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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN

SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

SOLVED QUESTION PAPER 2014-2017

GIVE THE CLASSIFICATION OF MINE ACCIDENTS ON THE BASIS OF “CAUSE OF ACCIDENT”.


WRITE THE CLASSIFICATION OF MINE ACCIDENT?
WHAT ARE THE CAUSE OF ACCIDENTS? (IMP(SUMMER*) (WINTER*))
DESCRIBE CLASSIFICATION OF MINE ACCIDENTS EXPLAIN INUNDATION IN DETAILS. (WINTER*)
WHAT IS AN ACCIDENT OF MINE AND GIVE DETAILED CLASSIFICATION OF MINE ACCIDENT?
ACCIDENT
It may be defined as any occurrence that interferes with the orderly progress of activity. Accidents subtracts
production, adds to the pains, divides pleasure and multiplies worries.
CLASSIFICATION
Accident do not happen, they are caused by agencies and circumstances. On the basis of investigations, the
responsibility of various accidents may be classified under the following heads:

1. Misadventure.
2. Fault of materials.
3. Fault of management.
4. Fault of co-workers.
5. Lack of supervision.
6. Fault of deceased.
CLASSIFICATION BASED ON THE CAUSES
The causes of accidents in mines have been classified as follows:
1. Ground movement:
a. Fall of roof.
b. Rock burst or bump.
c. Air blast.
d. Subsidence.
e. Fall of sides.
f. Premature collapse of working/pillars.
g. Fall of overhangs.
h. Landslide.
i. Collapse of shaft.
2. Transportation Machinery (Winding in Shafts):
a. Over-winding of cages.
b. Breakage of rope, chain and draw gear.
c. Fall of person from moving cages or other means of conveyance.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

d. Falling/rolling down of objects from moving cages, etc.


e. Hit by cages.
f. Cages colliding in the shaft.
g. Other accidents due to winding operations.
3. Transportation Machinery (Other than Winding):
a. Aerial ropeway.
b. Rope haulage.
c. Other rail transportation,
d. Mechanical conveyors.
e. Dumper and other heavy earth movers.
f. Railway wagon movement.
g. Hand trimming.
h. Other wheeled trackless means of transportation (trucks, lorries, etc.)
4. Machinery other than Transportation Machinery:
a. Drills.
b. Coal cutting machines.
c. Coal loading machines.
d. Haulage engines.
e. Winding engine.
f. Shovels, draglines, excavator, etc.
g. Ore handling plants including crushing and screening plants.
h. Pumps.
i. Other machinery.
5. Explosives
a. Solid blasting.
b. Deep hole blasting.
c. Air blasting.
d. Misfires/sockets while drilling in to it.
e. Misfire socket while breaking boulders or cutting at faces.
f. Delayed ignition.
g. Blown through shot.
h. Other explosive accidents.
6. Electricity
a. Overhead lines.
b. Other power cables.
c. Switch gear, gate end boxes.
d. Energized machines.
e. Other electrical accidents.

7. Dust & gases & other combustible material


a. Occurrence of gas.
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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

b. Influx of gas.
c. Suffocation by gases.
d. Explosion or ignition of gas/dust etc.
8. Falls (other than falls of ground)
a. Fall of the person from the height.
b. Fall of the person on same level.
c. Other falls.
9. Other causes
a. Irruption of water.
b. Flying pieces.
c. Extremity caught in between object.
d. Drowning of water.

EXPLAIN THE PROCEDURE OF DEALING WITH MISFIRE SHOT IN UNDERGROUND COAL MINES.
(IMP(SUMMER***) (WINTER**))

CAUSES :
By a misfired shot meant one in which the detonator fails to explode or having fails to ignite the charge. The
main reasons for failure are
1. Defective shot firing exploder by which the required voltage is not generated.
2. Bad connection between exploder and shot-firing cable, between cable and detonator leads or at other
places.
3. Defective shot firing cable, broken wires interrupting the circuit or damaged insulation causing a short-
circuit
4. Broken detonator leads or insulation covering of leads damaged.
5. Faulty detonator or bad quality explosive either due to bad manufacture or due to deterioration during
storage.

DEALING WITH A MISFIRED SHOT


In the event of a misfired shot the shot-firer should strictly observe the provisions of Reg. 177 of the CMR,
1957. He should –

1. Disconnect the cable and wait for the prescribed period.


2. Fence all the entrances to the place.
3. Examine cable and connections for any defect. If there is a defect, remedy it and fire the shot.
4. If the misfired shot does not explode drill a fresh hole at least 30 cms away from the misfired hole and
as far as possible parallel with it, noting the direction of the original hole, so that the bit does not touch
the misfired charge.
5. Charge and stem the new hole in the usual manner.
6. Secure the detonator leads of the misfired shot to the cable, or to a prop, or otherwise.
7. Re-examine the place for the presence of firedamp.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

8. Fire the new hole and search for the unfired detonator and charge. If they are not found, load the
materials by hand in a separate tub distinctly marked and send it to the surface for further search.
9. Destroy the misfired explosive detonator on the surface, if traced out.
10. Report the circumstances fully to the shot-firer of the next shift. Also record, in a bound-paged book
kept for the purpose, a report on the occurrence and actions taken.

GIVE THE PROCEDURE OF INSPECTION OF OLD WORKING. (IMP(SUMMER**) (WINTER***)).


WHAT ARE THE VARIOUS PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN TO WHILE INSPECTING OLD WORKING?
To ensure safety under the given condition, the following matter should receive attention –
1. The plans of the old workings should be recovered to determine the position of old workings.
2. All those persons who could assist with their personal knowledge of the disuse workings and the manner
in which they might have changed with time should be consulted.
3. A safety margin of about 60 metres should be arranged round the position of the faces and exploring
drifts to allow for inaccuracy of old plans.
4. Faults and dykes near the old workings should be traced out and marked on new plans.
5. The nature and thickness of surrounding strata and also the sources of surface water should be carefully
examined.
6. The possibility of entering the old workings for the purpose of restoring ventilation, pumping them dry,
examining them should be carefully considered before committing a scheme to a drilling programme.
7. In case the old workings are not accessible, the possible extent and head of water should be estimated.
8. A section along the heading approaching old workings should be prepared to ascertain the difference of
level between the starting place and the old workings.
9. A safe method of working with the strong roof supports, so as to prevent extensive roof fractures,
should be planned beforehand.
10. The working faces of the district approaching the old working should be stopped at a distance of 60
metres from the safety margin and further working should not be extended except with the prior
permission of the D.G.M.S
11. When permission is granted, arrangements as predetermined and approved planning should be to drive
narrow advance headings towards the old workings.
12. Explosive should not be used while driving galleries.

WHAT ARE THE VARIOUS CAUSES OF ACCIDENT DUE TO FALL OF ROOF? HOW WILL YOU PREVENT
IT? (IMP(SUMMER***) (WINTER*))
The accidents and the suggested remedial measures to eliminate such accidents are summarized below:

(a) In a slice under extraction, a mass of roof 1.2 m x 1 m x 40 cm thick had come down between supports
on two loaders standing underneath. One of them died instantly and the other received serious injuries.
(b) A mass of coal 1 m x 0.6 x 0.3 m (thick) got dislodged from a slip running across a coal lip at the edge of
the heightened portion of gallery and struck a timberman who was fatally injured.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(c) A face had been blasted towards the end of the shift. Supports had been knocked down. The shot firer
had not time to get the place re-supported as he had another face to blast. Timbermen were unwilling
to start on
(d) The serious accidents show that there were prominent cleats and numerous small slips in the coal that
result in frequent small falls. Also it was difficult to keep the heightened roof under control.
1. In additional to the above:
2. The supervision should be tightened.
3. Testing, dressing and timbering should be kept under watch and quality of timber improved.
4. Manager and Safety Officer should pay special attention to the seam
5. Workmen's participation should be urgently sought to deal with the problem.

WRITE DOWN THE PROVISION OF RESCUE STATION. (IMP(SUMMER*) (WINTER*)).


EXPLAIN THE PROVISION OF RESCUE STATION AND RESCUE ROOM.
STATE THE FUNCTIONS OF RESCUE STATION AS PER MINES RESCUE RULES.
ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION:
1. The D.G.M.s. may require the owner of a belowground mine or a group of belowground mines to
establish and maintain rescue Station/stations with such designs and specifications and such
place/places as may be considered necessary in consultation with the owner.
Provided that where there are belowground mines belonging to more than one owner the D.G.M.S. may
permit or require to two or more owners to jointly establish a common rescue station
2. At every rescue station there shall be appointed one Superintendent and at least two Instructors, and
also there shall be maintained a rescue brigade of not less than eighteen rescue-trained persons.
3. In case where the absence of the Superintendent at a rescue station exceeds 60 days, the owner shall
appoint another Superintendent.
4. The owner shall, within seven days from the date of assumption or relinquishment of charge by the
Superintendent, inform the C.I.M. and R.l.M. in Form I.

FUNCTIONS OF A RESCUE STATION


The functions of a rescue station shall include:
1. Imparting initial training in rescue work.
2. Imparting refresher training to rescue trained person.
3. Providing support by its own rescue teams and equipment’s in case of major accident or long-lasting and
recovery operations.
4. Carrying out the functions of a rescue room in respect of those belowground mines where is no rescue
room.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

RESCUE ROOM
ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION OF RESCUE ROOMS
At every belowground mine where more than 100 persons are ordinarily employed belowground, and there is
no rescue station within its radius of 35 km, the owner shall establish and maintain on surface, close to the
main entrance, a rescue room. It may be sufficient to provide one rescue room for a number of mines (Joint
rescue room) belonging to the same owner –
1. The total number of persons employed belowground workings of all such mines does not exceed 5000.
2. The mines are situated within a radius of 35 km from, and connected by road with, recue room.

The Director General of Mines Safety may permit the owner of a group of mines having the total number of
persons, ordinarily employed belowground in excess of 5000, to use the rescue room as a rescue station,
excepting the function of imparting initial training in such rescue work, if such rescue room is
1. Equipped with the requisite additional rescue apparatus, including at least 15 extra set of 2-hour self-
contained breathing apparatus.
2. Placed under the charge of a person, holding the qualification of an instructor and minimum of 5 rescue
trained persons, of whom at least one shall hold the qualification of a rescue room in charge are posted
thereat.

FUNCTIONS OF RESCUE ROOMS


A rescue room shall provide facilities for the storage, assembly, testing and adjustments of breathing apparatus
and other rescue equipment and apparatus and for their speedy transport to mines.
Its functions shall also include
1. Imparting training and regular practices of rescue trained workers in the general method of dealing with
underground fire, etc. and rescue and recovery works; the properties and detection of mine gases;
taking of gas samples in irrespirable atmosphere.
2. Storing copies of underground plans and sections of the mine/rescue tracings.
3. Maintaining a proper record of all rescue equipment and apparatus and apparatus at the rescue room
and inspection thereof.

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY ORGANIZATION? GIVE THE ORGANIZATION OF COAL INDIA


LIMITED. (IMP (SUMMER***))
ORGANIZATION
Organization is a process of dividing the activities of an enterprise into department and sections and of
combining the activities so divided into a Co-ordinated whole for successful performance of work. It weaves a
neat pattern of relationships among personnel, jobs & activities for ensuring a harmonious teamwork towards
the fulfilment of common aims.
KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS
There are three types of organization. These are -

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

1. Line organization.
2. Functional or Staff Organization
3. Line and Staff organization.

LINE ORGANIZATION
This is the oldest kind of organization based on the division of labor
force into a number of sections, each controlled by a foreman who is responsible for his jobs
in his department to the manager. This type of organization is inapplicable to complex modern
industrial operations because there is no specialist in the structure.
ADVANTAGES
1. It is simple and flexible
2. Allocation of responsibility can be done with precision.
3. Strict discipline can be maintained.
4. Quick decisions can be taken.
5. Planning and execution of the plan of each department is possible in closer co-ordination.
DISADVANTAGES
1. It encourages segregation between department and sections which can lead to duplication of effort
decreasing economy of the company.
2. Departmental head is to be of very high quality
3. Departmental heads are overloaded with works and they cannot discharge their duties efficiently
4. Future expansions and improvements of the department cannot be planned beforehand as the
departmental heads are overloaded with works.
5. Departments are run according to individual whims of the heads.
6. It takes long channel to reach any order from the General Manager to the workers which delays work.

FUNCTIONAL OR STAFF ORGANIZATION


In this type of organization each foreman is a specialist
in his own field and any worker may receive instruction from several specialized "bosses" so
that all phases of the operations involved are subject to supervision by a uniform level of intelligence. In
this organization the authority is divided on the basis of function.
ADVANTAGES
1. The system ensures quality production.
2. Departmental heads need not be expert in any matters.
3. Departmental heads may find much time for thinking of further improvement and expansion as he is not
overloaded with works.
4. Wastage of manpower, machine and materials may be avoided because of availability of specialized
guidance at every step.
5. Duplication of work is avoided with consequent increase in economy.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

DISADVANTAGES
1. Division of supervision may lead to weakening of discipline.
2. Conflict of authority may arise amongst many departmental bosses of same status.
3. Nobody can be particularly held responsible for failure in performing any work.
4. Increased production cost due to many high salaried specialists.

LINE AND STAFF ORGANIZATION


In this type of organization, the authority is transmitted directly downwards from top to bottom, but side
transmission is also possible to permit the utilization of the services of skilled departmental specialists. In
practice, this type of organization is obtained by grafting the functional' or 'staff on the line system. The chief
function of the 'staff is to analyze and point out the method of increasing the efficiency of an undertaking,
whereas the task of attaining the ends these means is the function of the line.

ADVANTAGES
1. Each official is familiar with his duties. He knows who his subordinates are and to whom he is directly
responsible.
2. Duplication of control is obviated and smooth operation is ensured.
3. It permits to secure the full benefits of functional specialization by allowing the line personnel to
concentrate on basic activities and by requiring the staff personnel to provide necessary advice and
service.
4. The departmental head is not to be expert in all matters. He can devote more time to future expansion
and improvement programme.
5. It links the different parts of the organization into an integrated whole by establishing the scalar chain or
line of command authority.
6. The expert service and specialist service of staff men are brought reach of line personnel to improve
their productivity
7. It facilitates managerial training and management development.

DISADVANTAGES
1. Line and staff arrangement are based on the assumptions that they should support each other & work
harmoniously for the attainment of enterprise objectives. But the establishment of a harmonious line-
staff relationship is very difficult.
2. The beneficial results of staff advice may not be secured if there is lack of teamwork between line &
staff positions.
3. The staff men have innate tendency for improving their status by empire-building and they dominate
over lower-level line managers instead of serving them.
4. As thinking functions cannot be separated from the doing functions in the proper execution of work, it
results in tendering such as impractical advice as cannot be worked upon.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

5. Unless the staff men are given sufficient volume of work cost of operating the business will be
increased.
6. By a consistent refusal to pay heed to staff advice, line managers weaken themselves and make the staff
system superfluous. As a result, the mutual support between them may be replaced by jealousy and
antagonism.
WHAT DO YOU UNDERSTAND BY TRADE UNIONS? WHAT ARE THE VARIOUS FUNCTIONS OF
TRADE UNION? (IMP(SUMMER***) (WINTER***))
TRADE UNION
It means any combination whether temporary or permanent, formed primarily for the purpose of regulating the
relations between workmen and employers or between workmen and workmen or between employers and
employers or for imposing respective condition on the conduct of any trade or business, and includes any
federation of two or more Trade Unions.
FUNCTIONS OF A TRADE UNION
1. To unite workers of different trades and industries.
2. Secure redress to grievances of the workers.
3. To help the working class by way of increased wages, improved working conditions, stable employment
and improved status in industry.
4. To increase efficiency of workers by urging management to provide for adequate leisure in the form of
reasonable hours of work and holidays with pay.
5. To make the worker class conscious and ensure their happy.
6. To introduce free and compulsory education and facilities for vocational guidance.
7. To help the management to bring down the rate of industrial accidents and to improve the productivity
of the industry
8. To develop in the workers a sense of responsibility towards the community.
9. To fight for adequate and proper housing, medical facilities and social security to the workers.
10. To bring about a change in the capitalist order of the society.

WHAT DO YOU UNDERSTAND BY SYSTEMATIC SUPPORT RULES? EXPLAIN.


1. WHO FRAMES SSR.
2. PLACES WHERE IT IS IMPLEMENTED.
3. SALIENT FEATURES OF SSR.
DESCRIBE SYSTEMATIC SUPPORT RULES FOR COAL MINES
It is a method of artificial supporting the underground workings (Roof and sides) as required by Regulation 108
of CMR 1957 in the detailed format. The method of supporting to be adopted for different places and the
distance between supports and face are specified by this method.

APPLICABILITY
It is compulsory as per statute in the following cases:
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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

1. Every districts in a mine in which extraction/reduction of pillar is going on:


2. Every long wall working.
3. Every working in a disturbed/crushed ground.
4. Any mine or part of a mine where in the opinion of D.M.S. the roof and side is of such nature as to
require artificial support.

FRAMING OF S.S.R
LEGAL REQUIREMENTS
The manager of a mine before commencing any operation requiring S.S.R. has to frame it in a form and submit
a copy to J.D.M.S. who may approve it de-facto addition or alteration as he thinks fit.

TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS
Support density and choice of supports are arrived at by consider the following factors:
1. Depth of working from the surface.
2. Nature and composition of subsoil.
3. Nature of immediate roof and floor.
4. Friability and the strength of coal.
5. Geological disturbances in the vicinity of workings and their possible effect,
6. Method of depillaring, whether caving or stowing and behavior of nether roof.
7. Incidence and history of creep, crush, and bumps.
8. Method adopted in neighboring mines under identical conditions and available statistics of their
effectiveness.
9. Presence of goaf, over or below the working.
10. Strength of pillars in site.
11. Liability of Hang-goaves and air blast.

ADVANTAGES OF S.S.R.
1. Largest number of accidents due to fall of roof and sides occur at the coal face due to the fact that
larger personnel densities and greatest strata movements are located at and near the coal face.
Systematic Support Rules guard against such eventuality.
2. consistent loading on the support throughout the face ls achieved by uniform and systematic disposition
of supporting members.
3. Systematic roof control is achieved by proper support density in the working area.
4. Considerable reduction in roof convergence which is gradual and systematic due to uniform and
systematic resistance offered.
5. The support is so disposed that the force of strata movement, initiated by coal getting, are controlled by
diverting the excessive force from the regions needed for mining while diverting the major forces from
working area the immediate roof weight is caused to act on the face rendering coal getting easy and
convenient with improvement of explosive efficiency.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

6. Experience shows that ventilation planning is easier in systematically supported area particularly in
highly gassy mines as gas emission is less fluctuating and keep at a minimum.

WHAT ARE THE FUNCTION OF MANAGEMENT?


MANAGEMENT
Management is the attainment of pre-established goal by the direction of human performances along pre-
established lines. The general objective of the management is to have optimum utilization of the men,
machines, money and time. Hence the management is the art and science of getting things done systematically
at the minimum cost within a reasonable period. The categories of industrial personnel included by the term
'management the persons in any organization who are officially vested with authority and accountability for
supervising those who get work done.

Functions of Management:
The whole process of management constitutes the following major functions-
1. Planning
2. Organization.
3. Staffing.
4. Direction.
5. Motivation.
6. Co-ordination.
7. Controls.

PLANNING
Planning is plotting the use of time, resources and effort towards the realization of what management drives to
accomplish. Realistic planning is based upon an accurate analysis of (a) present resources, (b) past performance,
(c) present situation and (d) future goals. It is the pre-action stage and a blue print for future activities. The
functions of management planning are both general and specific, both long-range and short-range.

ORGANIZATION
It is the arrangement of the work of individual & groups, & the provision of facilities necessary for doing that
work in such a way that the best, most efficient & economic result will be obtained.

STAFFING
It consists of selecting suitable persons for the posts of executives, supervisor and workers. The necessity of
training subordinates to fill vacancies as they arise is also considered, not in the interests of smooth operations
but also to give opportunities. for advancement to young and able men.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

DIRECTION
Direction sets the organization in action and consists in guiding and supervising the subordinates in their
activities. Directions must be definite, clear-cut, understandable, communicable and practicable.
To aim at providing effective leadership and direction an executive should
1. Be a reliable interpreter to his superiors and wise counsellor to his subordinates.
2. Give individual recognition for good service.
3. Treat subordinates with courtesy and respect.
4. Not override short circuit unnecessarily.
5. Know what is going on his own sphere of control.
6. Make suitable preparation before announcing major decisions on policy,
7. Have stability as well as ability.

MOTIVATION
Motivation involves
1. Integrating people to tasks and encouraging them to accomplish the same.
2. Understanding the needs of people, nature of human individuals, their urges and inspirations.
3. Providing opportunities for self-development and suitable promotions. Incentive schemes of various
kinds installed in many industries are nothing but tools of motivation to improve the standards as
productivity and quality.

CO-ORDINATION
The function of co-ordination is to synchronize and harmonies the activities of all departmental units of an
organization toward the establishment of a common end result as the prime purpose of organization is to
establish a frame work of responsibilities through and by means of which the concern may do its job, the prime
purpose of co-ordination is to make the organization work.

CONTROLS
The basic purposes of controls include the following
1. To clarify and project desired results more accurately.
2. Identify and forecast major trend and the probable need for changes in significant areas.
3. To detect operating problems in time to take corrective action before they become critical.
4. To locate quickly the administrative sections responsible wherever the need for remedial action is
indicated.

WHAT IS PERMITTED EXPLOSIVE. (SUMMER**)).


Permitted explosives are those that have been approved oved for use in coal mines where there is very
possibility of igniting fire damp or coal dust These explosives are approved by the Director General of Mines
Safety and placed on the permitted list after Official gallery tests satisfactorily of CMRS, Dhanbad and
prescribed for articular class to which they belong.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

CLASSIFICATION OF THE PERMITTED EXPLOSIVE.


1. P1 – These are ordinary permitted explosives to be used in general in degree I seam (the production of
gas is less than 1 cubic m per ton of coal), should be fired simultaneously without any delay in between
holes in undercut face. The maximum charge per hole is 794 grams. Example: AZAX-G & VIKING –G.
2. P2– Sheathed Permitted Explosives, not manufactured in India, use for simultaneous blasting in coal and
ripping. mostly replaced by P, permitted explosives.
3. P3 – This is safer variety explosive used in degree II or III mines, where production of gas is above 1 cubic
m. per ton of coal. Permissible charge in one shot hole shall not exceed 1 kg. Example: UNIPURF -G
&UNISAX –G.
4. P4– Not manufactured in India, used for delay blasting in ripping, in the undercut, overcut or side cut of
coal and in cross-measure drift. These are ultra-safe explosives and work on ion-exchange principle.
5. P5 – They are primarily designed for delay firing in solid blasting. They can also be used with undercut,
overcut or side cut. Example: SOLIGEX & PENTADYNE.

WHAT ARE THE PRINCIPLES OF TIME STUDY AND EXPLAIN? (IMP(SUMMER**) (WINTER*))
PRINCIPLES
For any method of performing a job to be regarded as satisfactory, it must be done in quickest possible times.
The greater production time implies a higher cost of production, irrespective of the rate of wages. To improve
methods of production, the time required to do the job must be shortened. With this end of view, the time
study finds out the standard time that should be taken by a worker for completing his task. To carry out this
time study, the job must be broken down into its. basic elements or operations. A number of time readings are
taken for each element of the job, the abnormal among them is rejected and average time value is calculated
form the rest. The average multiplied by a levelling factor gives the normal time. To this are added some
allowances on account of personal factors, fatigue, change or repair of tools and checking of the job to get what
is known as Standard Time, the statistics thus obtained will enable charts to be drawn showing standard of
performance which form a useful guide for future work.

BENEFITS OF PROPER APPLICATION OF THE TIME STUDY


1. Reduction of the number of workers on a specific job with the possibility of transfer of redundant
workers to more productive work.
2. Increase in speed. of various mining operations, such as, the driving of stone drifts resulting from timing
of drilling, filling out, setting supports, etc.
3. Improvements in haulage and transport to achieve a definite production target by noting and timing
delays at loading points, junctions, pass byes and in pit bottoms.
4. Increase the work efficiency of teams by cutting out any duplication of operations. In machine faces
time study technique may be applied to cut out dead labor and thereby to increase output per man shift
of the face.
5. The studies of machine operation and particularly of new coalface loader installations may be of value to
designers to afford information for improvement in design.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

6. Some districts or parts of a mine may be worked inefficiently and time studies can often be applied to
ascertain the causes to help improvements in the conditions in the districts
7. Time studies assist towards standardization of methods of work.
HOW WILL YOU PREVENT ACCIDENTS DUE TO EXPLOSIVES AND BLASTING?
SELECTION OF SHOT FIRERS AND EXPLOSIVES CARRIERS - It is essential that the explosives are not handled by
undesirable persons who may indulge in unsocial activities. Only such persons shall therefore be appointed as
shot firers and explosive carriers whose antecedents have been checked.
1. CASES OF CANISTER OF EXPLOSIVES - All Cases or Canisters (box) used for carrying of explosives shall
satisfy the following requirements
a. The lid of the box containing explosives and detonators shall be self-locking. The lock may open
only by the exploder key which is in the possession of the shot fired at all times or by any other
suitable device.
b. All boxes used for carrying of explosives and detonators shall be colored. The color of the boxes
shall be different for different shifts.
c. All boxes shall be numbered serially in each color.
d. Each shot firer shall be allotted one particular number irrespective of his shift.
e. Spare boxes of different colors shall be kept available in the magazine.
2. EXPLOSIVE BOXES - The original explosive boxes shall be opened in the magazine in the presence of
assistant manager or any other competent person (other than magazine clerk) specially authorized by
the manager for the purpose. Whenever possible, the number cartridges found in each box shall be
counted and entered in a book along with their weight.
3. TRANSIT SLIPS -Explosives issue and Return Voucher shall be prepared by the manager Assistant
Manager/Overman. As far as possible these slips shall be pre pared after enquiring about the amount of
balance coal left during the previous shift and the number of shots required during the following shift.
4. CHECKS UNDERGROUND – At the end of shot firing operation and at least once more during the shift,
the Sirdar shall count the number of cartridges and detonators left with the shotfirer, make an entry
thereof in the Transit Slip, and sign the same.
5. During the shift the overman and assistant manager shall check the boxes occasionally and sign the
Transit Slip.
6. At the end of the shift the overman shall check the boxes, enter the balance quantity of explosives in the
Transit Slip, and sign the entry.
7. RETURN OF UNUSED EXPLOSIVE TO MAGAZINE – The shotfirer shall return the boxes to the magazine,
and deposit key of the box with the magazine clerk.
8. GENERAL – Any overwriting of entries in the Transit Slip shall be countersign by the person making the
same.

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SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

EXPLAIN THE CAUSES OF INUNDATION AND PROCEDURE TO PREVENT INUNDATION. (SUMMER*)


(WINTER*)
DESCRIBE CLASSIFICATION OF MINE ACCIDENTS EXPLAIN INUNDATION IN DETAILS. (WINTER*)
CAUSES OF INUNDATION
The danger of inundation in underground workings may be caused due to –
1. Failure of barrier in the same mine or in adjoining mine.
2. Failure or collapse of dams which may be due to wrong siting of dams in weak pillars strata movement,
bad workmanship during construction, mine explosions, sudden increase of head of water beyond the
capacity of dam, etc.
3. Fault plane connecting with a waterlogged upper seam or water-bearing rocks.
4. Connection with disused or old abandoned water-logged workings in the same seam or upper or lower
seams including goaved out areas in, the same mine or in an adjoining mine.
5. Inadequate pumping capacity, unscientific pumping and failure of electricity.
6. Failure of shaft lining or tubbing.
7. Inadequate precautions while dewatering waterlogged workings which may result in water blast.
8. Connection with water-charged strata.
9. Wrong surveys which may lead to
a. Accidental penetration of barriers.
b. Sudden connection of a rise gallery to an old waterlogged gallery.
c. Connection of level gallery to waterlogged dip gallery.
10. Intentional robbing of coal barriers left between mine boundaries and not showing on the plans.

PROVISION OF CMR TO PREVENT THE DANGER OF INUNDATION


REGULATION 126
1. Where any mine or part thereof is so situated that there is any danger of inrush of surface water into
the mine, adequate protection against such inrush shall be provided and maintained.
a. Every entrance into a mine shall be so designed, constructed and maintained that its. lowest
point shall not be less than 1.5m above the highest flood level at that point.
2. No working shall be made in any mine vertically below –
a. Any part of any river, etc.
b. Any spot lying within a horizontal distance of 15 metres from either bank of a river, etc.
3. Other provisions in brief are –
a. Taking permission from the D.G.M.S. for working beneath and within 15 m of the bank of river,
nallah, tank, etc.
b. Regular examination of protective measures provided against danger of inrush of water by a
competent person once at least in every 14 days during the rainy season and once at least in 30
days during other periods of the year.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

REGULATION 127
1. Making proper provision to prevent irruption of water from workings of the same mine or of an
adjoining mine.
2. Taking adequate precautions against irruption of water while making working a lower level than the
adjoining body of water and while approaching fault passing through an upper seam or section.
3. Seeking permission from the D.G.M.S. before extending workings within 60 metres of disused or
abandoned workings.
4. Provisions of advance boreholes and restriction in the size of workings while advancing within 60 metres
of the water-body.
DESCRIBE SURFACE AND UNDERGROUND CAUSES OF INUNDATION. (WINTER*)
EXPLAIN THE SURFACE AND UNDERGROUND CAUSES AND PREVENTION OF INUNDATION.
(WINTER*)
DESCRIBE CLASSIFICATION OF MINE ACCIDENTS EXPLAIN INUNDATION IN DETAILS. (WINTER*)
1. The mines may have a low cover and have a roof of unconsolidated ground. The rain water may seep
directly into the workings.
2. The ground beneath the river beds may be weak and broken, and water may come through the roof.
3. Deeper mines may be overlain by a water bearing strata and the pillar fractures and faulty roof may
admit water.
4. The mine working could be connected to the old water-logged quarries or water may come through the
subsided areas.
5. Water could come from an adjoining mine, or from the old workings of the same mine, either from an
upper seam or from the rise side workings of the lower seam.
6. Surface water could enter through the inclines, audits or shafts.
7. A fault or crack may connect with a water source at the surface or a water-logged upper seam and when
the workings are advanced to the point, water may start rushing in and inundate the mine.
8. Disintegration of coal barriers and dams holding back water may also cause danger of inundation.
9. Wrong and inaccurate survey plans, negligence or inadequate precautions on the part of the persons
concerned are also the cause of inundation in mines.

PRECAUTIONS AGAINST DANGER OF INUNDATION FROM SURFACE WATER


The following measures should be taken to prevent danger of inundation from surface water-

1. A careful assessment of the danger of inundation from surface water should be made before the onset
of every rainy season. and adequate precautions against such danger should be clearly laid down and
implemented.
2. Effectiveness of the precautions, and weakening of embankments and obstructions in the normal
drainage system, should be checked regularly, and also by surprise inspections
3. A drainage should be made along a subsided area with an embankment. Cracks appearing on surface
should be blanketed with matti or should be grouted. Boreholes from surface should be grouted with
cement.
4. Every entrance into a mine should not be less than 1.5 m above the H.F.L. at that point.
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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

5. During rainy season, blockage of the river, jore, nallah or stream may occasionally occur on the
upstream. A constant watch should be kept and suitable precautions should be taken.
6. Fixation of danger mark of water level, and effectiveness of communication should receive particular
attention.
7. The position & the nature of the fault should be probated, & pumping capacity of mine should be
increase.
EXPLAIN THE PROCEDURE TO DEAL WITH BLOWN THROUGH SHOTS. (WINTER*)
1. The work at one of the two faces approaching each other should be discontinued and connection made
by advancing along one direction only when two faces have approached to within 9 metres of each
other.
2. Entrance to the temporarily stopped face and all approach galleries to the place of firing should be kept
fenced off. Notices should also be put up to prevent inadvertent entry work persons therein.
3. The mining Sirdar should supervise the shot-firing operations to ensure the precautions taken
4. The overman should give instructions in writing to the concerned shot-firers when the provisions of reg.
170(3) of the CMR, 1957 have attracted in the district under his charge and when the faces have
approached within 10 metres of each other.
5. When a face is temporarily discontinued, it should be ensured that the stopped face is always kept dry
by providing drains. siphon or pump as may be necessary to do so
6. In some cases, a working face may be approaching a gallery or roadway. In such cases also, it should be
ensured that when the parting between the side of the gallery or roadway and the face is 9 metres or
less, all approaches to such gallery or roadway should be fenced off before charging, stemming or firing
of shots at the face so as to prevent persons approaching the place where the connection is likely to be
established.

WHAT ARE THE FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO THE ACCIDENTS? DISCUSS THE GENERAL
STRATEGIES TO PREVENT ACCIDENTS. (WINTER*)
FACTORS CONTRIBUTE TO THE ACCIDENT
1. ACCIDENTS FROM EXPLOSIVES – These may occur mainly due to –
a. Misfires.
b. Blown-out shots.
c. Blown through.
d. Inadequate shelter.
e. Falls of ground soon after blasting.
f. Careless handlings.
g. Use of solid blasting.
h. Lack of examination for general safety.
2. ACCIDENTS FROM HAULAGES: These may occur due to –
a. Use of defective ropes, chains, couplings, brakes etc.
b. Runaway of tubs.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

c. Unauthorized riding.
d. Practice of guiding moving tubs.
e. Excessive haulage speeds.
f. Travelling along haulage road.
g. Safety devices not provided.
h. Lack of maintenance.
i. Lack of supervision.
3. ACCIDENT TO FITTERS AND ELECTRICIANS: Increase in minor accidents to fitters and electrician may be due
to –
a. Se of defective & substance material & parts of machineries.
b. Lack of proper maintenance.
c. Negligence of duties
d. Lack of proper training.
e. Lack of supervision.
STRATEGIES TO PREVENT ACCIDENT
1. ACCIDENTS FROM EXPLOSIVES – Accidents from explosives may be eliminated by rigid compliance with
regulations, with regard to
a) Taking shelter.
b) Posting reliable sentries.
c) Correct placing of charges of holes.
d) Correct procedure of examination for the general safety, ventilation, etc. Before and after firing.

2. ACCIDENTS FROM HAULAGE – It should be ensured that


a) Haulage roads are well lighted plenty of width and height. Are straight and graded.
b) Manholes are of correct dimensions, white-washed and they kept clear of any obstruction.
c) Pushing tubs in close succession, uncontrolled movement of tubs and guiding tubs at haulage
curves are stopped.
d) Loading points are well lighted and white-washed.
e) Ropes, chains, drawbars are carefully examined.
f) Safety appliances are provided.
g) Haulage safety rules are strictly abided.

3. ACCIDENTS TO FITTER AND ELECTRICIANS – To reduce accidents to fitters and electricians -


a) Defective and substandard machines or apparatus and their parts must not be used
underground.
b) Thorough testing and examination of all machineries including electrical equipment’s must be
made as often as may be necessary by competent persons.
c) Safety rules must be observed.
d) A proper scheme of inspection under a suitable official should be arranged to improve the
situation.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

MINE ORGANIZATION. (WINTER*)


LINE ORGANIZATION
The oldest type of organization based on the division of labor into a number of sections each controlled by a
section-in-charge or foreman, who is directly responsible for all aspects or jobs in his department. There is no
specialist in the system and for this reason, it is not applicable to complex modern mining operations.

FUNCTIONAL OR STAFF ORGANIZATION


The concept of functional system was evolved by F. W. Taylor. Taylor held that it pays to keep a man employed
continuously on one line of work which he becomes expert; the same principle may reasonably be applied to his
issuing of instructions. Thus in a functional organization any workman may receive instruction from several
specialized 'bosses' so that all phases of the operations are subject to supervision by a uniform level of
intelligence. Each specialist has control over all the workmen and thus is free to give orders to one or all. The
system leads to ill-feeling between officials, mistrust of official by the men consequent, chaotic condition of
supervision. The success will depend mainly on the ability of the employees involved to work together without
friction or conflict.

LINE AND STAFF ORGANIZATION


The type of organization adopted in the mining industry is obtained by grafting the 'functional' on to the line
system, the combination being called the and staff organization.

The authority in this type of organization is transmitted directly downwards from top to bottom, but side
transmission is also possible to permit the utilization of the services of the departmental specialists. With the
mechanization of the mines, both on the surface and underground, the service branches on the mechanical and
electrical engineering sides, under mechanical and electrical engineers responsible to the mine manager, are to-
day key unit’s in the organization. They have staff relationship with the ’line' officials below the manager level
and also with their own branches at the area level. The mine surveyor and his staff fall into the same category,
and there are other specialist officials such as the Safety Officer, the Ventilation Officer, the Personnel Officer
and so on who are principally 'staff official's appointed to advise the manager but who have in addition certain
line responsibilities to fulfil.

The chief advantages of the line and staff organization are that each official is familiar with his duties and to
whom he is directly responsible. Duplication of control is obviated and the expert service and specialist service
of staff men are brought within an easy reach of line improve the productivity of mines. But close and co-ordial
relationship between line & staff position is the only prerequisite condition for the successful working of this
dual system.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

DESCRIBE THE CAUSES OF ACCIDENTS DUE TO MINE FIRE AND ITS PREVENTION.
CAUSES
1. Normally spontaneous heating and fire occur in the following areas of coal mines.
2. and open blazing fires in an underground coal mine where a 25m.
3. Where premature collapse or crushing of pillars have occurred, even in stowing mines.
4. Where extracting of pillars is done by caving beyond incubation period.
5. Old workings having fallen coal.
6. Pillars especially between intakes and returns.
In our mines about 75-90% of fires are due to spontaneous heating,
PREVENTIVE MEASURE
1. All coal should be extracted by the longwall system, either advancing or retreating, maintaining a
straight line of face and removing carbonaceous materials from the goaf.
2. The face should be advanced rapidly and continuously to induce rapid consolidation of the job behind
the advancing face.
3. In pillar method of working, large pillar should be formed. Good roof controls are essential as breaks
introduce danger.
4. The seam should be worked on panel system; the size being determined by incubation period & the rate
of extraction.
5. Crushing of pillars should be prevented. Crevices or fractures in pillars to be mud-plaster to prevent
access of air. Special sealant or sodium silicate may be applied for the purpose.
6. All loose coal should be removed from goaf and all timbers should be withdrawn to allow roof
consolidation of the goaf.
7. Regulation 118A of the CMR should be strictly followed.
8. The mine should be inspected on ideal days with special attention to any symptoms of heating.

DEFINE THE FOLLOWING AS PER MINES ACT 1952 (IMP(SUMMER*) (WINTER*))


1. REPORTABLE INJURY – Reportable injury means any injury other than a serious bodily injury which involves,
or in all probability will involve, the enforced absence of the injured persons from work for a period of
seventy-two hours or more.
2. SERIOUS BODILY INJURY – Serious bodily injury means any injury which involves; or in probability will involve
the permanent loss of any part or section of a body or the use of any part or section of a body, or the
permanent loss of or injury to the sight or hearing or any permanent physical incapacity or the fracture of
any bone or one or more joints or bones of any phalanges of hand or foot.

STATE THE VARIOUS PROVISIONS UNDER SECTION 23 REGARDING NOTICE TO BE GIVEN OF


ACCIDENT AS PER MINES ACT 1952.
(1) Whenever there occurs in or about a mine: -
(a) an accident causing loss of life or serious bodily injury, or

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(b) an explosion, ignition, spontaneous heating, outbreak of fire or irruption or inrush of water or other
liquid matter, or
(c) an influx of inflammable or noxious gases, or
(d) a breakage of ropes, chains or other gear by which persons or materials are lowered or raised in a
shaft or an incline, or
(e) an over winding of cages of other means of conveyance in any shaft while persons or materials are
being lowered or raised, or
(f) a premature collapse of any part of the workings, or
(g) any other accident which may be prescribed, the owner, agent or manager of the mine shall give
notice of the occurrence to such authority in such form and within such time as may be prescribed,
and he shall simultaneously post one copy of the notice on a special notice-board in the prescribed
manner at a place where it may be inspected by trade union officials, and shall ensure that the notice
is kept on the board for not less than fourteen days from the date of such posting.

(1A) Whenever there occurs in about a mine an accident causing reportable injury to any person, the owner,
agent or manager of the mine shall enter in a register such occurrence in the prescribed form and copies of
such entries shall be furnished to the Chief Inspector once in quarter.
(2) Where a notice given under sub-section (1) relates to an accident causing loss of life, the authority shall
make an inquiry into the occurrence within two months of the receipt of the notice and, if the authority is
not the Inspector, he shall cause the Inspector to make an inquiry within the said period.
(3) The Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, direct that accidents other than those
specified in sub-sections (1) and (1A) which cause bodily injury resulting in the enforced absence from work
of the person injured for a period exceeding twenty- four hours shall be entered in a register in the
prescribed form or shall be subject to the provision of sub-section (1) or sub -section (1A), as the case may
be.

(4) A copy of the entries in the register referred to in sub section (3) shall be sent by the owner, agent or
manager of the mine, [on or before the 20th day of January in the year following that to which the entries
relate] to the Chief Inspector.
(5) Whenever there occurs in or about a mine an accident causing loss of life or serious bodily injury to any
person, the place of accident shall not be disturbed or altered before the arrival or without the consent of
the Chief Inspector or the Inspector to who notice of the accident is required to be given under sub-section
(1) of section 23, unless such disturbances of alteration is necessary to prevent any further accident to
remove bodies of the deceases; or to rescue any person from danger, or unless discontinuance of work at
the place of accident would seriously impede the working of the mine;

Provided that where the Chief Inspector or the said Inspector fails to inspect the place of accident, within
seventy-two hours of the time of the accident, work may be resumed at the place of the accident.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

WRITE ABOUT COMMITTEE UNDER SECTION 12 OF MINE ACT.


COMMITTEES
1. The Central Government shall, with effect from such date as that Government may by notification in the
official Gazette, specify in this behalf constitute for the purposes of this Act, a Committee consisting of -
a) a person in the service of the Government, not being the Chief Inspector or an Inspector,
appointed by the Central Government to as Chairman:
b) the Chief Inspector of mines;
c) two persons to represent the interests of miners appointed by the Central Government;
d) two persons to represent the interests of owners of mines appointed by the Central
Government;
e) two qualified mining engineers not directly employed in the mining industry, appointed by
Central Government:
(a) Provided that one at least of the persons appointed under clause.
(b) shall be for representing the interests of workers in coal mines and one at least of the
persons appointed under clause.
(c) shall be for representing the interests of owners of coal mines.
2. Without prejudice to generality of sub-section (1), the Central Government may constitute one or more
Committees to deal with specific matters relating to any part of the territories to which this Act extends
or to a mine or a group of mines and may appoint members thereof and the provisions of sub-section
(1) (except the provision thereto) shall apply for the constitution of any Committee under this sub-
section as they apply for the constitution of a Committee under that sub-section.
3. No act or proceeding of a Committee shall be invalid by reason only of the existence of any vacancy
among its members or any defect in the constitution thereof.

AS MINES ACT 1952, UNDER SECTION 22 DESCRIBE THE POWERS OF INSPECTORS WHEN CAUSES
OF DANGER NOT EXPRESSLY PROVIDED AGAINST EXIST OR WHEN EMPLOYMENT OF PERSON IS
DANGEROUS.
(1) If, in respect of any matter for which no express provision is made by or under this Act, it appears to the
Chief Inspector or an Inspector that any mine or part thereof or any matter, thing or practice in or connected
with the mine, or with the control, supervision, management or defective so as to threaten, or tend to, the
bodily injury of any person, he may give notice, in writing thereof to the owner, agent or manager of the mine
and shall state in the notice the particulars in respect of which he considers the mine or part thereof or the
matter, thing or practice to be dangerous or defective and require the same to be remedied within such time
and in such manner as he may specify in the notice.

(1A) Where the owner, agent or manager of amine fails to comply with the terms of a notice given under sub-
section

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(1) within the period specified therein, the Chief Inspector or the Inspector, as the case may be, may by order in
writing, prohibit the employment in or about the mine or any part thereof any person whose employment is
not in his opinion reasonably necessary for securing compliance with the terms of the notice.

(1) Without prejudice to the provisions contained in sub-section (10 the Chief Inspector or the Inspector as the
case may be, by order in writing addressed to the owner, agent or manager of a mine prohibit the extraction or
reduction of pillars or blocks of minerals in any mine or part thereof, if, in his opinion such operation is likely to
cause the crushing of pillars or blocks of minerals or the premature collapse of any part of the working or
otherwise endanger the mine or the life or safety of persons employed therein or if, in his opinion, adequate
provision against the outbreak of fire or flooding has not been made by providing for the sealing off and
isolation of the part of the mine in which such operation is contemplated and for restricting the area that might
be affected by fire or flooding.

(3) If the Chief Inspector, or an Inspector authorized in this behalf by general or special order in writing by the
Chief Inspector, is of opinion that there is urgent and immediate danger to the life or safety of any person
employed in any mine or part thereof, he may, by order in writing containing a statement of the grounds of his
opinion, prohibit, [until he is satisfied that the danger is removed] the employment in or about the mine or any
part thereof of any person whose employment is not in his opinion reasonably necessary for the purpose of
removing the danger.

[(3A) Every person whose employment is prohibited under sub -section (1A) of sub-section (3) shall be entitled
to payment of full wages for the period for which he would have been, but for the prohibition in employment
and the owner agent or manager shall be liable for payment of such full wages of that person: Provided that the
owner, agent or manager may instead of paying such full provide such person with an alternative employment
at the same wages which such person was receiving in the employment which was prohibited.

(4) Where notice has been given under sub-section (1) or an order made under sub-section (1A), sub-section (2)
or sub-section (3) by an Inspector, the owner, agent or manager of the mine may within ten days after the
receipt of the notice or order, as the case may be appeal against the same to the Chief Inspector who may
confirm, modify or cancel the notice or order.

(5) The Chief Inspector or the Inspector sending a notice under sub-section (1) or making an order under sub-
section (1A), sub-section (2) or sub-section (3) and the Chief Inspector making an order (other than an order of
cancellation in appeal) under sub-section (4) shall forthwith report the same to the Central Government.

(6) If the owner, agent or manager of the mine objects to a notice sent under sub-section (1) by the Chief
Inspector or to an order made by the Chief Inspector under sub-section (1A) or sub-section (2) or sub-section
(3) or sub-section (4), he may, within twenty days after the receipt of the notice containing the requisition or of
the order or after the date of the decision on appeal, as the case may be, send his objection in writing stating
the grounds thereof to the Central Government [which shall, ordinarily within a period of two months from the
date of receipt of the objection, refer] the same to a Committee.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(7) Every notice under sub-section (1) or order under sub-section (1A), sub-section (2) or sub-section (3) or sub -
section (4) to which objection is made under sub-section (6) shall be complied with, pending the receipt at the
mine of the decision of the Committee. Provided that the Committee may, on the application of the owner,
agent or manager, suspend the operation of a [notice] under sub-section (1) pending its decision on the
objection.

(8) Nothing in this section shall affect the powers of a magistrate under section 144 of the Code of Criminal
procedure 1896. [Act V of 1898).]

EXPLAIN THE PROVISION REGARDING LEAVE WITH WAGES AS PER MINES ACT.
ANNUAL LEAVE WAGES (SECTION 51)
1. Every person employed in a mine who has completed a calendar years’ service therein shall be allowed,
during the subsequent calendar year leave with wages, calculated –
a) in the case of a person employed below ground, at the rate of one day for every [fifteen days] of
work performed by him, and
b) in any other case, at the rate of one day for every twenty days of work performed by him.
2. A calendar years’ service referred to in sub -section (1) shall be deemed to have completed:
a) in the case of a person employed below ground in a mine, if he has during the calendar year put
in not less than one hundred and ninety attendances at the mine; and
b) in the case of any other person, if he has during the calendar year put in not less than two
hundred and forty attendances at the mine.

WAGES DURING LEAVE PERIOD


For the leave allowed to a person employed in a mine under section 52, he shall be paid at a rate equal to the
daily average of his total full -time earnings for the days on which he was employed during the month
immediately preceding his leave, exclusive of any overtime wages and bonus but inclusive of any dearness
allowance and compensation in cash including such compensation, if any accruing through the free issue of
food grains and other articles as persons employed in the mine may, for the time being, be entitled to: Provided
that if no such average earning is available, then the average shall be computed on the basis of the daily
average of the total full time earnings of all persons similarly employed for same months the.

PAYMENT IN ADVANCE IN CERTAIN CASES


Any person employed in a mine who has been allowed leave for not less than four days shall before his leave
begins be paid the wages due for the period of the leave allowed.
MODE OF RECOVERY OF UNPAID WAGES
Any sum required to be paid by the owner, agent or manager of a mine under this Chapter but not paid by him
shall be recoverable as delayed wages under the provisions of the payment of Wages Act. 1936.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

POWER TO EXEMPT MINES (SECTION 56)


Where the Central Government is satisfied that the leave rules applicable to persons employed in any mine
provide benefits20 which in its opinion are not less favorable than those provided for in this Chapter it may, by
order in writing and subject to such conditions as may be specified therein exempt the mine from all or any of
the provisions of the Chapter.

DEFINE AS PER MINE ACT 1952.


1. AGENT. (IMP(SUMMER**)) – When used in relation to a mine, means every person, whether appointed as
such or not, who, acting or purporting to act on behalf of the owner, takes part in the management, control,
supervision or direction of the mine or of any part thereof:
2. DISTRICT MAGISTRATE – District magistrate means, in a presidency-town, the person appointed by the
Central Government to perform the duties of a district magistrate under this Act in that town;
3. WEEK – Week means a period of seven days beginning at midnight on Saturday night or such other night as
may be approved in writing for a particular area by the Chief Inspector or an Inspector.
4. EMPLOYED. (IMP(SUMMER****) (WINTER***)) – A person is said to be employed in a mine who works as
the manager or who works under appointment by the owner, agent or manager of the mine or with
knowledge of the manager, whether for wages or not.

EXPLAIN THE PROVISIONS REGARDING HEALTH AND SANITATION AS PER MINE RULES.
(SUMMER*) (WINTER*)
EXPLAIN THE MINE RULE REGARDING QUALITY OF DRINKING WATER (SUMMER**)
STATE THE VARIOUS PROVISIONS OF QUANTITY OF DRINKING WATER UNDER MINES RULES 1955.
(IMP(SUMMER**) (WINTER**))
STATE THE VARIOUS PROVISIONS AS PER MINES RULES REGARDING
MINE RULE 30 – QUANTITY OF DRINKING WATER &STORAGE OF DRINKING WATER MINE RULE
31.

30. QUANTITY OF DRINKING WATER –


a) The quantity of drinking water to be provided in a mine or any part thereof shall be on a scale of at least
two liters for every person employed at any one time and such drinking water shall be readily available
at conveniently accessible points during the whole of the working shift.
b) Where 100 persons or more are employed, either above ground or in opencast workings, at any one
time, an Inspector may by order in writing require the drinking water to be effectively cooled by
mechanical or other means available.
c) No charge shall be made for the drinking water so supplied.

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SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

31. STORAGE OF DRINKING WATER –


1. If drinking water is not provided from taps connected with constant water- supply system, it shall be
kept cool in suitable vessels sheltered from whether and such vessels shall be emptied, cleaned and
refilled very day. Steps shall be taken to preserve the water, the storage vessels and the vessels used for
drinking water in a clean and hygienic condition.
2. If the source of drinking water is not from a public water supply system, an Inspector may by order in
writing require the owner, agent or manager of the mine to submit with the least possible delay a
certificate from a competent health authority or analyst as to the fitness of the water for human
consumption.

32. DECISION OF CHIEF INSPECTOR FINAL –


If any question arises as to whether water supply arrangements are satisfactory and in accordance with the
requirements of section 19 and rules 30 and 31, the decision of the Chief Inspector shall be final.

33. SURFACE LATRINES AND URINALS.


1. On the surface at every mine, adequate latrine and urinal accommodation shall be provided at
conveniently accessible places separately for the use of males and females employed in the mine.
2. The scale of latrine accommodation shall be at least one seat for every 50 males and at least one seat
for every 50 females employed at one time; Provided that where sanitary latrines are maintained in
bathing places, the number of latrines to be provided under this rule may include such sanitary latrines.

34. STANDARDS OF CONSTRUCTIONS. –


Every latrine on the surface provided for the use of persons employed in a mine shall conform to the following
standards of construction:
1. It shall be on a site approved of in writing by an Inspector,
2. It shall be built of brick or other suitable building material,
3. It shall be adequately drained and properly ventilated and afforded effective protection from the
weather,
4. It shall be of a type approved of in writing by an Inspector,
5. the floor and any interior surface of walls up to a height of 1 [1.25 metres] shall be cement punned or
otherwise so finished as to provide a smooth impervious surface,
6. It shall be partitioned off so as to secure privacy and shall have a proper door and fastenings, and where
a latrine intended for the use of one sex adjoins a latrine intended for the use of other sex, the
approaches shall be separate,
7. where a latrine is of the service type, the service chamber shall be provided with an efficient trap door
and the receptacle for night-soil shall be of galvanized iron,
8. the interior walls, ceilings and partitions shall be white-washed once at least in very four months, and
the dare of such white-washing shall be recorded in a book kept at the mine for the purpose; Provided
that this requirement regarding white- washing shall not apply to those parts of walls, ceilings or
partitions which are laid in glazed tiles or otherwise finished so as to provide a smooth polished and

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

impervious surface but all these parts shall be washed with suitable detergents and disinfectants at least
once in every seven days.

35. SIGN-BOARDS TO BE DISPLAYED –


Where persons of both sexes are employed, there shall be displayed outside each latrine a signboard in the
language understood by the majority of work persons “For Males” or “For Females” as the case may be. Each
sign board shall also have the figure of a man or a woman as the case may be.

36. PROVISION OF WATER FOR WASHING ETC.


1. Where a piped water supply is available, a sufficient number of water taps, conveniently accessible, shall
be provided in or near such latrines.
2. If piped water supply is not available, a sufficient quantity of water shall be kept stored in suitable
receptacles near latrines.

37. UNDERGROUND LATRINES –


If in any mine more than fifty persons are employed underground at any one time, latrines shall be provided
underground on a scale approved by an Inspector at convenient points near the working shafts and at
entrances to the districts or sections of the mine. The latrines shall be of a type approved of in writing by an
Inspector.

38. SANITATION –
1. At every mine all underground working places and traveling roadways shall be kept clean from excreta.
2. All latrines and urinals in or about a mine shall be kept in a clean and sanitary condition.
3. Receptacles for night-soil shall be cleaned and disinfected at least once in every day.
4. Proper arrangements shall be made on the surface for the disposal of night-soil and urine. Such
arrangements shall comply with the requirements of any health authority or Mines Board within whose
jurisdiction the mine is situated.

39. OBLIGATION OF WORK PERSONS –


1. No person shall want only misuse or damage the latrines provided either on the surface or
underground.
2. No person shall pollute the underground working of a mine with excreta. All persons employed
underground shall acquaint themselves with the sanitary arrangements provided from time to time in
the section of the mine in which they have to work or pass.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

STATE THE VARIOUS PROVISIONS REGARDING FIRST AID STATIONS AS PER RULE 44 OF COAL
MINES RULES 1955. (IMP(SUMMER***) (WINTER*))
FIRST AID STATIONS –
(1) At every mine there shall be provided and maintained first-aid equipment as prescribed in the Third
Schedule, at conveniently accessible stations where injured persons may receive first-aid treatment, as follows:
(a) above ground, a first- aid station –
(I) at the top of every shaft or incline where men or material are normally wound or hauled;
(ii) in every workshop;
(iii) at every screening plant and loading place; and
(iv) at every other place where more than 50 persons are employed at any one time.
(b) In every opencast working, one first-aid station for every 50 persons or part thereof, employed at any one
time.
(c) below ground, one first-aid station –
I) at the bottom of every shaft where men or material are normally wound, and at or near every plant;
ii) near the drive end of every haulage;
iii) in or at the entrance to every district or section of the mine; Provided that nothing in this sub-rule
shall be construed to require the provision of a first-aid station within 300 metres of another first-aid station.
(2) It shall be the duty of the persons appointed to be in charge of a first-aid station under rule 42, to see that
the equipment provided at the station is kept in good order and that it is replenished whenever necessary.
(3) An up -to-date list of all first-aid stations provided in the mine shall be kept in the office of the mine and also
displayed prominently at the first-aid room.

DEFINE THE FOLLOWING AS PER COAL MINES REGULATION 1957


1. COMPETENT PERSON. (IMP(SUMMER***) (WINTER*)) – “Competent person” in relation to any work or any
machinery, plant or equipment means a person who has attained the age of 20 years and who has been
duly appointed in writing by manager as a person competent to supervise or perform that work, or to
supervise the operation of that machinery, plant or equipment, and who is responsible for the duties
assigned to him, and includes a shotfirer.
2. GASSY SEAM OF FIRST DEGREE – “Gassy seam of the first degree” means a coal seam or part thereof lying
within the precincts of a mine not being an open cast working whether or not inflammable gas is actually
detected in the general body of the air at any place in its workings below ground, or when the percentage of
the inflammable gas if and when detected, in such general body of air does not exceed 0.1 and the rate of
emission of such gas does not exceed one cubic metre per ton of coal produced.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

DEFINE THE FOLLOWING TERM AS PER CMR 1957


1. AUXILIARY FAN. (IMP (SUMMER**)) – “Auxiliary fan” means a forcing fan or an exhausting fan used
belowground wholly or mainly for ventilating one or more faces forming part of a ventilating district.
2. BOOSTER FAN. (IMP(SUMMER**) (WINTER*)) – “Booster fan” means a mechanical ventilator used below
ground for boosting the whole current of air passing along the intake or return airway of a mine or
ventilating district.
3. FACE – “Face” means the moving front of any working place or the inbye end of any gallery, roadway or
drift.
4. FLAME PROOF APPARAT – “flame proof apparatus” means an apparatus that can withstand without
injury any explosion of the inflammable gas that may occur within it and can prevent the transmission
of flame such as will ignite the inflammable gas which may be present in the surrounding atmosphere.

STATE THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF SIRDAR AS PER CMR 44. (IMP (SUMMER**))
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF SIRDAR’S
1. Mining Sirdar shall obey orders of superior officials.
1. Keep control on work in the district assigned to him.
2. Make all efforts to ensure observance of the Act, regulations and orders issued thereunder.
3. If anyone contravenes the provisions, he shall inform the overman immediately.
4. He shall carry out all inspections required by the Regulations and write report.
2. In beginning of the shift,
(a) He shall take charge from mining Sirdar of the previous shift underground.
(b) If the mine is not worked in succession of shifts, he shall, within 2 hours before commencement
of work in the shift, inspect all working places and roadways where persons have to work or pass
during the shift. During the inspection, he shall be accompanied by such assistants as may be
necessary, and shall ascertain the condition regarding-
(1) ventilation
(2) sanitation
(3) presence of gases
(4) state of roof and sides
(5) presence of spontaneous heating and other fire risks
(6) generally, for safety of persons. The inspection shall be made with the help of
approved flame safety lamp, in case of a fiery seam also with a cage containing
suitable birds or an approved CO detector. He shall pay particular attention to (1)
checking of supports, (2) goaf edges, and (3) presence of gases.
After the above inspection, he shall go to the 'station'. allot working places to the
workmen waiting there and advice about any special precautions to be taken by
them.
3. Inspection during the shift

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

Inspections similar to the above shall be carried out at least once in every 4 hours. He shall see that
workmen are doing their job carefully. If he finds any workman at a place where he is not authorized
to go, he may order him to leave the mine, and inform the overman.
4. Support
(a) The mining Sirdar shall arrange to dress and support roof and sides of all working places and
roadways to make them safe.
(b) He shall observe systematic support rules strictly.
(c) Make sure that no support is withdrawn without a safety prop withdrawer. He shall ensure
availability of Sylvester machine, chain and rope for the purpose.
(d) Ensure availability of bunton (of adequate length) and ladder, if height at any place is more than
3m.
5. Precautions against dangers
(a) If he finds any place unsafe or gets report of a danger which cannot be removed immediate y, he
shall
i. withdraw the persons from such place,
ii. not leave the place until the danger is removed, or the place is fenced off.
(b) He shall take care that any dangerous work is done with due precautions, and shall be present
throughout whenever any work of clearing of falls of ground and setting of supports therein is
being carried out.
(c) He shall arrange to fence off entries to places not being worked or used.
(d) If he finds an accumulation of inflammable or noxious gases, he shall withdraw all person from
the place, fence it off and report the matter to the superior official. He shall not attempt to
remove the danger without his instruction.
(e) Report to the overman any deficiency of air.
6. In case of an accident
(a) On receiving information of accident in the district. He shall reach there immediately
i. inspect the place,
ii. if required, supervise rescue operations, and
iii. report or send information of accident to the overman, manager, assistant manager.
7. Inspection of second outlet
(a) If any of the two exit routes to surface is not ordinarily used for travelling, he shall travel the
whole such way, at least once in every 7 days to remain acquainted with the same.
8. Charge handing over and writing of report
(a) He shall devote the whole of his time to duties, and shall not leave the mine without handing
over charge to mining Sirdar of the succeeding shift, in the district. He shall also write a
descriptive report of his shift.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF SHOT-FIRER AS PER CMR 45. (IMP(SUMMER*) (WINTER*))


DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF SHOTFIRER
(a) Carry out his duties in accordance with the provisions of the regulations and of any orders made thereunder
with respect to the transport and use of explosives.
(b) Be responsible for the observance by his assistants, if any, of such provisions and of any direction with a
view to safety which may be given to them by a superior official.
(c) Not hand over any explosives to any unauthorized person.
(d) See that clay, sand or other suitable stemming material is available in sufficient quantities at convenient
places.
(e) Be present when shots are being charged and stemmed; and shall himself fire the shots.
(f) Be responsible, when a shot has misfired, for seeing that the place is adequately fenced, and that the
provisions of regulations 177 are strictly observed.

STATE THE GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ABOUT MINE PLANS AS PER CMR 58. (IMP(SUMMER***)
(WINTER*))
WHAT ARE THE GENERAL REQUIREMENT OF MINE PLAN AS PER CMR 1957?
General requirements about mine plans

1. Every plan or section prepared or submitted in accordance with the provisions of the regulations shall –
a. show the name of the mine and of the owner, and the purpose for which the plan is prepared;
b. show the true north, or the magnetic meridian and the date of the latter;
c. show a scale of the plan at least 25 centimeters long and suitably subdivided;
d. unless otherwise provided, be on a scale having a representative factor of 1200:1;
Provided that the Chief Inspector may, by an order in writing and subject to such conditions as he may specify
therein, permit or required the plans to be prepared on any other suitable scale.

e. be properly inked in or durable paper or on tracing cloth, and be kept in good condition.

1. The conventions shown in the Second Schedule shall be accurate and maintained corrected up to a date
which is not earlier than three months:

2. The plans and sections required by the regulations shall be accurate and maintained corrected up to a
date which is not earlier that three months:

3. Plans and sections required to be maintained under the regulations shall be kept available for inspection
in the office at the mine, and shall not be removed therefrom except by or with the approval in writing
of the Regional Inspector, unless a true copy thereof has been kept therein.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

STATE THE STANDARD OF VENTILATION AS PER CMR 130. (IMP (SUMMER****))


STANDARD OF VENTILATION.
1. It shall be the duty of the owner, agent or manager of every mine to take such steps as are necessary for
securing that there is constantly produced in all parts of the mine belowground which are not sealed off,
ventilation adequate to clear away smoke, steam and dust; to dilute gases that are inflammable or
noxious so as to render them harmless; to provide air containing a sufficiency of oxygen; and to prevent
such excessive rise of temperature or humidity as may be harmful to the health of persons.

2. For the purpose of securing adequate ventilation as aforesaid, the owner, agent and manager shall
ensure that:
I. in every ventilating district, not less than six cubic metres per minute of air per person employed
in the district on the largest shift or not less than 2.5 cubic metres per minute of air per daily ton
output whichever is larger, passes along the last ventilation connection in the district which
means the inbye-most gallery in the district along which the air passes;
II. at every place in the mine where persons are required to work or pass, the air does not contain
less than 19 percent of oxygen or more than 0.5 percent of carbon dioxide or any noxious gas in
quantity likely to affect the health of any person;
III. the percentage of inflammable gas does not exceed 0.75 in the general body of the return air of
any ventilating district and 1.25 in any place in the mine;
IV. the wet bulb temperature in any working place does not exceed 33.5 degrees centigrade; and
where the wet bulb temperature exceeds 30.5 degrees’ centigrade arrangements are made to
ventilate the same with a current of air moving at a speed of not less than one metre per second.
V. for ensuring compliance with the provisions of clauses (ii), (iii) and (iv) of this sub-regulation, air
samples and temperature readings shall be taken at least once in 30 days and the result shall be
recorded in a bound paged book kept for the purpose:
3. In every mine, ventilation as specified in sub-regulation (2) shall be produced by a suitable mechanical
ventilator: Provided that if in respect of any mine a suitable mechanical ventilator is not immediately
available the Chief Inspector may by an order in writing and subject to such conditions as he may specify
therein grant a temporary exemption from the operation of this sub-regulation until such time as a
suitable mechanical ventilator can be obtained.
4. If with respect to any mine or part thereof the Regional Inspector is of the opinion that the ventilation is
not adequate, he may, by an order in writing, require the installation and maintenance of such a
mechanical ventilator as is capable of producing adequate ventilation in the mine or part.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

STATE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF OVER MAN AS PER CMR.


DESCRIBE THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITY OF OVERMAN. (SUMMER*) (WINTER*)
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF OVERMAN
The overman shall strictly observe the following provisions, namely –
(1) (a) Subject to the orders of superior officials, he shall have responsible charge and control of such part of the
mine, and shall carry out such duties, as may be assigned to him by the manager.
(a) He shall, while on duty, carry a tracing of the workings of such district and shall keep the tracing up-to-date.
(b) He shall, in his district, make the inspections and reports required by these regulations.
(c) He shall be responsible to see that the subordinate officials and competent persons in his district carry out
their respective duties in a proper manner.
(d) He shall, to the best of his power, enforce in his district the provisions of the Act, of these regulations and
orders made thereunder, and shall, subject to the control of the manager and the undermanager, assistant
manager, if any, give such directions as may be necessary to ensure compliance with those provisions, and
to secure the safety of the district and the safety and proper discipline of the persons employed therein.
(2) He shall see that sufficient supplies of timber brattice and other necessaries required for the safe working of
his district are kept in convenient places therein.
(3) (a) He shall see that every air-crossing, stopping, door, brattice and other ventilation device is maintained in
good order.
(b) He shall, in his district, see that the ventilation is effective; and when brattices or air pipes are required to be
used for the ventilation of the working places, he shall see that they are kept sufficiently advance to ensure that
an adequate amount of air reaches every such working place.
(c) He shall have power to send out of the mine any person under his charge infringing or attempting to infringe
any provision of the Act or of the regulations or orders made thereunder, or failing to carry out any direction
given with regard to safety; and shall report in writing any such infringement or attempted infringement or
failure to the manager.
(4)(a) He shall see that all tracks and tramlines are properly laid, graded, ballasted or otherwise packed.
(b) He shall see that the manholes on the haulage roadways are kept safe, clear of any obstruction, and
properly white-washed.
(c) He shall see that the stop-blocks, runway switches and other safety devices are fixed and used as required
under the regulations, that drag or back-stays are provided and regularly used behind tubs ascending declines
and that a sufficient supply of suitable sprags is provided where tubs are loaded on a gradient or lowered down
a gradient by hand.
(d) He shall, if he finds any of the ropes, chains, signals, brakes, jig wheels and post or other apparatus in use in
his district to be in an unsafe condition, stop the use of the same forthwith.
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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(5) He shall be responsible to see that except for the purpose of inspection, examination and repairs every
person other than an official or a haulage attendant travels by the travelling roadway.
(6) He shall give prompt attention to the removal of any danger observed or reported to him, and shall see that
dangerous places are adequately fenced off.]
(7) He shall, under the direction of the manager, see that approved safety lamps are used and naked lights
excluded wherever and whenever danger from inflammable gas is apprehended.
(8)(a) He shall devote the whole of his time to his duties and shall visit each working place in his district as often
as may be necessary or possible.
(b) He shall not, except for justifiable cause, leave the district in his charge until he had finished the inspections
required under these regulations and any other duties that he is required to perform, or until relieved by a duly
appointed substitute.
(c) He shall, if the mine is working in a continuous succession of shifts, confer with the official succeeding him
and give him such information as may be necessary for the safety of his district and of persons employed
therein.
(9) He shall, at the end of his shift, record in a bound-paged book kept for the purpose a general report on the
performance of all his duties during the shift, including anything concerning the proper working of the mine and
the safety and discipline of persons employed in his district.

STATE STANDARD OF LIGHTING AS CMR.


STANDARDS OF LIGHTING.
(1) If any doubt arises as to whether any amp or light is of adequate lighting performance or not, it shall be
referred to the Chief Inspector for decision.
(2) The Chief Inspector may, from time to time, by notification in the Official Gazette, specify –
a. The type of lamp to be provided to specified categories of persons employed in a mine; or
b. The standard of lighting to be provided in specified areas or places in amine.

EXPLAIN VARIOUS PLANS AND SECTIONS TO BE KEPT IN MINES AS PER CMR 1957.
DESCRIBE VENTILATION PLAN AS PER COAL MINES REGULATION 1957. (WINTER*)

Type of plans –
The owner, agent or manager of every mine shall keep the following plans and sections:

(a) A surface plan showing every surface feature within the boundaries, such as telephone, telegraph or power
transmission line, water main, tram-line, railway, road, river, watercourse, reservoir, tank, bore-hole, shaft
and incline opening, opencast working, subsidence and building on the surface.
(b) An underground plan showing:
(I) the position of the workings of the mine belowground;

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(II) every bore-hole and shaft with depth, incline opening, cross measure drift, goaf, fire-
stopping or seal, water-dam (with dimensions and other particulars of construction),
pumping station and haulage roadway;
(III) every important surface feature within the boundaries, such as railway, road, river, stream,
watercourse, tank, reservoir, opencast working and building which is within 200 metres of
any part of the workings measured on the horizontal plane;
(IV) (iv) the general direction and rate of dip of the strata;
(V) (v) such sections of the seam as may be necessary to show any substantial variation in the
thickness or character thereof and showing the working section, and such sections of the
strata sunk or driven through in the mine or proved by boring as may be available;
(VI) (vi) the position of every roll, washout, dyke and every fault with the amount and direction
of its throw;
(VII) (vii) an abstract of all statutory restrictions in respect of any specified workings with a
referred to the order imposing the same.

(c) A ventilation plan, and section where necessary, showing the system of ventilation in the mine, and in
particular –
(I) the general direction of air-current;
(II) every point where the quantity of air is measured;
(III) every air-crossing, ventilation door, stopping and every other principle device for the
regulation and distribution of air;
(IV) every fire-stopping and its serial number;
(V) every room used for storing inflammable material;
(VI) the position of fire-fighting equipment;
(VII) every water-dam with dimensions and other particulars of construction;
(VIII) every pumping, telephone and ambulance station; and
(IX) every haulage and travelling roadway;
(d) A geological plan of the area of leasehold, on a suitable scale. Showing the geological structures of the
mine area, namely surface contour: coal seam outcrop/in crop, extent of different rock types: fault, fold
dykes etc.
(e) Joint survey plan.
(f) Water danger plan.

DEFINE MEANS OF ACCESS AND EGRESS AS PER CMR 1957. MEANS OF ACCESS AS PER CMR.
(WINTER*)
OUTLETS FROM A MINE
(1) No person shall be employed, or be permitted to enter or remain for purposes of employment, in any
working belowground, unless the working is provided with at least two shafts, inclines or other outlets to the
surface –

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SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(a) with which every seam or section of the time being at work has a communication so as to afford
separate means of ingress and egress to the persons employed therein;
(b) which do not have their surface openings in the same building; and
(c) which are under the sole control of the manager:

(2) Suitable arrangements shall be made for persons to descend and ascend by each of such shafts, inclines or
outlets; and
(a) where the shaft is more than 30 metres in depth, such arrangements shall be by mechanical means. Every
mechanical equipment used for the purpose shall be to installed and maintained as to be constantly
available for use. In case of a doubt as to whether any such arrangement is suitable or not it shall be
referred to the Chief Inspector for decision; and
(b) where in any shaft, ladders are used as a means of ingress or egress of persons employed in a mine, every
such ladder shall –
(I) be of strong construction;
(ii) be securely fixed in the shaft at an inclination of not more than 80 degrees from the horizontal;
(iii) be made continuous or without perceptible overlapping or break except at platforms which shall be
provided at intervals of not more than nine metres;
(iv) project at least one metre above the mouth of the shaft, and above every platform, except where
strong holdfasts or handrails are provided;
(v) have rungs equally spaced and at a sufficient distance from the wall or any timber to ensure proper
foothold; and
(vi) be maintained in good repair.
(3) Such shafts, inclines or outlets shall not be less than 13.5 metres distant from one another at any point, and
each shall be connected with the other by means of a walkable passage, not less than 1.8 metres high 1.5
metres wide, through the workings belowground that are being served by such shafts, inclines or outlets.
(4) Whenever the connection between two outlets which are required to be maintained under sub-regulation
(1) has been obstructed or found dangerous, only such persons as are necessary to clear the obstruction or to
repair the dangerous part of the connection or to make a new second outlet, as the case may be, shall be
employed belowground until such time as the connection has been re-established or a new second outlet has
been provided.
(5) The foregoing provisions of this regulation with respect to shafts, inclines and outlets shall not apply -
(a) to a shaft which is being sunk or to an incline or outlet which is being made;
(b) to any working for the purpose of making a connection between two or more shafts, inclines or outlets;
and
(c) to any working for the sole purpose of searching for or proving minerals;
(3) Such shafts, inclines or outlets shall not be less than 13.5 metres distant from one another at any point, and
each shall be connected with the other by means of a walkable passage, not less than 1.8 metres high 1.5
metres wide, through the workings belowground that are being served by such shafts, inclines or outlets.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(4) Whenever the connection between two outlets which are required to be maintained under sub-regulation
(1) has been obstructed or found dangerous, only such persons as are necessary to clear the obstruction or to
repair the dangerous part of the connection or to make a new second outlet, as the case may be, shall be
employed belowground until such time as the connection has been re-established or a new second outlet has
been provided.
(5) The foregoing provisions of this regulation with respect to shafts, inclines and outlets shall not apply -
(a) to a shaft which is being sunk or to an incline or outlet which is being made;
(b) to any working for the purpose of making a connection between two or more shafts, inclines or outlets;
(c) to any working for the sole purpose of searching for or proving minerals;
67. WORKING SHAFTS –
(1) Every shaft in use or in course of being sunk and every incline or other outlet shall be made and kept secure.
(2) Every shaft in the course of being sank shall be provided with a permanent lining of metal, concrete or
masonry, which shall at no time be more than six metres from the bottom of the shaft:
(3) Every shaft regularly used for lowering and raising persons or materials, in which water seeps out of the
strata shall be provided with water garlands or other means of collecting and conducting away seepage water.
(4) The top, all insets and bottom of every working shaft and the sump thereof shall be kept clear and free from
loose materials, tools and debris.
68. FENCINGS AND GATES AT OUTLETS –
(1) Every entrance to a mine from the surface, and the top and all entrances between the top and bottom,
including the sump, if any, of every working, ventilating or pumping shaft, shall be kept securely fenced.
(2) Every walkable entrance from the surface to the workings belowground shall be provided with a substantial
gate which shall be kept closed and locked when there are no persons belowground:
69. OUTLETS FROM MINE PARTS – Every part of a mine shall, where practicable, be provided with at least two
ways affording means of egress to the surface. If any doubt arises as to whether the provision of two such ways
is practicable or not, it shall be referred to the Chief Inspector for decision.
70. PERIODIC EXAMINATION, ETC. OF OUTLETS –
(1) Every shaft, incline and other outlets provided as required by regulation 66 shall be examined, once at least
in every seven days, by an overman or other competent person. A report of every such examination shall
immediately thereafter be recorded in a bound paged book kept for the purpose and shall be signed and dated
by the person making the examination.
(2) If at the time of such examination or at any other time, the shaft, incline or other outlet is found to be not
safe, it shall not be used for any purpose, except as a natural airway, until it has been made safe in all respects.
Report of every such action taken shall be recorded in the book kept under sub-regulation (1).
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SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

DESCRIBE THE TRANSPORT OF MEN AND MATERIAL IN HAULAGE. (WINTER*)

87. HAULAGE ROADWAYS – The following provisions shall have effect with respect to every length of road or
roadway in a mine where materials are transported in tubs by means of gravity of mechanical power, namely:
(1) Every such roadway shall –
(a) be of adequate dimensions and, as far as practicable, shall be straight and of regular gradient; and
(b) have tracks properly laid with rails of adequate section.
(2)(a) Pulleys, sheaves and rollers that alter the direction of a rope shall be securely fixed.
(b) No person shall guide or adjust a moving rope on to a drum, pulley, sheave or roller except with a
lever or other proper appliance.
(3) Where haulage is effected by one or more ropes, there shall be provided and maintained -
(a) at the top of every inclined plane, at least one stop-block or other effective contrivance to arrest tubs
from running or moving out of control;
(b) at least one run way switch or other effective contrivance below the first stop-block or other effective
contrivance at a distance greater than the length of a set or train of tubs:
(c) an attachment, behind an ascending tub or set or train of tubs, of a back-stay, drag or other suitable
contrivance for preventing the tub, set or train of tubs running back. Where an endless rope or chain is
used, the provisions of this clause shall be deemed to be satisfied if suitable automatic catches or other
effective contrivance are provided at suitable intervals along the track to prevent the ascending tubs
running back:
(d) safety hooks, jazz-rails or other suitable contrivances to prevent runaway in the forward direction;
(e) tub re-railers at intervals of not more than 250 metres. Where a tubs is re-railed manually, it shall either
be detached from the rope or ropes or the haulage engine which works the rope shall be stopped; and
(f) on every haulage roadway exceeding 30 metres in length, effective means of transmitting signal from
every stopping place on the roadway to the place at which the machinery working the rope is operated. All
signals shall be transmitted by mechanical or electrical means:

(4)(a)
(I) The following code of signals shall be used and strictly observed –
ONE RAP. STOP when in motion
TWO RAPS. LOWER or haul in slowly
THREE RAPS. START when at rest
FOUR RAPS. RAISE or haul out slowly
Any other signals shall be in addition to, and shall not interfere with, the foregoing.
(ii) A printed copy of the code of signals, including additional signals, if any, shall be posted prominently
at the place in which the machinery that works the rope is operated and at all regular stopping places along the
roadway.
(iii) No person, other than a competent persons or an official, shall give any signal.
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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(b) Where in any mine belowground, a system of haulage roadway (and conveyors, if any) extent to distance of
more than 600 metres from the shaft or the entrance to the mine, efficient telephonic communication shall be
(c) Where telephones or electrical signals are provided -
(iii) adequate precautions shall be taken to prevent signal and telephone wires coming into contact with
other cables and electrical apparatus;
(iv) signal wires shall be supported on insulators, and shall not be energized at more than 30 volts;
(v) contact makers shall be so constructed as to prevent accidental closing of the circuit; and
(vi) 1[in every gassy seam of the second or third degree], all signaling or telephonic communication
circuit shall be constructed, installed, protected, operated and maintained in such a manner as be intrinsically
safe.
(5) At places where telephone receivers are installed or where signals and safety contrivances are regularly
operated, every person using the telephone or operating any such signal or safety contrivance shall be afforded
adequate protection against tubs moving out of control.

(6)(a) Where any person is allotted to work or pass while the haulage is in motion, manholes for refuge shall be
provided at intervals of not more than 10 metres:
(b) Manholes shall be not less than 1.8 metres in height and 1.2 metres in depth, and not less than 0.75
metres but not more than one metre in width:
(c) Every manhole shall be kept clean and clear of obstruction, and white washed both inside and for a
distance of not less than 0.3 metres around the aperture.
(d) As far as practicable, all manholes shall be provided on one side of the haulage roadway.
(e) In case where there are serious practical difficulties in providing manholes as specified in clauses (a)
and (b), the Regional Inspector may, by an order in writing and subject to such conditions as he may specify
therein, permit manholes to be at greater intervals or of other dimensions.

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY STANDING ORDERS? DESCRIBE MODEL STANDING ORDERS IN THE
EVENT OF STOPPAGE OF MAIN VENTILATOR.
MODEL STANDING ORDER IN THE EVENTS OF STOPPAGE OF MAIN MECHANICAL VENTILATION.
(SUMMER*)
Model standing in evet of stoppage of main mechanical ventilator as per Regulation 134 of CMR 1957 are as
follow:
FAN ATTENDANT
1. The fan attendant shall not stop the main mechanical ventilator except on the written authority of
manager or person authorized by him in his behalf.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

2. In event of stoppage of the main mechanical ventilator either authorized or due to power failure or for
any other reason whatever under circumstances outside the control of management, the fan attendant
shall immediately open the main doors of the ventilator installation, where the such door is provided.
3. He shall the immediately notify the attendance clerk on the duties of the stoppage clearly indicating the
reason & circumstance.
ATTENDANCE CLERK
On being notified the attendance shall immediately send information of the stoppage.
To the on setter or any other person charge of the pit bottom (who shall immediately inform every one.)
IMMEDIATE PRECAUTION CUTTING OFF ELECTRICITY & WITHDRAWAL OF PERSON.
1. The engineer or person authorized in writing by manager in this behalf, shall arrange to have electric
current off from all apparatus b/w an expert from apparatus as is situated in main intake airway at
distance greater than 270m from nearest working place.
2. All supervisory staff shall arrange to withdraw all person present at b/w from working place to the
nearest main intake airways.
SHORT STOPPAGE
If the ventilator is restated & work satisfactorily with a period of one hours after it stoppage, the attendance
clerk on duty shall send information to all person concerned mentioned in article 2a.all working are found to be
free from gas & safe condition examine by overman & competent person.
LONG STOPPAGE
1. If the ventilator has not been restarted within period of 1hour from time of its stoppage, all person shall
be withdrawing from working.
2. When the ventilator has been restarted after a period of 1hr from the time of its stoppage, all working
place shall be examining by overman.
3. The manger shall also write or cause to be written in book the causes of stoppage of the ventilator &
time when the ventilator is restarted its normal working time.
PLANNED STOPPAGE
1. When the stoppage of mechanical ventilator is pre-planned no person shall be allowed to proceed U/g
without written authority of the manager.
2. The manger shall inform in writing all concerned official about the planned stoppage.
RESUMPTION OF WORK & RESTORATION OF ELECTRIC POWER
1. The competent making inspection record the result in book under regulation.
2. The electric current shall be switched on until as a result of such examination, when working free from
gas & safe condition.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

STATE QUALITIES OF GOOD SUPERVISORS. (IMP(SUMMER**) ((WINTER*))


DESCRIBE THE QUALITIES OF A GOOD SUPERVISOR AND HIS RESPONSIBILITIES. (WINTER*)
1. Knowledge and competence.
2. High level of integrity and honesty.
3. Ability to use power effectively and in a responsible manner.
4. Communication skills – Capacity to explain his ideas and make the people understand them. He should
be not only a good speaker but a good listener teacher, counsellor and persuader.
5. Motivational skills ability to understand the needs of people and motivate them through satisfying their
needs.
6. Task-oriented and boundary manager.
7. Self-confidence.
8. Logical thinking and decisiveness.
9. Social skills to understand people and maintain good human relations.
10. Above all, the leader has to be calm, supportive, unruffled in crisis, and risk taker - giving free hand and
accepting responsibility for failures in acts done in good faith. 80% leadership can be leant from
experience, 20% through training and study.
DEFINE THE FOLLOWING.
1. DAY – Day means a period of twenty- four hours beginning at mid-night
2. OPEN CAST WORKING – Open cast working means a quarry, that is to say an excavation where any operation
for the purpose of searching for or obtaining minerals has been or is being carried on, not being a shaft or
an excavation which extends below superjacent ground.
3. GENERAL BODY OF AIR – “general body of air” means the general atmosphere in a seam and includes the
atmosphere in the roof cavities, but does not include general atmosphere in the sealed off area or in any
borehole drilled in coal or in the adjacent “strata”.
4. MINE – Mine means any excavation where any operation for the purpose of searching for or obtaining
minerals has been or is being carried on and includes -
a. All borings, bore holes, oil wells and accessory crude conditioning plants, including the pipe
conveying mineral oil within the oilfields.
b. All shafts, in or adjacent to and belonging to a mine, where in the course of being sunk or not.
c. All levels and inclined planes in the course of being driven.
d. All opencast workings.
e. All conveyors or aerial ropeways provided for the bringing into or removal from a mine of
minerals or other articles or for the removal of refuse therefrom.
f. All audits, levels, planes, machinery works, railways, tramways and sidings in or adjacent to and
belonging to a mine.
g. All protective works being carried out in or adjacent to a mine.
5. OVERMAN – “Overman” means a person possessing a Manager’s or Overman’s Certificate, who is appointed
by the manager in writing, under any designated whatsoever, to perform the duties of supervision of
control in a mine or part thereof, and is as such superior to a Sirdar.

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

6. VENTILATION DISTRICT –Ventilating district” means such part of a mine below ground as has an independent
intake airway commencing from a main intake airway, and an independent return airway terminating at a
main return airway, and, in the case of a mine or part thereof which is ventilated by natural means, the
whole mine or part.
7. GASSY SEAM OF SECOND DEGREE – “gassy seams of the second degree” means coal seams or part thereof lying within the
precincts of a mine not being an open cast working in which the percentage of inflammable gas in the general body of air at any
place in the workings of the seam is more than 0.1 or the rate of emission of inflammable gas per ton of coal produced exceeds
one cubic metre but does not exceed ten cubic metres.
8. OWNER – Owner when used, in relation to a mine, means any person who is the immediate proprietor or
lessee or occupier of the mine or of any part thereof and in the case of a mine the business whereof is being
carried on by liquidator or receiver, such liquidator or receiver but does not include a person who merely
receives a royalty rent or fine from the mine, subject to any lease grant or license for the working thereof,
or is merely the owner of the soil and not interested in the minerals of the mine; but (any contractor or sub-
lessee for the working of a mine or any part thereof shall be subject to this Act in like manner as if he were
an owner, but not so as to exempt the owner from any liability.
9. RELAY – Where work of the same kind is carried out by two or more sets of persons working during different
periods of the day each of such sets is called a Relay (and each of such periods is called a Shift,).
10. WORKING PLACE – “working place” means any place in a mine to which any person has lawful access.
11. WORKING – “Working” means any excavation made or being made in a mine for search of or obtaining coal.
DESCRIBE CONDITIONS FOR SOLID BLASTING WITH P5 EXPLOSIVES. (SUMMER*) (WINTER***)
Condition for solid blasting with P5 explosive is as follow
1. In a developing gallery, coal can be blasted without giving an undercut by the use of explosive of P5 type.
2. The pattern of shot hole drilled for solid blasting in coal in galleries of B&P working is wedge cut & fan cut.
3. Only P5 type of explosive shall be used with non-incentive mist delay detonator.
4. Maximum delay between 1st& last shot of round shall be limited to 130ms in deg 1 seam & 100ms in deg 2
seam.
5. Delay between 2 consecutive shots of different delay number will not exceeds 25ms.
6. Distance between 2 shot of different delay will not exceed 60cm at explosive charged ends.
7. Blasting shall be done with inverse ignition.
8. Air within 4.5m of face shall not be less than 284m3/min.
9. Check for CH4 shall be done with Methanometer up to 20m of face.
10. No blasting will be done if it exceeds 0.1% in deg 1 seam 0.5% in deg 2.
11. No solid blasting within 60m of geological disturbance.
12. Water spraying up to 90m from face.
13. Hole pattern shall be fixed by the manager.

DESCRIBE THE PRECAUTIONS AGAINST DANGERS FROM DUST, GAS AND WATER.
122 PRECAUTIONS AGAINST DUST.

(1) The owner, agent or manager of every mine shall take such steps as are necessary for the minimizing of emissions of dust and for
the suppression of dust which enters the air at any work place belowground or on surface and for ensuring that the exposure of
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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

workers to reparable dust is limited to an extent that is reasonably practicable but in any cast not exceeding the limits that are
harmful to the health of persons.

(2) For the purpose of this regulation, a place shall not be deemed to be in a harmless state for person to work or pass or be therein if
the 8 hours’ time – weighted average concentration of airborne reparable dust in milligrams per cubic metre of air sampled by a
gravimetric dust sampler of a type approved by and determined in accordance with the procedure as specified by the Chief Inspector
by a general or special order, exceeds five in case of manganese ore and the value arrived at by dividing the figures of fifteen with the
percentage of free respirable silica present in other cases; or

(3) (a) The owner, agent or manager of every mine shall, within six months of the coming into force of the regulation and once at least
every six months thereafter or whenever the Regional Inspector so requires by an order in writing, cause the air at every work place
where airborne dust is generated to be sampled and the concentration of respirable dust therein determined:

124 PRECAUTIONS AGAINST IRRUPTION OF GAS –


Where any working is extended to within 30 metres of any goaf or disused workings containing or likely to contain an accumulation of
inflammable or noxious gases, there shall be maintained at least one bore-hole not less than 1.5 metres in advance of the working.
The operation of drilling the bore hole shall be carried out under the supervision of a competent person, and no lamp or light other
than an approved safety lamp or torch shall be used in any such working.

126 DANGER FROM SURFACE WATER


(1) [(a)] Where any mine or part thereof is so situated that there is any danger of inrush of surface water into
the mine or part, adequate protection against such inrush shall be provided and maintained. 2[Whether such
protection is adequate or not can be determined by the Chief Inspector or whose decision shall be final.]
[(b) Except with the permission of the Chief Inspector in writing and subject to such conditions as he may
specify therein and subject to the provisions of clause (a), every entrance into a mine shall be so designed,
constructed, and maintained that its lowest point
(2) No workings shall be made in any mine vertically below –
(a) any part of any river, canal, lake, tank or other surface reservoir; or
(b) any spot lying within a horizontal distance of 15 metres from either bank of a river or canal or from the
boundary of a lake, tank or other surface reservoir; except with the permission in writing of the Chief Inspector
and subject to such conditions as he may specify therein.

127. DANGER FROM UNDERGROUND INUNDATION.


(1) Proper provision shall be made in every mine to prevent irruption of water other liquid matter or any
material that is likely to flow when wet from the workings of the mine the same mine or of an adjoining mine
and to prevent accidents while drilling bore-holes for probe or release of a body of water or other liquid matter.
(2) Where work is being done in –
(a)
(I) Where work is being done in –
(ii) any place in a seam or section, which is at a lower level that any other place in a lower seam or section; or
(iii) any place in a seam approaching a fault passing through an upper seam or section, which contains or may
contain an accumulation of water or other liquid matter or any material that is likely to flow when wet; or

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

(b) any water-bearing strata 11 all useful information including the position, extent and depth of the above
mentioned features shall be acquired and kept recorded and a scheme of working designed to prevent irruption
of water or other liquid matter or any material which flows when Wet shall be prepared and put into operation.

DESCRIBE HOW RESCUE WORK IS CONDUCTED.


EXPLAIN BRIEFLY THE PROCEDURE OF RESCUE WORK TO BE CONDUCTED IN EVENT OF FIRE
BROKEN IN U/G COAL MINE DISTRICT.
24.Duties of Manager etc. in emergency: - (1) On receiving information of any emergency likely to require the
services of a rescue team, the manager, or in his absence the Principal Official present at the surface, shall
immediately: -
(a) inform the rescue room or the rescue stations serving the mine for necessary assistance;
(b) summon rescue trained person employed in the mine;
(c) inform the owner, agent or manager of nearby mines to make available the services of rescue trained
persons employed therein: if so required;
(d) inform the rescue station about the nature of the occurrence; stating whether assistance would be needed
from the rescue station;
(e) summon medical assistance; and
(f) send information of the occurrence to the Regional Inspector.
(2) All rescue and recovery work at a below ground mine shall be conducted under the control, direction and
supervision of the manager of the mine or in his absence the principal official present at the surface. Provided
that in the event of a major emergency, such as ignition, explosion, big underground fire or an accident
involving a number of persons, the manager or the principal official shall, in taking decisions regarding rescue
and recovery operations, take guidance from a ground consisting of a Senior Official of the management a
representative each from the Director General of Mines Safety, concerned rescue station and the recognized
Union of the Workers, so however that he must take necessary decisions and direct the operations as the
situation warrants, without waiting for the constitution or deliberations of the said group.

25.Accommodation at the below ground mine for persons engaged in rescue work: - Whenever rescue trained
persons are engaged in rescue or recovery work at a below ground mine, thee shall be provided at such mine
suitable accommodation for storage and charging of apparatus required for that work. Such accommodation
shall be situated at a convenient place near the entrance in use, and shall be properly ventilated and lighted.
Adequate quantity of cool and wholesale drinking water shall be provided at such accommodation; and proper
canteen facilities shall also be provided for the rescue workers.

26.Entry into below ground mines for rescue or recovery work: - (1) No person shall be allowed to enter a
below ground mine or part thereof which is unsafe for the purpose of engaging in rescue or recovery work,
unless authorized by the manager or in his absence by the principal official of the mine present at the surface.
Only rescue trained persons shall be permitted to enter the mine for the purpose of using self-contained
breathing apparatus.
(2) During the Course of rescue or recovery work, person or persons shall be stationed at the entrance to the
below ground mine and shall keep a written record of all persons entering and leaving such mine, and the time
thereof
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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

27.Fresh air bases: - (1) As soon as possible, base or bases shall be established in fresh air, as near to the
irrespirable zone or zones as safety permits, every such base shall, if possible be connected by telephone:
(I) if the base is below ground to the surface; or
(ii) if the base is on the surface, to the shaft bottom.
(2) Except in cases where the delay involved may result in danger to life, rescue trained persons shall not
proceed beyond any place where a base is to be established until there have been provided at such base: -
(a) two persons, of whom one shall be a qualified medical practitioner if practicable, and other shall be a rescue
trained person;
(b) a spare team; with rescue apparatus, ready for immediate service;
(c) one or more reviving apparatus, oxygen revivers etc.,
(d) first aid box and stretcher,
(e) means of testing for carbon monoxide;
(f) a hygrometer; and
(g) two flame safety lamp.

GIVE THE PROCEDURE FOR INSPECTION OF HAULAGE ROADWAY. (WINTER*))


BY A COMPETENT PERSON–By an overman or manager's certificate holder. Every shaft shall be examined for the
effectiveness of fencing arrangements at top and bottom of shaft, shaft wall & buntons, pipe lines, water
garlands, etc. Precautionary measures shall be taken during shaft inspection and Reg. 85 of the CMR shall be
strictly followed for the purpose Every such examination shall immediately thereafter be recorded in a bound-
paged book kept for the purpose and shall be signed and dated by the person making the examination

Tests of every Automatic contrivance and every brake shall be made by the Engineer or other competent
person appointed for the purpose (I) once at least in every seven days, by raising each cage or other means of
conveyance, in turn, to pass last control point above the topmost landing; and (I) once in every three months by
attempting to land the descending cage at excessive speed, for the purpose of this test setting of the Automatic
Contrivance may be altered to a predetermined point in shaft to regard as landing.

The following schedules of examination as stipulated in the CMR, 1957 shall be strictly observed for the
purpose:
1. Daily examination Reg. 83 (1) (a) (I) and (ii)
2. Weekly examination of engine and shaft fittings Reg. 76 (7) (b) and 83 (1) (b) (I) Weekly examination of
windings ropes Reg 83 (1) (b) and CIM circular No. 77 of 1963.
3. Monthly examination of winding engine/shaft equipment: Reg. 81 (2) (b) Monthly examination of winding
ropes: 83 (1) (c)
4. Quarterly examination of winding engine/shaft fittings: Reg. 76 (7) (b) (I).
5. Half yearly examination of winding engine and shaft equipment: Reg. 81 (2) (a) and Reg. 82. Half yearly
examination of recapped sample: Reg 80 (6) and Comprehensive testing of the same
6. Annual examination of winding engine and shaft equipment: Reg. 83 (I) (d)

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NOTES BY – MD ALAM KHAN
SUBJECT – MMLS
SESSION – 2017-18
COLLEGE – RENAISSANCE POLYTECHNIC CHANDRAPUR

STATE PROVISION OF SAFETY DEVICES IN WINDING IN SHAFT.


1. Signaling system between top of the shaft and Pit bottom; permanent landing or top inset of the shaft
to winding engineman.
2. Code of signals posted prominently at above places.
3. Guides adequate no. to ensure smooth &safe travel of cage. In case of rope guides, cheese weights to
be kept duly exposed.
4. Dogs in the headgear above the topmost landing for holding the cage in the event of overwind.
5. Keps at top of the shaft arranged to fall into ‘on' position when the operating lever is released.
6. Protective roofing at pit bottom; gap vertical and horizontal between roofing and top of the cage shall
not exceed 15cm when cage is resting at pit bottom.
7. Safety hook and catch plate to release the rope in the event of over winding and to hold the cage at the
catch plate installed in the headgear.
8. Suspension gear including rope cappels, safety hook, distribution plate, cage chains and safety chains.
9. Cage covered at the top and two sides, with gates or fences at two other sides and a hand bar.
10. Notice maximum no. of persons permitted to ride in a cage at a time.
11. Gates and fences self-operating at pit top and every landing.
12. Pass bye at pit bottom for persons to cross from one side to the other; height not less than 1.8m, width
not less than 1.2m, free from obstruction.
13. Pit bottom buffer at new shafts more than 200m deep.

EXPLAIN “BLOWN OUT” AND “BLOWN THROUGH SHOT”. (WINTER*)


BLOWN OUT SHOT
If stemming material and the explosive is thrown out of the hole without breaking the coal, it is known as a
blownout shot. It may be caused due to inadequate stemming, over charging or undercharging of explosive,
large gap between 2 cartridges due to the hole not being properly cleaned before charging, more than
optimum distance between adjacent holes, unduly long hole or hole in the wrong direction which does not get
free face for blasting.

DESCRIBE THE PROCEDURE OF INSPECTION OF SEALED OFF AREA, SUBSIDENCE AND GOAF AREA.
(IMP(SUMMER*) (WINTER**))
INSPECTION OF SUBSIDENCE

1. Formation or widening of cracks, need for filling matti or sand.


2. Sinking of ground.
3. Smell, smoke or other indications of fire U/g.
4. Accumulation of dry weeds and leaves.
5. Dumping of hot ash by men.
6. State of drainage of subsidence area. Drains around the subsidence area shall be clean so that outside
water does not enter.
7. Fencing shall be in proper condition.
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