice; for display, computation and analysis of data as well as for
simulations and demonstrations of probability laws. They will combine
concepts learned in class, computation/simulations, data exploration and
analysis as well as a clear communication of the results obtained.

Evaluation Methods: Homework, projects, a midterm and a final exam.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Benzion Boukai

Revised: November 07, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.70


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective: STAT 511 Statistical Methods I (3 cr.)


(one of the three Statistics and Probability electives)

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Descriptive statistics, Probability axioms and rules, Counting techniques,
Discrete random variables, Continuous random variables, Random samples
and sampling distributions, Point estimation, Confidence interval estimation,
Tests of hypotheses, Analysis of variance, Simple linear regression and
correlation, Goodness-of-fit tests and Two-way contingency tables.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 164 within the past two academic years with a minimal
grade of C-.

Prerequisite by Topic: Transcendental functions, methods of differentiation and integration, partial


differentiation and integration, implicit functions, power series, improper
integrals.

Textbook: J.L. Devore, Probability and Statistics: For Engineering and the Science, 5th
ed., 1999, Duxbury, ISBN 0-534-37281-3.

Coordinator: Stat Group, Mathematical Sciences

Goals: Proper application of (1) probability models and (2) statistical methodologies
in scientific research.

Course Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students should:
1. Know the notions of population, sample, types of variables and appropriate method of presenting
quantitative information in tables and diagrams.
2. Learn the axioms and rules of probability both as proportion of items having particular
characteristics and as the long-run proportion of times events occur,. Students will be able to apply
various counting techniques in order to evaluate probability.
3. Become familiar with description and properties of frequently used discrete and continuous
random variables to model various applied phenomenon.
4. Learn the notion of sampling distribution of a statistic as a thought experiment of obtaining values
of the statistic by repeated independent sampling.
5. By a logical inversion of ideas from sampling distribution estimate population characteristics
based on random samples, and develop an appreciation for the random error inherent in such
estimation by constructing confidence intervals.
6. Depending on the nature of the variable, learn the proper approach to establishing or refuting
proposed scientific hypotheses through statistical tests.
7. Recognize the central role of statistical significance in comparing two or more subpopulations, in
relation between two or more variables (continuous or discrete).

Topics:
The following outline is a week by breakdown of topics. There are 2 periods per week (1 period = 75
class minutes), for a 15-week semester. Some periods are saved for challenging problem solving
through group activities. However, the instructor may use these period to cover additional lecture or
discussion topic depending on his/her own interest and the need of the students.
1. Types of variables, descriptive statistics, presenting summary data in tabular and graphical forms.
Includes computer demonstration.
2. Probability axioms, properties and interpretation. Counting techniques.
3. Conditional probabilities, independence. Challenging problem solving through group
engagement.
4. Discrete random variables, their interpretations and applications.

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.71


B. Syllabi of Courses

5. Continuous random variables, their interpretations and applications.


6. Joint probability distributions. More problem solving through group engagement.
7. Random samples, sampling distributions, functions of random variables and their properties.
8. Review and Examination.
9. Point estimation concepts and illustrations for single samples. Estimation of the mean of a normal
population and proportion in a dichotomous population.
10. Hypotheses test concepts and illustrations for single samples. Tests about the mean of a normal
population and proportion in a dichotomous population.
11. Point estimation, confidence intervals and hypotheses tests concerning two samples – paired and
independent.
12. Comparison of more than two samples classified by one or two factors.
13. The simple linear regression model. Estimation of model parameters and prediction. Correlation.
14. Goodness-of-fit tests for one-way and two-way layouts of discrete (or discretized) variables.
15. Review and examination.

Computer Usage: The instructor may use a computer in the class to illustrate some statistical
applications and simulation results to justify theorems whose proofs are
beyond the scope of the course.

Laboratory Projects: No projects are assigned. However, the students are encouraged to use the
MINITAB, Excel and other packages available at the Department of
Mathematical Sciences computer laboratory.

Evaluation Methods: Homework, quizzes, midterm and final exams.

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared By: Jyotirmoy Sarkar

Revised: November 07, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.72


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective: ECE 302 Probabilistic Methods in Electrical Engineering


(one of the three Statistics and Probability electives)

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


An introductory treatment of probability theory including distribution and density
function, moments and random variables. Applications of normal and
exponential distributions. Estimation of means, variances. Hypothesis testing
and linear regression. Introduction to random processes, correlation functions,
spectral density functions, and response of linear systems to random inputs.

Prerequisite 1) EE 301 Signals and Systems or 2) ME 330 Modeling and Analysis of


Dynamic Systems or equivalent

Prerequisite By Topic: Calculus. Description of signals through the use of transform methods.
Proficiency in Matlab.

Textbook: D.G. R. Cooper and C. D. McGillem, Probabilistic Methods of Signal and


System Analysis, Second Edition, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1986.

References: D. G. Childers, Probability and Random Processes, Irwin, 1997

E. R. Dougherty, Probability and Statistics for the Engineering, Computing and


Physical Sciences, Prentice Hall, 1990.

Coordinator: José A. Ramos, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Goals: To introduce the concepts of probability, statistics and random processes and
to discuss their application to engineering problems. To emphasize the
applications of these methods in signal processing and communications.

Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Solve simple probability problems with electrical and computer engineering applications using the
basic axioms of probability [a, e]
2. Describe the fundamental properties of probability density functions with applications to single
and multivariate random variables [a, b2, e]
3. Describe the functional characteristics of probability density functions frequently encountered in
electrical and computer engineering such as the Binomial, Uniform, Gaussian and Poisson [a, b2]
4. Determine the first through fourth moments of any probability density function using the moment
generating function [a, e]
5. Calculate confidence intervals and levels of statistical significance using fundamental measures of
expectation and variance for a given numerical data set [b2]
6. Discern between random variables and random processes for given mathematical functions and
numerical data sets [a, b2]
7. Determine the power spectral density of a random process for given mathematical functions and
numerical data sets [a, b2]
8. Determine whether a random process is ergodic or nonergodic and demonstrate an ability to
quantify the level of correlation between sets of random processes for given mathematical
functions and numerical data sets [a, b2]
9. Model complex families of signals by means of random processes [a]
10. Determine the random process model for the output of a linear system when the system and input
random process models are known [a, c, e]

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.73


B. Syllabi of Courses

Topics:
1. Introduction, applications of probability, relative-frequency approach, review of set
theory (2 periods)
2. Axiomatic approach, conditional probability, independence (2 periods)
3. Bernoulli trials, random variables and distribution functions, probability density functions (2 periods)
4. Mean values and moments, Gaussian random variables, density functions related to Gaussian (2
periods)
5. Other density functions, conditional density functions, applications (2 periods)
6. Applications, test, joint distributions (2 periods)
7. Conditional probability, independence, covariance, sums of random variables (2 periods)
8. Random process definitions, examples of random processes, measurement of random processes (2
periods)
9. Correlation functions, properties of correlation functions, measurement of correlation functions (2
periods)
10. Cross-correlation functions, applications, test (2 periods)
11. Spectral density, properties of spectral density, mean-square values from spectral density (2
periods)
12. Sampling and estimation theory; point and interval estimation (2 periods)
13. Sampling distributions, estimation of means and variances (2 periods)
14. Hypothesis testing and goodness-of-fit test (2 periods)
15. Linear regression and correlation (2 periods)

Computer Usage: Matlab

Professional Component: Mathematics and Physical Sciences

Prepared by: Jose A. Ramos

Revised: April 28, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.74


B. Syllabi of Courses

B.3 Syllabi of Major Mechanical Engineering Electives

Syllabi of mechanical engineering electives are given in this section. These electives are 400 and
500 level courses. While the 400 level courses are of senior level courses, 500 level courses are
graduate level courses. Even though most undergraduates take 400 level courses, in the
combined BSMS degree program it is required the students take four graduate courses in the
senior years instead of 400 level ME electives. Therefore, we provide here the syllabi of those
graduate courses which students in this program will be able to take. Similar to undergraduate
courses, the course learning outcomes are also declared in all graduate courses and the end-of-
semester surveys are conducted on these outcomes.

1. ME 402 Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System


2. ME 430 Principles of Power Engineering
3. ME 433 Principles of Turbomachinery
4. ME 446 CAD/CAM-Theory and Applications
5. ME 450 Computer-Aided Engineering Analysis
6. ME 458 Composite Materials
7. ME 472 Advanced Stress Analysis
8. ME 474 Vibration Analysis
9. ME 491 Engineering Design Project
10. ME 497 Analysis and Design of Robotic Manipulators
11. ME 497 Introduction to Nanotechnology
12. ME 497 Electromechanical Systems and Applied Mechatronics
13. ME 497 Biomedical Engineering Applications
14. ME C184, C284, C384, C484 Cooperative Education Practice
15. ME I184, I284, I384, I484 Career Enrichment Internship
16. ME 505 Intermediate Heat Transfer
17. ME 509 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
18. ME 510 Gas Dynamics
19. ME 525 Combustion
20. ME 550 Advanced Stress Analysis
21. ME 551 Finite Element Analysis
22. ME 552 Advanced Applications of Finite Element Method
23. ME 558 Composite Materials
24. ME 560 Kinematics
25. ME 563 Mechanical Vibrations
26. ME 569 Mechanical behavior of Materials
27. ME 572 Analysis and Design of Robotic Manipulators
28. ME 597 Introduction to Nanotechnology
29. ME 597 Principles of Turbomachinery
30. ME 597 CAD/CAM – Theory and Applications
31. ME 597 Biomechanics of the Muskuloskeletal System
32. ME 597 Advanced Mechanical Engineering Project I

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.75


B. Syllabi of Courses

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.76


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 402 Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Mechanical design of organisms, with emphasis on the mechanics of the
musculoskeletal system. Selected topics in prosthesis design and
biomaterials; emphasis on the unique biological criteria that must be
considered in biomechanical engineering design.

Prerequisite: ME 272 Mechanics of Materials or equivalent

Corequisite: None

Textbook: A. Nigg and B. Herzog, Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, John


Wiley & Sons, 1994.

Coordinator: Charles Turner

Goals: To provide students with an understanding of how living organisms optimize


structures to adapt to the mechanical demands of their environment.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Construct free body diagrams and calculate forces on human joints [e]
2. Explain the role of remodeling in repair and replacement of bone [a4]
3. Apply failure criteria to determine when solid material or bone will fail [a4]
4. Be able to calculate stress and strain from elasticity equations for orthotropic or transversely
isotropic materials [a4, e]
5. Be able to calculate principal stresses and strains for anisotropic materials [a4, e]
6. Explain the concept of mechanical adaptation of biological tissues [j, k3]
7. Apply biological adaptation strategies to engineering applications [c1]
8. Apply viscoelasticity models to explain mechanical properties of ligament and tendon [a4]
9. Explain the compressive mechanics of cartilage based upon biochemical composition [j]
10. Explain tissue engineering in terms of cellular biomechanics and biology [j]
11. Apply the basic mechanics of muscles to explain muscle function [g, j]
12. Apply mechanics of material to derive criteria for orthopaedic implant design [a4, h]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Tissue engineering of cartilage (2 periods)
2. Nature of viscoelasticity in biphasic materials and mechanics of cartilage (2
periods)
3. Bone biology and structure (2 periods)
4. Bone mechanotransduction and fundamentals of bone biomechanics. Basic
theory of elasticity (4 periods)
5. Criteria for yielding including Tsai-Wu criterion (1 period).
6. Computer aided optimization and skeletal scaling (2 periods).
7. Muscle physiology (2 periods).
8. Muscle mechanics (1 period).
9. Tendons and Ligaments (2 periods)
10. Mechanics of human motion (2 periods)
11. Statically determinant systems (1 period)
12. Statically indeterminant systems (1 period)
13. Orthopedic prosthesis design (2 periods).

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.77


B. Syllabi of Courses

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Charles Turner

Revised: February 21, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.78


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 430 Power Engineering

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Rankine cycle analysis, fossil-fuel steam generators, energy balances, fans,
pumps, cooling towers, steam turbines, availability (second law) analysis of
power systems, energy management systems, and rate analysis.

Prerequisite: ME 200 Thermodynamics I

Corequisite: None

Textbooks: M.M. El-Wakil, Powerplant Technology, McGraw-Hill, 1984.

Coordinator: Razi Nalim

Goals: The design and engineering power generation plants based on both
conventional and renewable energy sources.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Discuss the energy resources and energy conversion methods available for
the production of electric power in the US and the world [j]
2. Discuss the market factors, regulatory factors, and environmental concerns
that have impact on the production of electric power [j]
3. Determine the efficiency and output of a modern Rankine cycle steam
power plant from given data, including superheat, reheat, regeneration, and all irreversibilities [a4]
4. Calculate the water circulation rate, the fan power consumption, flame
temperatures and combustion stoichiometry of conventional steam generators. [a4]
5. Calculate the tube surface requirement for condensers and feed water
heaters, and the power output of impulse and reaction turbine stages [a4]
6. Calculate the performance of gas turbines, including reheat and
regeneration, and discuss the use and performance of combined cycle power plants and
geothermal power plants [a4]
7. Explain the major types of hydro-power turbines and estimate power plant
output [a4]
8. Explain the principles of operation of thermal-fission and fast-breeder
nuclear reactors and power plants, including pressurized-water, boiling-water, and heavy-water
reactors [a4]
9. Discuss the power potential and challenges of non-conventional power
plants and energy conversion systems, such as fuel-cell, wind, solar, and ocean thermal power
plants [e]
10. Describe the methods of control of major pollutants from fossil-fuel power
plants [h]
11. Discuss the environmental impact of electric power production on air
quality, climate change, marine and aquatic ecology, and land use [h]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Introduction to Power Engineering (1 period)
2. Basics of Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics (2 periods)
3. The Rankine Cycle (3 periods)
4. Fossil-Fuel Steam Generators (2 periods)
5. Fuels and Combustion (3 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.79


B. Syllabi of Courses

6. Condensers, Feed Water Heaters, and Cooling Water Systems (3 periods)


7. Steam Turbines (2 periods)
8. Gas Turbines (2 periods)
9. Hydro Power (1 periods)
10. Nuclear Power (3 periods)
11. Fuel Cells & IC Engines (2 periods)
12. Other Energy Sources and Conversions (2 periods)
13. Pollution Control (1 periods)
14. Tests and Design Project Presentation (3 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Razi Nalim

Revised: March 10, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.80


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 433 Principles of Turbomachinery

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Unified treatment of principles underlying fluid mechanic design of hydraulic
pumps, turbines, and gas compressors. Similarity and scaling laws.
Cavitation. Analysis of radial and axial flow machines. Blade element
performance. Radial equilibrium theory. Centrifugal pump design, Axial
compressor design.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 200 Thermodynamics I and 2) ME 310 Fluid Mechanics

Corequisite: None

Textbooks: J.L. Kerrebrock, Aircraft Engines and Gas Turbines, 2nd Edition, MIT Press.

Coordinator: Andrew Hsu

Goals: Introduce the basic concepts of turbomachinary and design procedures.


Bridge the gap between basic engineering theory and industrial applications.
Students may not receive credit for both ME 433 and corresponding ME 597.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Be able to give precise definition of turbomachinery [a4]
2. Identify various types of turbomachinery [a4]
3. Perform thermal cycle analysis on gas-turbine engines [a4]
4. Perform fluid dynamic analysis of diffusers [a4]
5. Apply the Euler's equation for turbomachinery to analyze energy transfer in turbomachines [a4]
6. Apply three-dimensional velocity diagrams to turbomachinary analysis. [a4]
7. Design axial-flow turbines and compressors [c, a4]
8. Design radial-flow turbomachines [e, a4]
9. Compute efficiencies of various turbomachines [a4, g]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Introduction: Definition and types of Turbomachines (1 period)
2. Review of Thermodynamics (2 periods)
3. Basic Concepts of Gas Turbines and Cycle Analysis (4 periods)
a. Efficiency
b. Turbojets and Turbofans
c. Qualitative Analysis
d. Compressor and Turbine Analysis
4. Non-rotating Components (5 periods)
a. Summary of Gas Dynamics
b. Diffusers
c. Nozzles
d. Combustors
5. Compressors (6 periods)
a. Energy exchange, Rotor to Fluid
b. The Euler Equation
c. Stage Temperature Ratio
d. Compressor Geometry and the Flow Pattern
e. Subsonic Blading

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.81


B. Syllabi of Courses

f. The Loss Factor and Efficiency


g. Limits on Stage Pressure Ratio
h. Stage Performance
i. Multistage Compressors
j. Centrifugal Compressors
6. Turbines (6 periods)
a. Turbine Stage Characteristics
b. Degree of Reactions, Pressure Ratio
c. Turbine Blading
d. Turbine Cooling
e. Turbine Efficiency
f. Turbine Similarity
7. Pumps and Fans (4 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Andrew Hsu

Revised: September 13, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.82


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 446 CAD/CAM – Theory and Applications

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 2. Lab 2.


Introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided
manufacturing (CAM) theory and applications. Topics include CAD/CAM
systems (Hardware and Software), Geometric modeling using curves, surfaces
and solids, CAD/CAM data exchange, CAD and CAM integration,
Mechanical assembly, Mechanical Tolerancing, Mass property calculations,
Process planning and Tool path generation, integration of CAD/CAM with the
production machine, and Computer control of machines and processes in
manufacturing systems. Projects will focus on development of geometric
procedures for design and manufacturing applications and the use of
commercial CAD/CAM software for automating the production cycle.
Applications will include NC machining, design of (optimum) cutting tools
and modeling and design of fixtures for dies and molds. Hands-on experience
is attained through laboratory experiment.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 197 Introduction to Computer Programming and 2) ME 262


Mechanical Design I

Corequisites: None

Textbook: A. Zeid, CAD/CAM: Theory and Practice, McGraw-Hill, Inc, 1991.

Coordinator: Hazim El-Mounayri

Goals: To introduce the basic tools in computer aided design and computer aided
manufacturing with a focus on the integration of these tools and the
automation of the production cycle. To prepare the student to be an effective
user and developer of the state-of-the-art CAD/CAM technology. Students
may not receive credit for both this course and corresponding ME 597.
Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Design and model using CAD tools [c, k]
2. Automatically generate process plans using CAM tools [c, k]
3. Effectively and intelligently use the state-of-art CAD/CAM technology [k]
4. Automatically produce manufacturing information needed to drive CNC
machines and Rapid prototyping machines [k]
5. Implement CAD/CAM-based product development process [c]
6. Use a manufacturing set-up integrated with CAD/CAM for automated
production [c, k]
7. Explain the benefits of CAD/CAM, the different uses of the technology, and
the advantage of a comprehensive and integrated and integrated CAD/CAM system [k]
8. Explain the concepts and underlying theory of modeling and the usage of
models in the different engineering applications [k]
9. Compare the different types of modeling techniques and explain the
advantages of Solid modeling technique and the central role of solid models in the CAD/CAM-
based product development process [c]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. CAD/CAM definition (1 period)
2. CAD/CAM systems: Hardware and Software (1 period)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.83


B. Syllabi of Courses

3. Introducing a CAD/CAM software for the course (2 class)


4. Geometric modeling using curves (1 period)
5. Geometric modeling using surfaces (1 period)
6. Geometric modeling using solids (3 periods)
7. CAD/CAM data exchange (1 period)
8. Graphics concept (2 periods)
9. Interactive computer programming (1 period)
10. Extending the functionality of an existing CAD/CAM system (2
periods)
11. CAD and CAM integration (1 period)
12. Mechanical assembly (1 period)
13. Mechanical Tolerancing (1 period)
14. Mass property calculations (1 period)
15. Finite element modeling using different modeling techniques (1 period)
16. Manufacturing systems and processes (1class)
17. Process planning (1 period)
18. Machining (2 periods)
19. Tool path generation (1 period)
20. Computer control of machines and processes in manufacturing systems
(1 period)
21. Integration of CAD/CAM with the production machine (1 period)
22. Case study: Enhanced CAD/CAM for machining process simulation
and optimization (2 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, lab reports, two mid-term exams, and one
final exam.

Computer Usage: CAD/CAM software ProE and Mechanical Analysis software ProMechanica
are used extensively in this course. Also used is FADAL CNC machine.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Hazim El-Mounayri

Revised: December 12, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.84


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 450 Computer-Aided Engineering Analysis

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 1.5. Lab 1.5


Introduction to the use of finite element methods for analysis and design.
Applications involving stress analysis and heat transfer of solids. The use of
existing software and hardware for computer-aided engineering.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 262 Mechanical Design I and 2) and ME 272 Mechanics of Materials

Corequisites: None

Textbook: S. Moaveni, Finite Element Analysis - Theory and Application with ANSYS,
Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1999.

Coordinator: Hasan Akay

Goals: To teach the students the basic of the finite element method and its
applications for design and analysis of problems including stress analysis and
heat transfer of solids using a commercial finite element software.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Use the finite element method as a simulation/modeling tool for design [k2]
2. Use the finite element method for stress analysis and design of load
carrying structures [k1]
3. Use the finite element method for heat transfer analysis of solids [k1]
4. Use commercial finite element codes competently for most analysis and
design problems [e]
5. Create geometry and models for 2D and 3D systems [k2]
6. Evaluate the accuracy of results obtained from finite element codes [a4]
7. Make checks to verify the accuracy of the finite element solutions [a4]
8. Write project reports describing and evaluating the obtained results [g]
9. Give oral presentation of their projects [g]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Finite element formulation via direct methods (5 periods)
2. Finite element formulation via minimum potential energy principle (5
periods)
3. Stress Analysis-bars, trusses; beams, frames; plates, shells, and 2D/3D
solids (18 periods)
4. Heat Transfer Analysis of Solids-bars and 2D/3D solids (5 periods)
5. Dynamic problems (5 periods)
6. Applications using ANSYS

Computer Usage: Finite element analysis software ANSYS is used extensively for solid
mechanics and heat transfer problems.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final report
and presentation.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Hasan U. Akay

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.85


B. Syllabi of Courses

Revised: December 12, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.86


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 458 Composite Materials

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Basic concepts of fiber reinforced composites, manufacturing, mechanics and
analysis of composite laminates and their application to engineering design
are discussed.

Prerequisite: ME 272 Mechanics of Materials

Corequisite: None

Textbook: P.K. Mallick, Fiber Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing and


Design, Second Edition, Marcel-Dekker, Inc., 1993.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach students the basic concepts involved in fiber reinforced composites
and their applications in engineering. Students may not receive credit for both
this course and ME 558.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of composite materials [a4]
2. Differentiate metallic versus composite materials [a4]
3. Compare the mechanical properties of composite materials to the metallic
materials [a4]
4. Predict the composite properties at micro-level [a4]
5. Explain different manufacturing techniques for composites [a4]
6. Analyze fiber-reinforced composites for stresses and deformations [a4, k1]
7. Design composite members for stiffness and strength [a4]
8. Predict failure in composite members [a4]
9. Work in a group or individual setting and write a report [g]
10. Explain the advantages of composites over metals [a4]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering.

Topics:
1. Introduction: Overview of composite materials (1 period)
2. Materials: Fibers and Matrix (2 periods)
3. Mechanics: Lamina, laminated structure (9 periods)
4. Performance: Static mechanical properties, fatigue and fracture (8 periods)
5. Manufacturing: Molding, filament winding, poltrusion (4 periods)
6. Design: Laminate design, applications/examples (6 periods)

Computer Usage: Students use the finite element software ANSYS for modeling of composites.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: November 28, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.87


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 472 Advanced Mechanics of Materials

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Studies of stresses and strains in three-dimensional elastic problems. Failure
theories and yield criteria. Bending of curved beams. Torsion of bars with
noncircular cross sections. Beams on elastic foundation. Energy methods.
Selected topics. Students may not receive credit for both ME 472 and ME
550.

Prerequisite: 1) ME 272 Mechanics of Materials and 2) MATH 262 Linear Algebra and
Differential Equations

Corequisite: None

Textbook: A.C. Ugural and S.K. Fenster, Advanced Strength and Applied Elasticity, The
SI version, Elsevier 1995.

Coordinator: Jie Chen

Goals: To teach students tools require for design and analysis of complex problems in
mechanics of materials.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of elasticity, and the difference between stress and
strain [a4]
2. Explain the terms: isotropic, orthotropic and anisotropic, as applied to
materials [a4]
3. Explain the terms: plane stress and plane strain [a4]
4. Conduct the transformation of plane stress or plane strain components using
Mohr’s circle, the method of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, the method of quadratic form of
ellipsoids, and the method of stress or strain trajectories [a4, e]
5. Use the concepts of principal stress and principal strains [e]
6. Use the basic tensor notations, the stress, strain and inertia tensors, and their
reduction to principal axes [a4, e]
7. Apply the analytical procedures involved in strain gauge measurements, in
particular the transformation equations [e]
8. Solve basic problems in two-dimensional elasticity using Airy’s stress
function [e]
9. Evaluate solutions of simple engineering problems using mechanics of
material theories [e]
10. Use basic stability and yield criteria for elasto-plastic materials [e]
11. Apply basic concepts of elastic stability and buckling of elastic structures
[e]
12. Using finite difference approximations to solve elasticity problems
governed by partial differential equations [e]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Three-dimensional stress analysis (2 periods)
2. Plane stress and plane strain problems (2 periods)
3. Stress functions (2 periods)
4. Failure criteria (2 periods)
5. Bending of curved beams (2 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.88


B. Syllabi of Courses

6. Shear stresses (2 periods)


7. Shear center (2 periods)
8. Torsion (2 periods)
9. Thin walled members (2 periods)
10. Statically indeterminate problems (2 periods)
11. Elastic stability (2 periods)
12. Beams on elastic foundation (2 periods)
13. Fourier series (2 periods)
14. Energy methods (2 periods)
15. Introduction to plates (2 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Jie Chen

Revised: November 24, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.89


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 474 Vibration Analysis

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Introduction to simple vibratory motions, such as undamped and damped free
and forced vibrations, vibratory systems with more than one degree of
freedom, Coulomb damping, transverse vibration of beams, torsional
vibration, critical speed of shafts, and applications.

Prerequisites: ME 272, ME 274, and ME 330

Corequisites: None

Textbook: S.S. Rao, Mechanical Vibrations, Third Edition, Addison Wesley, 1995.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach students a basic knowledge of point mass vibratory systems and
vibration of elastic bodies. Students may not receive credit for both this
course and ME 563.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of modes of vibration, and the difference between
single-, two- and multi-degree-of-freedom vibrating systems [a4]
2. Formulate the equation of motion of an undamped, single degree-of-
freedom vibration system using both energy methods and Newton's laws of motion [a4]
3. Explain the difference between free and forced vibration [a1]
4. Formulate the equations of motion of vibrating systems with viscous
damping and hysteretic damping [a4]
5. Explain the effect of damping on vibration response both in the time domain
and in the frequency domain [a4]
6. Derive the equations of motion of lumped parameter, multi-degree-of-
freedom systems using matrix methods [a2, a4, k4]
7. Apply Lagrange's equation to derive equations of motion of simple
vibrating systems, with single or multi-degree of freedom [e, k4]
8. Obtain estimates for the lowest natural frequencies of continuous systems
using Rayleigh's principle [a2]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Free vibration of a single degree freedom of undamped and damped systems
of a mass and a spring, torsional vibration of a single degree freedom (5 periods)
2. Single degree of freedom of forced vibration of spring mass system, forced
torsional vibrations, whirling of rotating shafts (4 periods)
3. Vibration of system with Coulomb damping (2 periods)
4. Two degrees of freedom of free vibration without damping (2 periods)
5. Two degrees of freedom of forced vibration without damping (2 periods)
6. Introduction to Rayleigh principle for an approximate determination of
natural frequency (2 periods)
7. Introduction to vibration of elastic bodies such as rods, torsional members,
beams, membranes (4 periods)
8. Transient vibration (3 periods)
9. Energy technique, an introduction to Langrange's equations (3 periods)
10. Experimental Model Analysis (2 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.90


B. Syllabi of Courses

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Dare Afolabi and Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: November 15, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.91


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 491 Engineering Design Project (1-2 cr.)

Catalog Description: Credit 1 or 2. Class by arrangement.


The student selects an engineering design project and works under the
direction of the faculty sponsor. Suitable projects may be from the local
industrial, municipal, state, and educational communities. May be repeated
for up to 4 credit hours. (1-2 cr.)

Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of a faculty sponsor

Corequisite: None

Textbook: None

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach students to integrate and apply their courses by working on a multi-
faceted project.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Carry out a design project independently [c1 or c2]
2. Perform analysis of an engineering problem or design [c1 or c2]
3. Write a technical report [g]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics: Broad range of topics in mechanical engineering.

Computer Usage: Depends on the project.

Evaluation Methods: Status reports and a final project report.

Professional Component: Design and Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: April 12, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.92


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 497 Analysis and Design of Robotic Manipulators

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Introduction to robotics and automated manufacturing; components and sub
systems of robot manipulator; kinematics; dynamics; robot programming
languages; task planning; overview of robot control; sensors and mobile
robots.

Prerequisites: ME 372 Mechanical Design II, 2) Matrix algebra, 3) computer programming


skills.

Corequisite: None

Textbook: W. Stadler, Analytical Robotics and Mechatronics, McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1995.

Coordinator: Yaobin Chen, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Goals: To teach students the essential concepts necessary for understanding robots
and their effective use in the industrial environment. Students may not
receive credit for both this course and ME 572.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. A knowledge of current state of robotics and its applications and impact in
our societies [i].
2. An understanding of spatial coordinate transformation and an ability to
define the coordinates and the corresponding kinematic parameters for robotic manipulators.
3. An ability to solve forward and inverse kinematic equations [a, e]
4. An ability to analyze robotic motion using the concepts of Jacobian matrix
[a, e]
5. An understanding of robot dynamic modeling and an ability to derive
dynamic model using Lagrange's equations of motion.
6. An ability to design robot motion trajectories to meet the design
specifications and requirements. [a ,c, e, k]
7. An ability to analyze and design simple robot control systems using
classical control design methods.
8. An ability to evaluate and test the system performance using computer-
aided tools [a, c, e, k]
9. An ability to program industrial robots to perform pre-specified tasks.

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Overview of robotics and automated manufacturing (1 period)
2. Components and subsystems; implications for robot design (2 periods)
3. Kinematics: 3D transformations; forward and inverse position solutions;
singularities; manipulator Jacobian; programming (4 periods)
4. Dynamics: Newton Euler formulation; Lagrangian formulation; recursive
formulations (6 periods)
5. Robot programming languages (2 periods)
6. Task planning; path planning; trajectory planning (4 periods)
7. Robot control: position control, force control (6 periods)
8. Sensors: Vision; tactile; sensor fusion (4 periods)
9. Miscellaneous topics: Mobile robots; future direction; etc. (1 period)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.93


B. Syllabi of Courses

Computer Usage: Student use MATLAB for some HW problems.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Yaobin Chen

Revised: November 12, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.94


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 497 Introduction to Nanotechnology

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Nanotechnology describes a new emerging field of molecular manufacturing;
namely the ability to manipulate matter at the atomic and molecular level, and
the ability to build complex structures and machines with atom-by-atom
control. Such capability will have direct impact on material processing, drug
and gene delivery, nanomachine manufacturing, and purification of water and
air. ME students will be familiar with the concepts of nanotechonology and
be prepared to pursue careers in related areas.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 310 Fluid Mechanics and ME 372 Mechanical Design II

Corequisites: None

Textbook: E. Drexler, Nanosystems, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1992

Coordinator: Andrew Hsu

Goals: This course will introduce basic ideas of nanotechnology and the basic laws
that govern the physical and chemical properties of molecules. The
introductory course aims at teaching the students in the following three areas:
1. The basics of molecular dynamics
2. The analysis of components and systems at the nano-scale
3. Implementation strategies
The course will also bring current research into the classroom by inviting
researchers in this area to give talks. Students may not receive credit for both
this course and corresponding ME 597.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Understand the basic concepts of nanotechnology [a4].
2. Understand the fundamental differences between nanotechnology and
traditional technology [a4].
3. Understand the basic scaling laws [a4].
4. Grasp the essence of quantum mechanics and understand implications of
eigenvalue solutions of the Schrodingers equation [a4].
5. Apply molecular dynamics computer simulation to simulate nano-systems
[a4].
6. Understand the thermal and quantum uncertainties and their implication in
molecular manufacturing [a4]
7. Appreciate the requirements of nano components and systems design [a4].
8. Be aware of the current research topics in nanotechnology [a4].

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
I. Basic Laws for Nano-scale Analysis (10 periods)
1. Introduction to Molecular Manufacturing
2. Classical Scaling Laws
3. Quantum Theory and Approximations *
4. Molecular Mechanics *
5. Intermolecular Forces *
6. Molecular Dynamics *
7. Computer Simulations of Molecular Dynamics I

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.95


B. Syllabi of Courses

8. Computer Simulations of Molecular Dynamics II *


9. Molecular Modeling I *
10. The Simple Huckel Method and Applications
11. The Extended Huckel Method (Tight Binding Method)
12. Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics
13. Positional Uncertainty and Thermal Excitation
14. Bending and Displacement
15. Transitions and Errors
16. Damages
17. Energy Dissipation
18. Mechanosynthesis
19. Reactive Species and Mechano-chemical Synthesis
II. Nano Components and Systems (10 periods)
1. Nanoscale Structural Components
2. Moving Parts at Nanoscale I
3. Moving Parts at Nanoscale II
4. Intermediate Subsystems
5. Nanoscale Computational Systems
6. Molecular Processing and Assembly
7. Molecular Manufacturing Systems
II. Current Research (8 periods)
1. Guest Presentation: Nanomachinery
2. Guest Presentation: DNA and Nanotechnology

*NOTE: Extra project and homework problems will be assigned to graduate students on these items,

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Andrew Hsu

Revised: October 12, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.96


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 497/ECE 424 Electromechanical Systems and Applied Mechatronics

Catalog Description Credit 3. Class 3.


Design, optimization, and control of electromechanical and mechatronic systems.
Comprehensive dynamic analysis, modeling, and simulation of electric
machines, power electronics, and sensors. Application of advanced software and
hardware in mechatronic systems design and optimization.

Prerequisite: 1) ECE 340 Simulation, Modeling and Identification or 2) ME 340 Dynamic


Systems and Measurements

Prerequisites by Topic: Kirchhoff’s laws and circuit equations, sinusoidal steady state analysis, frequency
response, Laplace transforms and transfer functions, modeling and formulation
of differential equations for dynamic systems.

Textbook: D. G. Alciatore and M. B. Histand, Introduction to Mechatronics and


Measurement Systems, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, Boston, 2003. ISBN 0-07-
240241-5.

Coordinator: Steven M. Rovnyak, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Goals: To teach engineering students analysis, design, synthesis, and selection of


systems that combine electronic and mechanical components with modern
controls and microprocessors.

Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Use transistors to switch loads [a, b, e]
2. Analyze and implement operational amplifier circuits [a, b, e]
3. Understand the basics of amplitude and phase linearity, bandwidth, step and frequency response of 0,
1st and 2nd order systems [a, e]
4. Analyze and implement basic digital combinational logic networks [a, b, e]
5. Program microcontroller and interface with input switches, output LEDs and loads [a, b, e, k]
6. Understand relationship between sampling rate and signal bandwidth [a, e]
7. Use electromechanical sensors including hands-on experience with roughly half of the following:
proximity switches, potentiometers, linear variable differential transformers, optical encoders, strain
gages, load cells, thermocouples and accelerometers [a, b, c, d, e, k]
8. Control electromechanical machinery including hands-on experience with roughly half of the
following six categories: AC, DC and stepper motors, solenoids, hydraulic and pneumatic actuators [a,
b, c, d, e, k]

Topics:
1. Electric circuits and components (3 periods)
2. Semiconductor electronics (3 periods)
3. Analog signal processing using operational amplifiers (2 periods)
5. Combinational logic circuits (3 periods)
6. Microcontroller programming (4 periods)
7. Sensors (4 periods)
8. Actuators (4 periods)
9. General properties of 0th, 1st and 2nd order systems (4 periods)
10. Signal sampling (2 periods)
11. Midterm exam (1 period)
12. Final exam.

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.97


B. Syllabi of Courses

Computer Usage: MPLAB IDE version 6.40.00.0, PICALLW programmer Windows version 0.14.
Both available as Web download. Students complete two assignments involving
Microchip PIC programming.

Laboratory Projects: Measurements and semiconductor electronics, operational amplifiers and digital
electronics, microcontrollers and sensors, electromechanical machinery.

Evaluation Methods: Homework, 4 laboratory reports, one project, one semester exam, and one final
exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Steven M. Rovnyak

Revised: May 4, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.98


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 497 Biomedical Engineering Applications

Course Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


This course will introduce the student to engineering design principles applied
to the cardiovascular system. Numerous life saving technologies are in
common use which require fundamental engineering solutions. The
cardiovascular system will serve as a platform to introduce concepts of
biomechanics, biofluids, and bioelectricity. Along these lines devices such as
cardiac valves, vascular stents, the artificial heart and other cardiac assist
devices, and pacemakers and defibrillators will be described from an
engineering viewpoint.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in Engineering

Corequisite: None

Prerequisites by topic: Familiarity with statics, circuits, and engineering design

Textbook: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, Editors: J. Enderle, S. Blanchard, and


J. Bronzino, Academic Press, 2000. ISBN 0-12-238660-4.

Coordinator: Edward J. Berbari

Goals: To provide students with a perspective on the challenges of the design of


medical devices which interface with living systems.

Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to
1. Describe the cardiovascular system anatomy and physiology [a]
2. Apply principles of mechanics to describe and analyze the cardiovascular system [a, e]
3. Apply principles of fluids to describe and analyze cardiac hemodynamics and blood flow [a, e]
4. Apply principles of electrical theory to describe and analyze the origin of biopotentials measured
at the cellular and body surface levels [a, e]
5. Describe the basic properties and solve design problems related to artificial cardiac valves and
modern stenting devices [a, c]
6. Describe the basic properties and solve design problems related to cardiac assist devices [a, c]
7. Describe the basic properties and solve design problems related to cardiac pacemakers and
defibrillators [a, c]
8. Explain medical device regulations which govern the design, manufacturing, and sale of new
devices [h, j]

Topics:
1. Cardiovascular anatomy and physiology (4 periods)
2. Cardiac mechanics and hemodynamics (8 periods)
3. Passive cardiovascular devices (2 periods)
4. Cardiac assist devices (4 periods)
5. Cardiac electrophysiology (4 periods)
6. Cardiac pacemakers (4 periods)
7. Cardiac defibrillators (2 periods)
8. Tests (2 periods)

Computer Usage: As needed in homework assignments primarily with Matlab.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.99


B. Syllabi of Courses

Evaluation Methods: HW and exams.

Prepared by: Edward J. Berbari

Revised: October 28, 2002

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.100


B. Syllabi of Courses

Course: ME C184, C284, C384, C483, C484 Cooperative Education Practice (1 cr.
each)

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, minimum 2.7 GPA, and program advisor approval.

Textbook: None

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Description: Cooperative education is a true partnership between academic institutions and


the practical world of work. For students, it is a formal education and
practical experience in business, industry or government agency, a blend of
theory and application, new skills and knowledge, a competitive salary, and a
validation of career choice. Cooperative education is different from
internship. A coop student alternates semesters of work and full-time study.
Students may do coop work for 3 to 5 times during their undergraduate
education. A comprehensive written report on each coop practice is required

Guidelines: A student’s coop experience will be credited towards ME elective in the


program, if the student registers for coop courses through the School. Three
credit hours of ME elective credit will be awarded when a student completes
three coop courses, each with one credit hour. Faculty advisor’s approval is
required before registering for the coop course in order to get ME credit.

During the third coop session, the student must also work on a work-related
project in collaboration with a faculty member. The student must complete
the project according to the company and faculty advisor’s satisfaction and, in
addition to the coop report, give a formal oral presentation to faculty and
fellow students following the completion of last coop session. A maximum of
3 credit hours (one ME elective) is allowed in the BSME curriculum through
the coop program.

A pass or fail grade will be assigned for each course by the faculty advisor.
Note: A special fee is required for each coop course.

Outcomes:
After completion of this session, the students should be able to:
1. Competently carry out independent projects.
2. Work in teams effectively.
3. Value communication.
4. Value professional ethics.
5. Demonstrate leadership.
6. Value professional licensure.
7. Value professional societies.
8. Demonstrate professionalism.
9. Demonstrate good understanding of engineering practice.
10. Value continuing education.

Evaluation Methods: Final reports and oral presentations.

Professional Component: Engineering Practice

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: February 21, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.101


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME I184, I284, I384, I483, I484 Career Enrichment Internship (1 cr.
each)

Catalog Description: Internships provide students with opportunity to gain experience in industry or
organization of career interest. These experiences are designed to enhance the
student's preparedness for an intended career with a business, industry, or
government agency. The students can get internship experience during a
regular semester or summer. A comprehensive written report on each
internship practice is required.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, minimum 2.3 GPA, and program advisor approval.

Textbook: None

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Guidelines: One full semester of internship (or no less than ten weeks in summer) may
count as one credit hour of ME elective. The student registering for this course
should formalize the internship with the School. Faculty advisor’s approval is
also required before registering for the internship course in order to get ME
credit.

In addition to the internship report, the student is required to give a formal


oral presentation to faculty and fellow students following the completion of
last internship session. A maximum of 3 credit hours (one ME elective) is
allowed in the BSME curriculum through the internship program.

A pass or fail grade will be assigned for each course by the faculty advisor.

Outcomes:
After completion of this session, the students should be able to:
1. Competently carry out independent projects.
2. Work in teams effectively.
3. Value communication.
4. Value professional ethics.
5. Demonstrate leadership.
6. Value professional licensure.
7. Value professional societies.
8. Demonstrate professionalism.
9. Demonstrate good understanding of engineering practice.
10. Value continuing education.

Evaluation Methods: Final reports and oral presentations.

Professional Component: Engineering Practice

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: February 21, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.102


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 505 Intermediate Heat Transfer

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Heat and mass transfer by diffusion in one-dimensional, two dimensional,
transient, periodic, and phase change systems. Convective heat transfer for
external and internal flows. Similarity and integral solution methods. Heat,
mass, and momentum analogies. Turbulence. Buoyancy-driven flows.
Convection with phase change. Radiation exchange between surfaces and
radiation transfer in absorbing-emitting media. Multimode heat transfer
problems.

Prerequisite: ME 314 Heat and Mass Transfer or equivalent

Corequisite: None

Textbooks: F.P. Incropera and D.P. Dewitt, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer,
Wiley, Third Edition, 1990.

E.R.G. Eckert and R.M. Drake, Analysis of Heat and Mass Transfer, McGraw
Hill, 1972.

Coordinator: Sivakumar Krishnan

Goals: 1) To enhance the student's understanding of energy and mass exchange


processes and their relevance to practical and scientific apparatus and
methods.
2) To increase the student's analytical skills and ability to cope with complex
problems.
3) To provide the student with experience in treating multiple mode heat and
mass transfer effects and in solving generalized, but realistic, engineering
problems.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Build on an existing undergraduate background in heat and mass transfer
2. Explain the physical origins and modes of heat and mass transfer
3. Establish the relationship of these origins to the behavior of thermal systems
4. Develop methodologies that facilitate application of the subject to the broad
range practical problems
5. Discern relevant transport processes and simplifying assumptions
6. Develop appropriate expressions from first principles
7. Introduce requisite material from heat transfer knowledge base
8. Perform exact solutions when possible
9. Perform the kind of engineering analysis that, even though not exact, still
provides useful information concerning the design and/or performance of a system or process
10. When confronted with design and open-ended problems, relate
fundamentals to useful engineering models and, in turn, link these models to design decisions

Topics:
1. Review of Basic Concepts and Laws
2. Generalized Conservation Equations
3. One Dimensional, Steady Diffusion
4. Multi dimensional and Transient Diffusion
5. Special Topics: Periodic Diffusion, Diffusion with Phase Change, Integral
Methods

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.103


B. Syllabi of Courses

6. Implication of the Conservation Equations


7. Turbulent Flow
8. Boundary Layer Solutions: Similarity and Integral
9. External Flow: Forced Convection Correlations
10. Internal Flow
11. Free Convection
12. Mixed Convection
13. Heat Transfer with Phase Change
14. Fundamental Concepts
15. Surface Radiation Properties
16. Surface Radiation Exchange
17. Volumetric Effects

Computer Usage: Matlab and occasionally finite element software ANSYS

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Sivakumar Krishnan

Revised: August 22, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.104


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 509 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Fluid properties, basic laws for a control volume, kinematics of fluid flow,
dynamics of frictionless incompressible flow, basic hydrodynamics, equations
of motion of viscous flow, viscous flow applications, boundary layer theory,
wall turbulence, and lift and drag of immersed bodies.

Prerequisite: ME 310 Fluid Mechanics

Corequisite: None

Textbook: F.M. White, Viscous Fluid Flow, Second Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York,
1991

Coordinator: Andre Hsu

Goals: To introduce concepts and analytical techniques for inviscid flows and laminar
boundary layers and to teach when inviscid and boundary layer techniques
may be used as simplified flow models to more complex problems. To
introduce phenomena of turbulent flow, separation, drag and lift. Several
homework problems are assigned throughout the course. Emphasis is placed
upon good solution techniques and presentations.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Derive partial differential equations of continuity, momentum, and energy
for compressible and incompressible flows
2. Apply control volume theory for solution of inviscid and viscous flows
3. Solve partial differential equations of selected external and internal flow
problems
4. Compare and use different levels of flow approximations use simplified
models when necessary
5. Solve external and internal flow problems
6. Solve boundary layer, laminar, and turbulent flow problems
7. Solve similarity transformation equations numerically using Runge-Kutta
methods
8. Compute lift, drag, and separation for viscous flows
9. Make use of numerical and/or empirical methods when analytical methods
fail

Topics:
1. Preliminary concepts (2 periods)
2. Fundamental equations of compressible viscous flows (4 periods)
3. Inviscid flows (4 periods)
4. Solution of the Newtonian viscous-flow equations (7 periods)
5. Laminar boundary layers (5 periods)
6. Incompressible turbulent flows (6 periods)

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.105


B. Syllabi of Courses

Prepared by: Andrew Hsu

Revised: August 17, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.106


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 510 Gas Dynamics

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Flow of compressible fluids. One-dimensional flows including basic
concepts, isentropic flow, normal and oblique shock waves, Rayleigh line,
Fanno line, and simple waves. Multidimensional flows including general
concepts, small perturbation theory for linearized flows, and method of
characteristics for nonlinear flows.

Prerequisite: ME 310 Fluid Mechanics

Corequisite: None

Textbook: M.J. Zucrow and J.D. Hoffman, Gas Dynamics, Volume 1, John Wiley &
Sons, 1976.

Coordinator: Razi Nalim

Goals: To prepare the student for engineering analysis and design of high-speed flow
systems, by providing a foundation in compressible fluid mechanics and
introducing techniques for treatment of practical applications.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Derive the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid mechanics from fundamental
conservation principles.
2. Derive and explain the quasi one-dimensional compressible flow equations
from fundamental principles with appropriate simplifications and approximations.
3. Apply the one-dimensional flow equations to isentropic flow processes with
area change, and to flows with fluid friction, heat transfer, mass addition, and other driving
potentials.
4. Derive and apply the Rankine-Hugoniot equations for a normal shock.
5. Analyze flow through oblique shocks, using normal shock equations, graphs
or tables.
6. Analyze supersonic flows and explain the starting problem for supersonic
inlets.
7. Apply the equations for Prandtl-Meyer expansion waves and analyze flows
involving discrete-approximation expansion waves.
8. Explain modes of combustion waves, and describe the major features of the
detonation and deflagration modes of premixed combustion.
9. Derive the equations of inviscid, adiabatic, steady multi-dimensional flow
and apply them to simple flows.
10. Derive the equations of unsteady one-dimensional homoentropic flow.
11. Explain and apply the method of characteristics to simple unsteady one-
dimensional homoentropic flow, shock tube flow, and steady two-dimensional flow.
12. Derive linearized equations of transonic flow and apply them to transonic
nozzle analysis.

Topics:
1. Fundamental principles of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics.
2. Governing equations for compressible flow.
3. Steady one-dimensional compressible flow.
4. Isentropic flow with area change.
5. Flow with friction.
6. Flow with heat transfer.

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.107


B. Syllabi of Courses

7. Shock waves.
8. Expansion waves.
9. Generalized 1-d flow with combustion.
10. Multidimensional adiabatic inviscid flow, and acoustics.
11. Flow with small perturbations.
12. Method of characteristics for steady 2-d flow
13. Method of characteristics for unsteady 1-d flow.

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Razi Nalim

Revised: August 17, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.108


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 525 Combustion

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Physical and chemical aspects of basic combustion phenomena. Classification
of flames. Measurement of laminar flame speeds. Factors influencing
burning velocity. Theory of flame propagation. Flammability, chemical
aspects, chemical equilibrium. Chain reactions. Calculation and
measurement of flame temperature. Diffusion flames. Fuels. Atomization
and evaporation of liquid fuels. Theories of ignition, stability, and combustion
efficiency.

Prerequisites: 1) CHEM C105 General Chemistry I and 2) ME 310 Fluid Mechanics

Corequisite: None

Textbook: A. Glassman, Combustion, Third Edition, Academic Press, 1996.

Coordinator: Razi Nalim

Goals: To prepare the student for engineering analysis and design of combustion
systems, and assessment of fire and explosion hazards, based on fundamental
physical and chemical science of combustion phenomena.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Discuss the fundamental and characteristic physical and chemical features of flames and
combustion processes.
2. Perform chemical stoichiometric calculations of reactant and product compositions, and compute
the adiabatic flame temperature and equilibrium composition of major combustion products.
3. Determine the approximate rate of a combustion reaction from global kinetic data, and estimate
the rate of reactions in batch and well-stirred chemical reactors.
4. Describe the major elementary reactions and reaction mechanisms of hydrogen and hydrocarbon
combustion.
5. Discuss the important terms in the equations of mass, momentum, energy and species
conservation, as applied to combustion processes.
6. Explain the physical and chemical mechanism of laminar flame propagation, ignition and
flammability limits, and estimate the flame velocity and thickness.
7. Calculate the detonation velocity and describe the major features of the detonation and
deflagration modes of premixed combustion.
8. Apply the concept of mixture fraction to analyze one-dimensional diffusion flames.
9. Describe the features of laminar and turbulent non-premixed jet flames, and the role of turbulence
in premixed and non-premixed combustion processes.
10. Calculate the rate of liquid droplet and solid fuel combustion based on mass diffusion analysis.
11. Apply knowledge of fundamental combustion processes to describe fires, and practical
combustion devices, including internal combustion engines, gas turbines, furnaces, and rockets.
12. Describe the types of pollutants generated in typical combustion processes and the available
control techniques, and estimate emissions rates in standard reporting units.

Topics:
1. Introduction to combustion processes.
2. Thermodynamics and fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics.
3. Gas Phase chemical kinetics.
4. Explosions.
5. Premixed combustion.
6. Non-premixed combustion.

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.109


B. Syllabi of Courses

7. Current research topics and issues in combustion.

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, lab reports, two mid-term exams, and one
final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Razi Nalim

Revised: March 12, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.110


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 550 Advanced Stress Analysis

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Studies of stresses and strains in three-dimensional problems. Failure theories
and yield criteria. Stress function approach to two-dimensional problems.
Bending of non-homogeneous asymmetric curved beams. Torsion of bars
with noncircular cross sections. Energy methods. Elastic stability.
Introduction to plates. Students may not receive credit for both ME 472 and
ME 550.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 272 Mechanics of Materials and 2) MATH 262 Linear Algebra and
Differential Equations

Corequisite: None

Textbook: A.C. Ugural and S. K. Fenster, Advanced Strength and Applied Elasticity, The
SI version, Elsevier.

Coordinator: Dare Afolabi

Goals: To teach students the tools required for design and analysis of complex
problems in mechanics of materials.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of elasticity, and the difference between stress and
strain [a4]
2. Explain the terms: isotropic, orthotropic and anisotropic, as applied to
materials [a4]
3. Explain the terms: plane stress and plane strain [a4]
4. Conduct the transformation of plane stress or plane strain components using
Mohr's circle, the method of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, the method of quadratic form of
ellipsoids, and the method of stress or strain trajectories [a4, e]
5. Use the concepts of principal stress and principal strains [e]
6. Use the basic tensor notations, the stress, strain and inertia tensors, and their
reduction to principal axes [a4, e]
7. Apply the analytical procedures involved in strain gauge measurements, in
particular the transformation equations [e]
8. Solve basic problems in two-dimensional elasticity using Airy's stress
function [e]
9. Evaluate solutions of simple engineering problems using mechanics of
material theories [e]
10. Use basic stability and yield criteria for elasto-plastic materials [e]
11. Apply basic concepts of elastic stability and buckling of elastic [e]
12. Using finite difference approximations to solve elasticity problems
governed by partial differential equations [e]
13. Understand the importance of various yield criteria and material stability.

Topics:
1. Three-dimensional stress analysis (2 periods)
2. Plane stress and plane strain problems (2 periods)
3. Stress functions (2 periods)
4. Failure criteria (2 periods)
5. Bending of curved beams (2 periods)
6. Shear stresses (2 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.111


B. Syllabi of Courses

7. Shear center (2 periods)


8. Torsion (2 periods)
9. Thin-walled members (2 periods)
10. Statically indeterminate problems (2 periods)
11. Elastic stability (2 periods)
12. Beams on elastic foundation (2 periods)
13. Fourier series (2 periods)
14. Energy methods (2 periods)
15. Introduction to plates (2 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Dare Afolabi and Jie Chen

Revised: November 14, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.112


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 551 Finite Element Analysis

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Concepts of finite elements methods; formulations for different engineering
problems and their applications. Variational methods, the finite element
concept, and applications in stress analysis, dynamics, fluid mechanics, and
heat transfer.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Corequisite: None

Textbook: J.N. Reddy, An Introduction to the Finite Element Method, Second Edition,
McGraw-Hill, 1993.

H.U. Akay, Supplementary Notes for ME 551. Available on Oncourse.

Coordinator: Hasan Akay

Goals: To teach students the finite element method and to convey the basic ideas on
which the method is founded. The basic principles of the method with
applications in several areas are presented in a unified manner so that the
students with diverse backgrounds can later apply the method to problems of
their individual interests. A multi-physics finite element code, ANSYS is used
for applications.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Derive the finite element equations for different boundary- and initial-
boundary-value problems [a1, a2]
2. Use partial-differential equation concepts, variational principles, and
interpolation theories to derive finite element models [a1, a2]
3. Develop finite element algorithms for steady and transient problems [a1, a2,
a4]
4. Use finite element codes for modeling of problems encountered in various
branches of engineering and sciences [a4, k1]
5. Analyze and evaluate the solution of finite element codes [a1, a2, k1]
6. Make error analysis and checks to verify accuracy of the finite element
solutions [a1, a2]
7. Code finite element programs with minimum extra training [a1, a2, k1]
8. Apply the method to problems in their specific field of study a4, k1]

Topics:
1. Variational formulation of boundary and initial boundary value problems (4
periods)
2. Finite element formulation and analysis of one-dimensional problems (8
periods)
3. Computer implementation of the finite element method (3 periods)
4. Finite element formulation and analysis of two-dimensional problems with
single and multi-variables (10 periods)
5. Computer applications using the finite element computer program ANSYS
(3 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.113


B. Syllabi of Courses

Computer Usage: Students use ANSYS for solving some problems.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Hasan Akay

Revised: October 24, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.114


B. Syllabi of Courses

Course: ME 552 Advanced Applications of Finite Element Method

Course Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Various algorithms for nonlinear and time-dependent problems in two and
three dimensions. Emphasis on advanced applications with problems chosen
from fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics areas. Independent
project required.

Prerequisite: ME 551 Finite Element Analysis or equivalent

Corequisites: None

Textbooks: J.N. Reddy, An Introduction to the Finite Element Method, Second Edition,
McGraw-Hill, 1993.

H.U. Akay, Supplementary Notes for ME 551. Available on Oncourse.

Coordinator: Hasan Akay

Goals: To introduce to students several advanced topics which are not covered in
sufficient detail in an introductory course. Solution of nonlinear and time-
dependent problems in two-and three-dimensions are studied. Aims at giving
the students a chance to investigate practical problems of their interest in
detail.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Solve two-and three-dimensional advanced problems in stress analysis
using the FEM
2. Solve two-and three-dimensional advanced problems in heat transfer using
the FEM
3. Solve two-and three-dimensional advanced problems in fluid mechanics
using the FEM
4. Solve nonlinear problems in mechanics using the FEM
5. Apply the FEM to problems in their specific field of study
6. Conducted an independent project

Topics:
1. Review of variational formulation (2 periods)
2. Review of isoparametric elements of two- and three- dimensional problems (2 periods)
3. General field equations: equilibrium problems, eigenvalue problems, time-dependent problems,
convective equations (4 periods)
4. Computational aspects: assemblage of equations, solution of linear and non-linear equations, and
code development (4 periods)
5. Mesh generation techniques (2 periods)
6. Finite element formulation and solution of:
a. solid mechanics problems (5 periods)
b. fluid mechanics problems (5 periods)
c. heat transfer problems (4 periods)
d. Applications with the finite element Computer Program
ANSYS

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.115


B. Syllabi of Courses

Computer Usage: Students may use various finite element computer programs or code their own
programs.

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Hasan Akay

Revised: October 23, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.116


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 558 Composite Materials

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Basic concepts of fiber reinforced composites, manufacturing, mechanics and
analysis of composite laminates and their application to engineering design
are discussed. Students may not receive credit for both ME 458 and ME 558.

Prerequisite: ME 272 Mechanics of Materials

Corequisite: None

Textbook: P.K. Mallick, Fiber Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing and


Design, Second Edition, Marcell-Dekker, Inc., 1993.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach students the basic concepts involved in fiber reinforced composites
and their applications in engineering. Students may not receive credit for both
this course and ME 458.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of composite materials.
2. Differentiate metallic versus composite materials.
3. Compare the mechanical properties of composite materials to the metallic
materials.
4. Predict the composite properties at micro-level.
5. Explain different manufacturing techniques for composites.
6. Analyze fiber-reinforced composites for stresses and deformations.
7. Design composite members for stiffness and strength.
8. Predict failure in composite members.
9. Work in a group or individual setting and write a report.
10. Explain the advantages of composites over metals.

Topics:
1. Introduction: Overview of composite materials (1 period)
2. Materials: Fibers and Matrix (2 periods)
3. Mechanics: Lamina, laminated structure (9 periods)
4. Performance: Static mechanical properties, fatigue and fracture (8 periods)
5. Manufacturing: Molding, filament winding, poltrusion (4 periods)
6. Design: Laminate design, applications/examples (6 periods)

Computer Usage: Matlab and Ansys

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, one final project
report, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: October 17, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.117


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 560 Kinematics

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Geometry of constrained-plane motion with application to linkage design.
Type and number synthesis, size synthesis. Path curvature, inflection circle,
cubic of stationary curvature. Finite displacements, three- and four-separated
positions. Graphical, analytical, and computer techniques.

Prerequisite: ME 372 Mechanical Design II

Corequisite: None

Textbook: A.S. Hall, Jr., Kinematics and Linkage Design, Waveland Press, 1986.

Coordinator: Jie Chen

Goals: The objective of this course is to provide graduate students in mechanical


engineering the kinematical tools required for design and analysis of
engineering structures and mechanisms.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Perform position and displacement analysis using: Matrix method;
Displacement transformation; Screw motion; Coordinate transformation; and Hartenberg-Denavit
Notation.
2. Perform velocity and acceleration analysis using: Kennedy's theorem;
Instantaneous center method for sliding and rolling contact problems; and Parallel-line method.
3. Perform linkage syntheses for: Gross Motions; and Coupler Curves.
4. Determine pole, polode, pole tangent, pole velocity, and inflection circle of
a linkage.
5. Design linkage using Curvature Theory.
6. Perform design of 4-Bar Mechanism for Coordinated Motions of the
Cranks.
7. Perform linkage syntheses for multiple separated positions.
8. Analyze open-chain mechanisms

Topics:
1. Introduction to Mechanisms (one week)
2. Position and Displacement Analysis I: Graphic method, vector loops
method, and complex number method (one week)
3. Position and Displacement Analysis II: Matrix method, displacement,
transformation, screw motion, coordinate transformation, and Hartenberg Denavit Notation. (one
week)
4. Velocity and Acceleration Analysis (one week)
5. Gross Motions in the 4 Bar Mechanism (one week)
6. Coupler Curves (one week)
7. Curvature Theory (one week)
8. Design Synthesis (one week)
9. Stationary Curvature (one week)
10. Analytical Design of 4 Bar Mechanism for Coordinated Motions of the
Cranks (one week)
11. Finite Displacements (one week)
12. Three Separated Positions (one week)
13. Four Separated Positions (one week)
14. Open Chain Mechanisms (one week)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.118


B. Syllabi of Courses

15. Application to Robotics (one week)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Jie Chen

Revised: October 17, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.119


B. Syllabi of Courses

Course: ME 563 Mechanical Vibrations

Catalog Description: Review of systems with one degree of freedom. Lagrange's equations of
motion for multiple-degree-of-freedom systems. Matrix methods. Transfer
functions for harmonic response, impulse response, and step response.
Convolution integrals for response to arbitrary inputs. Principal frequencies
and modes. Applications to critical speeds, measuring instruments, isolation,
torsional systems. Nonlinear problems.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 272 Mechanics of Materials, 2) ME 274 Basic Mechanics II, and 3)


ME 340 Dynamic Systems and Measurements, or equivalent.

Corequisite: None

Textbook: S.S. Rao, Mechanical Vibrations, Third Edition, Addison Wesley, 1995.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidaparti

Goals: To teach students a basic knowledge of point mass vibratory systems and
vibration of elastic bodies. Students may not receive credit for both this
course and ME 474.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concept of modes of vibration, and the difference between
single-, two- and multi-degree-of-freedom vibrating systems [a4]
2. Formulate the equation of motion of an undamped, single degree-of-
freedom vibration system using both energy methods and Newton's laws of motion [a4]
3. Explain the difference between free and forced vibration [a1]
4. Formulate the equations of motion of vibrating systems with viscous
damping and hysteretic damping [a4]
5. Explain the effect of damping on vibration response both in the time domain
and in the frequency domain [a4]
6. Derive the equations of motion of lumped parameter, multi-degree-of-
freedom systems using matrix methods [a2, a4, k4]
7. Apply Lagrange's equation to derive equations of motion of simple
vibrating systems, with single or multi-degree of freedom [e, k4]
8. Obtain estimates for the lowest natural frequencies of continuous systems
using Rayleigh's principle [a2]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Free vibration of a single degree freedom of
undamped and damped systems of a mass and a spring, torsional vibration of a single degree
freedom (5 periods)
2. Single degree of freedom of forced vibration
of spring mass system, forced torsional vibrations, whirling of rotating shafts (4 periods)
3. Vibration of system with Coulomb damping
(2 periods)
4. Two degrees of freedom of free vibration
without damping (2 periods)
5. Two degrees of freedom of forced vibration
without damping (2 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.120


B. Syllabi of Courses

6. Introduction to Rayleigh principle for an


approximate determination of natural frequency (2 periods)
7. Introduction to vibration of elastic bodies
such as rods, torsional members, beams, membranes (4 periods)
8. Transient vibration (3 periods)
9. Energy technique, an introduction to
Langrange's equations (3 periods)
10. Experimental Model Analysis (2 periods)

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Dare Afolabi and Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: November 15, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.121


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 569 Mechanical Behavior of Materials

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


How loading and environmental conditions can influence the behavior of
materials in service. Elastic and plastic behavior, fracture, fatigue, low- and
high-temperature behavior. Introduction to fracture mechanics. Emphasis is
on methods of treating these conditions in design.

Prerequisite: ME 344 Introduction to Engineering Materials or equivalent

Corequisite: None

Textbooks: N.E. Dowling, Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Prentice Hall, 1993.

T.H. Courtney, Mechanical Behavior of Materials, McGraw Hill, 1990.

Coordinator: Ramana Pidparti

Goals: To develop methods for characterization of the mechanical behavior of


materials. Elastic and plastic behavior, fracture fatigue, environmental effects
and composites will be discussed. The mechanical engineer can select the
best material for a particular application from a better understanding of the
material behavior.

Course Outcomes
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concepts of elastic, plastic, fatigue, fracture and creep behavior
of materials.
2. Solve basic problems of finding stresses under various loading conditions.
3. Explain the plane strain, plane stress and 3D stress state concepts, and
evaluate the principal stresses and strains.
4. Explain various failure theories for brittle and ductile materials and evaluate
the conditions for failure.
5. Explain various defects in materials and the factors affecting the mechanical
and failure behavior.
6. Use the concept of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and estimate the effect
of cracks in materials and structures.
7. Explain the concept of fracture toughness, evaluate its value from
experiments, and its use in engineering design.
8. Explain the concepts of stress based fatigue, strain based fatigue, and
fatigue crack-growth.
9. Evaluate fatigue life for materials using various methods.
10. Predict the fatigue failure properties of structures and materials.
11. Explain creep and stress rupture concepts for materials.
12. Select a material for specific design application given the loading
environment.

Topics:
1. Overview of mechanical behavior (2 periods)
2. Elastic behavior (2 periods)
3. Plastic behavior (3 periods)
4. Dislocations (2 periods)
5. Fracture mechanics (8 periods)
6. Fatigue and crack-growth behavior (8 periods)
7. Composite material behavior (3 periods)

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.122


B. Syllabi of Courses

8. Creep and stress rupture behavior (2 periods)

Computer Usage: Matlab and Ansys

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Ramana Pidaparti

Revised: July 19, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.123


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 572 Analysis and Design of Robotic Manipulators

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Introduction to the analysis and design of robotic manipulators. Topics
include kinematic configurations, forward and inverse position solution,
velocity and acceleration, path planning, off-line programming, force and
torque solutions, rigid body dynamics, motors and actuators, robot design,
sensors, and controls, computer simulation and graphical animation.

Prerequisites: ME 482 Control Systems Analysis and Design or equivalent, and 2) any high-
level programming language

Corequisite: None

Textbooks: S. Niku, Introduction to Robotics: Analysis, Systems, Applications, Prentice


Hall, 2001.

Coordinator: Yaobin Chen

Goals: To teach students the essential concepts necessary for understanding robots
and their effective use in the industrial environment. Students may not
receive credit for both this course and corresponding ME 497.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Know the current state of robotics and its applications and impact in our
societies.
2. Understand the spatial coordinate transformation and an ability to define the
coordinates and the corresponding kinematic parameters for robotic manipulators.
3. Solve forward and inverse kinematic equations. [a, e]
4. Analyze robotic motion using the concepts of Jacobian matrix. [a, e]
5. Understanding of robot dynamic modeling and an ability to derive dynamic
model using Lagrange's equations of motion.
6. Design robot motion trajectories to meet the design specifications and
requirements. [a, c, e, k]
7. Analyze and design robot control systems using classical control design
methods.
8. Know advanced robot control techniques such as adaptive control, optimal
trajectory planning and control, computed torque, etc.
9. Evaluate and test system performance using computer-aided tools. [a, c, e
,k]
10. An ability to program industrial robots to perform pre-specified tasks.

Topics:
1. Introduction: robotics and automation, mechatronics, and applications
2. Fundamentals of robot technology
3. Kinematics: spatial description, homogeneous transformations
4. Kinematics: D-H representation and transformation matrices
5. Inverse Kinematics: solvability and solutions
6. Differential motions and robot Jacobian
7. Robot programming languages
8. Path/Trajectory planning
9. Robot dynamics: Euler-Langrange formulation
10. Robot actuators
11. Sensors and instrumentation

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B. Syllabi of Courses

12. Robot control: concept, classical control design techniques


13. Robot control: computed torque technique
14. Machine vision: introduction

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Yaobin Chen

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.125


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 597 Introduction to Nanotechnology

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Nanotechnology describes a new emerging field of molecular manufacturing;
namely the ability to manipulate matter at the atomic and molecular level, and
the ability to build complex structures and machines with atom-by-atom
control. Such capability will have direct impact on material processing, drug
and gene delivery, nanomachine manufacturing, and purification of water and
air. ME students will be familiar with the concepts of Nanotechnology and be
prepared to pursue careers in related areas.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 310 Fluid Mechanics and 2) ME 372 Mechanical Design II; or


Graduate Standing

Corequisites: None

Textbook: E. Drexler, Nanosystems, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1992

Coordinator: Andrew Hsu

Goals: This course will introduce basic ideas of nanotechnology and the basic laws
that govern the physical and chemical properties of molecules. The
introductory course aims at teaching the students in the following three areas:
1. The basics of molecular dynamics
2. The analysis of components and systems at the nano-scale
3. Implementation strategies.
The course will also bring current research into the classroom by inviting
researchers in this area to give talks. Students may not receive credit for both
this course and corresponding ME 497.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Understand the basic concepts of nanotechnology.
2. Understand the fundamental differences between nanotechnology and traditional technology.
3. Understand the basic scaling laws.
4. Grasp the essence of quantum mechanics and understand implications of eigen value solutions of
the Schodingers equation.
5. Apply molecular dynamics computer simulation to simulate nano-systems.
6. Understand the thermal and quantum uncertainties and their implication in molecular
manufacturing.
7. Appreciate the requirements of nano components and systems design.
8. Be aware of the current research topics in nanotechnology.

*NOTE: Extra project and homework problems will be assigned to graduate students on these
items on the ME 597 Nanotechnology course.
Topics:
I. Basic Laws for Nano-scale Analysis (10 periods)
1. Introduction to Molecular Manufacturing
2. Classical Scaling Laws
3. Quantum Theory and Approximations *
4. Molecular Mechanics *
5. Intermolecular Forces *
6. Molecular Dynamics *
7. Computer Simulations of Molecular Dynamics I
8. Computer Simulations of Molecular Dynamics II *

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B. Syllabi of Courses

9. Molecular Modeling I *
10. The Simple Huckel Method and Applications
11. The Extended Huckel Method (Tight Binding Method)
12. Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics
13. Positional Uncertainty and Thermal Excitation
14. Bending and Displacement
15. Transitions and Errors
16. Damages
17. Energy Dissipation
18. Mechanosynthesis
19. Reactive Species and Mechano-chemical Synthesis
II. Nano Components and Systems (10 periods)
1. Nanoscale Structural Components
2. Moving Parts at Nanoscale I
3. Moving Parts at Nanoscale II
4. Intermediate Subsystems
5. Nanoscale Computational Systems
6. Molecular Processing and Assembly
7. Molecular Manufacturing Systems
III. Current Research (8 periods)
1. Guest Presentation: Nanomachinery
2. Guest Presentation: DNA and Nanotechnology

Computer Usage: Matlab

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Andrew Hsu

Revised:

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.127


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 597 Principles of Turbomachinery

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Unified treatment of principles underlying fluid mechanic design of hydraulic
pumps, turbines, and gas compressors. Similarity and scaling laws.
Cavitation. Analysis of radial and axial flow machines. Blade element
performance. Radial equilibrium theory. Centrifugal pump design. Axial
compressor design.

Prerequisites: 1) ME 200 Thermodynamics I and 2) ME 310 Fluid Mechanics

Corequisite: None

Textbook: D.G. Wilson and T. Korakianitis, The Design of High-Efficiency


Turbomachinery and Gas Turbines, Prentice Hall, 1998.

Coordinator: Andrew Hsu

Goals: This course will introduce basic ideas of turbomachinery and the basic
equations that govern the performance of turbomachinery. The introductory
course aims at teaching the students in cycle analysis, efficiency calculation,
and flow and energy analysis. Students may not receive credit for both this
course and ME 433.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Be able to give precise definition of turbomachinery.
2. Identify various types of turbomachinery.
3. Perform thermal cycle analysis on gas-turbine engines.
4. Perform fluid dynamic analysis of diffusers.
5. Apply the Euler's equation for tubomachinery to analyze energy transfer in
turbomachines.
6. Apply three-dimensional velocity diagrams to turbomachinery analysis.
7. Design axial-flow turbines and compressors.
8. Design radial-flow turbomachines.
9. Compute efficiencies of various turbomachines.

Topics:
1. Introduction: Definition and types of Turbomachines (1 period)
2. Review of Thermodynamics (1 period)
3. Basic Concepts of Gas Turbines and Cycle Analysis (4 periods)
a. Efficiency
b. Turbojets and Turbofans
c. Qualitative Analysis
d. Compressor and Turbine Analysis
4. Non-rotating Components (5 periods)
a. Summary of Gas Dynamics
b. Diffusers
c. Nozzles
d. Combustors
5. Compressors (6 periods)
a. Energy exchange, Rotor to Fluid
b. The Euler Equation
c. Stage Temperature Ratio
d. Compressor Geometry and the Flow Pattern

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B. Syllabi of Courses

e. Subsonic Blading
f. The Loss Factor and Efficiency
g. Limits on Stage Pressure Ratio
h. Stage Performance
i. Multistage Compressors
j. Centrifugal Compressors
6. Turbines (6 periods)
a. Turbine Stage Characteristics
b. Degree of Reactions, Pressure Ratio
c. Turbine Blading
d. Turbine Cooling
e. Turbine Efficiency
f. Turbine Similarity
7. Pumps and Fans (6 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Andrew Hsu

Revised: September 11, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.129


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 597 CAD/CAM-Theory and Applications

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 2. Lab 2.


Introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided
manufacturing (CAM) theory and applications. Topics include CAD/CAM
systems (Hardware and Software), Geometric modeling using curves, surfaces
and solids, CAD/CAM data exchange, CAD and CAM integration,
Mechanical assembly, Mechanical Tolerancing, Mass property calculations,
Process planning and Tool path generation, integration of CAD/CAM with the
production machine, and Computer control of machines and processes in
manufacturing systems. Projects will focus on development of geometric
procedures for design and manufacturing applications and the use of
commercial CAD/CAM software for automating the production cycle.
Applications will include NC machining, design of (optimum) cutting tools
and modeling and design of fixtures for dies and molds. Hands-on experience
is attained through laboratory experiment.

Prerequisites: ME 197 Introduction to Computer programming (in C) and ME 262


Mechanical Design I

Corequisites: None

Textbook: A. Zeid, CAD/CAM: Theory and Practice, McGraw-Hill, Inc, 1991.

Coordinator: Hazim El-Mounayri

Goals: To introduce the basic tools in computer aided design and computer aided
manufacturing with a focus on the integration of these tools and the
automation of the production cycle. To prepare the student to be an effective
user and developer of the state-of-the-art CAD/CAM technology. Students
may not receive credit for both this course and ME 446.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Explain the concepts and underlying theory of modeling and the usage of
models in the different engineering applications. Explain the benefits of CAD/CAM, the different
uses of the technology, and the advantage of a comprehensive and integrated CAD/CAM system.
2. Design and model using CAD tools and automatically generate process
plans using CAM tools as well as manufacturing information needed to drive CNC machines and
Rapid prototyping machines.
3. Create accurate and precise geometry of complex engineering systems and
use the geometric models in different engineering applications.
4. Compare the different types of modeling techniques and explain the central
role solid models play in the successful completion of CAD/CAM-based product development.
5. Use state-of-the-art CAD/CAM codes efficiently, effectively and
intelligently in design and manufacturing .
6. Use current CAD/CAM technology as modeling and simulation tool for
integrated product development.
7. Apply the methods and tools learned in the course in solving engineering
problems.
8. Develop algorithms for 2D and 3D geometric modeling.

Topics:
1. CAD/CAM definition (1 period)
2. CAD/CAM systems: Hardware and Software (1 period)

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B. Syllabi of Courses

3. Introducing a CAD/CAM software for the course (2 periods)


4. Geometric modeling using curves (1 period)
5. Geometric modeling using surfaces (1 period)
6. Geometric modeling using solids (3 periods)
7. CAD/CAM data exchange (1 period)
8. Graphics concept (2 periods)
9. Interactive computer programming (1 period)
10. Extending the functionality of an existing CAD/CAM system (2 periods)
11. CAD and CAM integration (1 period)
12. Mechanical assembly (1 period)
13. Mechanical Tolerancing (1 period)
14. Mass property calculations (1 period)
15. Finite element modeling using different modeling techniques (1 period)
16. Manufacturing systems and processes (1class)
17. Process planning (1 period)
18. Machining (2 periods)
19. Tool path generation (1 period)
20. Computer control of machines and processes in manufacturing systems (1
period)
21. Integration of CAD/CAM with the production machine (1 period)

Computer Usage: Pro/Engineer and Pro/Mechanica

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences

Prepared by: Hazim El-Mounayri

Revised: December 12, 2003

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.131


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 597 Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Mechanical design of organisms, with emphasis on the mechanics of the
musculoskeletal system. Selected topics in prosthesis design and
biomaterials; emphasis on the unique biological criteria that must be
considered in biomechanical engineering design.

Prerequisite: ME 272 Mechanics of Materials or equivalent

Corequisites: None

Textbook: A. Nigg and B. Herzog, Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, John


Wiley & Sons, 1994.

Coordinator: Charles Turner

Goals: To provide students with an understanding of how living organisms optimize


structures to adapt to the mechanical demands of their environment. Students
may not receive credit for both this course and ME 402.

Course Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Construct free body diagrams and calculate forces on human joints [e]
2. Explain the role of remodeling in repair and replacement of bone [a4]
3. Apply failure criteria to determine when solid material or bone will fail [a4]
4. Be able to calculate stress and strain from elasticity equations for
orthotropic or transversely isotropic materials [a4, e]
5. Be able to calculate principal stresses and strains for anisotropic materials
[a4, e]
6. Explain the concept of mechanical adaptation of biological tissues [j, k3]
7. Apply biological adaptation strategies to engineering applications [c1]
8. Apply viscoelasticity models to explain mechanical properties of ligament
and tendon [a4]
9. Explain the compressive mechanics of cartilage based upon biochemical
composition [j]
10. Explain tissue engineering in terms of cellular biomechanics and biology [j]
11. Apply the basic mechanics of muscles to explain muscle function [g, j]
12. Apply mechanics of material to derive criteria for orthopaedic implant
design [a4, h]

Note: The letters within the brackets indicate the program outcomes of mechanical engineering

Topics:
1. Tissue engineering of cartilage (2 periods)
2. Nature of viscoelasticity in biphasic materials and mechanics of cartilage (2
periods)
3. Bone biology and structure (2 periods)
4. Bone mechanotransduction and fundamentals of bone biomechanics. Basic
theory of elasticity (4 periods)
5. Criteria for yielding including Tsai-Wu criterion (1 period)
6. Computer aided optimization and skeletal scaling (2 periods)
7. Muscle physiology (2 periods)
8. Muscle mechanics (1 period)
9. Tendons and Ligaments (2 periods)

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B. Syllabi of Courses

10. Mechanics of human motion (2 periods)


11. Statically determinant systems (1 period)
12. Statically indeterminant systems (1 period)
13. Orthopedic prosthesis design (2 periods)

Evaluation Methods: Homework assignments, quizzes, two mid-term exams, and one final exam.

Professional Component: Engineering Sciences (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Charles Turner

Revised: January 16, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.133


B. Syllabi of Courses

Elective Course: ME 597 Mechanical Engineering Project I

Catalog Description: Credit 3. Class 3.


Individual advanced study in various fields of mechanical engineering. May
be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Corequisite: None

Textbook: None

Coordinator: Hasan Akay

Goals: To teach students to conduct an independent research project in an advanced


or emerging area.

Outcomes:
After completion of this course, the students should be able to:
1. Clearly identify the problem investigated
2. Demonstrate creativity
3. Demonstrate the use of a sound methodology
4. Use sound engineering principles
5. Demonstrate completeness of project
6. Demonstrate effectiveness in writing
7. Demonstrate effectiveness in presenting orally

Topics: Vary depending on the project.

Evaluation Methods: Final report and a final presentation to faculty and fellow students.

Computer Usage: Varies depending on the project.

Professional Component: Engineering Science (Engineering Topics)

Prepared by: Hasan Akay

Revised: January 9, 2004

2004 ME ABET Report Appendix I Page I.134