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OPERATIONS MANUAL
PART-A

Manual Control No: ....................

INTERGLOBE AVIATION LIMITED


(INDIGO)
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INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 00

FOREWARD & COMPLIANCE FDW

The Operations Manual (Part A, B, C, D) has been prepared by InterGlobe


Aviation limited (IndiGo), Flight Operations department. The purpose is to;

 Provide the necessary Operating Limitations, Procedures, Performance

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


and System Information to Flight Crew to safely and efficiently operate
the company airplanes.
 Establish standardised procedures and practices for uniform application.
 Serve as a review guide.

The manual will be periodically revised to incorporate procedural and system


information changes. Items of a more critical nature will be issued as ‘Notices’ to
crew.

The manual is prepared in accordance with Civil Aviation Requirements (CAR)


Section 8, Series O, Part VII. The manual is to be read in conjunction with other
manuals and documents specified in Chapter 0. In case of a conflict between
Operations manual and the national regulations, the latter will apply.

The Manual is Company (IndiGo) property and any disclosure of its contents to
others is given in strictest confidence. It must not be reproduced by any other
person, agency or company without specific approval and permission of the Vice
President (Flight Operations).

InterGlobe Aviation Limited.


st
1 Floor, Tower ‘C’, Global Business Park,
Gurgaon-1220002 ,
Haryana, India.

Tel: +91 124 435 2500


Fax: 91 124 406 8536

A-COM-1 Effective 17-Aug-11


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 00

FOREWARD & COMPLIANCE FDW

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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

A-COM-2 Effective 17-Aug-11


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ACKW

To provide necessary information and instructions to guide personnel


connected with Flight Operations in the proper discharge of their duties,
the Operations Manual (Part A, B, C, D and EDTO) is being issued to all
concerned.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


It is the responsibility of every employee to be aware of the provisions of
the Operations Manual and use them in day to day operations.
Suggestions for improving the contents are requested, just as your
compliance with the Operations Manual is expected.

This is your personal copy for reference. It is manual owner’s


responsibility to update the manual as required.

Capt. Ashim Mittra


Vice President (Flight Operations)

Manual Control No. ................................

Signature ................................

Name of Holder ................................

Assigned Position ................................

A-ACKW Effective 15-Dec-13


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ACKW

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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

A-ACKW Effective 15-Dec-13


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS GTOC

Details

Manual Administration

- DGCA Approval

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- Foreword and Compliance

- Acknowledgement

- Global Table of Contents

- Distribution List

- List of Effective Pages (LEP)

- Record of Normal Revisions (ROR)

- Revision Highlights (RH)

Chapters 0 to 38

Chapter No Chapter Name

00 Administration & Control Of Operations Manual

01 Operations Supervision

02 Flight Duty And Time Limitations

03 Navigation Equipment Required

04 Long Range Navigation Procedures Required

05 Radio Listening Watch

06 Determination Of Minimum Flight Altitudes

A-GTOC Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS GTOC

Chapter No Chapter Name

07 Determination Of Aerodrome Operating Minima

Safety Precautions During Refueling With Passengers On


08

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Board.

09 Ground Handling Arrangements & Procedures

10 Procedures For Pilot In Command An Observing An Accident

Flight Crew For Each Type Of Operation And Succession Of


11
Command

12 Computation Of Quantities Of Fuel And Oil To Be Carried

Conditions Under Which Oxygen Shall Be Used And Amount


13
Of Oxygen Determined.

14 Instructions For Mass And Balance

Instructions For Conduct & Control Of Ground De-Icing /


15
Anti-Icing Operations

16 Specifications Of Operational Flight Plan

17 Standard Operating Procedures For Each Phase Of Flight

18 Instructions On Normal Use Of Normal Checklist

19 Departure Contingency Procedures

20 Instructions On Maintenance Of Altitude Awareness

21 Sue Of Auto Pilot And Thrust In IMC

22 Clarifications And Acceptance Of ATC Clearances

A-GTOC Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS GTOC

Chapter No Chapter Name

23 Departure And Approach Briefings

24 Route And Destination Familiarisation

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25 Stabilised Approach Procedure

26 Limitation On High Rates Of Descent Near Surface


Conditions Required To Commence Or To Continue An
27
Instrument Approach

28 Precision/Non-Precision Instrument Approach Procedures

29 Night And IMC Instrument Approach And Landing Operations

30 Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS)


Airborne Collision Avoidance System (ACAS) /Traffic Alert &
31
Collision Avoidance System (TCAS)
Information And Instructions Relating To The Interception Of
32
Civil Aircraft

33 For Airplanes Intended To Operate Above 15000M

34 Details Of Accident Prevention And Fight Safety Program

35 Dangerous Goods And Weapons

36 Security Instructions And Guidance

37 Suspected Sabotage
Instructions and training requirements for the use of Head-Up
38 Displays (HUD) and Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS)
equipment as applicable.
ANX Annexures

A-GTOC Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

GLOBAL TABLE OF CONTENTS GTOC

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A-GTOC Effective 09-Jul-14


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 03

DISTRIBUTION LIST DL

The Operations Manual (Part A, B C, D and EDTO) shall be distributed as


follows:

Serial No. Manual Holder Type of Format

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001 Master Copy Hard Copy/ PDF

002 Vice President (Flight Operations) Hard Copy /DVD

003 Vice President (Special Projects) Hard Copy / DVD

004 Chief Pilot (Training) Hard Copy / DVD

005 Operations Control / Dispatch Hard Copy / DVD

006 Vice President (OCC) Hard Copy / DVD

007 Chief Of safety Hard Copy/DVD

008-015 DGCA Hard Copy / DVD

016 Director(Training) Hard Copy / DVD

017 Director (Flight Operations Support) Hard Copy / DVD

018-035 All Ground Instructors Hard Copy /DVD

036-045 Flight Operations Support (Region) Hard Copy

046-50 Simulator Hard Copy

Deputy Chief Instructor (Performance &


51 Hard Copy / DVD
Documentation Standardization)
52-100 Intentionally Left Blank -

101-200 All Aircraft Hard Copy

- All Station Managers DVD

- All Pilots DVD

- All HOD DVD

A-DL-1 Effective: 15-Dec-13


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 03

DISTRIBUTION LIST DL

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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

A-DL-1 Effective: 15-Dec-13


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES LEP / HC

Revision
Chapter/Details Page No. Date of Issue
No
DGCA Approval 4 All 09-Jul-14
Foreword and Compliance 0 All 17-Aug-11

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Acknowledgement 3 All 15-Dec-13
Global Table of Contents 4 All 09-Jul-14
Distribution List 3 All 15-Dec-13
List of Effective Pages (LEP) - All 09-Jul-14
Record of Normal Revisions 0 All 17-Aug-11
Revision Highlights 4 All 09-Jul-14
00 4 All 09-Jul-14
01 4 All 09-Jul-14
02 1 All 04-Dec-12
03 3 All 15-Dec-13
04 3 All 15-Dec-13
05 0 All 17-Aug-11
06 0 All 17-Aug-11
07 4 All 09-Jul-14
08 0 All 17-Aug-11
09 1 All 04-Dec-12
10 0 All 17-Aug-11
11 4 All 09-Jul-14
12 4 All 09-Jul-14
13 1 All 04-Dec-12
14 4 All 09-Jul-14
15 0 All 17-Aug-11
16 1 All 04-Dec-12
17 4 All 09-Jul-14
18 0 All 17-Aug-11
19 0 All 17-Aug-11
20 0 All 17-Aug-11
21 0 All 17-Aug-11

A-LEP-1 Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES LEP / HC

Revision
Chapter/Details Page No. Date of Issue
No
22 0 All 17-Aug-11

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23 0 All 17-Aug-11
24 0 All 17-Aug-11
25 1 All 04-Dec-12
26 0 All 17-Aug-11
27 4 All 09-Jul-14
28 1 All 04-Dec-12
29 1 All 04-Dec-12
30 4 All 09-Jul-14
31 0 All 17-Aug-11
32 0 All 17-Aug-11
33 0 All 17-Aug-11
34 4 All 09-Jul-14
35 2 All 27-May-13
36 0 All 17-Aug-11
37 0 All 17-Aug-11
38 1 All 04-Dec-12
Annexures 3 All 15-Dec-13

A-LEP-2 Effective 09-Jul-14


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 00

RECORD OF NORMAL REVISIONS ROR

The manual holder /representative shall enter the appropriate data in the
revision sheet after updating the manual. An initial of the holder/representative
incorporating the revision signifies compliance. This sheet is to be retained

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until officially replaced.

Rev. No. ISSUE DATE DATE FILED INITIALS

A-ROR-1 Effective 17-Aug-11


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 00

RECORD OF NORMAL REVISIONS ROR

REV. NO. ISSUE DATE DATE FILED INITIALS

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A-ROR-2 Effective 17-Aug-11


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS RH

As the Company has been growing steadily there has been a continuous update
on policies and procedures which were reviewed since the initial approval of the
Company Operations Manual in form of TRs/Notices. The TRs were ‘accepted’ by
DGCA and have been incorporated in this revision.

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Some chapters have been completely revised/ re-issued to maintain chronological
order of the contents, in spite of a few changes therein.

The revision highlights for Issue II, Revision 04, dated 09-Jul-2014, are as under

Please note that changes are termed as either: New (N), Revised (R), Shifted (S),
or Editorial (E).

Reason of
Para/Page Change
Change Description
No.

Chapter 00 ADMIN CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL

Complete Chapter R

Chapter 01 OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION

Complete Chapter R

Chapter 07 AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA

Complete Chapter R

A-RH-1 Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS RH

Chapter 11 FLIGHT CREW FOR EACH TYPE OF OPERATION &


SUCCESSION OF COMMAND

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Complete Chapter R

Chapter 12 COMPUTATION OF QUANTITIES OF FUEL AND OIL TO BE


CARRIED

Complete Chapter R

Chapter 14 MASS AND BALANCE CONTROL

Complete Chapter R

Chapter 17 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

Complete Chapter R

Chapter 27 COMMENCEMENT OR CONTINUATION OF AN INSTRUMENT


APPROACH

Complete Chapter R

A-RH-2 Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS RH

Chapter 30 GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEM

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Complete Chapter R

Chapter 34 SAFETY MANAGEMENT AND ACCIDENT PREVENTION


PROGRAM

Complete Chapter R

A-RH-3 Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

REVISION HIGHLIGHTS RH

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF


CHAPTER 00
OPERATIONS MANUAL

TABLE OF CONTENTS

0. ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL ........3

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0.1 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................3

0.1.1 Compliance ................................................................................3

0.1.2 Abbreviations..............................................................................6

0.1.3 Definitions.................................................................................25

0.1.4 Units conversion table ..............................................................43

0.1.5 International standard atmosphere (ISA) ..................................44

0.1.6 Parts of operations manual.......................................................45

0.1.7 Volumes of the operations manual ...........................................46

0.1.8 Official language and modes of communication .......................47

0.1.9 Gender applicability ..................................................................47

0.2 FLIGHT OPERATIONS DOCUMENTS ..................................................47

0.2.1 System for dissemination of information ...................................49

0.2.2 On board documentation ..........................................................50

0.2.3 Missing document ....................................................................52

0.2.4 Navigation bag: ........................................................................52

0.2.5 Documents library at bases: .....................................................55

0.2.6 Documents at Simulator ...........................................................55

0.2.7 Standard operating procedure ..................................................55

0.2.8 Carriage of Documents by Cockpit Crew..................................56

0.3 SYSTEM OF AMENDMENTS AND REVISIONS ...................................56

0.3.1 Procedures and checklists:.......................................................56

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

0.3.2 Operations Manual................................................................... 56

0.4 PROMULGATION OF ADDITIONAL OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONS


AND INFORMATION ............................................................................. 58

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0.5 DISTRIBUTION OF OPERATIONS MANUAL ....................................... 59

0.5.1 Disposal/Destruction Obsolete documents .............................. 60

0.6 DOCUMENT PROCESS MANUAL ....................................................... 60

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

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CHAPTER 00
OPERATIONS MANUAL

0. ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF OPERATIONS MANUAL

0.1 INTRODUCTION

0.1.1 Compliance

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The Operations Manual is prepared in conformity with Rule 140B of Aircraft Rules
1937 and the requirements specified in CAR Section 8, Series „O‟ Part VII and
other instructions issued by DGCA. Guidance laid down by ICAO in Annexure 6
Vol-1 and EASA, where applicable, has also been incorporated. The Operations
Manual complies with all applicable regulations and the terms and conditions of
the Airline Operator‟s Permit (Air Operator‟s Certificate).

The Operations Manual is issued under the authority of the Vice President (Flight
Operations). It contains policies procedures and guidance on all matters that are
the responsibility of Flight operations.

The contents of the manual shall not be deemed to supersede any instructions
contained in the following documents:
a) Aircraft Manual (India)
b) Flight Manual
c) Civil Aviation Requirements (CAR)
d) DGCA Mandatory Circulars and Directives.

All Personnel connected with the Operation of Company aircraft shall comply with
the prescribed methods of Operation as laid down in the Operations Manual and
the above documents as well as Company Notices (circulars) issued from time to
time. Any wilful and deliberate violation of flight operations organizational/ State
policies and/or procedures by flight operations personnel shall be viewed
seriously.

The Operations Manual provides necessary information and instructions on


policies, procedures, duties and responsibilities and other relevant information. Its
contents may require amendments from time to time which are to be incorporated
immediately and the Manual should be kept updated. All Air Crew and Operations
personnel are required to be fully conversant with the relevant contents of the
Manual. All employees when aboard must comply with Laws, Regulations and
Procedures of those States in which operations are conducted.

A-0-3 Effective 09-Jul-14


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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF


CHAPTER 00
OPERATIONS MANUAL

All operating staff are required to adhere to instructions laid down in this Manual
and any deviations should be reported, the reasons for such deviation being given
in writing.

CRM principles should be applied in line operations by all personnel at all times.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Nothing contained in the Operations Manual shall keep personnel from exercising
their own best judgement during any irregularity for which the Operations Manual
gives no provisions or in an emergency.

Should any individual consider that all or any part of a procedure or instruction
requires to be amended, he should notify the Vice President (Flight Operations)
with reasons and suggested improvement.
Notes:

 Commander, Pilot-in-command, Captain, P1, CM1 are used synonymously.


 Co-pilot, First Officer, P2, CM2 are used synonymously.
 For conciseness, the pronoun "he" is used throughout the text. Where appropriate,
"she" should be added to or substituted for "he".
 When used in the Operations Manual, the following terms shall imply:
- “Shall”, "will", "must" or an action verb in the imperative sense means that the
application of a rule or procedure or provision is mandatory.
- “Should” means that the application of a procedure or provision is
recommended.
- “May” means that the application of a procedure or provision is optional.
- “No person may...” or “a person may not...” means that no person is required,
authorised, or permitted to do the act concerned.
- "Approved" means the Authority has reviewed the method, procedure or policy
in question and issued a formal written approval.
- "Acceptable" means the Authority or the airline has reviewed the method,
procedure or policy and has neither objected to nor approved its proposed use or
implementation.
- "Prescribed" means the Authority or the airline has issued a written policy or
methodology which imposes either a mandatory requirement, if it states "shall",
"will", "must" or an action verb in the imperative sense, a recommended
requirement if it states "should" or a discretionary requirement if it states "may".
- "Note" is used when an operating procedure, technique, etc., is considered
essential to be emphasised.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

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CHAPTER 00
OPERATIONS MANUAL

- "Caution" is used when an operating procedure, technique, etc., may result in


damage to equipment if not carefully followed.
- "Warning" is used when an operating procedure, technique, etc., may result in
personnel injury or loss of life if not carefully followed.

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- Air Crew refers to both Flight and Cabin Crew.
- Crew Member refers to a person assigned by the Company a duty/task on a
company aircraft during flight duty period.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

0.1.2 Abbreviations
The following abbreviations may be found throughout the manual. Some
abbreviations may also appear in lower case letters.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


AAL Above Aerodrome Level
ABM Abeam

ABAS Aircraft Based Augmentation System (GNSS/GPS)

AC Advisory Circular, Alternating Current, Aircraft

ACARS Aircraft Communication Addressing and Reporting System

ACJ Advisory Circular Joint (JAR)

ACMS Aircraft Condition Monitoring System

ACN Aircraft Classification Number

AD Airworthiness Directive

ADC Air Data Computer


ADD Acceptable Deferred Defect

ADI Attitude Direction Indicator

ADIRS Air Data Inertial Reference System

ADF Automatic Direction Finder

ADV Advisory

ADS Automatic Dependent Surveillance

AFM Airplane Flight Manual

AEA Association of European Airlines

AFTN Aeronautical Fixed Tele-Communication Network

AFS Automatic Flight System

AGL Above Ground Level

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

AH Alert Height

AIP Aeronautical Information Publication

AIRS Aircrew Incident reporting System

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AIS Aeronautical Information Service

ALD Actual Landing Distance

ALS Approach Light System

ALT Altitude

ALTN Alternate

AMC Acceptable Means of Compliance (JAR)

AMJ Advisory Material Joint

AMSL Above Mean Sea Level

AOA Angle Of Attack

AOC/P Air Operator Certificate/Permit

AOC Airline Operations Communications/Control

AOG Aircraft On Ground

AOM Airplane Operations Manual

AOT All Operators Telex

A/P Auto-Pilot

APA Accident Prevention Adviser

APM Airplane Performance Monitoring

APQ Airline Pre-Qualification

APU Auxiliary Power Unit

ARINC Aeronautical Radio Inc.

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

ARPT Airport

ARP Aerodrome Reference Point

ASAP As Soon As Possible

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ASDA Accelerate Stop Distance Available

ASI Air Speed Indicator

AMM Aircraft Maintenance Manual

ASR Airport Surveillance Radar

ASR Air Safety Report

ASU Air Starter Unit

ATA Actual Time of Arrival

ATA Aeronautical Transport Association

ATC Air Traffic Control

ATD Actual Time of Departure

ATHR Auto Thrust

ATIS Automatic Terminal Information Service

ATM Air Traffic Management

ATN Aeronautical Telecommunication Network

ATPL Airline Transport Pilot License

ATS Air Traffic Services

ATS Auto Thrust System

ATSU Air Traffic Services Unit

ATT Attitude

AVGAS Aviation Gasoline

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AWO All Weather Operations

AWY Airway

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B
BARO Barometric

BAT Battery

BFE Buyer Furnished Equipment

BITE Built In Test Equipment

BRG Bearing

BRK Brake

BRNAV Basic Area Navigation

C Celsius, Centigrade

CAPT Captain

CAR Civil Aviation Regulations

CAS Calibrated Airspeed

CAT Clear Air Turbulence

CAT I/II/III Landing Category I (II or III)

CAVOK Ceiling and Visibility OK

CB Cumulonimbus

C/B Circuit Breaker

CBT Computer Based Training

CCOM Cabin Crew Operating Manual

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CCQ Cross Crew Qualification

CDL Configuration Deviation List

CDU Control Display Unit

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CEFA Cockpit Emulator for Flight Analysis

CFDS Centralized Fault Display System

CFIT Controlled Flight Into terrain

CFP Computerised Flight Plan

CFD Centralised Flight Dispatch

CIDS Cabin Intercommunication Data System

CG Centre of Gravity

C/L Check List

CMD Command

CMP Configuration, Maintenance & Procedures

CNS Communication, Navigation, Surveillance

COM Communication

CP Critical Point (ETOPS)

CPDLC Controller Pilot Data Link Communications

CP(LINE) Chief Pilot Flight Operations (Line Operations)

CP(STD) Chief Pilot Flight Operations (Standards & QA)

CP(TRG) Chief Pilot Flight Operations (Training)

CRM Crew Resource Management

CRS Course

CRT Cathode Ray Tube

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CRZ Cruise

CTA Control Area

CTR Centre

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CVR Cockpit Voice Recorder

D
DA Decision altitude

daN Deca Newton

DDG Dispatch Deviation Guide

DEG Degree

DEST Destination

DFDR Digital Flight Data Recorder

DFO Director Flight Operations

DGCA Director General of Civil Aviation

DGPS Differential GPS

DH Decision Height

DIST Distance

DME Distance Measuring Equipment

DOI Dry Operating Index

DOW Dry Operating Weight

DU Display Unit

E
ELT Entry Level Training

ELT Emergency Locator Transmitter

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

EMER Emergency

EO Engine Out

EOSID Engine Out SID

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EST Estimated

ETA Estimated Time of Arrival

ETD Estimated Time of Departure

ETOPS/EDTO Extended Twin Engine Operations/ Extended diversion time


operations

ETP Equi Time Point

EUROCAE European Organisation for Civil Aviation Equipment

EXP Exit Point (ETOPS)

EXT External

ECAM Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitoring

EEP ETOPS Entry Point

EFB Electronic Flight Bag

EFIS Electronic Flight Instrument System

EFOB Estimated Fuel On Board

EGPWS Enhanced GPWS

EGT Exhaust Gas Temperature

EIS Electronic Instrument System

ELEC Electrical

ELEV Elevator, Elevation


F
FAF Final Approach Fix

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FANS Future Air Navigation System

FAP Final Approach Point

FAR Federal Aviation Regulations

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FBS Fixed Base Simulator

F/C Flight Crew

FCOM Flight Crew Operating Manual

FCTM Flight Crew Training Manual

FCU Flight Control Unit

FD Flight Director

FDM Flight Data Monitoring

FDTL Flight Duty & Time Limitations

FF Fuel Flow

FFS Full Flight Simulator

FIR/FIC Flight Information Region/Center

FL Flight Level

FLT Flight

FM Flight Manual

FMA Flight Mode Annunciator

FMGS Flight Management and Guidance System

FMS Flight Management System

F/O First Officer

FOB Fuel On Board

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FOD Foreign Object Damage

FOM Flight Operations Manual

FOQA Flight Operations Quality Assurance

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FOT Flight Operations Telex

F-PLN Flight Plan

FPV Flight Path Vector

FQI Fuel Quantity Indication

ft, FT Foot (Feet)

FTL Flight Time Limitation

FU Fuel Used

FWD Forward

G
GBP Global Business Park, Gurgaon

GEN Generator

GBAS Ground Based Augmentation System (GNSS/GPS)

GLONASS Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System

GMT Greenwich Mean Time

GMU GPS (height) Monitoring Unit

GNLU Global Navigation and Landing Unit

GNSS Global Navigation Satellite System

GPS Global Positioning System

GPU Ground Power Unit

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OPERATIONS MANUAL

GPWS Ground Proximity Warning System

GS Ground Speed

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G/S Glide Slope

GW Gross Weight

GA Go Around

L
LP Low Pressure

LPC Less Paper Cockpit (Airbus concept)

LRNS Long Range Navigation System

LROPS Long Range Operations

LRU Line Replaceable Unit

LSK Line Select Key

LVL Level

LVP Low Visibility Procedures

LVTO Low Visibility Take-Off

LW Landing Weight
M

MASPS Minimum Aviation Systems Performance Standards

M Mach

MABH Minimum Approach Break off Height

MAA Maximum Authorised Altitude

MAG Magnetic

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MAINT Maintenance
MAP Missed Approach Point

MBOH Minimum Break Off Height

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MCC Maintenance Control Centre

MIALS Medium Intensity Approach Light System

MIRL Medium Intensity Runway Light

MLW Maximum Landing weight

MME Maintenance Management Exposition

MMEL Master Minimum Equipment List

MMO Maximum Operating Mach


MMR Multi-Mode Receiver

MNPS Minimum Navigation Performance Specification

MOCA Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude

MOE Maintenance Organisation Exposition

MOR Mandatory Occurrence Reporting

MORA Minimum Off-Route Altitude


MRVA Minimum Radar Vectoring Altitude

MSA Minimum Safe (or Sector) Altitude

MSG Message
MSL Mean Sea Level

MSN Manufacturer's Serial Number

MTBF Mean Time Between Failure

MTOW Maximum Take Off Weight

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MEW Manufacturer's Weight Empty


MZFW Maximum Zero Fuel Weight
N

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N/A Not Applicable
NAI Nacelle Anti Ice

NAT North Atlantic

NAV Navigation

NAVAID Navigation Aid (Radio)

NCD Non Computed Data

ND Navigation Display

NDB Non Directional Beacon

NM Nautical Mile
NOPAC North Pacific

NOTAM Notice To Airmen


NOTOC Notice To Crew (Dangerous Goods)

NPA Non Precision Approach

NTO No Technical Objection


O
OAT Outside Air Temperature
OBRM On Board Replaceable Module

OCA/H Obstacle Clearance Altitude / Height

OCC Operational Control Centre


OEB Operations Engineering Bulletin

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OEW Operating Empty Weight


OIT Operator Information Telex

OM Outer Marker

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OM Operations Manual

ONC Operational Navigation Chart

OPS Operations

OPT Optimum

OTS Oceanic Track System

OXY Oxygen
P
PA Passenger Address

PAC Pacific
PACOTS Pacific Oceanic Track System

PANS Procedures for Air Navigation Services

PAPI Precision Approach Path Indicator

PAR Precision Approach Radar

PAX Passenger

PB Pushbutton

PBN Performance Based Navigation

PCN Pavement Classification Number

PERF Performance

PF Pilot Flying

PFD Primary Flight Display

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PIREP Pilot Report


PIC Pilot In Command

P/N Part Number

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PNR Point of No Return

PNF/PM Pilot Not Flying/ Pilot Monitoring

POS Position

PROC Procedure

PROF Profile

PPR Prior Permission Required

PSI Pounds per Square Inch


PT Point

PTS Polar Track System

PVI Para Visual Indicator

PWR Power
Q

QA Quality Assurance
QDR Magnetic bearing from facility

QFE Field elevation atmosphere pressure

QFU Magnetic orientation of runway


QGH Procedure or facility to be used for recovery to airfield

QNE Sea level standard atmosphere (1013 hPa or 29.92" Hg)

QNH Sea level atmosphere pressure


QRH Quick Reference Handbook

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RA Radio Altitude/Radio Altimeter

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REF Reference

RESA Runway End Safety Area

RMI Radio Magnetic Indicator

RNAV Area Navigation

RNP Required Navigation Performance

RPL Repetitive Flight Plan

RPM Revolutions Per Minute

RQRD Required
RSV Reserves

RTA Required Time of Arrival

RTCA Requirements and Technical Concepts for Aviation

RTO Rejected Take Off

RTOW Regulatory Take Off Weight

RVR Runway Visual Range


RVSM Reduced Vertical Separation Minima

RWY Runway
S
SARPS Standards And Recommended Practices

SAT Static Air Temperature

SATCOM Satellite Communication

SB Service Bulletin

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SEL Selector
SELCAL Selective Calling

SEP Safety & Emergency Procedures

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SFE Seller Furnished Equipment

SSFDR Solid State Flight Data Recorder

SI International System of units

SID Standard Instrument Departure

SIGNET Significant Meteorological report

SOP Standard Operating Procedures

SOPAC South Pacific


SPECI Aviation selected special weather report

SPD Speed

SRA Surveillance Radar Approach

SRE Surveillance Radar Element of precision approach radar


system
SSR Secondary Surveillance Radar

STAR Standard Terminal Arrival Route

STD Standard
T
T, t Ton, Tonne, Temperature

TA Traffic Advisory

TACAN Tactical Air Navigation

TAF Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

TAS True Air Speed

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TAT Total Air Temperature


TAWS Terrain Awareness and Warning System

TBC To Be Confirmed

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TBD To Be Determined/Defined

TCAS Traffic alert and Collision Avoidance System

TDZ Touch Down Zone

TEMP Temperature

THR Thrust

TMA Terminal Maneuvering Area

T/O Take off


TOC Top Of Climb

TOD Top Of Descent

TODA Take-Off Distance Available

TOGA Take-Off/Go-Around

TOGW Take-Off Gross Weight

TORA Take-off Run Available


TOW Take-Off Weight

TR Temporary Revision

TRE Type Rated Examiner


TRI Type Rated Instructor

TVMC Temperature Velocity Minimum Control

TWR Tower

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TWY Taxiway
U
UHF Ultra High Frequency (300 – 3000 MHz)

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UNM Unaccompanied Minor

U/S Unserviceable

UTC Universal Time Coordinated


V
VMIN Minimum Operating Speed

VMO Maximum Operating Speed

VNAV Vertical Navigation

VOR VHF Omni-directional Range

VPFO Vice President (Flight Operations)

VR Rotation speed

VREF Landing reference speed


VS Stall speed

V/S Vertical Speed

VSI Vertical Speed Indicator

w
WBM Weight and Balance Manual
WGD Windshield Guidance Display

WGS World Geodetic System

WPT Waypoint
WX Weather

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WXR Weather Radar


X
XCVR Transceiver

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XFR Transfer
XMTR Transmitter

XTKE Cross Track Error


Z

Z Zulu time (UTC)

ZFCG Zero Fuel Centre of Gravity

ZFW Zero Fuel Weight

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0.1.3 Definitions
Accountable Manager: Is the manager who has corporate authority for
ensuring that all tasks as per the scope of approval of the approved

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organization can be financed and carried out to the standard required by
DGCA.

Accelerate-Stop Distance Available: The length of the take-off run available


plus the length of stop way, if such stop way is declared available by the
appropriate authority and is capable of bearing the mass of the Airplane under
the prevailing operating conditions

Adult: Male and female, is defined as person of an age of 12 years and


above.

Aerodrome: A defined area on land or water (including any buildings,


installations and equipment) intended to be used either wholly or in part for
the arrival, departure and surface movement of aircraft.

Aerodrome Elevation: The elevation of the highest point of the landing area.

Aeronautical Information Publication: A publication issued by or with the


authority of a State and containing aeronautical information of a lasting
character essential to air navigation.

Aircraft (Airplane) Flight Manual: A manual, associated with the certificate


of airworthiness, containing limitations within which the aircraft is to be
considered airworthy, and instructions and information necessary to the flight
crewmembers for the safe operation of the aircraft.

Aircraft identification: A group of letters, figures or a combination thereof


which is either identical to, or the coded equivalent of, the aircraft call sign to
be used in air-ground communications, and which is used to identify the
aircraft in ground-ground air traffic services communications.

Air Operator Certificate (AOC): A certificate authorising an operator to carry


out specified commercial air transport operations. Also referred to as Air
Operator‟s Permit

Airprox Incident: A situation in which, in the opinion of a pilot or controller,


the distance between aircraft as well as their relevant positions and speed

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have been such that the safety of the aircraft involved was or may have been
compromised.

Air Traffic: All aircraft in flight or operating on the manoeuvring area of an


aerodrome

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Air Traffic Control: A service that promotes the safe, orderly, and
expeditious flow of air traffic at aerodromes and during the approach,
departure, and en route environments.

Air Traffic Control Clearance: Authorisation for an aircraft to proceed under


conditions specified by an air traffic control unit

Air Traffic Control Instruction: Directives issued by air traffic control for the
purpose, if requiring a pilot to take a specific action

Air Traffic Control Service: A service provided for the purpose of:

- Preventing collisions between aircraft, and on the manoeuvring area


between aircraft and obstructions

- Expediting and maintaining an orderly flow of air traffic

Air Traffic Service: A generic term meaning variously, flight information


service, alerting service, air traffic advisory service, air traffic control service
(area control service, approach control service or aerodrome control service).

Airway: A control area or portion thereof established in the form of a corridor


equipped with radio navigation aids.

Alerting Service: A service provided to notify appropriate organisations


regarding aircraft in need of search and rescue aid, and assist such
organisations as required.

All weather operations. Any surface movement, take-off, departure,


approach or landing operations in conditions where visual reference is limited
by weather conditions.

Alternate aerodrome: An aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed when


it becomes either impossible or inadvisable to proceed to or to land at the
aerodrome of intended landing. Alternate aerodromes include the following:

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- Take-off alternate: An alternate aerodrome at which an aircraft can


land should this become necessary shortly after take-off and it is not
possible to use the aerodrome of departure.

- En-route alternate: An aerodrome at which an aircraft would be

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able to land after experiencing an abnormal or emergency condition
while en route.

- Destination alternate: An alternate aerodrome to which an aircraft


may proceed should it become impossible or inadvisable to land at
the aerodrome of intended landing.
Note: The aerodrome from which a flight departs may also be an en-route or a
destination alternate aerodrome for that flight.

Altitude: The vertical distance of a level, a point or an object considered as a


point, measured from mean sea level.

Approach ban point: The point on an approach segment where the reported
weather conditions at the runway must meet the applicable minima, so as to
be able to meet regulatory requirements for continuing an instrument
approach to a landing.

Approach and landing operations with vertical guidance: An instrument


approach and landing which utilizes lateral and vertical guidance but does not
meet the requirements established for precision approach and landing
operations.

Appropriate authority: ( also see Authority)

- Regarding flight over the high seas: the relevant authority of the
State of Registry

- Regarding flight other than over the high seas: the relevant authority
of the State having sovereignty over the territory being over flown

Approved: The Authority has reviewed the method, procedure or policy in


question and issued a formal written approval.

Apron: A defined area, on a land aerodrome, intended to accommodate


aircraft for purposes of loading or unloading passengers, mail or cargo,
fuelling, parking or maintenance.

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Aquaplaning (or hydroplaning): is a situation where the tyres of the aircraft


are, to a large extent, separated from the runway surface by a thin fluid film.

ATS route: A specified route designed for channelling the flow of traffic as
necessary for the provision of air traffic services.

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Note: The term "ATS route" is used to mean variously, airway, advisory route,
controlled or uncontrolled route, arrival or departure route, etc.

Authority: The competent body responsible for the safety of civil aviation in
the state of the applicant or operator.

Base training: Flight training required by Airworthiness Authorities to obtain


the aircraft type rating.

Braking action: a report on the conditions of the airport movement areas,


providing pilots the quality or degree of braking that may be expected. Braking
action is reported in terms of: Dry, Good, Medium to Good, Medium, Medium
to Poor, Poor, Nil or Unreliable.

Calendar day: The period of elapsed time, using Co-ordinated Universal


Time or local time, that begins at midnight and ends 24 hours later in the next
midnight

Cabin attendant: A crew member who performs, in the interest of safety of


passengers, duties assigned by the operator or the commander of the aircraft,
but who shall not act as a flight crew member. (also See Cabin Crew
member)

Certifying Staff: The organisation must employ sufficient number of licensed/


authorised/ approved personnel (including unlicensed category of personnel
such as technicians) required for production and certification in proportion to
the quantum of the work and appropriate to the approval sought. The
organization must ensure that the certifying staff (type rated
AMEs/authorized/approved persons) is/are fully aware of the organization
policies and procedures as detailed in the QC Manual.

Children: Person who is of an age of two years and above but who are less
than twelve years of age.

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Circling: The visual phase of an instrument approach to bring an aircraft into


position for landing on a runway which is not suitably located for a straight-in
approach

Civil aircraft: Any aircraft on the civil register of a state, other than those

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which that state treats as being in the service of the state, either permanently
or temporarily.

Commander: The pilot designated by the operator responsible for the


operation and safety of the aircraft during flight time. He may delegate the
conduct of the flight to another suitable qualified pilot. (See Pilot-in-
command)

Commercial air transport operation: An aircraft operation involving the


transport of passengers, cargo or mail for remuneration or hire.

Continuous Descent Final Approach (CDFA): A technique, consistent with


stabilized approach procedures, for flying the final approach segment of a
non-precision instrument approach procedure as a continuous descent,
without level-off, from an altitude/height at or above the final approach fix
altitude/height to a point approximately 15 m (50 ft) above the landing runway
threshold or the point where the flare manoeuvre should begin for the type of
aircraft flown. This is also referred to as CANPA (Constant Angle Non-
Precision Approach)

Converted Meteorological Visibility (CMV): A value equivalent to an RVR


which is derived from the reported meteorological visibility, as converted in
accordance with the specified requirements in the CAR.

Contaminated runway: A runway is considered to be contaminated when


more than 25% of the runway surface area (whether in isolated areas or not)
within the required length and width being used is covered by the following:

- Surface water more than 3 mm (0.125 in) deep, or slush, or loose


snow, equivalent to more than 3 mm (0.125 in) of water; or

- Snow which has been compressed into a solid mass which resists
further compression and will hold together or break into lumps if
picked up (compacted snow); or ice, including wet ice.

Contingency fuel: A quantity of fuel carried to compensate for items such as:

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- Deviations of an individual airplane from expected fuel consumption


data

- Deviations from forecast meteorological conditions

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- Deviations from planned routings and/or cruising levels/altitude

Co-pilot: Pilot serving in any piloting capacity other than as pilot in command
or commander, but excluding a pilot who is on board the aircraft for the sole
purpose of receiving flight instruction for a license or rating.

Course: A program of instruction to obtain an airman license, rating,


qualification, authorisation, or currency.

Crew member: A person assigned by an operator to duty on an aircraft


during a flight duty period.

- Flight crew member: A licensed crewmember charged with duties


essential to the operation of an aircraft during a flight duty period.

- Cabin crew member: A crewmember other than a flight


crewmember.

Crew Resource Management (CRM): A program designed to improve the


safety of flight operations by optimizing the safe, efficient, and effective use of
human resources, hardware, and information through improved crew
communication and co-ordination.

Critical phases of flight: Those portions of operations involving taxiing, take-


off and landing, and all flight operations below 10,000 feet, except cruise flight

Cross Crew Qualification (CCQ): An Airbus Industrie term for applying the
concepts of FAA AC 120-53 to related aircraft type like the A320, A330, and
A340. The term is intended to provide for the carryover of credit from one
aircraft type to another based on the common design characteristics, and if
applicable to transition between types as well as mixed fleet flying of different
types of aircraft.

Cruising level: A level maintained during a significant portion of a flight.

Damp runway: A runway is considered damp when the surface is not dry, but
when the moisture on it does not give it a shiny appearance.

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Dangerous good: Articles or substances that are capable of posing


significant risk to health, safety or property when transported by air and which
are classified according to ICAO Technical Instructions.

Deadhead Transportation: Time spent in transportation on aircraft (at the

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insistence of the AOC holder) as a passenger to or from a crewmember‟s
home station.

Decision altitude/height (DA/DH): A specified altitude or height (A/H) in the


precision approach at which a missed approach must be initiated if the
required visual reference to continue the approach has not been established.
Note 1: "Decision altitude (DA)" is referenced to mean sea level (MSL) and "decision
height (DH)" is referenced to the threshold elevation.

Note 2: The "required visual reference" means that section of the visual aids or of the
approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the pilot to have
made an assessment of the aircraft position and rate of change of position, in relation
to the desired flight path.

Dry lease: Is when the airplane is operated under the AOC of the lessee.

Dry runway: A dry runway is one which is neither wet nor contaminated, and
includes those paved runways which have been specially prepared with
grooves or porous pavement and maintained to retain “effectively dry” braking
action even when moisture is present.

Elevation: The vertical distance of a point or a level, on or affixed to the


surface of the earth measured from mean sea level.

Electronic Flight Bag (EFB): An electronic display system intended primarily


for flight deck or cabin use. EFB devices can display a variety of aviation data
(e.g., checklists, navigation charts, aircraft operating manual (AOM) or
perform basic calculations (e.g., performance data, fuel calculations). The
scope of the EFB system functionality may also include various other hosted
databases and applications. Physical EFB devices may use various
technologies, formats, and forms of communication. Physical EFB displays
may be portable (Class 1), attached to an approved mounting device (Class
2), or built into the aircraft (Class 3).

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Exemption: A formal authorisation issued by the Authority providing relief


from part or all of the provisions of a CAR. The authorisation may or may not
be conditional.

Extended over-water operation: An operation over water at a horizontal

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distance of more than, 50 NM away from shore.

Extended Diversion time operations: Any operation by an aeroplane with


two or more turbine engines where the diversion time to an en route alternate
aerodrome is greater than the threshold time set by the state of the operator.
EDTO regulations are applicable to routes over water as well as remote land
areas.
Extended Range Operations with Twin Engine Aeroplane (ETOPS): Any
flight by aeroplane with two turbine power engines where from any point on
the route the flight time at the one engine inoperative cruise speed to an
adequate aerodrome is greater than the threshold time.
Fail-Operational flight control system: A flight control system is fail-
operational if, in the event of a failure below alert height, the approach, flare
and landing, can be completed automatically. In the event of a failure, the
automatic landing system will operate as a fail-passive system.

Fail-Passive flight control system: A flight control system is fail-passive if,


in the event of a failure, there is no significant out-of-trim condition or
deviation of flight path or attitude but the landing is not completed
automatically. For a fail-passive automatic flight control system the pilot
assumes control of the airplane after a failure.

Filed flight plan: The flight plan as filed with an ATS unit by the pilot or his
designated representative, without any subsequent changes
Note: When the word "message" is used as a suffix to this term, it denotes the content
and format of the filed flight plan data as transmitted.

Final reserve fuel: An amount of fuel for all turbine powered airplanes,
calculated to fly 30 minutes at holding speed at 1500 ft above the aerodrome
elevation in standard conditions, calculated with the estimated mass on arrival
at the alternate or the destination, when no alternate is required.

Flight control system: A system which includes an automatic landing system

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Flight crewmember: See Crewmember.

Flight level: A surface of constant atmospheric pressure which is related to a


specific pressure datum, 1013.2 hecto -Pascals (hPa), and is separated from
other such surfaces by specific pressure intervals.

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Note 1: A pressure type altimeter calibrated in accordance with the Standard
Atmosphere:
- When set to QNH altimeter setting, will indicate altitude
- When set to QFE altimeter setting, will indicate height above the QFE reference
datum
- When set to a pressure of 1013.2 hecto-Pascals (hPa) may be used to indicate
flight levels.
Note 2: The terms "height" and "altitude", used in Note 1 above, indicate altimetric
rather than geometric heights and altitudes.

Flight plan: - ATS Flight Plan: Specified information provided to air traffic
services units, relative to an intended flight or portion of a flight of an aircraft.

Flow control: Measures designed to adjust the flow of traffic into a given
airspace, along a given route, or bound for a given aerodrome, so as to
ensure the most effective utilisation of the airspace.

Friction coefficient: Relationship between the friction force acting on the


wheel and the normal force on the wheel. The normal force depends on the
weight of the aircraft and the lift of the wings.

Glide path: A descent profile determined for vertical guidance during a final
approach.

Ground visibility: The visibility at an aerodrome, as reported by an


accredited observer or by an automatic system.

Heading: The direction, in which the longitudinal axis of an aircraft is pointed,


usually expressed in degrees from North (true, magnetic, compass or grid).

Height: The vertical distance of a level, a point or an object, measured from a


specified datum.

Hydroplaning: Refer to Aquaplaning


Human Factors Principles: Principles applied to aeronautical design,
certification, training, operations and maintenance to ensure equipment,

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systems, processes and procedures take into account human capabilities and
limitations as well as the safe interface between the human and system
components, for the purpose of optimizing human performance and reducing
human error.

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Human Performance: Human capabilities and limitations that have an effect
on the safety and efficiency of aeronautical operations.
Infant: A person who has not yet reached his second birthday.

Initial Operating Experience (IOE): Operational support given to newly type


rated pilots. The objective of IOE is to familiarize the pilot with revenue
operations, route and airport qualifications, using Airbus and airline approved
documents: FCOM, MEL, OEBs, etc.

Inspection: The examination of an aircraft or aeronautical product to


establish conformity with a standard approved by the Authority.

Instrument approach procedure: A series of predetermined manoeuvres by


reference to flight instruments with specified protection from obstacles from
the initial approach fix or, where applicable, from the beginning of defined
arrival route, to a point from which a landing can be completed and thereafter,
if a landing is not completed, to a position at which holding or en-route
obstacle clearance criteria apply.

Instrument Flight Rules: Rules that are applicable to all IFR flights (AIP
India). Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) are a set of regulations and procedures
for flying an aircraft without the assumption that pilots will be able to see and
avoid obstacles, terrain, and other air traffic; it is an alternative to Visual Flight
Rules (VFR).

Instrument Meteorological Conditions: Meteorological conditions


expressed in terms of visibility, distance from cloud, and ceiling, less than the
minima specified for visual meteorological conditions.

ILS critical area: An area of defined dimensions about the localizer and glide
path antennas where vehicles, including aircraft, are excluded during all ILS
operations. The critical area is protected because the presence of vehicles
and/or aircraft inside its boundaries will cause unacceptable disturbance to
the ILS signal-in-space.

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ILS sensitive area: An area extending beyond the critical area where the
parking and/or movement of vehicles, including aircraft, is controlled to
prevent the possibility of unacceptable interference to the ILS signal during
ILS operations. The sensitive area is protected to provide protection against

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


interference caused by large moving objects outside the critical area but still
normally within the airfield boundary.

Journey log: A form signed by the Commander of each flight that records the
airplane's registration, crew member names and duty assignments, the type
of flight, and the date, place, and time of arrival and departure
Low Visibility Procedures (LVP): Specific procedures applied at an
aerodrome for the purpose of ensuring safe operations during Categories II
and III approaches and/or low visibility take-offs.
Low Visibility Take-Off (LVTO): A term used in relation to flight operations
referring to a take-off on a runway where the RVR is less than 400 m.
Maintenance: Tasks required to ensure the continued airworthiness of an
aircraft or aeronautical product including any one or combination of overhaul,
repair, inspection, replacement, modification, and defect rectification.

Maintenance release: A document containing a certification that inspection


and maintenance work has been performed satisfactorily in accordance with
the methods prescribed by the Authority.

Missed approach procedure: The procedure to be followed if the approach


cannot be continued.

Net flight path: Is a flight path determined for engine(s) failure case. It is
established in such a manner that it represents the actual climb performance
diminished by a gradient equal to:

. Take-off (one engine failure): 0.8 % for two-engine aircraft, 0.9 % for three-
engine aircraft, and 1.0 % for four-engine aircraft

. En-route (one engine failure): 1.1 % for two-engine aircraft, 1.4 % for three-
engine aircraft, 1.6 % for four-engine aircraft

. En-route (two engine failure): 0.3 % for three-engine aircraft, 0.5 % for four-
engine aircraft

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Night: The hours between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning
of morning civil twilight or such other period between sunset and sunrise. Civil
twilight ends in the evening when the centre of the sun's disc is 6 degrees
below the horizon and begins in the morning when the centre of the sun's disc

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


is 6 degrees below the horizon.

Non-precision approach: Instrument approach with lateral guidance only


from the FAF to the runway environment. Descent limit is the MDA, and
obstacle clearance (including go-around) is guaranteed if the approach is
discontinued no farther than the MAP. Approaches with lateral guidance from
localiser, VOR, NDB or GPS are considered non-precision approaches.
Although often a helpful tool for lateral and vertical navigation during
approach, FMS guidance is not a certified approach aid.

NOTAM: A notice containing information concerning the establishment,


condition or change in any aeronautical facility, service, procedure or hazard,
the timely knowledge of which is essential to personnel concerned with flight
operations.

- Class I: Distribution by means of telecommunication

- Class II: Distribution by means other than telecommunication


(NOTAMs are also classified as „A‟, „B‟, „C‟, „D‟ and „G‟ depending mainly upon the type
of airport (Civil / Defence) and the duration of applicability of NOTAM.)

Obstacle clearance altitude/height (OCA/H): The lowest altitude (OCA), or


alternatively the lowest height above the elevation of the relevant runway
threshold or above the aerodrome elevation as applicable (OCH), used in
establishing compliance with the appropriate obstacle clearance criteria.

Operational control: The exercise of authority over the initiation,


continuation, diversion or termination of a flight in the interest of the safety of
the aircraft and the regularity and efficiency of the flight.

Operational flight plan: The operator's plan for the safe conduct of the flight
based on considerations of aircraft performance, other operating limitations,
and relevant expected conditions on the route to be followed and at the
aerodromes or heliports concerned.

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Operator: A person, organisation or enterprise engaged in or offering to


engage in an aircraft operation.

Performance-based navigation (PBN): Area navigation based on


performance requirements for aircraft operating along an ATS route,

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


in an instrument approach procedure or in a designated airspace.
Pilot Flying (PF): The pilot, who for the time being, is in charge of the
controls of an aircraft.

Pilot-in-command: The Pilot designated by the operator as being in


command of the aircraft and charged with responsibility for the operational
control and safe conduct of the flight.

Pilot Not Flying/ Pilot Monitoring (PNF/ PM): The pilot crew member who is
monitoring and supporting the pilot flying in accordance with the multi-crew
co-operation concept, when the required flight crew is more than one.

Precision approach: Instrument approach with lateral and vertical guidance


from the FAP to the runway touchdown zone, with system accuracy, integrity
and obstacle clearance (including go-around) guaranteed until the descent
limit (decision altitude or decision height) is reached. ILS, MLS and PAR are
considered precision approaches.

Pre-flight inspection: The inspection carried out before flight to ensure that
the aircraft is fit for the intended flight.
Prescriptive Compliance: A conventional means of achieving target levels of
safety performance of a system or process based on operator compliance
with pre-established non-variable standards or limitations.
Pressure-altitude: An atmospheric pressure expressed in terms of altitude,
which corresponds to that pressure in the Standard Atmosphere.
Policy: The stated intentions and direction of an organization.
Positioning: The practice of transferring crew from one place to another as
passengers in surface or air transport at the behest of the Company.
Post Holder: Persons nominated by an operator, and typically approved or
accepted by the Authority, that are responsible for the management and
supervision of specific areas of operations.

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Psychoactive Substances: Substances that can produce mood changes or


distorted perceptions in humans, to include, but not limited to, alcohol,
opioids, cannabinoids, sedatives and hypnotics, cocaine, other
psychostimulants, hallucinogens and volatile solvents; coffee and tobacco are
excluded.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Quality Assurance: All those planned and systematic actions necessary to
provide adequate confidence that operational and maintenance practices
satisfy given requirements.

Quality System: The organisational structure, responsibilities, procedures


and resources for implementing quality management.

Rating: An authorisation entered on or associated with a license or certificate


and forming part thereof, stating special conditions, privileges or limitations
pertaining to such license or certificate.

Repair: The restoration of an aircraft/aeronautical product to a serviceable


condition in conformity with an approved standard.

Repetitive flight plan (RPL): A flight plan related to a series of frequently


recurring, regularly operated individual flights with identical basic features,
submitted by an operator for retention and repetitive use by ATS.

Reporting point: A specified geographical location in relation to which the


position of an aircraft can be reported

Required Navigation Performance (RNP): A statement of the navigation


performance accuracy necessary for operation within a defined airspace

RESA: An area symmetrical about the extended runway centre line and
adjacent to the end of the strip primarily intended to reduce the risk of
damage to an aeroplane undershooting or overrunning the runway.
Rest Period: An uninterrupted and defined period of time during which a
crew member is free from all duties and airport standby
Rostered /Planned duty: A duty period, or a series of duty periods, with
stipulated start and finish times, notified by the Company to crew in advance.

Runway: A defined rectangular area on a land aerodrome prepared for the


landing and take-off of aircraft.

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Runway visual range: The range over which the pilot of an aircraft on the
centreline of a runway can see the runway surface markings or the lights
delineating the runway or identifying its centreline.

Sector: The time between an aircraft first moving under its own power until it

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


next comes to rest after landing, on the designated parking position.

SIGMET information: Information issued by a meteorological watch office


concerning the occurrence or expected occurrence of specified en-route
weather phenomena which may affect the safety of aircraft operations.

Slush: Water-saturated snow which with a heel-and-toe slap-down motion


against the ground will be displaced with a splatter; specific gravity: 0.5 up to
0.8

Snow (on the ground): Dry snow: Snow which can be blown if loose or, if
compacted by hand, will fall apart upon release; specific gravity: up to but not
including 0.35.

 Wet snow: Snow which, if compacted by hand, will stick together and
tend to or form a snowball; specific gravity: 0.35 up to but not
including 0.5.

 Compacted snow: Snow which has been compressed into a solid


mass that resists further compression and will hold together or break
up into chunks if picked up; specific gravity: 0.5 and over.

Special VFR: Flights under VFR rules, permitted upto 1500M visibility. These
are subject to specific authorisation from ATC

Split Duty: A flying duty period which consists of two or more sectors,
separated by less than a minimum rest period.

Stabilised approach: An approach without speed and/or configuration


changes during final descent.

Stabilised approach procedure: An approach procedure along the extended


runway centreline with a constant, in-flight verifiable descent gradient from the
final approach altitude to the runway touchdown zone. Except for offset-
localizer approaches, an ILS approach is inherently a stabilised approach
procedure. Non-precision approaches can be constructed as a stabilised

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approach procedure by choosing the FAF accordingly and by publishing a


distance-versus-altitude (VOR+DME, NDB+DME, LOC+DME) or waypoint-
versus-altitude table (GPS) to be able to verify adherence to the (imaginary)
glide path.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Standard: A specified system, policy, program, process, procedure, plan, set
of measures, facility, component, type of equipment, or any other aspect of
operations under the Audit Scope of IOSA/ISAGO, that is considered an
operational necessity, and with which an Operator/Provider will be expected
to be in conformity at the conclusion of an Audit.
Standby Duty: A period during which the Company places restraints on a
crew member who would otherwise be on off duty.
System of Non-Shared Responsibility (Operational Control): A system
whereby the PIC has sole responsibility for all aspects of operational control,
assisted and/or supported by Flight Dispatchers/ Flight Operations Officer
(FOO) or other operational control personnel.

System of Shared Responsibility (Operational Control): A system


whereby the pilot-in-command and a Flight Dispatcher/Flight Operations
Officer (FOO) have joint responsibility for all aspects of operational control.
Taxiing: Movement of an aircraft on the surface of an aerodrome under its
own power, excluding take-off and landing

Taxiway: A defined path on a land aerodrome established for the taxiing of


aircraft and intended to provide a link between one part of the aerodrome and
another.

Technical log: A document carried on an aircraft that contains information to


meet ICAO requirements; a technical log contains at least two independent
sections: a journey record section and an aircraft maintenance record section.

Threshold: The beginning of that portion of the runway usable for landing.
Threshold Time: The range established by the State and expressed in time,
to an en route alternate airport, whereby any operation that results in a time
beyond requires an EDTO (ETOPS) approval from the State.
Track: The projection on the earth's surface of the path of an aircraft, the
direction of which path at any point is usually expressed in degrees from
North (true, magnetic or grid).

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Transition altitude: The altitude at or below which the vertical position of an


aircraft is controlled by reference to altitudes.

Transition level: The lowest flight level available for use above the transition
altitude.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


UN number: The four-digit number assigned by the United Nations
Committee of experts on the transport of dangerous goods to identify a
substance or a particular group of substances.

Vertical Navigation (VNAV): A method of navigation which permits aircraft


operation on a vertical flight profile using altimetry sources, external flight path
references, or a combination of these.

Visibility: Visibility for aeronautical purpose is greater of:

a) The greatest distance at which a black object of suitable dimensions,


situated near the ground, can be seen and recognized when observed
against a bright background;

b) The greatest distance at which the lights in the vicinity of 1000 candelas
can be seen and identified against unlit background.
Note 1: The two distances have different values in air of a given extinction coefficient.
The former a) is represented by meteorological optical range (MOR), and the latter
b) varies with the background illumination.

Note 2: The definition applies to the observations of visibility in local routine and special
reports, to the observations of prevailing and minimum visibility reported in METAR and
SPECI and to the observations of ground visibility.

Visual approach: An approach when either part or all of an instrument


approach procedure is not completed and the approach is executed with
visual reference to the terrain.

Visual meteorological conditions: Meteorological conditions expressed in


terms of visibility, distance from cloud, and ceiling, equal to or better than
specified minima.

Waypoint: A specified geographical location used to define an area


navigation route or the flight path of an aircraft employing area navigation.

Wet lease: when the airplane is operated under the AOC of the lessor.

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Wet runway: A runway is considered wet when the runway surface is


covered with water, or equivalent, less than or equal to 3 mm or when there is
sufficient moisture on the runway surface to cause it to appear reflective, but
without significant areas of standing water.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Zero Flight Time Training (ZFTT): A flight crew qualification concept
whereby:
- Flight training and evaluation is conducted solely in advanced
simulation devices without the need for flight time in an aircraft;
- A final demonstration of competency is completed in an aircraft
during actual line operations under the supervision of an
instructor, evaluator or current and qualified Pilot-in-Command
(PIC) designated for the purpose by the Operator and/or State.

- Intentionally Left Blank -

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0.1.4 Units conversion table

METRIC  US US  METRIC

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


LENGTH 1 mm = 0.0394 in 1 in = 25.4 mm

1 m = 3.281 ft 1 ft = 0.3048 m

1 m = 1.094 yd 1 yd = 0.914 m

1 km = 0.540 NM 1 NM = 1.852 km

1 km = 0.6215 statute mile 1 statute mile = 1.609 km

SPEED 1 m/s = 3.281 ft/s = 1.944 kt 1 ft/s = 0.3048 m/s

1 km/h = 0.54 kt 1 kt = 1.852 km/h = 0.514 m/s

WEIGHT 1 g = 0.353 oz 1 oz = 28.35 g

1 kg = 2.2046 lb 1 lb = 0.4536 kg

1 t (tonne) = 2 204.6 lb 1 lb = 0.0004536 t

FORCE 1 N = 0.2248 lb 1 lb = 4.448 N

1 daN = 2.248 lb 1 lb = 0.4448 daN

PRESSURE 1 bar = 14.505 PSI 1 PSI = 6892 Pa = 0.0689 bar

1 mbar = 1 hPa = 0.0145 PSI 1 PSI = 68.92 hPa = 68.92 mbar

1 mbar = 1 hPa = 0.02953 in 1 in Hg = 33.864 hPa = 33.864


Hg mbar

VOLUME 1 l = 0.2642 US Gallon 1 US Gallon = 3.785 l


3
1 m = 264.2 US Gallons 1 US Gallon = 0.003785 m3

1 l = 1.0567 US Quart 1 US Quart = 0.94635 l

MOMENTUM 1 m.daN = 88.5 lb.in 1 lb.in = 0.0113 m.daN

TEMPERATURE °C = 5/9 (°F - 32) °F = (°C x 1.8) + 32

°C = 5/9 (°F + 40) – 40 °F = 9/5 (°C + 40) - 40

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0.1.5 International standard atmosphere (ISA)

SPEED
PRESSURE PRESSURE ALTITUD
DENSITY of
ALTITUDE TEMP. RATIO E
 = ρ/ρo SOUND

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


(Feet) (°C)  = P/Po (metres)
hPa PSI In.Hg (kt)

40 000 - 56.5 188 2.72 5.54 0.1851 0.2462 573 12 192


39 000 - 56.5 197 2.58 5.81 0.1942 0.2583 573 11 887
38 000 - 56.5 206 2.99 6.10 0.2038 0.2710 573 11 582
37 000 - 56.5 217 3.14 6.40 0.2138 0.2844 573 11 278
36 000 - 56.3 227 3.30 6.71 0.2243 0.2981 573 10 973
35 000 - 54.3 238 3.46 7.04 0.2353 0.3099 576 10 668
34 000 - 52.4 250 3.63 7.38 0.2467 0.3220 579 10 363
33 000 - 50.4 262 3.80 7.74 0.2586 0.3345 581 10 058
32 000 - 48.4 274 3.98 8.11 0.2709 0.3473 584 9 754
31 000 - 46.4 287 4.17 8.49 0.2837 0.3605 586 9 449
30 000 - 44.4 301 4.36 8.89 0.2970 0.3741 589 9 144
29 000 - 42.5 315 4.57 9.30 0.3107 0.3881 591 8 839
28 000 - 40.5 329 4.78 9.73 0.3250 0.4025 594 8 534
27 000 - 38.5 344 4.99 10.17 0.3398 0.4173 597 8 230
26 000 - 36.5 360 5.22 10.63 0.3552 0.4325 599 7 925
25 000 - 34.5 376 5.45 11.10 0.3711 0.4481 602 7 620
24 000 - 32.5 393 5.70 11.60 0.3876 0.4642 604 7 315
23 000 - 30.6 410 5.95 12.11 0.4046 0.4806 607 7 010
22 000 - 28.6 428 6.21 12.64 0.4223 0.4976 609 6 706
21 000 - 26.6 446 6.47 13.18 0.4406 0.5150 611 6 401
20 000 - 24.6 466 6.75 13.75 0.4595 0.5328 614 6 096
19 000 - 22.6 485 7.04 14.34 0.4791 0.5511 616 5 791
18 000 - 20.7 506 7.34 14.94 0.4994 0.5699 619 5 406
17 000 - 18.7 527 7.65 15.57 0.5203 0.5892 621 5 182
16 000 - 16.7 549 7.97 16.22 0.5420 0.6090 624 4 877
15 000 - 14.7 572 8.29 16.89 0.5643 0.6292 626 4 572
14 000 - 12.7 595 8.63 17.58 0.5875 0.6500 628 4 267
13 000 - 10.8 619 8.99 18.29 0.6113 0.6713 631 3 962
12 000 - 8.8 644 9.35 19.03 0.6360 0.6932 633 3 658
11 000 - 6.8 670 9.72 19.79 0.6614 0.7156 636 3 353
10 000 - 4.8 697 10.10 20.58 0.6877 0.7385 638 3 048
9 000 - 2.8 724 10.51 21.39 0.7148 0.7620 640 2 743
8 000 - 0.8 753 10.92 22.22 0.7428 0.7860 643 2 438
7 000 + 1.1 782 11.34 23.09 0.7716 0.8106 645 2 134
6 000 + 3.1 812 11.78 23.98 0.8014 0.8359 647 1 829
5 000 + 5.1 843 12.23 24.90 0.8320 0.8617 650 1 524
4 000 + 7.1 875 12.69 25.84 0.8637 0.8881 652 1 219
3 000 + 9.1 908 13.17 26.82 0.8962 0.9151 654 914
2 000 + 11.0 942 13.67 27.82 0.9298 0.9428 656 610
1 000 + 13.0 977 14.17 28.86 0.9644 0.9711 659 305
0 + 15.0 1013 14.70 29.92 1.0000 1.0000 661 0
- 1 000 + 17.0 1050 15.23 31.02 1.0366 1.0295 664 - 305

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0.1.6 Parts of operations manual


The Operations Manual is divided into following parts:

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Part A: General (Operations Policy Manual)

Part A defines all non-type related operational policies, procedures,


instructions and guidance necessary for company flight operations
personnel to perform their duty and needed for a safe operation.

Part B: Airplane Operating Information

Part B comprises all type related instructions and procedures needed for
a safe operation. It takes account of any differences between types,
variants or individual aircraft used by the company.

Material produced by the company for this Part is supplemented or


substituted by applicable parts of the following manuals for the operated
aircraft:
 Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) including the Configuration Deviation
List (CDL).
 Minimum Equipment List (MEL).
 Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM) and Quick Reference
Handbook (QRH)
 Flight Crew Training Manual (FCTM) – Practical and training-
oriented information is addressed in the Flight Crew Training Manual
 Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual (SEP)

The Flight Crew Training Manual (FCTM) is published as a supplement to the


Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM) and is designed to provide pilots with
practical information on how to operate the Airbus aircraft. It should be read in
conjunction with the FCOM. In the case of any conflict, the FCOM is the over-
riding authority.
Airline training policy may differ in certain areas. Should this be the case, the
airline training policy is the over-riding authority.

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Part C: Routes and Aerodromes

Part C comprises all instructions and information needed for the area of
operation.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Material produced by the company for this Part is supplemented or substituted by
applicable Route Guide material produced by specialised professional company:
 En-route charts
 Airport charts
 Airport briefing
 NOTAM

Part D: Training

Part D comprises all training instructions required for a safe operation.

0.1.7 Volumes of the operations manual


The following Manuals form a part of the Operations Manual:
a) Company Policy and Administration Manual
b) A 320
 Flight Manual
 FCOM (GEN/DSC,PRO/LIM/OEB/FCBUL,PERF)
 FCTM
 QRH
 MEL
c) Flight Safety Manual
d) EDTO Manual.
e) Document Management System Manual (DMS)
f) EFB Policy and Procedure Manual
In addition following documents are also to be used as reference as and when
required.
i) ICAO/IATA dangerous goods annual
ii) Emergency response manual
iii) Security manual
iv) SEP manual
v) Flight despatch and Flight operations Process manuals

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0.1.8 Official language and modes of communication


English shall be the official language for communication. The Company
Operations manual and all other company documents will be published in English
and in such a way that entire documentation contains legible and accurate

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


information.

The English language shall be used as a common language for use by all flight
crew members for communication:
i) On the flight deck during line operations;
ii) Between the flight crew and cabin crew during line operations;
iii) During flight crew training and evaluation activities.
iv) English shall also be used as the universal language in
radiotelephony. Crew is expected to use English language of an
operationally acceptable standard.
Company shall use letter/e-mail/circulars etc as official mode of communication.

0.1.9 Gender applicability


The Operations manual applies to both female and male personnel, although
some references may refer to one gender only. In all cases, references to one
gender shall also be deemed equally applicable to both genders.

0.2 FLIGHT OPERATIONS DOCUMENTS

Flight Operations Support is responsible for ensuring that regulations of the State
and of the other states or authorities relevant to operations are available to the
users.
 ICAO International Standards and Recommended Practices, as
applicable
 Airworthiness Directives;
 Aeronautical Information Publications (AIP) and NOTAMS;
 Manufacturer's Approved Flight Manual (AFM), including
performance data, weight/mass and balance data/manual,
checklists and MMEL/CDL;
 Route and airports charts, FMS databases, GPWS terrain and
obstacle databases, airport analysis data etc,

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 Any manufacturer's operational communications

The company has a system for the management and control of documentation
(both internal and external), and/or data used directly in the conduct or support of
operations, including on-board library documents.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


The company utilises an paper/electronic method of document management,
control and distribution, Within which document files are typically created,
maintained, identified, revised, distributed, accessed, presented, retained and/or
deleted using computer systems.

Flight Ops support team shall be responsible for the documentation control and
updates. Flight ops support section will ensure:
 Retention of a master copy;
 Examination and approval prior to issue;
 Review and update, to include an approval process;
 Version control (electronic documents);
 Identification of revision status;
 Identification and retention of revisions as history;
 Identification and retention of background or source references
as history;
 Distribution to ensure appropriate availability at points of use;
 checking of documents to verify they remain legible and readily
identifiable;
 Identification, update, distribution and retention of documents of
external origin;
 Identification and retention of obsolete documents
 Disposal of documents

A distribution list for all operational documents and their dissemination shall be
maintained. All operational documents shall be duly signed by the issuing authority
and these signed copies shall be deemed as original copy and shall be maintained
at Flight Operations Support Section. Dissemination shall essentially be via
electronic means; like email and suitable software shall be used to establish that
the individual user has received the correct documents.

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All documents shall be published in PDF format for electronic dissemination. A


record of receipt of all documents sent by Flight Ops support to individual users
shall be maintained for a period of 6 month.

System for dissemination of information

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


0.2.1

Electronic documentation (e-manual and company portal)


E-manual along with IndiGo Portal (6E World) has been the main tool for training
and reference. On the Portal and in the E-manual Crew shall be able to refer;
a) Company Operations Manual (Part A, B, C, and D)
b) Flight Operations Notices
c) Flight Manual (FM),
d) Flight Crew Operating Manuals (FCOMs)
e) Quick Reference Handbook (QRH),
f) Flight Crew Training Manual (FCTM),
g) MEL
h) EDTO Manual
i) Flight Safety Manual
j) Flight Safety Circulars
k) Flight Safety forms
l) Regulatory documents (CAR, AIC, Operations Circular, Air Safety
Circulars) and other flight operations reading material like FOBN, ALAR
briefing notes, etc.

Some salient features of electronic documentation are;


i) The e-manual is issued every quarter or if deemed necessary can be
issued earlier or postponed.
ii) All temporary revisions, OEBs etc. issued to FCOM by the end of the
preceding month shall be included in the e-manual.
iii) Any new document/Notice issued in between two issues of the e-manual
will be posted on the portal.
iv) All new notices will be only disseminated electronically. It is
recommended that crew access IndiGo‟s portal and check e-mails
before operating a flight. Particulars of latest notices issued will be listed
on the Flight Release. The Captain acknowledges by signing the Flight

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Release that all Flight Deck crew members have reviewed the latest
Notices and are well versed with their contents.

0.2.2 On board documentation

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


List of documents required to be carried
As part of pre-flight inspection, flight crew are required to check before
commencement of a flight that all mandatory manuals/documents are available on
board, (in original or attested copies (CAR Section 2, Series X, Part VII)

Department Mandatory /
Sr. No. Documents
Responsible Informatory
i) Certificate of Registration Engineering Mandatory
ii) Certificate of Airworthiness Engineering Mandatory
iii) Airworthiness Review Certificate
Engineering Mandatory
(ARC)
iv) Noise Certification Engineering Mandatory
v) Air Operator‟s Permit Engineering Mandatory
vi) Appropriate Crew Licences Crew Mandatory
vii) Aeromobile Radio Operations
Engineering Mandatory
Licences
viii) Journey Log Book or appropriate
Engineering Mandatory
document
ix) Operations Manual Flight Operations Mandatory
x) Minimum Equipment List Engineering Mandatory
xi) Flight Manual Flight Operations Mandatory
xii) Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM) Flight Operations Mandatory
xiii) Quick Reference Handbook
Flight Operations Mandatory
( check list)
xiv) Cabin Crew Manual (SEP Manual) Inflight Services Mandatory
xv) Route Guide, Navigation Charts and
Flight Operations Mandatory
Topographical Maps
xvi) Airplane Search Procedure Checklist Flight Operations Mandatory
xvii) Maintenance Release/Certificate of Engineering Mandatory
Release to Service *
xviii) Weight Schedule Engineering Mandatory
xix) Load and Trim Sheet Airport Services Mandatory
xx) Passenger Manifest Airport Services Mandatory
xxi) Crew Manifest Airport Services Mandatory

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xxii) Cargo Manifest (when carried) Airport Services Mandatory


xxiii) Dangerous Goods Manifest (when
Airport Services Mandatory
carried)
xxiv) Chart showing location of emergency
and safety equipment‟s carried on- Engineering Mandatory

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


board
xxv) RTOW Charts Flight Operations Mandatory
xxvi) Company Operational Notices Flight Operations Informatory
xxvii) Flight Safety Manual Flight Operations Informatory
xxviii) Red Book (Emergency Response –
Flight Operations Mandatory
DGR Goods)
xxix) LOPA (Layout of Passenger
Engineering Mandatory
Arrangement);

* Note 1: With the introduction of CAR 145, Flight Release Certificate (FRC) is no longer
issued for an aircraft. Now Certificate of Release to Service (CRS) has replaced FRC.

A CRS is valid till next maintenance action. For example there is a snag another CRS after
snag rectification will be issued, and previous CRS will not be valid. Similarly after every
Check a new CRS is issued and is valid till next maintenance action. If a layover check is
carried out, the previous CRS is no more valid and a new CRS is issued. This is the reason
after every lay over, check a new CRS is signed off in the Tech Log.

A CRS is not required to be issued after Transit/ Pre-flight inspection.

Note 2: In case a document has been submitted to a competent authority for renewal or for
any other reason, that fact shall be deemed as valid for it’s not being on board an aircraft. In
such a case a document shall be issued stating that the required document has been
submitted to the authority. This document shall be carried on board.
Items at sr. nos. vii) to xv) shall be stored in a suitable place accessible to the crew in flight.
The remaining may be carried in any other safe place on board the aircraft.
Item vii) to xv) are placed either in the Navigation bag in the cockpit or are placed in the
various document stowage boxes. In case, a Manual/document is missing this is required to
be reported to local flight operations personnel / flight dispatch by filling up the relevant form.
It will be replaced at the earliest opportunity.
It is a common courtesy to leave the cockpit in a condition a crew would expect to find it in.
Pilots are expected and required to ensure that if any documents / chart is taken out for use
during flight, it is placed back in the correct position and correct order. The Pilot-In-
Command is responsible to ensure that all manuals and documents are placed in the proper
place after completion of flight.

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0.2.3 Missing document


In case a document is missing or requires replacement flight crew should inform
local Flight Operations Personnel / Flight Dispatch by filling up the relevant
“Missing Documentation form”, which is kept in On Board Notice File. Missing

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


documentation will be replaced at the earliest opportunity. In-case of any urgent
assistance, crew can contact Senior Manager Flight Ops Support, on:
+919818125126.

0.2.4 Navigation bag:


On board Operational Documents are placed as below:

 Nav Bag kept behind Right Seat will contain: FCOMs and Company
Operations Manual, Parts A, B, C (Including EDTO manual) and D.

 Coat Stowage Compartment : In order to create extra space in the


cockpit, Nav bag 2 has been removed and remaining documents such as
Sealed Jeppesen manual, Security manual, Cabin Crew manual (SEP),
On board form file, DGR (Red book), safety forms are kept in the coat
stowage compartment.

 On board Notice File: All Notices have been placed in following order:
NOTAC, C-NOTAM, Operations Notice, and Technical Notice.

Note: Administrative notices are disseminated electronically. They are not part of on-board
documentation and are only available on the Portal and in e-manual.

EDTO Manual: Approved EDTO manual is available on the portal and in e-manual. Hard
copy of this manual is available on every aircraft. The manual is placed along with Route
Guide, in the same binder.

RTOW Charts: Each aircraft shall have a single RTOW file for both domestic and
international stations. RTOW charts are also available on Company Portal.

Company Minima: Minima shall be available in the on-board minima file. The on board
minima file shall consist of;

 Normal Minima – Single document for both domestic and international stations.
This shall be printed in white sheets.

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 LVTO/Non LVTO Minima- Single document for both domestic and international
stations. This shall be printed in light blue sheets.

 Alternate Minima: Alternate minima(dispatch planning minima) is printed in yellow


sheets.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


 CMV Cards- Single document for both domestic and international stations. This
shall be printed in light pink sheets.

Jeppesen Manuals: Two kits are kept in all aircraft. These kits include introduction,
destination, en-route and alternate aerodromes charts. The details of trip kits vary for 77T
and 73.5 T fleet as under;

 Jeppesen Kits in 73.5 T fleet:

- Front: Only manuals covering domestic area of operations.

- Coat Stowage Area: manuals covering International area of operations, plus


sealed Jeppesen for domestic area of operations.

 Jeppesen Kits in 77 T fleet:

On 77 T fleet, Jeppesen trip kits were placed in small blue bags, adjacent to either
seat. These bags were open bags with no securing option. To meet the
international norms and safety standards, navigation bags have been re-designed
with the option of securing facility.
Top transparent flap- This shall ensure that the manuals remain within the bag,
even in case of severe disturbances.
Securing the bags –These bags have two belt to secure them.

Small Navigation Bags (Containing Trip Kit)

- Captain Side: Bag shall be kept under Left observer seat. It is secured by
tying it with the seat belt of observer seat.
- First Officer Side: The bag is secured by tying the bag with floor belt
provided for Navigation bag.

Big Navigation Bags: is secured with the belt which is attached with the floor.

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Crew responsibility

(i) Before commencement of flight, both Captain and First Officer shall
 Take out the relevant approach plates, including
alternate.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


 Ensure both bags remain secure.
(ii) After the flight
 Keep the chart back in respective folders inside the
bag.
 Ensure both bags remain secure.

No night kits or any personal bags are to be placed on Navigation Bag.

- Refer Next Page -

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Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


0.2.5 Documents library at bases:
As all Company Documents are available on Company Portal and in e-manual,
hard copies of selected documents have also been kept at aircraft night halt
bases. These are primarily maintained to refurbish aircraft libraries. All the bases
have dedicated Flight operations computers for crew to access electronic libraries.

0.2.6 Documents at Simulator


The documents required for training shall be placed and maintained at all
simulators used by Company.

0.2.7 Standard operating procedure


Company strictly adheres to Airbus SOPs. Any deviation from Airbus SOPs will be
reflected in Operations Notice 4 (series)

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0.2.8 Carriage of Documents by Cockpit Crew

Refer Para 11.4.1.6, Chapter 11.

0.3 SYSTEM OF AMENDMENTS AND REVISIONS

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


0.3.1 Procedures and checklists:
The Operations manual procedures and check lists, when published are useable,
identifiable and consistent with manufacturer specifications. Any deviations from
manufacturer procedures or checklists will be based on operational requirements
as identified. Few points to be kept in mind while preparing the checklist:

 Information is in a useable format, at the appropriate reading level,


technical sophistication and clarity;

 Consistent labels, symbols, colours, terms, acronyms, abbreviations,


formats and data fields;

 Availability and usability for specific tasks, when needed and in a form
that is directly usable;

 Designed with simplicity, consistency and ease of use;

 Enabling operators to perceive and understand elements of the current


situation and project them to future operational situations;

 Minimizes special operator skills, abilities, tools or characteristics;

 Assess the net impacts upon the physical, cognitive and decision-making
resources, using objective and subjective performance measures.

0.3.2 Operations Manual


(Refer CAR Section 8, Series „O‟ part VII)

The Vice President (Flight Operations) is responsible for issuance of amendments


and revisions. Each holder of a paper version of the manual is responsible for
insertion of amendments and revisions in their copies.

Operations manual and its revisions will be issued to crew in electronic format
only, i.e. included in e-manual and will be available on the 6E World Portal

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a) For the digital version, a fresh media will be provided. The Vice
President (Flight Operations) will designate an officer who will be
responsible for incorporation of amendments / revisions in official
copies of the manual that are maintained in the flight dispatch

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


libraries and placed on board aircraft.

b) The DGCA will be provided at least two copies of the Operations


Manual. Subsequently any revisions shall also be provided to
FSD, DGCA Headquarters in duplicate for review and acceptance
/approval. Additional copies may be required by the DGCA for
distribution among the authority Inspectors.

c) Each manual will have a record of amendments and revisions


with insertion dates and effective dates.

d) No handwritten amendments and revisions are permitted except


in situations in which in the interest of safety immediate
amendment / revision is required. The formal amendment
revision will be incorporated on receipt.

e) The Header of each page contains Company Logo, Name of


Manual, Part Name, Chapter Title, and Chapter Number. The
Footer of each page contains Issue Number, Effective Date and
Page Number indicating Part, Chapter and Page.

f) A list of effective pages will be issued for incorporation in the


manual.

g) Any amendments, corrections to the contents of this Operations


Manual will be issued as Revisions, if these revisions are not
governed by CAR/CAP 8100, these revisions may be issued
under the authority of Vice President (Flight Operations).
Additionally the company may issue, NOTAC, C-NOTAM,
Administrative Notice, and Operations/Technical Notices, as
deemed appropriate for immediate dissemination to all. If the
revision to the contents of Operations manual is more than 50%,
then the change will be incorporated as a new Issue.

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h) The contents of these notices will subsequently be incorporated in


the Operations manual twice a year, pending DGCA approval.
However, DGCA policies will be incorporated on issue.

i) Personnel becoming aware that amendments or revisions have

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


been made, but not in receipt of those amendments, should apply
to the Head Flight Operation Support for the relevant amendment
or revision as soon as possible.

j) The manual (Paper version where applicable) will be provided in a


ring binder outer cover for easy incorporation of amendments.

k) The manual will be in A5/appropriate size so that it is conducive to


easy handling and study in the cockpit.

0.4 PROMULGATION OF ADDITIONAL OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONS


AND INFORMATION

The Vice President /Director (Flight Operations) will issue additional safety critical
operational, technical and administrative instructions and dissemination of
changes in policy through the following Circulars, to all concerned, which shall be
filed and kept updated. These shall also include airworthiness directives, flight
crew bulletins or directives, manufacturer‟s bulletins and NOTAMs if any.

a) NOTAC – Notice to Air Crew – Information in a NOTAC is of more


permanent nature and may effect a revision of the Operations Manual.
NOTACs are for compliance.

b) Technical Notice – Information, guidance and or compliance to the Crew


which is of technical nature and is related to aircraft systems, technical
explanations, modification being progressively carried out on airline fleet
etc. will be provided in the form of Technical Notice.

c) Operation Notice - Changes in Standard Operating procedures, Training


Procedures etc. shall be issued as an Operation Notice. These are for
Compliance.

d) Administrative Notice- Administrative issues with regard to duties and


obligations of Flight Operations will be notified in Administrative notices.

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e) C-NOTAMs – Company Notice to Airmen - Information and guidance to


Crew on various flight operation related aspects that are of a temporary
nature not covered in the Operations Manual will be provided in
Company NOTAMs. These can be either Informatory or mandatory in

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


nature.

Notification of withdrawal and checklist of effective NOTACs, C-NOTAMS,


Technical, Administrative and Operations Circulars will be issued under C-
NOTAMs.

All current & valid NOTACs, Technical Notices, Operations Notices and C-
NOTAMs will be issued in digital format every quarter, receipt of which will be duly
acknowledged by the recipient.

All current and valid NOTACs, Technical Notices, Operations Notices and C-
NOTAMs will kept on board each company aircraft and will also be available on
the company portal. They can be viewed through secured access by using user Id
/ password.

0.5 DISTRIBUTION OF OPERATIONS MANUAL

All Crewmembers will be issued digital version of the Operations Manual quarterly.
Revisions to Operations manual will be issued to crew electronically and will be
posted on Company portal. Intimation regarding any revisions will be sent to all
concerned via e-mail. Subsequently all revisions shall be added to the next
version of e-manual. The electronic copy of Operations manual will have search
functions. All crewmembers and other holders shall be responsible for the
possession and use of the latest edition.

The DGCA will be provided with a copy of the Operations Manual, all amendments
and revisions.

The Operations Manual and amendments will be distributed under


acknowledgement from the manual holder.

Each paper Manual will be assigned a Control number and the digital version shall
be issued on a DVD (e-manual) to each holder. A record of the holders name,
position and department will be maintained for all paper manuals. The same is to
be returned by the holder while leaving the company.

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0.5.1 Disposal/Destruction Obsolete documents


Senior Manager Flight Operations Support shall be responsible for disposal /
destruction of obsolete documents. Hard copies shall be destroyed centrally at
Flights Operations Support facility at main base (DEL) by shredding. The owners

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


of DVD (e-manual) will be responsible to destroy older version on receipt of the
latest version.

0.6 DOCUMENT PROCESS MANUAL

Flight Operations has established a comprehensive documentation processes to


ensure QUALITY and ACCURACY in „on board documents‟, Library, and copies
distributed to management personnel/ non-management personnel including
Crew. The manual provides all the policies and procedures under which
documents are issued, maintained, and destroyed.

Document process manual shall be available for reference on company portal and
a hard copy in-turn shall be made available in all Flight Operations Support offices.

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OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. OPERATIONS SUPERVISION.................................................................9

1.1 ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE ........................................................11

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.1.1 Flight Operations Management Structure .................................12
1.2 SCOPE ...................................................................................................14

1.3 RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT


PERSONNEL .........................................................................................14

1.3.1 Continuity of Operations ...........................................................15


1.3.2 Vice President (Flight Operations) ............................................15
1.3.3 Director (Flight Operations) ......................................................16
1.3.4 Chief Pilot (Line) .......................................................................18
1.3.5 Chief Pilot (Training) .................................................................20
1.3.6 Chief Pilot (Standards & Quality Assurance) ............................22
1.3.7 Director (Flight Operations Support) .........................................24
1.3.8 Director (Pilot Management).....................................................26
1.3.9 Fleet Captain (Corporate) .........................................................27
1.3.10 Fleet Captain (Line Training) ....................................................27
1.3.11 Fleet Captain (Simulator Training)............................................29
1.3.12 Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations)..............................30
1.3.13 Deputy Chief Instructor (Performance & Documentation
Standardization) .......................................................................31
1.3.14 Fleet Captain (Safety) ..............................................................32
1.3.15 Fleet Captain (Region) .............................................................32
1.3.16 Fleet Captain (Standards & QA) ...............................................33
1.3.17 Fleet Captain (Technical) .........................................................34
1.3.18 Fleet Captain (SMS and FDM) .................................................35

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1.3.19 Fleet Supervisor (Line)............................................................. 36


1.3.20 Fleet Supervisor (Training) ...................................................... 37
1.3.21 Fleet Supervisor (Standards and QA) ...................................... 37

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.3.22 Manager (Safety & Technical) ................................................. 38
1.3.23 Manager (FDM & SMS) ........................................................... 38
1.3.24 Training Captains ..................................................................... 39
1.3.25 Director - Training .................................................................... 40
1.3.26 Senior Manager (Flight Operations Support) ........................... 41
1.3.27 Senior Manager (Performance Management).......................... 42
1.3.28 Senior Manager (Pilot Resourcing) .......................................... 42
1.3.29 Associate Director / Manager (Pilot Administration) ................. 43
1.3.30 Vice President - Operations Control Centre (OCC) ................. 44
1.3.31 Director Crew Scheduling ........................................................ 45
1.3.32 Associate Director- Flight Dispatch .......................................... 46
1.3.33 Senior Manager Flight Dispatch ............................................... 47
1.3.34 Manager Dispatch .................................................................... 48
1.3.35 Duty Officer Flight Dispatch ..................................................... 49
1.3.36 Duties and Responsibilities of Controlling Flight Dispatchers .. 50
1.3.37 Assistant Manager OCC .......................................................... 53
1.3.38 Assistant Manager – Operations Control Center & Flight
Dispatch ................................................................................... 54
1.3.39 Executive-OCC / Controllers .................................................... 56
1.3.40 Meteorologist ........................................................................... 57
1.3.41 Executives (Flight Operations Support) ................................... 57
1.3.42 Executives (Training) ............................................................... 58
1.3.43 Communication Pyramid ........................................................ 58

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1.3.44 Coordination with Other Departments ......................................59


1.4 CREW MEMBER RESPONSIBILITY .....................................................60

1.4.1 Crew Member shall not perform duties On an Airplane: ...........60

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.4.2 Crew Advocacy ........................................................................60
1.4.3 Flight Crew Members Responsibility In Case Of Special Crew
Pairing ......................................................................................61
1.5 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITY OF COMMANDER ............................62

1.5.1 Position in the Organisation......................................................62


1.5.2 Status and Conduct ..................................................................62
1.5.3 Period of Command .................................................................63
1.5.4 Responsibility and Authority .....................................................63
1.5.4.1 General ......................................................................64

1.5.4.2 Flight Preparation .......................................................66

1.5.4.3 Flight Execution..........................................................67

1.5.4.4 Commander‟s Emergency Authority...........................68

1.5.4.5 Customer Relations....................................................68

1.5.4.6 VIP Passengers - Handling ........................................69

1.5.4.7 On-Time Performance................................................69

1.6 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF CREW MEMBERS OTHER


THAN THE COMMANDER ....................................................................70

1.6.1 Co-Pilot.....................................................................................70
1.6.1.1 General ......................................................................70

1.6.1.2 Flight Preparation .......................................................71

1.6.1.3 Flight Execution..........................................................72

1.6.2 Lead Cabin Attendant ...............................................................73


1.6.2.1 Flight Execution..........................................................73

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1.6.3 Cabin Attendant ....................................................................... 75


1.6.3.1 Management of Crew Fatigue during flight ................ 77

1.6.3.2 Cockpit crew inside the lavatory ................................ 77

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.6.4 On Board Sale Of Merchandize ............................................... 78
1.7 DESIGNATED PILOT OPERATIONS CONTROLLER .......................... 78

1.7.1 Duties and Responsibilities: ..................................................... 79


1.8 SUPERVISION OF THE OPERATION BY THE OPERATOR ............... 80

1.8.1 General Policy ......................................................................... 80


1.8.2 Operations Policy, Mission and Goals ..................................... 80
1.8.3 Management Responsibilities .................................................. 81
1.8.4 Air Operator's Permit (AOP)..................................................... 81
1.8.5 Licence and qualification validity .............................................. 81
1.8.6 Competence of operations personnel ...................................... 81
1.8.7 Control analysis and storage of records, flight documents....... 81
1.8.8 Operational Supervision........................................................... 81
1.8.8.1 General ...................................................................... 81

1.8.8.2 Means of Flight Operation Supervision ...................... 82

1.8.8.3 Safety Management & Accident Prevention Activities 83

1.8.8.4 Anonymous/Voluntary Reporting ............................... 83

1.8.8.5 Hazard Reporting ...................................................... 83

1.8.8.6 Mandatory Reporting ................................................. 83

1.8.8.7 Defining Clear & Practical Operational Policies and


Procedures ................................................................ 84

1.8.8.8 Flight Data Monitoring ............................................... 84

1.8.8.9 Policy Conflict Resolution .......................................... 84

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1.8.8.10 Regular Surveillance of Flights & Operational Activities


...................................................................................84

1.8.8.11 Standardisation of Operations Policies and Training


Programs ...................................................................85

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.8.8.12 Standards and Training Committee Meeting ..............85

1.8.8.13 Legality Tracking Of Licenses and Records ...............85

1.8.8.14 FDTL Monitoring ........................................................86

1.8.8.15 Operations of Airworthy Aircraft In Accordance With


The Approved Limitations ..........................................86

1.8.8.16 Flight Crew Scheduling ..............................................86

1.8.8.17 Operations Coordination and Operations Control. .....87

1.8.8.18 Establishing Processes To Receive Crew Feedback


From Line Operations - Fltops and Pilot Admin..........89

1.8.8.19 Fuel Monitoring ..........................................................90

1.8.8.20 Putting In Place A Flight Dispatch and Ops Supervision


System to Manage All Daily Operational Activities .....90

1.8.8.21 Outsourcing and product quality control .....................90

1.8.9 Central Flight Dispatch .............................................................91


1.8.9.1 Safety .........................................................................92

1.8.9.2 Standardisation ..........................................................92

1.8.9.3 Notice of Violations ....................................................93

1.8.9.4 Training ......................................................................93

1.8.9.5 Personal Conduct.......................................................93

1.8.9.6 Personal Devices .......................................................94

1.8.9.7 Reporting For Duty .....................................................94

1.8.9.8 Shift Changeover Briefing ..........................................94

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1.8.9.9 Shift Process ............................................................. 95

1.8.9.10 Workload Management ............................................. 96

1.8.9.11 Flight Dispatch Log Book ........................................... 98

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.8.9.12 Record Retention....................................................... 98

1.8.9.13 Flight Dispatch Library ............................................... 98

1.8.9.14 Procedures for Dispatch Quality Assurance ............ 100

1.8.9.15 Operational Policies & Processes............................ 100

1.8.9.16 Flight Planning - General ......................................... 102

1.8.9.17 Route Guide ............................................................ 102

1.8.9.18 Alternate Airports ..................................................... 102

1.8.9.19 Operational Flight Plan (Manual and Computerized)103

1.8.9.20 MEL / CDL Handling Procedure .............................. 106

1.8.9.21 Aircraft Performance Weight Limitations ................. 107

1.8.9.22 Handling Payload Restrictions ................................. 108

1.8.9.23 Fuel Tankering......................................................... 109

1.8.9.24 Crew Briefing/Debriefing Procedure ........................ 109

1.8.9.25 Flight Release.......................................................... 111

1.8.9.26 Issuance of amended Flight Release ...................... 111

1.8.9.27 Requirement for issuance of amended Flight Release


................................................................................ 112

1.8.9.28 Requirement for issuance of New Flight Release .... 112

1.8.9.29 Manual Flight Planning ............................................ 112

1.8.9.30 ATS Flight Plan........................................................ 113

1.8.9.31 Repetitive Flight Plan (RPL) .................................... 113

1.8.9.32 Test Flights, Maintenance Ferry & Training Flights . 113

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1.8.9.33 Automated Systems Failure .....................................114

1.8.9.34 Scheduled System Outage ......................................114

1.8.9.35 Unscheduled System Outage ..................................114

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.8.9.36 Role of Dispatcher And Pilot-In Command...............114

1.8.9.37 Disagreement Resolution Policy ..............................115

1.8.9.38 Flight Watch .............................................................115

1.8.9.39 Communications ......................................................116

1.8.9.40 Delay Handling Procedures .....................................117

1.8.9.41 Diversion Handling Procedures ................................117

1.8.10 Operations Supervision and Crew Records............................118


1.8.11 Operations Control Centre (OCC) ..........................................118
1.9 ADMINISTRATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE .............................................119

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OPERATIONAL SUPERVISION CHAPTER 01

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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

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1. OPERATIONS SUPERVISION

The chapter provides a comprehensive description of the scope, structure and


functionality of the management system and depicts lines of accountability
throughout the organization, as well as authorities, duties, responsibilities and the

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interrelation of functions and activities within the system for ensuring safe and
secure operations.

The organograms, duties and responsibilities are given such that they define and
clearly delineate the management system.

The organisation charts also indicate the continuity within the management system
that ensures the entire organization works as a system and not as a group of
independent or fragmented units.

The charts show the relationship between corporate management and


management in the operational areas.

The management system shall ensure compliance with all applicable standards
and regulatory requirements. In addition to internal standards and regulations of
the State, to comply with authorities that have jurisdiction on operations conducted
over the high seas or within a foreign country.

Name of Company InterGlobe Aviation Limited

Address Of Reg Office Ground Floor, Central Wing, Thapar


House, 124, Janpath, New Delhi
110001.

Corporate Office Tower C, Third Floor, Global Business


Park, DLF City, Gurgaon-122 Haryana,
India

Tel No : +91-(0)124 4352500

Fax No : +91-(0)124 4068536

E-Mail : fltops@goindigo.in

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APPROVED PERSONNEL

Accountable Manager

The President is the Accountable Manager of the Airline / Company to the aviation

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authorities.

Chief of Operations

The Vice President (Flight Operations) is the approved person responsible for
Flight Operations and Flight Operations Training. He shall be accountable to
President for Compliance with the requirements contained in the Operations
Manual.

Chief of Engineering

The Vice President (Engineering) is the approved person responsible for all
engineering aspects of airplane operations. He is accountable to President for
Compliance with the laid down requirements. .

Chief of Flight Safety

The Chief of Flight Safety is the approved person accountable to President for all
matters concerning Flight Safety.

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1.1 ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

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1.1.1 Flight Operations Management Structure

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1.2 SCOPE

The flight operations department manages various facets of the


operational side within the Company. However, its primary responsibility is
to ensure safe, legal and efficient operation of IndiGo aircraft. This

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includes training of flight deck crew to ensure that they meet all licensing
and regulatory requirements and can execute high-quality operation in a
safe, efficient and customer-friendly manner. Specially trained operational
staffs, within the department, play a key role in the recruitment of new
flight deck crew. The support staff is involved in effective surveying of all
new routes and making available all navigation, performance and other
necessary operational data to flight crew, to ensure safe air and ground
operations. Investigating, monitoring and disseminating information on all
accidents, incidents and other occurrences involving indigo aircraft also
come within the scope of this function.
The flight operations department comprises of the following sections:
 Flight operations – Line
 Flight operations – Training
 Flight operations - Standards and Quality Assurance
 Flight operations - Pilot Management
 Flight operations – Support

The Vice President Flight Operations shall ensure that the management and non-
management positions within the flight operations organization that require the
performance of functions relevant to the safety and security of aircraft operations
are filled by personnel on the basis of knowledge, skills, training and experience
appropriate for the position in consultation with HR department.

1.3 RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF OPERATIONS


MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL

The designated managers in the flight operations organization are responsible,


and thus are accountable, for ensuring:

i) The management and supervision of all flight operations activities;

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ii) The management of safety and security in flight operations;

iii) Flight operations are conducted in accordance with conditions and


restrictions of the Air Operator Certificate (AOC), and in compliance with
applicable regulations and standards.

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1.3.1 Continuity of Operations

The authority and responsibilities of management and non - management


personnel that perform functions relevant to the safety or security of aircraft
operations in areas of the flight operations are enumerated in the succeeding
paragraphs. They are over all responsible for making decisions that affect the
safety and/or security of operations and also ensure operations are conducted in
accordance with applicable regulations and standards of the Company.

To ensure continuity of operations, at least one of the under mentioned managers


shall be available at all times.

 Vice president (Flight operations)


 Director (Flight operations)
 Chief pilot (Line operations)

1.3.2 Vice President (Flight Operations)

The Vice President (Flight Operations) will be responsible for all Flight Operation
functions of the Company, which shall include directing the company‟s Flight
Operations in a safe and efficient manner.

The Vice President (Flight Operations) has the functional & administrative
authority and responsibility for the following:

a) All Flight Operations Personnel and their training


b) Structuring and Staffing the Flight Operations Department
c) Determining the feasibility of Flight Operations
d) Operations of the Company‟s fleet
e) Flight Operational Policies, Procedures and Safety Standards
f) Flight Crew Standards
g) Flight Operations Engineering
h) Evaluating Schedule Performance
i) Flight Operations cost control

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The Vice President (Flight Operations) is accountable to the President


(Accountable Manager) for compliance with all regulatory requirements and
renewal of Air Operator‟s Permit. He reports to the President.

In the absence of the post holder, Director (Flight Operations) will assume all
functions of Vice President (Flight Operations).

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1.3.3 Director (Flight Operations)

Director (Flight Operations) shall report directly to the Vice President


(Flight Operations). He is:
a) Responsible for all day-to-day Flight Operations functions.
b) All Flight Operations verticals, including Chief Pilot (Line), Chief Pilot
(Training), Chief Pilot (Standards & QA), Director (Pilot Management)
and Director (Flight Operations Support) will report to him.
c) Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in setting Flight Operations
policy.
d) Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in setting budget priorities
and exercising budgetary cost controls.
e) Monitor all government regulations related to flight operations and
ensure compliance at all times.
f) Ensure that all company instructions, policies, and procedures are
adhered to so as to result in a high level of safety and efficiency in all
flight operations functions.
g) Responsible for the morale, welfare and discipline of all pilots through
the Chief Pilot (Line). Ensure harmonious pilot/management relations
with open and effective channels of communication.
h) Provide input, guidance and leadership towards the structure and
staffing of the Flight Operations department to ensure the operational
needs and business objectives are achieved.
i) Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in the establishment of
quarterly and annual performance goals for the department and direct
reporting staff.
j) Develop a performance matrix to ensure that operational objectives are
measured and achieved.
k) Assist the Vice President (Flight Operations) in the review of Indian and
Foreign Pilot Employment Agreements, and in the selection and hiring
parameters for Indian and Expat pilots so as to meet the objectives of

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the company.
l) In conjunction with the Director (Pilot Management), ensure well planned
and timely induction and processing of pilots joining, as also all
administrative matters concerning pilots such as leave and rotation
planning, base assignments, etc.

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m) In conjunction with Chief Pilot (Training), ensure that all training is
carried out in a timely, safe and efficient manner based on company‟s
needs, and in adherence with company policies and procedures.
n) In conjunction with the Chief Pilot (Standards and QA), ensure that
required proficiency and safe practices are maintained at all times in all
aspects of flight operations.
o) To seek continuous improvements in training practices and standards
based on industry best practice and evidence of gaps in training or
standards as brought out by FDM/CVR analysis, LOSA flights or Training
Captains feedback.
p) In coordination with the Director (Flight Operations Support), ensure that
all support functions are accomplished at a high order of efficiency and in
a timely manner. Also to continually seek out improvements and new
technologies for the betterment of flight operations safety practices and
efficient operations.
q) In conjunction with each vertical head, suggest changes to Operations
Manuals, and inclusion of best practices and SOPs so as to improve
safety, efficiency and standards in all flight operations functions.
r) Coordinate as appropriate with all other departments, particularly with
Crew Scheduling, HR, Inflight and Engineering, so as to build synergies
and improve efficiency.
s) In conjunction with the Chief Pilots, select pilots for Command Upgrade,
and recommend to the Vice President (Flight Operations), pilots to be
considered as Check Pilots, Instructors and Examiners.
t) Be a member of the Upgrade, Appeal and Review Boards.
u) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel under
him in Flight Operations.
v) Carry out any other duties as assigned by Vice President (Flight
Operations).
w) Assume all functions of Vice President (Flight Operations) during his
absence.

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In the absence of the post holder, Chief Pilot (Line) will assume all
functions of Director (Flight Operations).
1.3.4 Chief Pilot (Line)

Chief Pilot (Line) will function under the authority of Director (Flight Operations)

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and will provide full-time efforts and services in all aspects related to the continued
safe operation, policy, planning of the Flight Operations Department in meeting
these objectives including, but not limited to the following:

a) Assist and support the Director Flight Operations in the management of Line
Operations in a safe, efficient and economic manner.

b) Follow Established policies, guidelines and procedures to provide a high level


of safety, efficiency and standardization in Line Operations.

c) Recommend updates and changes to policy, procedures in the Operations


Manual.

d) Ensure that all company instructions, policies, and procedures with regard to
Line operations, are adhered to.

e) Coordinate Pilot scheduling issues with Director (Pilot Management).

f) Coordinate Flight Dispatch issues with GM (Flight Operations Support).

g) Be responsible for all morale, welfare and disciplinary matters with regard to
all pilots.

h) Be responsible for continuous review of pilot‟s performance and up gradation


of those found suitable. Select pilots for Command Upgrade, and recommend
to the Director (Flight Operations), pilots to be considered as Check Pilots,
Instructors and Examiners in conjunction with Chief Pilot (Training) and Chief
Pilot (Standards and QA).

i) Ensure harmonious management/ pilot relations and provide necessary


feedback and communications between management and pilots.

j) Be a member of the Upgrade, Appeal and Review Boards.

k) Provide input, guidance and leadership towards the structure and staffing of
the Flight Operations department to ensure the operational needs and
business objectives are achieved.

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l) Assist Director (Flight Operations) in the formulation of Flight Operations


budget.

m) Work in close coordination with Director (Pilot Management), GM (Flight


Operations Support), Chief Pilot (Training), Chief Pilot (Standards and QA),
Vice President (Maintenance and Engineering) and Vice President (OCC).

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n) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in the establishment of quarterly and
annual performance goals for the department and direct reporting staff.

o) Establish Flight Operations Safety Management guidelines.

p) Assist in conducting pre-hire screening of flight crew applicants and their


selection in coordination with Director (Pilot Management) as per guidelines
laid down by the Vice President (Flight Operations).

q) Develop performance matrix to ensure that operational objectives are


measured and achieved.

r) Liaise with Vice President (In Flight) to ensure flight crew and cabin crew
procedures are compatible and in agreement with Flight Operations
procedures / policies in the FCOM and Company Operations Manual.

s) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in the review of Indian and Foreign Pilot
Employment Agreements, Make recommendations to ensure the Pilot Head
count is adequate to meet the business objectives of the company.

t) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) with the Selection of Fleet Captains
and Fleet Supervisors and monitor their performance.

u) In absence of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA), will conduct Pilot counselling.

v) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to


him.

w) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Director (Flight Operations).

x) Assume all functions of Director (Flight Operations) during his absence.

In the absence of the post holder, Fleet Captain (Corporate) will assume all
functions of Chief Pilot (Line).

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1.3.5 Chief Pilot (Training)

Chief Pilot (Training) will report to the Director (Flight Operations) and will be
responsible to him to provide full-time efforts and services in all aspects related to
the planning of pilot training, pilot training execution as per the Company and
DGCA policies so as to meet the Company‟s business objectives including, but not

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limited to the following:

a) Chief Pilot Training is responsible for training pilots to proficiency.

b) Execute flight operations training curricula for all types of aircraft operated by
the company taking into consideration latest operating techniques, experience
& instructions from the regulatory authority.

c) Be responsible for Trainers Matrix, which will be based on actual training


requirements of the entire fleet and to be reviewed twice in a year.

d) Be responsible for the supervision and completion of all simulator, aircraft and
line training after induction until the pilot is ready for line release.

e) Execute training plans and programs for pilot training in coordination with
Chief Pilot (Standards & QA). Such training will include Endorsement
Training, Recurrent Training, Safety and Dangerous Goods Training, Crew
Resource Management, Flight Instructors Training, Check Pilots and
Command Training as per laid down Company Policy.

f) Flight Crew Training facilitation and support.

g) Interact and coordinate with Training providers to whom the Company has out
sourced its training requirements and ensure implementation of the training
agreements and clearance of training Invoices.

h) Suggest changes in Training Policies / methodologies, Training Standards,


and amendments / revisions to the Company Operations Manual Part D.

i) Ensure that all training is conducted as per the policies and instructions of the
Company

j) Plan 12/9/6/3/1 monthly Simulator Training with CAE as per the Training
Agreement and implementation thereof, for transition training, recurrent
training, LVO training, special qualification and any other training as
mandated by the Company.

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k) Coordinate/plan Line training in consultation with the Director (Scheduling)


and monitoring its implementation to ensure early line ready dates for pilots
under training. This includes supernumerary, Initial Operating Experience
(IOE), supervised line flying (SLF), all route checks, license renewal,
instrument rating checks and special checks as required by Director (Flight

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Operations) / Chief Pilot (Line).

l) Be responsible for Planning of Post Induction training and all facilitation for
trainee pilots.

m) Will be responsible for recurrent training, yearly ground refreshers of Indian


and Foreign pilot and their FATA renewals.

n) Planning and Control of crew training records, reports, certification of log


books and crew license control. He is responsible to ensure that no pilot
exceeds the validity of a license, rating or license medical requirements.

o) Coordinate with Airbus TRI/TRE and TRE/TRI deputed under the Constituted
Crew Schemes on training progress of constituted crew cadets and IndiGo
pilot‟s and to review their recommendation for implementation in coordination
with the other chief pilots.

p) Monitor all government regulations related to crew training and directives and
ensure compliance at all times.

q) Ensure that the Operations Manual Part D is kept updated at all times based
on Company / DGCA requirements.

r) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in the establishment of quarterly and


annual performance goals for the department and direct reporting staff.

s) Develop performance matrix to ensure that training objectives are achieved.

t) Ensure that no instruction contradicts the Company Operations Manual and


DGCA instructions contained in CARs, AICs, Circulars and orders.

u) Be a member of the Upgrade, Appeal and Review Boards.

v) In absence of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA), will conduct Pilot counselling.

w) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to


him.

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x) Coordinate his activities with Chief Pilot (Line), Director (Corporate Learning),
Chief Pilot (Standards & QA), GM (Flight Operations Support) and Director
(Pilot Management).

y) Carry out any additional duties assigned to him by the Director (Flight
Operations).

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In the absence of the post holder, Fleet Captain (Line Training/Simulator Training)
will assume all functions of Chief Pilot (Training).

1.3.6 Chief Pilot (Standards & Quality Assurance)

The Chief Pilot (Standards and QA) functions under the authority of the Director
(Flight Operations). He is responsible for Flight Crew Standards and Quality
Assurance of Flight Crew Training. He will be accountable to the Vice President
(Flight Operations) for Compliance on all Training Standards.

His main function is to audit the Flight Operations Training and Line Operations
Standards so as to ensure that the required proficiency and safe practices are
maintained at all times.

He will be assisted by Fleet Captain (Standards & QA), Fleet Captain (SMS &
FDM), Fleet Supervisors (Standards and QA) and Examiners. He will be
responsible for:

a) Checking Pilot proficiency and ensuring that the required proficiency and safe
practices are maintained at all times in Flight Operations Training and Line
Operations Standards.

b) Formulating and enforcing, within the requirements of Company and DGCA


Policy the standards of flight proficiency necessary for safe and efficient
operation of all types of aircraft in use.

c) Flight Data Monitoring (FDM) and Standardisation of Flight Crew and


procedures.

d) Monitor, and or nominate personnel to carry out all avaluations and checks on
similator and aircraft for line release , command assesment, evaluation, and
any special assesment /evaluation required by the company.

e) Company Surveillance and Observation flights for Flight Operations Quality


Assurance.

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f) Pilot counselling. (In absence of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA), Chief Pilot
(Training), Chief Pilot (Line) or a nominated TRE will conduct Pilot
counselling. They can be assisted by Fleet Captain (FDM & SMS) for flight
analysis and review.)

g) Bringing to the attention of the Director (Flight Operations) any dilution of

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Flight Standards and any unsafe practices and trends.

h) Be a member of the Training Review Boards, Captain Upgrade Board and the
Appeal Boards.

i) Making recommendations for changes in Flight Operations Standard


Operating Procedures.

j) Maintaining close coordination with the Chief Pilot (Line), Chief Pilot-
(Training), GM (Flight Operations Support), Director (Pilot Management, Vice
President (In-flight Services), Executive Vice President ( AOCS & OCC) and
Vice President (Maintenance & Engineering) in so far as his functions have a
bearing on their activities.

k) Assist the Director (Flight Operations) in Regulatory Compliance, Monitor


government regulations and directives and ensure their Regulatory
Compliance with the Chief Pilots with regard to CARs, Circulars and AICs
issued by DGCA, and Company Operations Manual Control.

l) Coordinate with the concerned departments for the preparation for and
compliance with recommendations and actions required for Surveillance
flights.

m) The performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to him.

n) Ensuring the application of the Company Safety policy and procedures in


accordance with the Safety Management System.

o) Ensuring acceptance and overview of any residual risk or hazard, and their
associated control in accordance with the procedures contained in the
Company Operations Manual.

p) Ensuring that safety issues are identified and reported in a timely manner.

q) Ensuring that all executives and staff reporting to him / her are trained,
qualified and competent to discharge their safety related obligations.

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r) Ensuring that fitness for service including any necessary safety assessment
has been declared and accepted by the responsible authority in relation the
development of all plans, procedures, policies, processes and systems.

s) Any other duty assigned by the Director (Flight Operations).

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In the absence of the post holder, Fleet Captain (Standards & QA) will assume all
functions of Chief Pilot (Standards & QA).

1.3.7 Director (Flight Operations Support)

The Director (Flight Operations Support) will be accountable to the Director (Flight
Operations). He will be responsible to provide the required operations support to
the Vice President (OCC), and the Chief Pilots. He will be responsible to:

a) Provide Technical Support, which will consist of:

o Flight Dispatch support

o Flight Operations requirements of Maps Charts, Nav Data


bases.

o Flight operations Voice and Data communications

o Pre-flight Medical setup; equipment procurement, calibration


and record keeping

b) All coordination with the regulatory and airport authorities on Operations


Support Requirements.

c) Technical feasibility of new stations.

d) Responsible for Flight Operations Systems, electronic management of


documents and Special Projects.

e) Managing the Company fltops@goindigo.in Email ID and resolving


operational & technical issues in the Company

f) Aircraft & Regulatory document control

g) Mandatory document distribution

h) NOTAM surveillance- alerts and advisory control

i) Fuel Tankering analysis

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j) Operations MIS & Cost Analysis

k) Ferry, charter, non-scheduled flight planning and support.

l) Supporting Vice President /Director (Flight Operations)/ Chief Pilots on issue


of all Notices.

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m) Central point of contact for amendments to all Company Operations Manuals
after co-ordination with relevant Chief Pilots, final approval by Vice
President/Director (Flight Operations) and their publication thereafter.

n) Perform function related to Operations & Performance Engineering consisting


of :

 Aerodrome and Runway Surveillance


 Performance and Route analysis
 Fuel monitoring
 Feasibility of special operations
 Development of Engine out Standard Instrument Departures.

 Carrying out Operations IT, Automation & implementation of:


Electronic Flight Bag, Operational software/ hardware and
communication setup, Operational Data Management.

o) Work in close coordination with the Chief Pilots, Director (Pilot Management),
Vice President (OCC).

p) Coordinating with Engineering department and Airbus on Airworthiness


Directives (AD‟s), Modifications (MOD‟s), OEBs and issues.

q) Monitor industry for technological applications that could enhance operational


efficiency and bring these to the knowledge of Director (Flight Operations).

r) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel assigned to


him.

s) Any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations).

In the absence of the post holder, Sr. Manager (Flight Operations Support) will
assume all functions of Director (Flight Operations Support).

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1.3.8 Director (Pilot Management)

He will be accountable to the Director (Flight Operations) and be the single point
contact for all flight crew Administrative issues. Will be responsible for flight crew
management and administrative control including:

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a) Flight Crew Planning, Pilot requirement projection, sourcing and
recruitment of National and Foreign pilots and their pre training
induction.

b) Interact with all foreign pilot providers and monitor their agreements
and clearance of their invoices.

c) Foreign Pilot Security Clearances and initial foreign license


validation, VISAs and their renewals.

d) Flight Crew Management and Administration.

e) Coordinating with Airbus Customer Services for AIB TRE


assignment with IndiGo and the clearance of all related invoices

f) Coordinating all constituted crew schemes and implementation of


their agreements and invoice clearance.

g) Implementation and monitoring of the CAE and SABENA Trainee/


Cadet Pilot Schemes and any such other schemes in the future.

h) Pilots leave planning & authorisation.

i) Review and coordinate flight crew schedules with Crew Scheduling


to ensure adequate crew staffing and fair and efficient distribution of
flying.

j) Be responsible for Flight Operations Cost Control and make


recommendations for cost reduction.

k) Work in close coordination with the Chief Pilots and GM (Flight


Operations Support) on matters relating to Crew management.

l) Be responsible for the performance and welfare of all personnel


assigned.

m) Carry out any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations).

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In the absence of the post holder, Manager (Pilot Management) will assume all
functions of Director (Pilot Management).

1.3.9 Fleet Captain (Corporate)

The Fleet Captain (Corporate) is accountable to the Chief Pilot (Line).

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He will assist Chief Pilot (Line) in the following:

a) Assist and support the Chief Pilot (Line) in the management of


IndiGo Line Operations in a safe, efficient and economic manner.

b) Recommend updates and changes to policy and procedures in the


Company Operations Manual.

c) Coordinate Pilot scheduling issues with GM (Crew Scheduling).

d) Coordinate Flight Dispatch issues with Director (Operations support)

e) Assist Chief Pilot (Line) on all morale, welfare and disciplinary


matters with regard to all pilots.

f) Provide input, guidance and leadership towards the structure and


staffing of the flight operations department to ensure the operational
needs and business objectives of IndiGo are achieved.

g) Ensure harmonious management/ pilot relation and provide


necessary feedback and communications between management and
pilots.

h) Process and act on Commander‟s Trip reports.

i) Carry out day-to-day administration of the fleet.

j) Work in close coordination with other Fleet Captains

k) Represent Chief Pilot (Line) as member of the Upgrade, Appeal and


Review Boards when deputed.

l) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned

m) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Chief Pilot (Line).

1.3.10 Fleet Captain (Line Training)

The Fleet Captain (Line Training) is accountable to the Chief Pilot (Training).

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He will assist the Chief Pilot in the following:

a) Execution of flight operations training curricula for all types of aircraft


operated by the company taking into consideration latest operating
techniques, experience and instructions by the Regulatory Authority.

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b) Execution of line training plans and programs for pilot training in
coordination with Chief Pilot (Training). Such training will include
Recurrent Training, Safety and Dangerous Goods Training, Crew
Resource Management, Flight Instructors Training, Check Pilots and
Command Training as per laid down Company Policy.

c) Joint responsibility with Fleet Captain (Simulator Training) for


coordinating and ensuring Instructor and Examiner scheduling and
effective utilization. Responsible for all Check Pilot scheduling and
effective utilization.

d) Flight Crew Training facilitation and support.

e) Suggesting changes in Training Policies / methodologies and Training


Standards.

f) Planning yearly, nine, six, three and monthly line training and
implementation thereof, of transition training, recurrent training, LVO
training, Special qualification and any other training that is mandated by
the Company.

g) Carry out day to day administration of training programs as assigned by


Chief Pilot (Training).

h) Supporting Chief Pilot (Training) to ensure that the Operations Manual-


Part D is kept updated as and when required by company/DGCA.

i) Coordinate with Airbus TRI/TRE and TRE/TRI deputed under the


Constituted Crew Schemes on training progress of constituted crew
cadets and IndiGo pilot‟s and to review their recommendation for
implementation in coordination with the other Chief Pilots.

j) Monitor all government regulations and directives to ensure compliance


at all times.

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k) Ensure that no instruction is issued regarding training that contravenes


the Operations Manual/IGO notices and DGCA instructions contained in
CARs, AICs, Circulars and orders.

l) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned

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m) Any other duties as assigned by Chief Pilot (Training).

1.3.11 Fleet Captain (Simulator Training)

The Fleet Captain (Simulator Training) is accountable to the Chief Pilot (Training).

He / She will assist the Chief Pilot in the following:

a) Execution of Simulator training curricula for all aircraft operated by the


company taking into consideration latest operating techniques,
experience and instructions by the Regulatory Authority.

b) Execution of training plans and programs for pilot training in coordination


with Chief Pilot (Training). Such training may include Endorsement
Training, Recurrent Training, Flight Instructors Training, Check Pilots and
Command Training as per laid down Company Policy.

c) Joint responsibility with Fleet Captain (Line Training) for coordinating and
ensuring Instructor and Examiner scheduling and effective utilization.

d) Flight Crew Training facilitation and support.

e) Suggesting changes in training policies / methodologies and training


standards. He is also to ensure that a requirement of simulated aircraft,
weather and environmental conditions are standardized, appropriate for
the training/evaluation and are updated periodically;

f) Plan 12/9/6/3/1 monthly or any other Simulator Training with CAE/other


providers as per the Training Agreement and implementation thereof, of
transition training, recurrent training, LVO training, Special qualification
and any other training that is mandated by the Company.

g) Carry out day to day administration of training programs as assigned by


Chief Pilot (Training).

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h) Supporting Chief Pilot (Training) to ensure that the Operations Manual-


Part D is kept updated as and when required by company/DGCA.

i) Monitor all government regulations and directives to ensure compliance


at all times.

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j) Ensure that no instruction is issued regarding training that contravenes
the Company Operations Manual / notices and DGCA instructions
contained in CARs, AICs, Circulars and orders.

k) Represent Chief Pilot (Training) if required as member of the Upgrade,


Appeal and Review Board.

l) Carry out flight and flight related duties when assigned

m) Carry out any other duty as assigned by the Chief Pilot (Training).

1.3.12 Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations)

The Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations) is accountable to the Chief Pilot
(Training). He/ She will assist the Chief Pilot (Training) in the following:

a) Execution of training curricula for aircraft operated by the company


taking into consideration latest operating techniques, experience
and instructions by the Regulatory Authority.
b) Coordinate with GM/ DGM (Training) that Pilots / FDs due for
training are detailed and ground school accomplishes the task.
c) Coordinate and plan the training schedule of the pilots / FDs and
impart training in keeping with regulatory / company requirements.
d) Coordinate and integrate new entrants (pilots) so that required
training is imparted and they attain the desired standards.
e) Ensure that detailed briefing / training to expatriate pilots is
conducted vide approved syllabus on regulatory / company policies
and procedures and prepare them for re-validation.
f) Monitor and ensure that induction training in accordance with AIC
02/2007 is conducted for national pilots vide approved syllabus.
g) Organize and ensure that corrective training to line pilots is
conducted on as required basis.
h) Be responsible for ATPL training of pilots on as required basis.
i) Liaise with other departments to ensure that training is conducted

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and completed in time.


j) Monitor and ensure that Instructors conduct training as per
approved syllabus.
k) Ensure that additional training task as and when assigned is
completed.

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l) Responsible for coordinating and ensuring Instructor scheduling and
effective utilization. Also ensure that new instructors are qualified in
time and in accordance with the regulatory criteria.
m) Suggesting changes in training policies / methodologies and training
standards.
n) Carry out day to day monitoring of training programs and other tasks
as assigned by Chief Pilot (Training).
o) Ensure that operational and training objectives are quantified,
measured and achieved.

In the absence of the post holder, Deputy Chief Ground Instructor will
assume all functions of Chief Ground Instructor (Flight Operations).

1.3.13 Deputy Chief Instructor (Performance & Documentation


Standardization)

Following duties shall be carried out In addition to the duties of Performance


Instructor:

 Streamlining all Flight Operations documentation with the aim of


making referencing simpler and less prone to error.
 Cross checking of any-references to the same item /procedure in
one manual or circular with all other similar references in all IndiGo
documents across departments without any ambiguity or
duplication.
 Ensuring all Company documentation complies with DGCA
regulations and timely amendments as necessary.
 Ensuring smooth transition towards electronic documentation and
liaison with Flight Operations Support team.
 Ensuring compliance with IOSA requirements.
 Any other duty assigned by Chief Pilot (Standards and QA)

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1.3.14 Fleet Captain (Safety)

For matters pertaining to flight safety, Fleet Captain (Safety) is responsible to


Chief of Flight Safety. For administrative purposes he reports to Vice President
(Flight Operations). He will:

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a) Be a Flight operations member of all Flight Safety investigation
boards as detailed by Vice President (Flight Operations), on the
requirement of Chief of Flight Safety.

b) Act as a bridge between Flight Operations and Flight Safety.

c) Ensure that all recommendations and safety issues are brought to


the attention of Vice President (Flight Operations) for action.

d) Be a member of all audit teams and monitor compliance of the


recommendations made during internal Safety Audits as detailed by
Vice President (Flight Operations), on the requirement of Chief of
Flight Safety.

e) Shall assist Chief Pilot (Standards and QA) in Pilot counselling.

f) Ensure timely dissemination of safety related information to Flight


Crew.

g) Will work in close coordination with Chief Pilots and Director (Pilot
Management).

h) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned

i) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Vice President (Flight
Operations).

1.3.15 Fleet Captain (Region)

He will be accountable to Chief Pilot (Line). He will be responsible to:

a) Assist and support the Chief Pilot (Line) in the management of Line
Operations in a safe, efficient and economic manner.

b) Recommend updates and changes to policies and procedures in the


Company Operations Manual.

c) Coordinate Pilot scheduling issues with Director (Pilot Management)

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d) Coordinate Flight Dispatch issues with GM (Flight Operation


Support).

e) Ensure day-to-day administration of the base in coordination Director


(Pilot Management)

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f) Assist Chief Pilot (Line) on all morale, welfare and disciplinary
matters with regard to pilots under his control.

g) Provide inputs towards the structure and staffing of the flight


operations department (at respective bases) to ensure the
operational needs and business objectives are achieved.

h) Ensure harmonious management/ pilot relation and provide


necessary feedback and communications between management and
pilots.

i) Liaise with regional DGCA, Air safety, Air Traffic Control, Met
department and regional BCAS whenever required for the company
work.

j) Work in close coordination with other Fleet Captains.

k) Forward Commander‟s Trip reports to Chief Pilot (Line) for required


action.

l) Recommend pilots as Supervisory Pilots.

m) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned

n) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Chief Pilot (Line).

1.3.16 Fleet Captain (Standards & QA)

He will be accountable to Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) and will assist him for:

a) Checking Pilot proficiency.

b) Formulating and enforcing, within the requirements of Company and


DGCA Policy the standards of flight proficiency necessary for the
safe and efficient operation of all types of aircraft in use.

c) Follow up recommendations made during Company Surveillance


and observation flights for Flight Operations Quality Assurance.

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d) Bringing to the attention of the Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) any
dilution of Flight Standards and any unsafe practices and trends.

e) Suggesting changes in Flight Operations Standard Operating


Procedures.

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f) Work in close coordination with other Fleet Captains

g) Represent Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) as member of the Captain


upgrade Board and the Appeal & Review Board when deputed.

h) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned

i) Addressing findings that result from audits of flight operations


functions, to ensure:

i) Identification of root cause(s);

ii) Development of corrective action as appropriate to address


the finding(s);

iii) Implementation of corrective action in appropriate operational


areas;

j) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Chief Pilot (Standards &
QA).

1.3.17 Fleet Captain (Technical)

The Fleet Captain (Technical) is accountable to the Director (Flight Operations).


He will be responsible for:

a) Taking up all technical matters related to Flight Operations with


Engineering department, DGCA and aircraft & engine
Manufacturers.

b) Supporting Director (Flight Operations) on issue of Technical and


Operations Circulars.

c) Interfacing with DGCA and process all Flight Operation Approvals in


coordination with the Chief pilots.

d) Coordinate feasibility of Flight Operations with GM (Flight Operations


Support).

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e) Technological upgrade of the Flight Operations Department.

f) Carry out technical evaluations and feasibility studies required by


Flight Operations.

g) Represent Flight Operations with airport operators and DGCA in

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matters under his responsibility.

h) Evaluate new technologies beneficial to flight operations in


coordination with GM (Flight Operations Support) and incorporate
after approval by Director (Flight Operations).

i) Work in close coordination with Chief Pilots and other Fleet Captains

j) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned.

k) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Vice President /Director
(Flight Operations).

1.3.18 Fleet Captain (SMS and FDM)

He is tasked by the Director (Flight Operations) for Flight Operations Safety


Management and Flight Data Monitoring (FDM/FOQA). He will be accountable to
Chief Pilot (Standards & QA) and shall ensure:

a) Flight Operations Accident Prevention initiatives.

b) Flight Operations Safety Management System involving risk


identification, reduction, mitigation and elimination.

c) Performing / facilitating hazard identification and safety risk analysis.


Monitoring corrective actions and evaluating their results.

d) Operational risk management, including recommending changes /


reinforcement in operating and training procedures based on trend
analysis.

e) Establishing safety matrix and providing periodic reports on the


department‟s safety performance. Undertaking ongoing review of
safety management system to evaluate its effectiveness in ensuring
that improvements are made where required.

f) Conducting SMS analysis as required by the Director (Flight


Operations).

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g) Working on Flight Data Monitoring /FOQA for exceedance grading &


trend analysis, utilizing the FDM/FOQA cell.

h) Providing feedback to Line pilots on exceedance and trend analysis.

i) Work in close coordination with Chief Pilots and other Fleet

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Captains.

j) During counselling may assist Chief Pilots for flight analysis and
review.

k) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned

l) Carry out any other duty assigned by the Director (Flight


Operations).

m) Providing independent advice on safety matters.

1.3.19 Fleet Supervisor (Line)

Capable and willing pilots will be nominated as Fleet Supervisors to obtain


necessary exposure and opportunity in Flight Operations Management.

Fleet Supervisors will report to Fleet Captain (Region). The Fleet supervisor will be
responsible to:
a) Bring to the attention of management, problems faced by pilots
during day-to-day administrative and operational work. He will
interact with flight operations management to resolve them.
b) Any duty assigned by the Fleet Captain.
c) Carry out flights and flight related duties when assigned
d) Act as a communication link between pilots and management, as per
the Communication Pyramid below. Ensure that all management
communications are passed down the line quickly and accurately.
Also provide feedback to management on pilots‟ issues before they
become a problem.
e) Co-ordinate with Pilot management and crew scheduling
f) Recommend pilots‟ leave requests to Director (Pilot Management).

g) Any duty assigned by the Fleet Captain.

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1.3.20 Fleet Supervisor (Training)

Capable and willing pilots will be nominated as fleet supervisors to obtain


necessary exposure and opportunity in flight operations management. The fleet
supervisor will report to Fleet Captain (Line or Simulator Training)

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The Fleet Supervisor (Training) will:

a) Be responsible to Fleet Captain (Line / Simulator Training) for


line/simulator training activities.

b) Be available on allocated days for hand holding / indoctrination of new


hires, subject to flight schedule.

c) Be responsible to maintain close liaison with Crew Scheduling and track


all training requirements on a daily basis to ensure optimal and efficient
conduct of all line or simulator training.

d) Be available for office duties as assigned.

e) Undertake any other duty assigned by Chief Pilot (Training) /Fleet


Captain (Line or Simulator Training).

1.3.21 Fleet Supervisor (Standards and QA)

Fleet Supervisors will report to Fleet Captain (Standards and QA) / Fleet Captain
(FDM and SMS). The Fleet supervisor will assist in the following functions:

a) Flight Operations Accident Prevention initiatives.

b) Flight Operations Safety Management System involving risk


identification, reduction, mitigation and elimination.

c) Performing / facilitating hazard identification and safety risk analysis.


Monitoring corrective actions and evaluating their results.

d) Operational risk management, including recommending changes /


reinforcement in operating and training procedures based on trend
analysis.

e) Conduct of FDM data analysis when required.

f) Processing significant Commander Trip Reports / Pilot Voluntary


reports with regard to flight parameter exceedences.

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g) Conduct of CVR analysis as required by regulation.

h) Assist in Pilot Counselling to the extent of data analysis and record


keeping.

i) Any duty assigned by Chief Pilot or Fleet Captain.

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1.3.22 Manager (Safety & Technical)

Manager (Safety & Technical) will be accountable to the Chief Pilot (Standards
and QA). He will function as a Flight Operations Manager fulfilling both a safety
and technical role to include:-

a) Act as a resource to Fleet Captain (Safety) in fulfilling all Safety related


duties as assigned by him.

b) Act as resource to Fleet Captain (Technical) in assisting with all


Technical matters related to the fleet. This could include compiling data
on fleet modifications, new Technical Notices, enhanced technical
functionalities, coordination with Flight Operations Support and
Engineering.
c) Assist in the functioning of the FDM / FOQA cell.
d) In due course, be trained in FDM analysis so as to conduct the same.
e) Carry out CVR monitoring if required.
f) Any other duties as assigned by Chief Pilot (Standards & QA).

1.3.23 Manager (FDM & SMS)

The Manager (FDM & SMS) shall be a fulltime office employee reporting directly to
the Fleet Captain (FDM & SMS). He shall be responsible for:

a) Set up and maintenance of the Flight Ops FDM / FOQA cell.


b) Collection and storage of Flight Operations Quality and Standards data.
c) Analysis of Flight Operations Quality and Standards data.
d) Flight operations Risk Assessment and Risk Management programs
e) Flight Operations Safety Surveys
f) Flight Operations Safety reviews
g) Flight Operations Safety study
h) Any other task assigned by Fleet Captain (FDM & SMS) / Chief Pilot
(Standards & QA).

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1.3.24 Training Captains

a) Duties

The Training Captains (Instructors & Check Pilots) are responsible to the
Chief Pilot - Training for the maintenance of professional standards of all

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pilots as required by the company and in accordance with relevant air
legislation.

Training Captain is the Commander of the aircraft in a formal sense. His


task is to allow the pilot under check to do all the duties of a crew
member, including decision making for which he is being checked,
himself acting as the other crew member. If the limitations of the Aircraft
Flight Manual are likely to be infringed, he should intervene to ensure
safety. When not flying the aircraft himself he should perform the duties
of PNF.

Operating Procedures are a code of practice and discipline, necessary


for proper operation of the aircraft and essential to safety. The Pilot under
check should be monitored and assessed for his ability & judgment,
including his relationship & interaction with the other crew members,
ground personnel and passengers.

Take-off and landing, flying through weather and let down in IFR
conditions should be allowed by the Training Captain at his discretion.

In case, during the course of flight, actual or abnormal or emergency


situations arise, they should be handled by the Training Captain himself.
He is at all times responsible for the safe and efficient conduct of the
flight. No deviations from the normal procedures should be made or
allowed to be made on a scheduled flight.

During assessment the Training Captain should observe any deficiencies


in the Pilot, which should be forwarded to the Chief Pilot (Training). At the
same time the good qualities of the Pilot should be appreciated.

b) Privileges

Examiners *
i) Simulator and Airplane Training
ii) Skill test for Co-Pilot‟s rating (CA 40-A),

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iii) Skill test for Pilot in Command rating (CA 40-B)


iv) Skill test for issue of Instrument Rating(IR)
v) Proficiency Checks on Simulator and Aircraft.
vi) Final Simulator Check;

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vii) Ninth and tenth route checks for Command endorsement;
viii) All release Route Checks
ix) Training of Examiners to exercise the privileges of an Instructor
and a Check Pilot.

Instructors *
i) Simulator and Airplane Training
ii) Training of Pilots for Type/Command rating, Instructor and check
pilot rating
iii) Training of Check Pilots;
iv) Proficiency checks (LR and Route Check)
v) Instrument Rating (IR) renewal checks;
vi) Local Checks and Route Checks
vii) Supervised Line Flying
viii) To exercise the privileges of a Check Pilot.
Note: * - Examiners /Instructors approved by DGCA can be utilised after they have
attained 60 years of age, for the purpose of training / skill test of pilots for Co-Pilot
rating /Initial Type Endorsements and also initial issue of Instrument Rating,
provided a type qualified Captain less than 60 years of age having no medical
restrictions placed on his licence shall be on board as ‘Safety Pilot’

Check Pilots
i) Route checks.
ii) Under supervision flying for eligible pilots for command upgrade and for
line release as co-pilots.

1.3.25 Director - Training

He / She will report to Chief Pilot (Training). He / She will be responsible to:

a) Maintain records of Crew Qualifications/Licences and Dispatcher


training

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b) Plan Crew Training – Transition, Difference, Ab-Initio, Refresher and


Upgrade Trainings.

c) Plan Dispatcher Transition, Difference and Refresher training

d) Co-ordinate with Training Providers and Crew Scheduling for

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Simulator Training and booking of slots.

e) Manage Crew Training on day-to-day basis and take prompt


recovery action in case of any deviation of programs due to non-
availability of resources, breakdown of training facilities etc.

f) Prepare documentation for submission to DGCA, AFCME and follow


up for securing various approvals.

g) Liaise with DGCA on Licensing matters

h) Advise Crew Scheduling of the requirements to carry out Route


checks and specific assessments for various pilots

i) Maintain a Pilot Not Available Status due Training for the Monthly
Scheduling Meeting.

j) Any Other duty assigned by Director (Flight Operations).

1.3.26 Senior Manager (Flight Operations Support)

He / She will report to Director (Flight Operations Support). He / She will be


responsible to:

a) Implement various software for Flight Operations

b) Carry out NOTAM Surveillance and development of RTOW charts

c) Manage Aircraft and Regulatory information & Route Guides

d) Distribute operational information to crew and Dispatchers

e) Develop LPC infrastructure

f) Liaise with DGCA, AAI, BCAS and defence authorities

g) Manage documentation for Crew, Fleet, Simulators including


control of documents. .

h) Any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations Support).

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1.3.27 Senior Manager (Performance Management)

He will report to Director (Flight Operations Support) and be responsible to:

a) Carry out Aircraft Performance Evaluations

b) Regularly monitor ICAO/DGCA/AAI circulars, AIP amendments,

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NOTAMs etc. to analyse suitability of various airports for Flight
Operations and keep everyone concerned informed

c) Carry out Route & Alternate Analysis

d) Analyse and propose Fuel Tankering options

e) Carry out Fuel Burn Analysis

f) Formulate guidelines for Fuel conservation and optimization of Flight


Operations

g) Carry out Aircraft Performance Monitoring

h) Develop Aerodrome Operating Minima

i) Any other tasks assigned by Director (Flight Operations Support)

1.3.28 Senior Manager (Pilot Resourcing)

He will be accountable to the Director (Pilot Management). He will be responsible


for:
a) Flight crew Requirement Planning based on fleet expansion plan.
b) Recruitment of National pilots
 Screening of Application received for matching with qualification and
experience criteria set out by the company.
 Establishing contact with eligible candidates and planning the
interviews.
 Advising the agreement signing schedule for the selected
candidates.
 Coordination with flight Crew training team for establishing the
training needs based on the qualification and experience of the
prospective candidates.
 Ensuring timely completion of the other administration issues related
to National Pilot recruitment.

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 Keeping in touch with the selected candidates and regular follow up


on their joining schedule.
 Coordinating with various departments for the joining of pilots.
 Managing the pilot provisioning the schemes or Cadet Programs
presently run by the company or contemplated in future.

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c) Recruitment of Foreign pilots
 Assess the comprehension of English language of foreign pilots.
 Supervising and follow up the security clearance of the foreign pilots.
 Interacting with Chief Pilot (Training) for the selected pilot
application.
 Requisition of and timely issuance of pilot contracts and forwarding
the same to the respective providers.
 Ensuring timely completion of other administration issues related to
foreign pilot recruitment.
 Coordinating with various departments for the joining of pilots.
d) Interaction with various pilot providers in terms of:
 Receipt of initial documents of the proposed pilot candidates.
 Communication of initial documents of the candidature to the
providers based on the screening of the CVs.
 Intimation to providers on the pilot Security clearance update.
 Follow-up regarding availability of pilots and ensuring that the pilots
join as per the committed timelines.
 Ensuring that the pilots arrive with current license, medical and
ratings as per Indian DGCA norms.
e) Single point of contact for the pilots for all their pre-employment queries.
f) Controlling foreign and Indian pilot data along with the pilot provider.
g) Verification of Pilot Provider Invoices.
h) Any other task assigned by reporting Manager or Director (Flight
Operations).

1.3.29 Associate Director / Manager (Pilot Administration)

He will be accountable to Director (Pilot Management). He will be first point of


contract for all pilots for all Admin/Finance/HR issues and will also be responsible
for:
a) Coordination with HR/Admin/Finance departments on pilot issues
b) Monitoring of pilot hourly utilization

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c) Pilot privilege leave planning and authorization


d) Pilot sick leave monitoring
e) Expat and Indian pilot rotation leave planning and authorization
f) Temporary duty assignment planning and administration
g) Base manning levels and transfers

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h) FDTL exceedance reporting to DGCA
i) Coordination with crew scheduling on individual pilot rostering issues to
help in decision making by chief pilot (Line)
j) Responsible for ensuring that all pilot lapsable items (VISA, AEP etc.) are
flagged and renewals done well in time.
k) Advising human resource on pilot salary deductions and maintain a
record.
l) Ensuring that all pilot admin files/records are up to date.
m) Direct supervision and monitoring of the team members assigned.
n) Development systems and procedures to streamline all the function listed
above.
o) Any other duties assigned by Director –Crew Resourcing.

1.3.30 Vice President - Operations Control Centre (OCC)

The Vice President (OCC) will report to the Executive Vice President (AO & CS,
OCC) and is accountable for central co-ordination of operating departments to
meet the company‟s operating plan.

He/ She shall be responsible for the functioning of the Operation control Centre
and Coordination & Control of the Company Aircraft. He / she will be responsible
for initiating the Emergency Response Management Procedure and notifying all
Incident & Accident Reports, as required by Company Policy and DGCA
requirements.

Vice President (OCC) will also be responsible for maintaining the Company „On
time performance‟ for which he /she is authorised to initiate, terminate, cancel, re-
route flights for commercial viability and efficiency of operations, within laid down
Safety, Operational, Engineering and DGCA guidelines.

He / She will be responsible for delay reporting, delay analysis and investigation of
systemic causes that affect regularity and efficiency of operations. He / She will be
responsible for maintaining all records of OCC aircraft communications (ACARS /
Voice etc.)

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Vice President (OCC) will work in close coordination with Vice Presidents of Flight
Operations, Engineering, Airport services, in-flight and the Chief Commercial
Officer in addition to maintaining a close liaison with airport authorities, air traffic
service providers, ground service providers and airport operators for the efficient
discharge of his responsibilities.

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In the absence of the post holder, Director (OCC) will assume all functions of Vice
President (OCC).

1.3.31 Director Crew Scheduling

He /She will be responsible for

a) Air crew scheduling as per guidelines laid down by Vice President


(Flight Operations) and within the stipulated Flight & Duty Time
Limitations (FDTL). He will be responsible for ensuring that legal and
qualified crew are rostered for all flights and their optimum utilisation.

b) Implementation of DGCA & Company Operational Manual policies


with respect to FDTL and scheduling (refer Para 1.8.8.13 and 11.4.1,
Chapter 11 for qualification requirements).

c) Assessment of minimum crew strength required to maintain


company flight schedule within DGCA/Company FDTL rules.

d) Monitoring flight movement and ensure that expected prolonged


delays are included in the crew planning process and FDTL
exceedances do not occur.

e) Development & Publication of crew roster as per flight operations


policy.

f) Monitoring non-adherence to the DGCA guidelines on FDTL and


report on all FDTL exceedences with justifications.

g) Liaise with Pilot Training for rostering / release of pilots for training
duties.

h) Regular Scheduling of qualified crew for flights to airports / routes


that have special qualification / recurrent requirements.

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i) Scheduling of crew and day-to-day roster planning to meet the


requirements of Airline policies and guidelines with regard to crew
pairing and distribution of flight duty assignments amongst air crew.

j) Ensuring that all information related to flights & crew is recorded in


software for crew scheduling and FDTL monitoring.

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k) Ensuring that all changes in crew scheduling are communicated to
Air Crew, Flight Dispatch, OCC & Crew Logistics.

1.3.32 Associate Director- Flight Dispatch

He/ she will be a qualified and DGCA approved Flight Dispatcher in charge of the
Central Flight Dispatch unit and will be responsible for implementing the company
Flight Operations and Flight Dispatch policies laid down in the Operations Manual
in conformity with DGCA rules and guidelines. He/she will be responsible for
Notification of any incident, accident, unlawful interference events etc. as per laid
down notification procedure. He will:

 Provide operational support to crew through Flight Dispatch including,


but not limited to Flight Planning, Flight Watch, Weather Briefing and
communications as required by Company Policy.
 Implement and enforce operational supervision standards, policies and
procedures pertaining to the Flight Dispatch function, in accordance with
Operations Manual, Flight Safety instructions and DGCA requirements.
Provide day-to-day functional, administrative, and technical direction to
the Flight Dispatch.
 Ensure that Company flights are safely and efficiently planned, cleared,
and monitored in accordance with established standards, regulations
and flight operations policies.
 Be responsible for disruption containment due weather, industrial unrest
etc.
 Analyze delays on the network, suggest ways to minimize them and
recommend changes in procedures for smooth functioning.
 Ensure that all Flight Dispatch personnel are provided with adequate
training, assessment and route familiarization suitable to the position
being held within the Flight Dispatch.
 Providing work schedules which ensure adequate and efficient Flight
Dispatcher staffing.

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 Preparing the operating and capital expenditure budgets related to Flight


Dispatch.
 Associate Director - Flight Dispatch will work in close coordination with
Director - Flight Operations Support who is responsible for long term
formulation of Flight Supervision processes and interaction with all Nodal

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agencies including DGCA, Airport authorities and Vendors.

Associate Director - Flight Dispatch to ensure delegation of authority and


assignment of responsibility within the management system for liaison with
regulatory authorities, original equipment manufacturers and other external entities
relevant to operational control.

In the absence of the post holder, designated Sr. Manager/Manager will assume
all functions of Associate Director - Flight Dispatch.

1.3.33 Senior Manager Flight Dispatch

Will be a qualified and DGCA approved Flight dispatcher who is in-charge of the
Central Flight Dispatch Unit and will be responsible for implementing the company
Flight Operations Dispatch policies laid down in the Operations Manual and in
conformity with DGCA rules and guidelines. He/she will be responsible for
Notification of any incident, accident, unlawful interference events etc. as per the
laid down notification procedure. He will:

a) Implement and enforce operational supervision standards, policies and


procedures pertaining to the Flight Dispatch function, in accordance with
Operations Manual, Flight Safety instructions, and DGCA requirements
b) Analyze delays on the network, suggesting ways to minimize them and
recommend changes in procedures for smooth functioning.
c) Ensure that all Flight Dispatch personnel are provided with adequate
training, assessment and route familiarization suitable to the position
being held within the Flight Dispatch as per directions of Associate
Director - Flight Dispatch.
d) Providing work schedules which ensure adequate and efficient Flight
Dispatcher staffing.
e) Preparing the operating and capital expenditure budgets relative to Flight
Dispatch.
f) Maintain himself current and his approval valid for him/her to be able to
discharge his/her responsibilities and maintain adequate supervision and

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control.
g) Sr. Manager-Flight Dispatch will work in close coordination with Flight
Operations Support who is responsible for long term setting up of Flight
Supervision processes and interaction with all Nodal agencies including
DGCA, Airport authorities and Vendors.

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In the absence of the post holder, designated Manager will assume all functions of
Senior Manager - Flight Dispatch.

1.3.34 Manager Dispatch

Will be a qualified and DGCA approved as Flight dispatcher who is in-


charge of the Central Flight Dispatch Unit and will be responsible for
implementing the company Flight Operations Dispatch policies laid down
in The Operations Manual and in conformity with DGCA rules and
guidelines. He/she will be responsible for Notification of any incident,
accident, unlawful interference events etc. as per the laid down
notification procedure. He/she will provide operational support to crew
through Flight Dispatch including, but not limited to, Flight Planning,
Flight Watch, Weather Briefing, and communications as required by
Company Policy. He/ She will:

a) Provide day-to-day functional, administrative, and technical direction to


the Flight Dispatch.

b) Ensure that Company flights are safely and efficiently planned, cleared,
and monitored in accordance with established standards, regulations and
flight operations policies.

c) Be responsible for disruption containment due weather, industrial unrest


etc.

d) Analyze delays on the network, suggesting ways to minimize them and


recommend changes in procedures for smooth functioning.

e) Providing work schedules which ensure adequate and efficient Flight


Dispatcher staffing.

f) Maintain himself current and his approval valid for him/her to be able to
discharge his/her responsibilities and maintain adequate supervision and
control.

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g) Manager-Flight Dispatch will work in close coordination with Flight


Operations Support who is responsible for long term setting up of Flight
Supervision processes and interaction with all Nodal agencies including
DGCA, Airport authorities and Vendors.

h) Manager-Flight Dispatch will ensure that in the case of absence of Duty

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Manager Flight Dispatch in a shift, the responsibility for operational
control functions is assumed by qualified personnel.

In the absence of the post holder, designated Duty Manager will assume all
functions of Manager - Flight Dispatch.

1.3.35 Duty Officer Flight Dispatch

This function is performed by Deputy Manager in Flight Dispatch and in


their absence senior most Assistant Manager will assume the role of Duty
Officer – Flight Dispatch.
He/she is responsible for the working of the Flight Dispatch Shift and ensuring that
all Flight dispatch activity is effectively executed. He/she will be responsible for the
Notification of all Incidents, accidents, unlawful interference to his superiors. He
will be a qualified and DGCA approved flight dispatcher and will be responsible to
keep his approval current.

He is responsible for:

a) Supervision, on day-of-flight for the Company network, based on the


inputs provided by Flight Dispatcher, Operations Controller, Maintenance
Coordinator and Airport Dispatch Coordinator.
b) Exercise flight supervision and assist the PIC to decide on initiation,
continuation, termination, diversion and cancellation of flights due
operational, technical, environmental or any other reasons.
c) Ascertaining the availability of aircraft and crew to operate the flights
scheduled for the day and plan rescheduling, if required.
d) Monitoring all delays and taking pre-emptive and corrective measures to
contain the extent and duration of delays.
e) Providing quick flight planning assistance when desired by the
Commander.
f) Arranging for re-routing, re-planning of flights, if required.
g) Compiling information about all operational delays over the network for

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the duration of his duty.


h) Work in close coordination with flight Crew Scheduling.

1.3.36 Duties and Responsibilities of Controlling Flight Dispatchers

The Indian Aircraft Rules and DGCA issued CARs have not considered flight

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dispatchers as a licensed category and they operate subject to an approval
accorded under CAR Section 7, Series M-Part II.

A Flight Dispatcher, qualified as per CAR mentioned above, is assigned the


responsibility of exercising safe and efficient operational supervision over flights in
conjunction with the Pilot-in-Command, on behalf of the Vice President (Flight
Operations).

Flight Dispatcher is responsible for:

a) Exercising operational supervision and assist the pilot-in-command for


the safe &efficient planning and monitoring of a flight.
b) Performing Operational Flight Watch and for determining if changes in
operational and meteorological conditions may affect the safety of flights
within a prescribed area or on assigned routes, and for communicating
those changes to the Pilot-in-Command.
c) Maintaining the Flight dispatch written log and record of all Company
Radio Transmissions between OCC and Aircraft.

PRE-FLIGHT DUTIES

The developing, reviewing, authorizing, issuing and revising, as required, of


the Operational Flight Plan for all scheduled and nonscheduled flights
inclusive of training and test flight operations, in keeping with Safety,
Regulatory, Customer Service, and Company fiscal requirements.

 Assisting the PIC for the release of an aircraft to operate in accordance


with the terms and conditions established by the Operational Flight Plan.
However the final decision lies with the Pilot in Command.
 Analyzing operational conditions and identify any opportunities that may
constrain, impede or benefit operational capabilities inclusive of, but not
limited to weather, facilities, Air Traffic Control, and aircraft performance.
 Analyzing operational and meteorological conditions to evaluate and
determine the safest and most efficient minimum fuel requirement.

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 Formulating and implementing revised Operational Flight Plans when


conditions warrant, and for communicating the revised plans to the Pilot-
in-Command.
 To provide the Pilot-in-Command with a thorough and professional flight
crew briefing package, covering all significant information which may

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impact the operation of his flight.
 Soliciting, interpreting, and maintaining current flight and field conditions
reports, NOTAMs etc. to provide flight crew with the latest operational
information.
 Providing and communicating revised information for Load Control with
total fuel requirements and aircraft weight limitations that maximizes
revenue payload potential while satisfying all Safety standards.
 Communicating to Air Traffic Control Services all Operational Flight Plan
requirements.
 Resolving with Maintenance Control, the pilot-in-command, Flight
Operations Management Pilots, as required, problems caused by any
aircraft deviation from standards including MEL, which may limit or
impact flight operational capabilities, and to communicate any
operational limitations to the respective operating Departments, as
required.
 Apprising respective operating departments and Flight Operations
Management Pilots, if warranted, of any reported deviations from
standard which occur during flight and which could impact down line
scheduling integrity.
 During irregular operations, congruent when practical with the Pilot-in-
Command, advising flight delays to Associate Director Flight Dispatch/
Director-OCC; and when conditions warrant, recommending flight
cancellations, and initiating alternative plans.
 Providing timely analysis of meteorological risk which may reasonably be
anticipated to impact local and/or system operations including aircraft on
layover, to Maintenance and Ground Operations.
 Administering, managing, and implementing economic fuel policies to
maximize company profitability, subject to operational constraints and
within proper Safety parameters
 Ensuring, on day-of-flight, which the Flight Dispatch function performs
safe and efficient Operational supervision in accordance with all

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Company policies and procedures.


 To advise on delay / cancellation of the flight or otherwise decide on a
possible / alternative routes which may be flown safely in accordance
with company procedures & standards, taking into account likely weather
conditions at the destination and alternate aerodromes; en-route

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weather; with the maximum fuel load possible.
 Obtain the Pilot-in-command's signed concurrence with the operational
flight plan and flight release;

Note: A Flight Dispatcher shall avoid taking any action that would conflict with
the procedures established by:

 Air Traffic Control


 the meteorological service
 the communications service
 Authority of Commander

IN -FLIGHT DUTIES

a) After a flight has departed a flight watch shall be maintained till the flight
lands at the destination or in case of a diversion a watch must be kept on
the flight to the alternate and its departure thereafter to the destination.
During flight watch, weather at destination & alternate should be
monitored and the commander of the flight advised of any weather
deterioration through available communications channels.
b) Capturing up-to-date flight progress information of assigned flight
movements (Flight Watch) and to ensure that the flight movement
information is both current and accurate.

POST-FLIGHT DUTIES

The Flight Dispatcher on duty shall:

a) Ensure that all reports of the commander are sent to Chief Pilot (Line).
b) Remain on duty unless he has been properly relieved.

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1.3.37 Assistant Manager OCC

Assistant Manager - OCC are operations personnel assigned duties in


OCC to assist flight dispatch in operations supervision. They are suitably
trained to perform their job functions efficiently.

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Assistant Manager - OCC will function under the Flight Dispatcher and be
responsible for all VHF/HF communication and maintain records/logs of all
communication and will monitor all company frequencies on real time
basis. He/she will have readily available information on latest weather,
airfield limitations etc. for assistance of Flight Dispatcher and Flight Crew.
He/she may be asked to prepare an operational flight plan under the
guidance of Flight Dispatcher, who will however be responsible to verify its
correctness. Get en-route significant weather information from
Meteorologist and communicate to flight crew through ACARS or available
channels of communication.
In addition, following are the list of duties and responsibilities of Assistant
Manager - OCC:
i) To perform job responsibilities as allocated to him by Duty Officer - Flight
Dispatch.
ii) To assist Flight dispatcher in Flight follow-up.
iii) To retrieve FIC/ADC for all flights. To follow-up wherever ATS plan not
available and take appropriate action i.e. to extract ATS PLAN from OFP
and send it to respective station / ATC unit.
iv) To prepare automated RPL report and fax to the respective ATS units.
v) To monitor maintenance status of Aircraft, ZFW change mails and Crew
roster on daily basis for conditional crew and change in crew pattern and
to inform Flight Dispatchers accordingly.
vi) To assist/prepare the formatted automated”Flight Release” in the word
document as per our current schedule and Pilot roster/Aircraft rotation.
vii) To follow-up with IndiGo MET and confirm Summary weather brief/ Met
Folder is placed in MET shared folder and same to be placed in
respective flight folder well in time.
viii) To retrieve NOTAMs through RBT system, edit flight wise/FIR wise and
place in the respective folders.

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ix) To assist Flight dispatcher to prepare the flight folder, convert into PDF
and upload on IndiGo world portal.
x) All Executive-OCC should be familiar with MC Plot, ACARS, MET PLUS,
Report Engine,
xi) Checklist Amendment etc.

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xii) To monitor ACARs messages & handle company frequency.
xiii) To attend incoming telephone calls and transfer calls to respective Flight
Dispatcher i.e. according to responsibilities assigned.
xiv) To clear Post-flight folders on daily basis.
xv) To perform job responsibilities as allocated to various groups i.e.
Document Updation, Schedule Change Activities etc.
xvi) Attend ROC meetings as and when required.
xvii) Visit and brief station staff regarding ATC and other procedures before
commencement of operation to new stations.
xviii)To perform any other tasks assigned by Associate Director – Flight
Dispatch/ Sr. Manager/ Manager -Flight Dispatch.

1.3.38 Assistant Manager – Operations Control Center & Flight


Dispatch

His duties and responsibilities are as follows:

a) Assistant Manager (OCC & Flight Dispatch) will be responsible to


maintain all documents and publications necessary for provision of
technical support on operational matters. List of documents/publications
requires maintaining & updating for this purpose are given below:-

i) Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM)

ii) Flight Crew Operations Manual (FCOM)

iii) Cabin Crew Training Manual

iv) RTOW Charts folders

v) MEL/CDL

vi) Operations Manual

vii) Flight Dispatch Manual

viii) DGCA Circulars

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ix) NOTAC‟‟s/ C NOTAMS/ Technical Notice/ Operations Notice

x) Technical Circular (QAN) issued by Engineering/ Quality Control

xi) Aircraft Manual of India

xii) AIPs

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xiii) AICs

xiv) AIP Supplement

xv) Civil Aviation Requirements (C A R)

xvi) Jeppesen Route Manual

xvii) ICAO Annexes

xviii) Defence Airfields IAL Charts

xix) Any other relevant documents/publications including security alerts


and Flight Crew Bulletins.

b) All the above documents are to be kept updated by Assistant Manager


(OCC & Flight Dispatch).
c) Maintain a record of revisions received and action taken.
d) Keep the record of all the documents, their updating and status.
e) Keep and maintain a file in the Flight Dispatch Section for various
circulars on emergencies, hijacking, bomb scare and incidents/accidents.
f) Follow up of post flight folders or FSR required by flight safety.
g) Check the board for watch hours, any closure, and firefighting category
etc.
h) Update Admin info file for dispatchers on daily basis.
i) Get approvals for the new staff inducted and update his records in
Dispatch documents.
j) Order the Stationary as and when required in consultation with that
group in charge.
k) Update routine check file whenever routine check of any station done by
dispatchers.
l) Brief the trainees who go for FD training, renewals/refreshers and
provide them required forms.
m) Update Dispatch directory with latest tankering, fuel policy, performance
factor etc.

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In the absence of Assistant Manager (OCC & Flight Dispatch), the above jobs and
responsibilities are delegated to the Executive in shift.

1.3.39 Executive-OCC / Controllers

Executive-OCC are operations personnel assigned duties in OCC to assist flight

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dispatch in operations supervision. They are suitably trained to perform their job
functions efficiently.

Executive-OCC will function under the Flight Dispatcher and be responsible for all
VHF/HF communication and maintain records/logs of all communication and will
monitor all company frequencies on real time basis. He/she will have readily
available information on latest weather, airfield limitations etc. for assistance of
Flight Dispatcher and Flight Crew. He/she may be asked to prepare an operational
flight plan under the guidance of Flight Dispatcher, who will however be
responsible to verify its correctness. Get en-route significant weather information
from Meteorologist and communicate to flight crew through ACARS or available
channels of communication.

In addition, following are the list of duties and responsibilities of Executive-OCC:

i) To perform job responsibilities as allocated to him by Duty Officer - Flight


Dispatch.
ii) To assist Flight dispatcher in Flight follow-up.
iii) To retrieve FIC/ADC for all flights. To follow-up wherever ATS plan not
available and take appropriate action i.e. to extract ATS PLAN from OFP
and send it to respective station / ATC unit.
iv) To prepare automated RPL report and fax to the respective ATS units.
v) To monitor maintenance status of Aircraft, ZFW change mails and Crew
roster on daily basis for conditional crew and change in crew pattern and
to inform Flight Dispatchers accordingly.
vi) To assist/prepare the formatted automated “Flight Release” in the word
document as per our current schedule and Pilot roster/Aircraft rotation.
vii) To follow-up with IndiGo MET and confirm Summary weather brief/ Met
Folder is placed in MET shared folder and same to be placed in
respective flight folder well in time.
viii) To retrieve NOTAMs through RBT system, edit flight wise/FIR wise and
place in the respective folders.
ix) To assist Flight dispatcher to prepare the flight folder, convert into PDF
and upload on IndiGo world portal.

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x) All Executive-OCC should be familiar with MC Plot, ACARS, MET PLUS,


Report Engine,
xi) Checklist Amendment etc.
xii) To monitor ACARs messages & handle company frequency.
xiii) To attend incoming telephone calls and transfer calls to respective Flight

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Dispatcher i.e. according to responsibilities assigned.
xiv) To clear Post-flight folders on daily basis.
xv) To perform job responsibilities as allocated to various groups i.e.
Document Updation, Schedule Change Activities etc.

To perform any other tasks assigned by DGM – Flight Dispatch/ Sr. Manager/
Manager -Flight Dispatch.

1.3.40 Meteorologist

Meteorologists function under the Manager Operations Control and are


responsible for

a) Collecting and analyzing meteorological data from Indian


Meteorological Department (IMD) websites

b) Prepare MET Folders for all IndiGo flights in accordance with DGCA
rules.

c) Forecast inclement weather for the entire IndiGo network,

d) Provide general, country-wide and international forecast to assist


Operations Co-ordination Centre with operational decision making.

e) If destination weather deteriorates provide latest METAR /SPECI to


aircraft in flight.

f) Keep watch on weather requests through ACARS

1.3.41 Executives (Flight Operations Support)

Flight Operations Support Executives shall be accountable to Manager Flight


Operations Support/ Manager Flight Operations, and are responsible for;

a) Update and maintain base library

b) Update and maintain aircraft library

c) Update and Simulator library

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d) Disseminate Company Notices, TR, e-manual to Crew

e) Any other duty assigned by Manager Flight Operations Support.

1.3.42 Executives (Training)

Flight Operations Training Executives shall be accountable to Manager Flight

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Operations and are responsible for;

a) Assist Manager Flight Operations in renewal of crew licenses, and


related activities

b) Assist Manager Flight Operations in renewal of crew medical , and


related activities

c) Any other duty assigned by Manager Flight Operations

1.3.43 Communication Pyramid

A communication system has been established within the organisation that


enables and ensures an effective exchange of information relevant to the conduct
of flight operations throughout the flight operations management system and
among operational personnel. The pyramid given below indicates the flow of
communication. However there is no restriction on direct communication at
different levels for the sake of speed and necessity.
Note: Fleet Captain (Safety) communicates directly with Vice President (Flight Operations).

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1.3.44 Coordination with Other Departments

It is to be ensured that the issues that affect operational safety and security are
coordinated among personnel with expertise in the appropriate areas within the
flight operations organization and relevant areas outside of flight operations, as
appropriate. The issues that could affect operational safety and security include
aircraft modifications, new equipment, new destinations/routes, or regulatory
changes. The flight operations shall ensures that necessary internal and external
coordination occurs through the meetings or other means of liaison (e.g. e-mail,
memos, conference call and meetings). The following aspects may need constant
liaison with various departments on day to day basis.

i) Flight safety;
ii) Cabin operations;
iii) Engineering and maintenance;
iv) Operations engineering;
v) Operational control/flight dispatch;
vi) Human resources;
vii) Ground handling, cargo operations and dangerous goods;
viii) Manufacturers, (AFM/AOM, operational and safety communication);
ix) Regulatory agencies or authorities.

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1.4 CREW MEMBER RESPONSIBILITY

1.4.1 Crew Member shall not perform duties On an Airplane:

a) while under the influence of any drug that may affect his
faculties in a manner contrary to safety.

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b) following deep sea diving except when a reasonable time
period has elapsed.

c) following blood donation except when a reasonable time


period has elapsed.

d) if he / she is in any doubt of being able to accomplish his


assigned duties

e) if he / she knows or suspects that he is suffering from


fatigue, or feels unfit to the extent that the flight may be
endangered.

f) if she is pregnant.

g) Under the effect of Illness, surgery or use of medication

It shall be the responsibility of every crew member to immediately bring to the


notice of the cockpit crew scheduling if he/she is unable to perform duties on an
airplane for any of the above mentioned applicable reasons.

He / she shall not:

I. consume alcohol in contravention of the DGCA and company rules

II. commence a flight duty period with a blood alcohol level in excess
of permissible limits

III. consume alcohol during the flight duty period or whilst on standby

IV. engaging in any kind of problematic use of psychoactive


substances

1.4.2 Crew Advocacy

It is the responsibility of all aircrew to bring to the attention of the Commander any
departure from prescribed procedures and safe practices. This is essential so that
the Commander is aware and understands the particular situation to enable him to

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take appropriate action. This is especially relevant to all co-pilots, who due to large
experience/age gap may be hesitant. The Co- Pilot shall bring any potentially
unsafe flight condition immediately to the attention of the Commander.

Two Communication Rule

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The pilot flying shall respond to any flight related standard callout communication
made by the pilot not flying (PNF) with regard to deviation from standard operating
procedure, standard practice and any deviation beyond the stipulated parameters
laid down for the different phases of flight. The oral response shall be “check”,
indicating that the pilot flying is aware of the deviation followed by the oral
response “correcting”, indicating that he is initiating corrective action. If there is no
response to two verbal standard callout communications, the PNF must promptly
evaluate if a situation of pilot incapacitation exists. If the airplane is in an unsafe
flight condition, or is likely to enter an unsafe flight condition, the PNF shall
immediately take over control by calling “I have controls” and pressing the side
stick takeover pushbutton so that flight control priority is transferred to his side
stick and the other side stick is deactivated.

1.4.3 Flight Crew Members Responsibility In Case Of Special Crew


Pairing

The table below clearly determines the Designated Captain when special crew
pairing is planned by the Company.
Left hand Right hand
TYPE OF FLIGHT Observer Remarks
seat seat
Training
CAPT FO Crew Line check
Line Captain
Training CAPT TRG CAPT CAPT line check
TRG
FO FO line check
CAPT
or CAPT/T TRG CAPT CAPT IOE
checking Safety
situations TRG
Commercial FO/T Additional FO IOE
CAPT
flights Pilot (a)
CAPT FO Standard crew
CAPT TRG CAPT
No training Lack of FO and no
or CAPT qualified on
TRE TRI
checking the right hand seat

CAPT CAPT (b)

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TRG
FO/T (OBS)
Base training
CAPT
CAPT/T TRG CAPT (OBS)
Special flights (c) Designated by Vice President (Flight Operations)
Note:

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a) Safety additional pilot if required by Airline during Initial Line Training (IOE)
b) Airline Captain trained on the right-hand seat, designated to be the Co-pilot for
this flight.

c) Special flights = maintenance check, Aircraft positioning flight …

CAPT= Captain, CAPT/T= Captain on Training , FO= First Officer


FO/T= First Officer on Training, OBS= Observer
TRG CAPT = Type Rated Examiner / Instructor / Check Pilot

Each time a TRG CAPT is operating as Pilot Flying or Pilot non-Flying, he has to
take the responsibility of the flight.

When a TRG CAPT is Observer, he must not interfere in any decision process
except on the Commander request. Nevertheless, he may provide advice, at the
appropriate time, about the management of the flight.

1.5 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITY OF COMMANDER

1.5.1 Position in the Organisation

The Commander is directly subordinate to the Chief Pilot (Line). It should be


recognised, however, that he also has certain duties, as described by law.

1.5.2 Status and Conduct

For each Flight, the company designates the Commander. A Commander is a


senior official of the Company. He is expected at all times to act as such in relation
to his duties and responsibilities. In addition to setting and maintaining a high
standard of self discipline, the Commander is responsible that his/her crew attain
an equally high standard. He must ensure that orders are correctly given and are
always promptly obeyed and do his utmost to develop a high level of "Espirit de
Corps".

IndiGo Pilots are professional and are required to conduct themselves in a manner
consistent with the highest professional standards. The inherent nature of our
operations requires the maintenance of the highest level of safety and public
confidence.

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The discipline required to maintain these extremely high standards, calls for the
constant attention of both management and pilots. When dealing with any breach
of personal conduct it is recognised that no two situations are quite alike.
Therefore, apparently different treatment may be required for circumstances that
might be facially similar. Thus, judgment must be used in dealing with any breach

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of professional conduct.

1.5.3 Period of Command

The designated Commander assumes command the moment he accepts/signs


the aircraft acceptance (Flight Report Book / Technical log book) and /or enters
the aircraft with the intention of carrying out a flight, whichever is earlier. His
command continues until the termination of his flight duty when he/she completes
all the post flight documentation and leaves the aircraft.

1.5.4 Responsibility and Authority

The Commander is responsible for the safe execution of the flight and for the
safety of the aircraft and its occupants, baggage and freight during the flight. He is
also responsible for discipline on board and orderly conduct of the flight. He shall
have the final authority as to the disposition of aircraft while he is in command. He
has the authority to take such measures as necessary for the safety of the flight
and in this connection he may take such reasonable measures as are necessary
for order and discipline on board. These measures may include the restriction of
freedom of one or more occupants until they are delivered to the competent
authorities. This general description of the Commander's legal responsibility
requires elucidation on the following points:

a) The legal text leaves many specific questions open to interpretation.


It is, however, a basic philosophy of our legal system to leave room
for judgment against the specific circumstance prevailing at the time.

b) This legal philosophy implies that the law draws no strict lines as to
the beginning and end of the Commander's responsibility and
authority, and it does not exclude the responsibility of others at the
same time as that of the Commander (for instance, Authorities on
the ground, ATC, etc.). The company has however, defined the
period of command above.

c) The term 'flight' as used in the law may in general be assumed to


represent the period between 'doors closed' and `door open'

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1.5.4.1 General
The Commander will:

a) maintain over-all responsibility for the flight execution; be the


representative of the company when dealing with other crew

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members during flight duty time and at layovers, and towards
passengers in his capacity as Commander of the airplane;

b) promote an atmosphere under which optimum crew co-operation


may be expected;

c) be responsible for flight preparation and execution in compliance


with legal and company regulations;

d) report facts which may influence the quality of the general flight
execution to his Chief Pilot;

e) have no doubts about his condition and proficiency when reporting


for duty.

f) The Commander whether handling the controls or not is responsible


for the operation of the aircraft in accordance with Rules of the Air
except that he may depart from these rules in circumstances that
render such departure absolutely necessary in the interest of safety.

g) It is incumbent on the Commander to comply with laws, regulations


and procedures of the state in which the aircraft is flown. This
includes complying with all health, Custom and Immigration laws in
force. He / She shall ensure that no crew violates any of these laws
and no contraband or unauthorised articles are placed anywhere on
board an aircraft. If an emergency situation arises which endangers
the safety of the aircraft or personnel and necessitates taking of
action which involves violation of local regulation or procedures, the
Commander shall notify the appropriate local authority. A report shall
be submitted of any such emergency action to the DGCA through
the Vice President (Flight Operations) as soon as possible.

h) At Base stations, upon arrival at the briefing area, it shall be the


responsibility of the Lead Cabin Attendant to contact the Captain
once all Cabin Attendants are present. Immediately as this happens,
the Captain shall assemble the other pilot/s and all the Cabin

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Attendants. He will conduct a short 3-4 minute briefing with the intent
of creating a harmonious, congenial, and professional atmosphere
amongst all crewmembers, using best CRM practices. It is
recommended that this briefing be completed by D-55 (Domestic) /D-
70 (International) at the latest, because the cabin attendants need to

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complete their briefing and be at the aircraft by D-45 (Domestic)/ D-
60 (International). In case the Captain does not at this stage have
specific briefing details on the flight, this meeting should
nevertheless be conducted during this time window, as its purpose is
to enhance the feeling of being part of the same team and for the
crewmembers to get to know each other. Specific details can be
briefed to the Lead Cabin Attendant once in the cockpit.

 Commander and Lead will cross check / confirm with each other
regarding PFMC compliance for their respective crew & self.

i) During transit flights when a crew change occurs, the joining Cabin
Attendants must visit the cockpit and introduce themselves to the
pilots when time and their duties permit. In this scenario, the
introduction will not be insisted upon by the Captain, and will only be
done if the Lead determines that it will not impact boarding or
passenger service. The underlying principle will be that a face-to-
face meeting between the pilots and cabin crew enhances a feeling
of teamwork, and if possible under the prevailing circumstances, the
Lead shall facilitate this. In all cases, the Captain shall brief the Lead
before doors closing, upon the Lead presenting the details of Cabin
Attendants.( Flight Dispatch Activity – Responsibility Matrix is placed
at Para 1.7.10.15 of this chapter)

Cabin crew joining (flight deck Crew remains same)

As and when the Lead reports to the flight deck for giving the pre-
flight check, she will confirm to the commander that all the crew have
done their PFMC.

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Flight Deck crew joining (Cabin Crew remains same)

As and when the Flight deck crew conducts the joint Pre-flight
briefing on board, he/she will confirm to the Lead that the crew has
done PFMC.

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He shall confirm that all pre-departure drills and safety checks are
completed. Should a Commander's duties detain him and he is
unable to board the aircraft before the passengers, he must ensure
that all preparations are made by the remainder of the crew so that
departure can be made with a minimum delay after he boards the
aircraft.

j) The Commander is responsible for ensuring that all passengers are


fully briefed on safety procedures and that all emergency exits are
kept clear during flight.

k) The primary responsibility of the Commander is that he must not


commence a flight when in his judgment the aircraft is not in a
satisfactory condition and to conduct the flight in a safe manner in
order to maintain a high level of safety. It is his obligation to report
any areas of operation which could be detrimental to safety. This
includes but is not limited to items such as mechanical problems,
weather, crew proficiency, airport facilities or ATC problems. This is
to permit the airline to initiate follow up action. The Commander is
responsible for filing de-briefing reports and ensuring reporting of
accident/incident as per laid down procedures.

l) In the absence of Company Ground Personnel, the Commander


during his period of command is also responsible for the safety of the
aircraft passengers, crew and their comfort while on the ground. He
shall make all efforts to mobilise available resources until Company
personnel are available to takeover and resume their responsibilities.

1.5.4.2 Flight Preparation


The Commander will:

a) acquaint himself with all relevant particulars and latest instructions


concerning aircraft type and flight to be flown

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b) co-ordinate the flight preparation and ascertain that all aspects have
been covered

c) convince himself of the airworthiness of the aircraft and have no doubts


as to the fitness and proficiency of his crew members

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1.5.4.3 Flight Execution
The Commander will:

a) be responsible for the operation and safety of the airplane and for the
safety of all persons on board, during flight time

b) be responsible to ensure that passengers and crew are seated and


strapped during takeoff and landing and when the seat belt sign is 'ON'.
The crew may be allowed to conduct their duties with the Seat Belt sign
„ON” if the Commander considers it safe to do so.

c) ensure that checklist and standard operating procedures are adhered to


and thoroughly carried out

d) be responsible for notifying the nearest appropriate authority by the


quickest available means of any accident involving the airplane resulting
in serious injury or death of any person or substantial damage to the
airplane or property

m) be responsible for reporting all known or suspected defects in the


airplane at the time of termination of the flight. The commander shall
inform OCC & MCC of the defect and associated MEL application
through ACARS, when the defect is accepted after the cabin door‟s
closure and the flight is continued.

e) be responsible for certifying the Flight Report / journey log book or


equivalent document

f) co-ordinate all crew duties as described in company manuals

g) direct his flight management in such a manner that all cockpit crew
members are constantly aware of his intentions

h) take all actions which may improve the efficiency and comfort of the
flight, without having any adverse effect on safety

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i) take all actions deemed necessary to ensure the safety of the flight; if
these actions divert from prescribed procedures he will (if time permits)
do so in consultation with the other crew members and submit a report
about his action to his Chief Pilot (Line)

j) be responsible to file a debriefing report on completion of every flight

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duty in the event that in his opinion any matter needs the attention of
management

k) In case of diversion, advise OCC using any possible means, about the
planned course of action

l) In case of diversion to an airport where company personnel are not


available, remains in-charge of the flight until airport services personnel /
handling agent and/or engineering personnel arrive.

1.5.4.4 Commander’s Emergency Authority

Nothing contained in this manual is to be construed as relieving a Commander of


his responsibilities to take any action in an emergency or under unusual
circumstances, in order to preserve the safety of the aircraft, its occupants, mail
and freight.

Whenever a Commander uses his emergency authority, a Use of Emergency


Authority Report, as specified in Company Operations Manual Part B shall be
submitted.

1.5.4.5 Customer Relations

It is very important that our customers‟ experience of IndiGo is consistent and


standardized. Attention to the little details is one way that IndiGo can create a
competitive advantage in the marketplace.

It has been decided that one of the pilots, preferably the Captain, from now on,
after completion of the Parking Checklist, is required to be at the forward exit to
wish our customers Good Bye and thank them for flying IndiGo.

This instruction is inviolate and applies to all Pilots on IndiGo flights irrespective of
their rank.

Instructions exist on the cockpit door being kept open when on ground to
encourage children (our future customers and employees) to visit the flight deck,
something all children would love to do.

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Cabin attendants will encourage customers and especially children to „peep‟ into
the cockpit while deplaning. Pilots are expected to be polite and friendly in such
cases. There is a proposal to gift „Log Books‟ to children which when presented
should be signed by the Captain.

The above instruction is not intended to override the existing DGCA order on

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cockpit entry in flight. i.e. between the closing of the Cabin doors before departure
and their opening on arrival.

1.5.4.6 VIP Passengers - Handling

The company will refer certain persons as VIP passengers. The Captain will be
informed of the presence of such passengers on his flight before departure.

The Lead will check with the Captain if he would like to greet/pay his compliments
to the VIP passenger/s before departure. Time and duties permitting, it is expected
that the Captain will personally meet the VIP passenger/s and welcome him/her
before doors close. If this is not possible, the Captain must ask the Lead to do so
on his behalf.

During the flight, all courtesies will be extended to the VIP passenger/s by the
Lead. The Captain is requested to inquire and assure the same. Any courteous
but professional gesture (like sending a business card with a short note) from
the Captain / crew are welcome.

As per existing procedure, the Captain (or other pilot depending on post-flight
duties) is required to say „Goodbye‟ and thank all passengers, including the VIP.

Remember that every action mentioned above must display professionalism and
not over do them. Also, do not let the other passengers feel that all the attention is
only being given to the VIPs.

1.5.4.7 On-Time Performance

DGCA regularly monitors company‟s ON-Time performance on behalf of travelling


public. In case of frequent delays, operational slots at various airports can be
threatened. While some delay reasons are external to the airline and are beyond
control, there are others which can be managed. As an important operating
department Flight Operations has a major role to ensure that the controllable
reasons of delays are kept effectively under check.

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Procedure:
The Company expects, passenger boarding is targeted to be completed at ETD-
15 min.

To achieve this target, Airport Services personnel at various airports are required

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to start boarding as soon as feasible. Specific clearance from the Commander is
not required. Pilots are NOT repeat NOT to insist that passenger boarding is
delayed or interrupted except for reasons affecting safety of aircraft operations. In
case of such an action, a Pilot report, justifying the reasons why boarding was
delayed / interrupted, must be submitted.

Crew reporting late is an avoidable reason of delay. Crew are expected to report
No Later than 1:00 hr (domestic)/1:15 hr (International) prior to the notified
departure time. In case of a pick up or en-route delay crew must contact OCC
ASAP and advise OCC of the situation.

Reporting Sick at last minute causes irreparable damage to our ON-Time


performance. This last minute report “Sick” inconveniences fellow crew members
and destabilizes the roster. If a crew member feels that he is medically unfit to
exercise the privileges of his license, MUST inform crew scheduling as soon as
possible instead of intimating at the last minute.

1.6 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF CREW MEMBERS OTHER


THAN THE COMMANDER

1.6.1 Co-Pilot

1.6.1.1 General

The co-pilot is:

a) subordinate to the Chief Pilot and to the commander during the


flight duty and flight execution;
b) expected to report facts which may influence the quality of the
general flight execution to the commander and to the Chief Pilot;

c) to have no doubts about his condition and proficiency before


starting a flight and during flight execution.

d) is equally responsible for the safety of flight operations.

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The Co-pilot is under the direct supervision of the Commander and shall
carry out all duties pertaining to the operations of a flight as directed by
him and any other duty as may be assigned from time to time.

The Co-pilot is responsible for the navigation of the airplane (unless a


navigator is carried on the flight). Any deviation from track shall be

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brought to the attention of the Commander. If track deviation occurs due
to circumnavigation, weather etc., the Co-pilot Shall keep a track of the
airplane position at all times.

He does not have authority to directly reprimand the cabin attendant, but
shall bring the lapses to the notice of the Commander.

The Co-pilot shall remain at his station at all times during flight except
when authorised to leave his station by the Commander.

He shall not normally alter any flight condition, controls, switches etc.
without the knowledge and approval of the Commander except where
such alteration is necessary in an emergency.

The Co-pilot shall read out the check list at the appropriate time and
ensure its compliance.

The Co-pilot shall normally maintain a listening watch on R/T when within
Area, Approach or Airport Control boundaries and shall make position
reports as and when required.

The Co-pilot shall periodically obtain destination and alternate weather.

When a Co-pilot is carrying out under supervision PF duties, the


Commander will discharge all PNF duties. However, Commander will
retain the authority and responsibility for final disposition of the aircraft.

The Co-pilot is responsible for filling in all required documents and logs.
Aircraft defects will only be entered with the permission of the
Commander.

1.6.1.2 Flight Preparation

The Co-pilot will:

a) acquaint himself with all relevant particulars and latest instructions


concerning aircraft type and flight to be flown;

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b) advise the Commander if, in his opinion, any aspect of the flight
preparation has been overlooked.
Notes:
i) Co-Pilots, are considered to be potential Commanders, they shall
understand and study the duties and responsibilities of the Commander

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in addition to their own, at all times
ii) The most valuable instruction is the experience gained in actual flight
operations and therefore, flight operation techniques of the commander
will be studied.
iii) Any methods or procedures which are not thoroughly understood shall
be requested from the Commander to be explained.

1.6.1.3 Flight Execution

The Co-pilot will:

a) perform all duties as described in the company manuals under


the supervision of the Commander:

b) assist in promoting an atmosphere in which a good


understanding and co-operation between the crew members
may be expected;

c) be alert on developments which may endanger the safety of the


flight; if he believes these developments exist he will:

- advise the Commander


- ask the Commander to take appropriate action

d) if, in his opinion, strong doubts exist as to the physical or mental


fitness of the Commander (incapacitation) and/or immediate
action is required to prevent a highly critical situation, he shall
take such action as deemed necessary (if possible in
consultation and agreement with other crew members).
Note: - It is obvious that with the action described above, a highly undesirable
situation is created. All further initiatives should be aimed at the safe
completion of the flight.

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1.6.2 Lead Cabin Attendant

The Lead Cabin Attendant is in charge of all cabin attendants in flight and is
responsible to the Commander for their duties on-board.

At Base Stations, upon arrival at the briefing area, it shall be the responsibility of

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the Lead Cabin Attendant to contact the Captain once all cabin attendants are
present. Immediately as this happens, the Captain shall assemble the other pilot/s
and all the Cabin Attendants. He will conduct a short 3-4 minute briefing with the
intent of creating a harmonious, congenial and professional atmosphere amongst
all crewmembers, using best CRM practices. During transit flights when a crew
change occurs, the joining cabin attendants must visit the cockpit and introduce
themselves to the pilots when time and their duties permit. In this scenario, the
introduction will not be insisted upon by the Captain, and will only be done if the
Lead determines that it will not impact boarding or passenger service. The
underlying principle will be that a face-to-face meeting between the pilots and
cabin crew enhances a feeling of teamwork, and if possible under the prevailing
circumstances, the Lead shall facilitate this. In all cases, the Captain shall brief the
Lead before doors closing, upon the Lead presenting the details of cabin
attendants‟

1.6.2.1 Flight Execution

The Lead Cabin Attendant will carry out the following responsibilities:-

a) Allocate duties to the other cabin attendants, and maintain proper


team work and coordination on board, in consultation with the
Commander.

b) Check turn out of all cabin attendants and report, if necessary.

c) Conduct the pre-flight briefing to all cabin attendants on safety,


service and merchandise sale procedures and timings to be
followed.

d) Take report from all cabin attendants regarding emergency


equipment and report to Commander.

e) Take report from all cabin attendants regarding status of galleys,


toilets, cabin, catering stocks, etc.

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f) Check Cabin Defect Report Book and make appropriate entries, if


necessary.

g) Ensure that all necessary announcements are made on time.

h) Ensure that cabin services/sales are carried out as per norms laid

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down.

i) Take and advise all clearances to the commander

j) Be responsible for receipt, safe custody and delivery of diplomatic


bags, pouches and high value consignments or other security
removed items on behalf of Commander and keep at safe place so
that they are inaccessible to any person during flight.

k) The Lead Cabin Attendant must ensure that suitable announcement


to passengers are made as per announcement booklet provided to
each cabin attendant. These announcements must include usage of
seat belt, location of emergency exits, availability and usage of
oxygen masks and the safety cards available in each pocket, No
smoking, non-usage of electronic devices and mobile/cellular
telephones.

l) Attend to any complaints or problem on board.

m) Report any cabin incident/accident on board to the Commander.

n) Complete the Cabin Attendant Flight Report and submit on arrival.

The Lead Cabin Attendant must inform the Commander whenever smoke, fire,
unusual sounds or other abnormal conditions are observed. This information will
be passed on as follows:
Observations during Warning to Commander
a) Taxi, cruise or descent Immediately

b) take-off and climb out Immediately. However, no calls will be made


during commencement of take-off roll till the
retraction of landing gear.
c) final approach and Immediately. However, no calls will be made
landing from extension of landing gear till the end of
landing roll. (No contact period)

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During an emergency, the Lead Cabin Attendant is responsible for preparation of


the cabin and execution of evacuation procedures, as specified in chapter 11,
Operations Manual, Part-B. If an evacuation is anticipated, she may request
assistance from any additional and non-working crew members.

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1.6.3 Cabin Attendant

The Cabin attendants detailed for a flight will work under the Lead Cabin Attendant
and shall be under the direct command and supervision of the Commander during
the period of their duty and at lay over station.

The Cabin attendants shall keep their seat belt/harness fastened during take off,
landing and whenever the Commander so directs.

Cabin attendants rostered for a particular flight shall report to the Lead Cabin
Attendant who will brief them on any special procedure. The Lead Cabin Attendant
will allocate the other Cabin Attendants their duty stations with the concurrence of
the Commander. The duty station of any Cabin Attendant may be changed by the
Commander during the course of the flight.

The Cabin Attendant shall ensure the availability, accessibility and serviceability of
aircraft cabin emergency systems and equipment. This shall include a preflight
inspection of all systems and equipment, which, as a minimum, shall be conducted
by the cabin crew prior to the first flight:

 After a new cabin crew or, if no cabin crew is used, a new flight
crew has assumed control of the aircraft cabin;
 After an aircraft has been left unattended by the flight crew or
cabin crew for any period of time.

The duties and responsibilities of Cabin Attendant are laid down in detail in the
Safety & Emergency Procedures Manual but notwithstanding anything mentioned
therein a Cabin Attendant shall:
a) Ensure that they maintain the highest standard of discipline courtesy,
decorum and turn out.
b) Report any deficiency noticed in cabin, emergency equipment, cabin
cleanliness, catering stocks etc to the Lead Cabin Attendant.

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c) If required by the Commander/Lead Cabin Attendant, ensure by


means of head count that the number of passengers on board tallies
with the number reflected on the trim sheet.
d) Ensure that the passengers are fully briefed with regard to
emergency procedure etc. before take off and landing and a report

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made thereof to the Commander through the Lead Cabin Attendant.
During in- flight emergency, shall instruct the passengers regarding
the emergency actions to be taken as appropriate to the
circumstances.
e) Carry out in flight service and merchandise sales as per company
procedures notified from time to time
f) Ensure that all crockery and cutlery are removed before take-off and
landing from the cockpit/passenger cabin unless instructed to the
contrary by the Commander.
g) Ensure that all doors are closed, armed and disarmed on instructions
from the Cockpit crew.
h) Ensure that no unauthorized person has access to the Cockpit.
i) Ensure that they are seated and strapped for take-off and landing
and during a declared emergency. They shall also ensure that they
are seated and strapped whenever the seat belt sign is switched on
unless authorized by the Commander to continue the service or
move about. This does not preclude them from taking any action that
may be required for the comfort and safety of passengers or in an
emergency.
j) Immediately bring to the notice of the Commander any suspicious
article that may be carried by a passenger, any unruly act,
drunkenness or any violation of regulations etc.
k) Bring to the notice of the Commander any strange noise or anything
which in their opinion may cause passenger apprehension or affect
the safety of the flight.
l) Not enter the cockpit in flight unless called to attend. This does not
preclude entry into the cockpit in an emergency or to make reports
which are required under their duties and responsibilities.
m) Ensure courteous, friendly and professional conduct towards
passengers

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n) Ensure that Exit row seating policy is complied with chapter 9.


o) Ensure that the passengers fasten their seat belts whenever the seat
belt sign is "ON".
p) Ensure that no passenger smokes on the flight.

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q) Ensure that no passenger uses mobile / cellular telephone on board
when the airplane doors are closed unless permitted by the
Commander.
r) Ensure that passenger baggage is properly stowed and aisles/
emergency exits are cleared of all baggage and obstructions. Check
with the Commander before starting any meal/snack service.
s) Ensure that cabin door is kept guarded if open and the door safety
strap is attached when passenger ramp has been removed. The
door should be closed immediately after removal of the ramp.
t) Ensure that they do not leave the airplane without the permission of
the Commander at transit stations.
u) Ensure that they do not contravene any custom and censorship
instructions.
v) In case any flight is delayed on ground, carry out any service/sale
including meal service to the passengers as directed by the
Commander/Lead.
w) Report to the Lead Cabin Attendant after the flight for debriefing
x) Seek authority from the Commander to stay away from designated
hotel.
y) Interact with other crew Professionally and with courtesy

1.6.3.1 Management of Crew Fatigue during flight

Refer Chapter 17, Company Operations Manual, Part A

1.6.3.2 Cockpit crew inside the lavatory

It has been observed time and again that when one pilot enters the lavatory the
cabin attendants generally reveal it to the passengers waiting in the area. In such
an event the cabin attendants must use the following verbiage – “The forward
lavatory is being serviced/ occupied, could you please wait for a while or you may
choose to use the Lavatories located in the rear side of the Aircraft”.

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1.6.4 On Board Sale Of Merchandize

The Following process will govern on board merchandise sale.

a) All Merchandise meant for sale on board will be under the stipulated
pre loading Security Procedures

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b) It will be ensured by the Company that no goods that fall under the
Dangerous Goods Regulation or listed as items prohibited by the
BCAS for carriage by passengers in their person/ hand baggage are
loaded for sale on board.

c) Merchandise for sale will be stored in standard service trolleys


secured (latched & locked) in either the forward or aft galley.

d) Only serviceable trolleys with foot brakes will be used for


merchandise sale

e) When not in use such trolleys must be stowed and locked so that
they do not move out into or obstruct the Galley area.

f) No merchandise sale/service is permitted if the Seat Belt sign is


switched on and the captain has advised the cabin attendants „to be
seated & fasten seat belts‟. The trolleys are to be stowed and
secured under these circumstances.

g) At all times while sale of merchandise is in progress, one cabin


attendant shall not be involved in the sale of merchandise and be
present at the rear galley to keep the entire cabin in full view and is
responsible for passenger safety and service.

h) Safety and orderly conduct on board will take priority over any
merchandise sale.

1.7 DESIGNATED PILOT OPERATIONS CONTROLLER

Flight Operations department will designate suitably qualified Captains as


Operations Controllers in the Operations Control Centre to carry Operations
Control duty (OCD).

The Pilot Operations Controller is an integral part of OCC and must ensure that his
actions are taken in consultation and cooperation with airport services,
engineering and commercial representatives in OCC. Pilots on OCD duty will not

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interfere with the normal day to day activity and decisions of OCC. There exists a
vast difference between Central Coordination and Operations Control

Central Coordination is the exercise of authority over the initiation, continuation,


diversion or termination of a flight in the interest of efficiency and regularity.

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Operations Control is the authority over commencement, continuation, diversion
of a flight for the safety of the aircraft operations.

1.7.1 Duties and Responsibilities:

The company follows a non-shared operational control system where in the


operations controller‟s responsibility is limited to provide advice on the
commencement, continuation or diversion of a flight for reasons of flight safety,
mechanical problem and adverse weather. He is responsible to support the Pilot in
Command in making a decision with regards to continuation/diversion of a flight. In
this regard the operations controller has resources of Flight Dispatch,
Meteorological Services, Maintenance Control and Crew Scheduling at his
disposal. The operations controller while exercising this function will strive to
provide timely relevant information and guidance to the pilot in command who will
ensure that laid down procedures are not infringed and no take-off or landing is
conducted in conditions below the approved minima. He will function under the
authority of the Director OCC and will be responsible and accountable to The Vice
President (Flight Operations) for his decisions.

Pilots on OCD will also ensure that no take-off or landing is conducted in


conditions below the approved minima such that a flight does not commence or
continue if the weather conditions at the destination or alternate are forecast to be
below the minima at the expected time of arrival. However a flight can commence
if the destination is below a aerodrome operating minima as long as one
destination alternate is above minima.

The Pilot Operations Controller will also provide guidance to pilot in the application
of the MEL so as to reduce avoidable delays. He is to provide the Pilot in
Command with guidance when due to certain failures, a ground or air turn back is
being considered. While the Pilot in Command is responsible for the safe conduct
of the flight, the Pilot Operations Controller is responsible for maintaining flight
supervision. Although, the final authority remains with the Captain, he is expected
to give due importance to the advice and guidance of the Operations Controller,

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and to override his suggestions only when deemed essential in the interest of
safety.

Cases where agreement between the two cannot be reached are to be brought to
the attention of the Vice President (Flight Operations), or in his absence, to one of
the Chief Pilots, for resolution before departure.

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1.8 SUPERVISION OF THE OPERATION BY THE OPERATOR

1.8.1 General Policy

The Flight Operations department shall advise the feasibility of all Flight
Operations. No operation that jeopardizes safety or is in contravention of the State
Rules, the Operations Manual or the Airplane Flight Manual shall be undertaken.
Identification and reduction of all hazards and risks affecting flight operations will
be the priority of the Company.

1.8.2 Operations Policy, Mission and Goals

Mission

The Company is dedicated to providing on-time, hassle-free courteous and


affordable Air transport service.

Goals

 Commitment to safety, punctuality, dependability, economy,


efficiency
 Friendly, efficient and cordial work force.
 High airplane utilization and employee productivity.
 Market driven fares, simplified services.

Safety

The convenience, speed and comfort of air transportation cannot be viable without
Safety, which is air transport's priority. The price of carelessness or neglect is so
much greater in the air than it is on the ground. Safety is the responsibility of
everyone connected with the air transport system. Management at all levels
should provide means for prompt corrective action in the elimination of unsafe
acts, conditions, etc.

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Reliability

It is obligatory on the Company to provide "reliability" with a high level of service


and operational efficiency. To achieve this management and employees must
carry out their responsibilities with integrity, professionalism and enthusiasm.

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Profitability

For the Company to remain financially viable, the economy of flight operations is
just as important as reliability and service. The productivity and efficiency of a
Company is measured by the quality of its service and care shown towards
people.

1.8.3 Management Responsibilities

It will be the responsibility of Management to ensure that no instructions are given


that will be in conflict with the procedures established by the State, the Operations
Manual or the Airplane Flight Manual. No instructions shall conflict with the
authority of the Commander. It is the responsibility of all personnel connected with
the operation of the aircraft to bring to the attention of the Vice President/Director
(Flight Operations) any infringement of the provisions of Operations Manual.

1.8.4 Air Operator's Permit (AOP)

The Air Operator's Permit (AOP) is obtained by the Company from DGCA after
fulfilling all the laid down requirements. The conditions mentioned in the permit
must be complied with by the concerned departments. (Refer annexure 1)

1.8.5 Licence and qualification validity

Refer Chapter 11 and Company Operations Manual part D

1.8.6 Competence of operations personnel

Refer Chapter 11 and Company Operations Manual part D

1.8.7 Control analysis and storage of records, flight documents

Refer Chapter 5, Company Operations Manual, part D

1.8.8 Operational Supervision

1.8.8.1 General

Vice- President (Flight Operations) is responsible for overall supervision of Flight

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Operations. He specifies the policies, the procedures and any associated control
to ensure safe operations. He co-ordinates and supervises the operational
departments and appoints managers.

The operational supervision of the whole operation is ensured by:

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a) Specifying the organisation, the policies, procedures and instructions

b) Maintaining competence of the staff

c) Performing the operations within the authorised limits

1.8.8.2 Means of Flight Operation Supervision

Supervision of flight operations is achieved by:

a) Safety Management & Accident prevention activities


b) Anonymous reporting
c) Hazard reporting
d) Mandatory reporting
e) Defining clear & practical operational policies and
procedures
f) Flight Data Monitoring
g) Policy Conflict Resolution
h) Regular surveillance of flights & operational activities
i) Standardisation of Operations Policies and Training
Programs
j) Standards and Training committee meetings.
k) Legality tracking of Licenses and records
l) FDTL monitoring
m) Operation of airworthy aircraft in accordance with the
approved limitations
n) Flight crew scheduling
o) Operations coordination and Operations Control
p) Establishing processes to receive Crew feedback from line
operations – Flt Ops and pilot admin
q) Fuel monitoring
r) Putting in place a flight dispatch and ops Supervision
system to manage all daily operational activities

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1.8.8.3 Safety Management & Accident Prevention Activities

Aviation is inherently risky. Safety management involves timely identification of


risk, its mitigation, reduction and eventual removal. All risks cannot be eliminated.
A successful safety management system endeavours to reduce risk to an
acceptable level.

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The aim of an accident prevention program is:.

a) To review safety results and identify significant safety issues

b) To develop and implement safety action plans and review


implementation and effectiveness

c) To oversee accident prevention activities of all department involved


with the operation of aircraft

d) To review safety impacts of any project (new destination, increase in


fleet size, etc.)

Accident Prevention is achieved by Flight Data Trend analysis, investigation of the


causes of occurrences, developing preventive methods, encouraging reporting of
occurrence, hazard and incidents with non-punitive programs. Refer chapter 34 for
details of the Safety Management and Accident Prevention program.

1.8.8.4 Anonymous/Voluntary Reporting

The Company supports and promotes all legal requirements pertaining to safety.
Safety in operations and at the work place is primarily the responsibility of the
operating departments. Refer chapter 34 for details of Anonymous/Voluntary
Reporting.

1.8.8.5 Hazard Reporting

Refer chapter 34 for details of Hazard reporting.

1.8.8.6 Mandatory Reporting

DGCA Air Safety Circular No. 5 of 1982 lists the incidents / occurrences affecting
aircraft design, maintenance and / or operation, are mandatorily reported upon so
as to bring to the notice of the authorities.

List of reportable incidents / occurrences is reproduced in Operations Manual, Part


A, Chapter 34.

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1.8.8.7 Defining Clear & Practical Operational Policies and Procedures

Vice President (Flight Operations) is responsible to define, in the Operations


Manual, the policies and procedures to ensure that the operations comply with the
content of the granted AOC and its associated Operations Specifications. He is
also responsible to communicate clear instructions to pilots to ensure that the

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aircraft is operated in compliance with the terms of its Certificate of Airworthiness
and within the approved limitations contained in its Airplane Flight Manual.

It must be defined with reasonable clarity in the Operations Manual as to what


prevails in case there is a variation between the guidelines & procedures given in
Operations Manual, Manufacturer‟s Flight Manual and State regulations.

1.8.8.8 Flight Data Monitoring

Refer chapter 34 for details of Flight Data Monitoring program.

1.8.8.9 Policy Conflict Resolution

In case there is a variation between the operating procedures given in Operations


Manual, Airplane Flight Manual and Flight Crew Operating Manual / Check List,
the information given in Airplane Flight Manual, Operations Manual and Flight
Crew Operating Manual / Check List will prevail in that order. In case, there is a
conflict between Policy / procedure stipulated in a company NOTAC and the
Operations Manual, the information in the NOTAC will prevail.

In case there is a variation between the policies outlined in Operations Manual and
State Regulations, the State regulations will prevail.

1.8.8.10 Regular Surveillance of Flights & Operational Activities

The issuance of an air operator permit / certificate is dependent upon an airline


demonstrating an adequate organisation and method of control and supervision of
flight operations.

Also the continued validity of this air operator permit / certificate is dependent
upon the airline‟s continued maintenance of standards that were demonstrated
upon original issuance of the air operator permit / certificate.

To achieve this objective, the airline shall ensure that a continued surveillance of
its flights, crew and aerodrome operations are carried out regularly by its
examiners who are appropriately approved by DGCA. Regular surveillance,
through regular inspections, ensures that various stakeholders / actors engaged in

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flight operations activities continue to adhere to the standards to which they were
certified or approved.

Operations surveillance shall be viewed as "system oriented" where individual


performance may be considered in the context of the airline's total system for
training, qualifying and ensuring the continued proficiency of aircrew. Systemic

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causes for less than satisfactory performance during surveillance checks should
not be ignored, particularly where trend exists.

1.8.8.11 Standardisation of Operations Policies and Training Programs

Apart from operational activities, airline examiners also undertake flights to carry
out standardisation checks on its training activities. These include standardisation
of Examiners/Instructors/Check Pilots and standardisation of simulators training
activities etc.

1.8.8.12 Standards and Training Committee Meeting

Standards and Training Committee includes Vice President (Flight Operations),


Director (Flight Operations), Chief Pilots, Examiner Pilots and designated Fleet
Captains. Additional members may be co-opted by Vice President /Director (Flight
Operations).

Regular meetings of Operations & Training Committee ensure that the operating
policies and training procedures are reviewed for consistency, safety, efficiency
and standardisation.

1.8.8.13 Legality Tracking Of Licenses and Records

Regulations require that no aircraft may be flown on a licensed air transport


service unless each member of crew is in possession of the appropriate licence
issued or rendered valid in accordance with stipulated requirements.

Company has implemented procedures and deployed appropriate software


systems to monitor legality of all crew licences and ratings. All timelines related to
expiration of licences are shared with Crew Scheduling. The system warns Crew
Scheduling in case any crew is rostered for flight duties without having valid and
current licences / ratings.

Flight Operations Training Department under Chief Pilot (Training) is responsible


to maintain all pilot training records and ensure that no pilot exercises the
privileges of a license beyond its validity. All training records will be preserved as

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per company policy and in case of an accident the records of involved pilots will be
immediately sealed.

1.8.8.14 FDTL Monitoring

Airline is required by regulations to formulate requirements to limit flight time and

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flight duty periods and provide adequate rest periods for all its crew members.
Current records of flight time, flight duty periods and rest periods for all its crew
members shall also be maintained.

All prevailing Flight & Duty Time Limitations, as given in Chapter 2 are coded in
the Crew Scheduling software system. This system warns crew scheduling in case
any crew is rostered in violation of Flight & Duty time limitations.

In case, due to operational exigencies a crew ends up in a flight /flight duty in


exceedance of company Flight & Duty Time limitations, Crew Scheduling software
is capable of producing reports thereof.

1.8.8.15 Operations of Airworthy Aircraft In Accordance With The


Approved Limitations

The Company shall ensure that:

- the aircraft shall be operated in an airworthy condition


- has serviceable operational and emergency equipment
necessary for the intended flight
- has a valid certificate of airworthiness; and
- is operated within approved operating limitations contained
in the certificate of airworthiness / Flight Manual or other
appropriate and relevant documents.

Before commencement of flight, Pilot-in-Command is required to satisfy himself


that the aircraft is airworthy. Pilot-in-command is also required to ensure that the
provisions of MEL applicable to his flight do not affect the aircraft‟s compliance to
the type of operations being undertaken.

1.8.8.16 Flight Crew Scheduling

Crew scheduling is to ensure that the crew rostered on a flight are legal with
respect to currency, license and approval validity and FDTL. It also ensures that in
case due to diversions / unplanned delays a flight crew infringes on the provisions
of FDTL, adequate additional rest is provided.

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Crew Scheduling is also responsible for the following activities:

a) Ensuring that all crew are rostered to undergo various trainings /


recurrent checks as per the plan given by Chief Pilot (Training) and
Chief Pilot (Standards & QA).

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b) Ensuring that pilots who are qualified for flight/routes which have
special recency requirements are rostered accordingly to maintain
their qualification.

c) Ensuring that crew planning and day-to-day roster meets the


requirement of Airline policies and guidelines with regard to
distribution of flight duty assignments amongst flight crew.

d) Ensuring that in case of prolonged anticipated delays, the extended


flight time / flight duty time is considered during rostering of crew.

e) Crew Scheduling is responsible to ensure that operating crew has


minimum 500 hrs. total cockpit experience on type wherein PIC
hours are considered from release on type and Co-pilot hours are
considered after endorsement on type”.

f) Ensuring that only qualified and current crew are rostered for flights

g) Monitoring flight movement and ensure that expected prolonged


delays are included in the crew planning process and FDTL
exceedances do not occur

h) Monitoring non-adherence to the DGCA guidelines on FDTL and


report on all FDTL exceedances along with justifiable explanation
thereof.

1.8.8.17 Operations Coordination and Operations Control.

Operations Coordination is the exercise of authority over the initiation,


continuation, diversion or termination of a flight in the interest of efficiency and
regularity.

Operations Control is the authority over commencement, continuation, diversion


of a flight for the safety of the aircraft operations.

Company however uses a method of Operations Coordination which engages


Executive OCC / Controllers, Maintenance Control Meteorologists and Pilot

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Operations Controllers.

Operations Control of the flight is vested in the Designated Pilot operations


controller and The Pilot in command with regard to safety of Aircraft Operations
for the commencement, continuation, diversion or termination of the flight.

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Before the flight

 Flight Dispatcher(s) collates latest information on the planned flight and


take the necessary decisions to initiate the flight or to cancel it.

 Station manager supervises all airport activities (passenger,


ground handling, loading). He coordinates also with Flight
Dispatcher, Operations Control Centre and the Commander of the
flight. The station manager is responsible for the flight until the
Commander takes the responsibility of the flight (door closed).

Commencement of the flight

 It is the responsibility of the commander to commence the flight.

Once the flight has commenced

 The authority on the disposition of the aircraft rests with the


Commander and the Pilot Operations controller. The Commander
will be guided by the Pilot Operations Controller. However, the
Commander can override the instructions of the Operations
controller by use of Emergency Authority.

 The Central Flight Dispatch must provide the commander with any
information having an operational impact or with any other
information requested by the commander.

After the flight

 The Commander must report to the Chief Pilot (Line) any


operational procedure deviation and any event providing useful
information for the enhancement of flight safety and promotion of
smooth operations.

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 Any use Of Emergency authority by a Commander is to be


reported to the Vice President (Flight Operations) on termination of
the flight.

1.8.8.18 Establishing Processes To Receive Crew Feedback From Line

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Operations - Fltops and Pilot Admin

By regularly processing Crew Reports and by having an effective working


relationships with line pilots, Flight Operations Management encourages a free
exchange of information, ideas and feedback, which can be used to identify
hazards, enhance the safety of the operation as a whole and promote smooth
operations. However, rumours may not be acted upon.

Company has setup two dedicated e-mailboxes where pilots can send in their
reports, feedback and opinion for the consideration of Flight Operations
Management.

 fltops@goindigo.in - Their feedback to management, for filing Trip


reports, PIREPs and for raising questions of Technical,
Operational, Training and Crew Management related issues. Fltops
also includes feedback/comments on the content of Operations
Manual.

 pilotadmin@goindigo.in All communication from crew on


administrative issues are required to be sent to this e-mail ID.

Flight Operations has put processes in place to provide a timely response to the
pilots on the feedback provided by them.

There are other areas where working relationships are developed. They include:

 Cabin Crew Training: Quality, development and content of Safety


Equipment and Procedures training, interpretation of regulations. advice
on applying procedures, incident reviews.
 Commercial: Effect of schedules on crew fatigue, flight numbering
confusion, passenger complaints alleging Company infringement of
safety rules.
 Airport Services: Inadequate ground handling procedures, aircraft
ground damage.
 Cargo: Mishandling/loading of dangerous goods and general cargo.
 Medical: Crew sickness on duty, passenger illness, deaths in flight.

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 Security Services: Events concerning unruly passengers, aircraft


sabotage.

1.8.8.19 Fuel Monitoring

Refer Chapter 12

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1.8.8.20 Putting In Place A Flight Dispatch and Ops Supervision System
to Manage All Daily Operational Activities

Airline is required to ensure that a flight will not commence unless it has been
ascertained by every available means that the ground and/or water facilities
directly required on such flight, for the safe operations of the aircraft and protection
of passengers, are adequate for the type of operation under which the flight is
being conducted and are available for this purpose. Regulation also requires that
before a flight commences, Pilot-in-Command has prepared and checked an
Operational Flight Plan. However, the use of flight dispatchers / flight operations
officers to assist the flight crew in completing the pre-flight planning; enabling
Operations Supervision, providing information and support to crew when in-flight
and certain post-flight activities is permissible.

IndiGo has set up a Central Flight Dispatch office at its corporate office at
Gurgaon. The central flight dispatch office is co-located with Operations Control
Centre and Central Maintenance Control.

Central Flight Dispatch collects MET and AIS briefing, prepares the flight plan,
files the flight plan with ATS/FIC authorities, and provides documents and manuals
for consultation of flight crew. Flight dispatcher(s) monitor the progress of flights
under their jurisdiction and initiate recovery/alternate plans in case diversion / un-
scheduled events take place.

1.8.8.21 Outsourcing and product quality control

For all external service providers that conduct outsourced flight operations
functions, the company shall monitor such external service providers to ensure
that the requirements of safety or security of flight operations are being fulfilled in
accordance with the specifications of the contract/laid down guide lines.

The company outsources the services of :

 Nav Data Base


 Flight Planning software

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 Aeronautical charts from Jeppesen


 Simulator training

A contract and agreement shall be executed with external service provider.


Annual audit of the system shall be conducted to check the integrity and

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correctness of the data used by the system.

FOS/Training/Standards shall conduct audit and integrity checks for the


outsourced functions and ensure that the services are provided as per the contract
and agreement signed with the service provider.

Any data or product that directly affect aircraft, flight deck, or cabin operational
safety (Such as GPWS terrain and obstacle databases, airport analysis data,
weight/mass & balance data and performance data) acquired from external
suppliers and used for the support of flight operations should be current, accurate
and complete.

The Flight Ops Support department is to ensure that the electronic navigation data
utilized by the aircraft, must be approved or accepted by regulator and electronic
navigation data products acquired from suppliers, prior to being used as a means
for navigation in operations:

 Are assessed for a level of data integrity;


 Are compatible with the intended function of equipment in which it is
installed;
 Are distributed in a manner to allow insertion of current and unaltered
electronic navigation data into all aircraft that require it.

The company shall include auditing as a process for the monitoring of external
service providers. Monitoring and control of external organizations should typically
include random samplings, product audits, supplier audits, or other similar
methods.

1.8.9 Central Flight Dispatch

IndiGo‟s method of Operations Supervision provides for a central flight dispatch.


Central flight dispatch is responsible for:

a) Providing assistance to Pilot-in-Command in flight preparation

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b) Preparation of operational & ATS flight plan and providing RPL


supplementary information to ATC

c) Liaison with Air Traffic Services for collection of NOTAMs

d) Collection & compilation of meteorological data and preparation of

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flight crew briefing folder

e) During flight, providing information necessary for the safe and


efficient conduct of the flight to the PIC

f) Monitoring the progress of each flight under their jurisdiction (Flight


Watch)

g) Advising the PIC of company requirements for cancellation, re-


routing and re-planning, should it not be possible to operate as
planned

The responsibility of Operations Supervision and Flight Dispatch is to plan safe


and efficient flight operations in coordination with the Pilot-in-Command and other
departments and agencies. To achieve these objectives, Flight Dispatcher and
Executive OCC must constantly be aware of the changing conditions that affect
the operations environment and be prepared to react to these conditions in the
manner specified by established regulations, policies and procedures. The Flight
Dispatcher is expected to plan ahead, anticipate problems, establish work
priorities and exercise good judgment in the performance of his duties.

1.8.9.1 Safety

Safety is the most important consideration in all Flight operations. The operating
philosophy of IndiGo directs that safety is an essential ingredient to success.
Every policy or procedure shall be developed around such safety-oriented
guidelines. Knowing and adhering to safe practices that have been established for
the mutual benefit of both Flight Crew and Flight Dispatch personnel are essential
to the prevention of mishaps. Be proactive not reactive.

1.8.9.2 Standardisation

The use of standard operating procedures enhances safety and efficiency by


logically assigning various tasks to appropriate personnel. Use of standard
procedures reduces the burden on planning process and promotes confidence &
precision within the Flight Dispatch department.

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Although not all eventualities can be foreseen, it has been well proven that the
best operations occur when a high level of planning, communications, Flight
Dispatch support, and standardisation exist.

It is the goal of Flight Dispatch to achieve a precise level of standardisation that


discourages unsafe practices, carelessness and the development of individualised

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procedures but not too stringent to discourage operational flexibility, good
judgment and professionalism.

1.8.9.3 Notice of Violations

Any communication received by Flight Dispatch personnel from DGCA / ATC


concerning a reported flight violation or incident will be immediately forwarded to
the Manager Flight Dispatch

1.8.9.4 Training

All flight Dispatchers are to be trained as per requirements of CAR Section 7


Series M Part II. All flight dispatchers must ensure that they meet the re-currency
requirements before accepting flight dispatch duties.

Trainee Dispatchers – May be provided ground school training as per the


requirements of the CAR. They may also be trained to work on Flight Planning
software, flight watch system, ACARS communication etc. to enable them to
discharge their daily function effectively.

1.8.9.5 Personal Conduct

IndiGo expects all employees to accept certain responsibilities of adhering to


ethical business principles in matters of personal conduct and to exhibit a high
degree of personal integrity. Acceptable conduct involves not only sincere respect
for the rights and feelings of others but assuring that personal conduct in both
business and personal life avoids any action that might be harmful to the
employee himself, other employees, the Company or cause any unfavourable
reaction from current or potential internal and external customers.

Flight Dispatch personnel must use discretion when dealing with the public or
news media regarding company matters. Approval from President is also required
prior to representing IndiGo at any public forum (i.e. speaking engagements,
school career days, etc.), prior to participating in interviews or make public
statements.

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Flight Dispatch personnel when contacted, either directly or indirectly by the


DGCA, shall refrain from commenting on any operational matters. DGCA
representative calling shall be referred to Vice President (Flight Operations).

No person shall be under the influence of alcohol and/or mind altering drugs, while
on duty. Sleeping at any time, while performing the duties of Controlling Flight

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Dispatcher, is forbidden.

1.8.9.6 Personal Devices

While on duty, Flight Dispatch personnel shall not wear headset apparatus for the
purposes of listening to non- operational supervision related broadcasts. A flight
dispatcher shall at all times, monitor company communications.

1.8.9.7 Reporting For Duty

Due to the dynamic nature of the Flight Operations in a fast-paced, time sensitive
environment and to rule out delays/disruptions due to miscommunications, it is
necessary to have a seamless exchange between the outgoing and the incoming
shifts. If incoming shift is not comfortable and is not fully briefed, they may not
accept shift responsibilities until they are fully briefed. This will ensure a smooth
handover of all operational matters from outgoing shift to incoming shift.

Flight Dispatch personnel shall report for duty at the scheduled time and be
prepared to assume duties as assigned. Prior to assuming duty, all personnel
must be aware of operational functions, responsibilities and authorities associated
with respective duties.

1.8.9.8 Shift Changeover Briefing

A Flight Dispatcher debriefing, at shift changeover, shall consist of a thorough


explanation of categories as outlined below:

a) Flights under the flight watch phase

b) Weather conditions for departure, en-route, terminal areas, and


cyclonic activity

c) Any Non Schedule flights

d) Any significant NOTAMS

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e) Significant changes to NOTAM bulletins or new NOTAM issued since


incoming Dispatcher‟s last shift that affect departure, destination /
destination alternate, and any other areas affecting IndiGo routes.

f) Aircraft Operating under MEL

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


g) Any pertinent log entries from previous shifts; any new Instructions
issued by e-mail or Memo

h) Items like scheduled system outage, equipment failure etc; that may
affect Dispatch Operations

i) Revisions to Aircraft Manuals

j) Changes to Operating Manuals

k) Any other information which may be relevant for operation

l) Miscellaneous items under Dispatcher Handover Checklist

1.8.9.9 Shift Process

Flight Dispatchers upon joining a shift, assume responsibility and authority over
the assigned workload/areas and shall remain on duty until relieved by another
Dispatcher.
Note: Flight Dispatcher(s) will be considered relieved from duty only when the individual(s)
assuming their duties and responsibilities are satisfied with the briefing. Assumption of the
shift by the incoming Flight Dispatcher implies an acceptance of responsibility for the on
going operations.

a) Joining Duty Manager shall record the names of all Flight Dispatch
personnel on duty; allocate shift duties, and brief Flight Dispatchers of
any special requirements for their shift.

b) All personnel on duty in Flight Dispatch shall remain at their work


stations during their shift. Request to leave the work station shall be
made with the Duty Manager. No one shall leave his workstation
unless properly relieved / authorised by the Controlling flight
dispatcher.

c) All Flight Dispatch personnel shall have a heightened „Situational


Awareness‟ and shall bring to the attention of the Controlling Flight
Dispatcher all matters which may have the potential to adversely

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impact the flight operations. The Controlling Flight Dispatcher shall


consider and re-evaluate each situation and formulate a suitable
response. Some of the examples are:
- Non-receipt of Pre-flight documents by any airport or data-link
failures

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


- Non-receipt of ATS plans by respective ATC units
- Aircraft diversions or deviations
- Volcanic or Cyclone Activity
- SIGMETs
- Non-availability of fuel
- Any unscheduled system or equipment problems / limitations
- ATC strikes or any other event that affects flight planning for the
shift or future shifts
- Details of any movement messages that give dispatch a delay
reason
- All adhoc, unscheduled, and additional flights shall require a
prior DGCA approval. Flight Dispatch shall coordinate with
OCC to obtain the necessary DGCA approval.

1.8.9.10 Workload Management

Operational tasks must be given priority over administrative tasks. Controlling shift
Dispatcher is expected to demonstrate sound judgement, administrative skills, be
willing to seek help and mobilise additional resources if the workload increases.

While normal priorities between various tasks are listed below, adjustments for
daily operations are expected.

a) Operational Tasks - Flight emergencies and safety related situations


will be handled with top priority. Providing operational support to flights
in progress will be given priority over the flights which have not yet
departed or are likely to depart in following couple of hours.

Support to flights in progress (Not listed in any specific order)

- Notice of cyclonic activities, SIGMETs, clear air turbulence and


thunderstorms on route of flight

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- Information about diversion alternates

- ATC co-ordination / liaison for smooth operations of flights

- Information about sudden degradation of ATS facilities

- Information about changes in Meteorological conditions

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


- Post landing operational / passenger facilitation support

Pre-departure issues (Not listed in any specific order)

Providing information to crew about:

- Change in Alternate aerodrome

- Change in Airfield / ATC conditions

- Weather conditions affecting Maximum Take-off Weights and other


changes affecting payload

- Degradation of Aircraft Performance Capabilities due to invocation of


MEL

- Slot Times

- Changes in Aircraft rotation (Tail swaps) and resulting changes to OFP

- Revisions to Operational Flight Plans and Amend previously released


flights to reflect OFP changes in operating conditions

b) Administrative Tasks – Ongoing flight dispatch administrative,


monitoring, record-keeping & reporting activities shall be kept on hold if
the operational environment needs attention from flights operations
personnel.

- Answering telephones promptly. Be courteous, identify yourself and


follow good communication protocol

- Assisting other Flight dispatchers as the need requires

- On-the-job training of Executive OCC

- Professional knowledge enhancement activities

- Answer radio calls

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- Read, evaluate and action all written communications dealing with


operational supervision

- Monitoring of weather, facilities, flight progress and performing other


dispatch duties.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


1.8.9.11 Flight Dispatch Log Book

Central Flight Dispatch shall maintain a log of day‟s activity. All the abnormal and
non-routine situations shall be entered in the log book. Entries made in the log
book shall be concise, neat, and legible. A log book is an official document;
therefore a high level of professionalism shall be maintained while making any
entry in the log book.

In case of an accident, the current log book shall be sealed and all further
communications shall be logged in the fresh log book. Sealed log book will be kept
under the possession of controlling flight dispatcher until taken over by Vice
President (Flight Operations).

1.8.9.12 Record Retention

All Operational Flight Plan (OFP) will be retained in the Flight Planning System for
a period of forty-eight (48) hours.

 All pre-flight crew briefing documents and amendments thereof are


placed in a central server. Copies of flight release signed by PIC are sent
by respective airports to central flight dispatch and saved for a period of
six (06) months.

 Post-flight documents for flights terminating at Delhi are collected and


stored at CFD on daily basis for a period of six (06) months. Post-flight
documents for flights terminating at other bases are collected, and
checked & stored at the respective bases for six (06) months.

 All flight documents for a flight involved in an accident or in an incident


are retained until the termination of the accident or incident investigation.
These documents thereafter are retained for a period of an additional six
(6) months.

1.8.9.13 Flight Dispatch Library

A flight dispatch library is maintained at Central Flight Dispatch.

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The following documents are required to be kept in Flight Dispatch Library for
ready reference:
a) AIP and AIP Supplements
b) AIC

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


c) ICAO Annexures
d) DGCA CAR
e) DGCA Circulars
f) Company Operations Manual
g) Aircraft Flight Manual, FCOMs & QRH
h) MEL
i) RTOW Charts
j) Route Manual – Jeppesen
k) Military airfields‟ instrument arrival charts
l) NOTACs, Company – NOTAMs, Company Operational Circulars and
Technical Notices
m) Flight Safety Manual
n) Flight Dispatch Manual
o) Cabin Crew Manual (SEP Manual)
p) DGR Manual
q) Aircraft Handling Manual, Passenger Handling Manual
r) Master copy of all Operations Reporting Forms

All Flight Dispatchers shall familiarize themselves with all the operational
documents in Flight Dispatch library.

Flight Operations Support is responsible to ensure that all revision services are
fully subscribed to and are provided to Flight Dispatch in a timely manner. DGM-
Flight Dispatch shall be responsible to ensure that all the documents in Flight
Dispatch Library are kept current & updated and record of revisions is maintained.

An electronic copy of various manuals / documents is also made available on


IndiGo intranet portal for ready reference at all airports of crew layover.

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1.8.9.14 Procedures for Dispatch Quality Assurance

Central Flight dispatch and airports of crew layover shall be assessed for
availability of required infrastructure, data-links and compliance to various
procedures laid down in this manual. Such assessments will be done after every
3-month by Flight Dispatchers under instruction from Manager Flight Dispatch.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Following items should be reviewed during assessment:

a) Support to crew in accessing and printing Crew Briefing Folder

b) Collation of various documents

c) Accessing Weather server and providing requisite weather to crew

d) Pre-flight medical records

e) Any other significant issue

1.8.9.15 Operational Policies & Processes


Flight Dispatch Activity - Responsibility Matrix
Time Flight Dispatch Activity Responsibility
Automatic
EZFW based on booked load & assumed cargo are
D-0400 automatically updated in the Flight Planning Software
through Reservation system (Navitaire)

D-0400 Retrieve NOTAMs from RBT System installed at GBP. CFD

Compute Company Operational Flight Plan from


D-0330 CFD
Computerized Flight Planning System
Obtain Met folder from Company Met section
D-0300 CFD
(International flight)

Obtain Met folder from Company Met section (Domestic


D-0230 CFD
flight)
Collate all documents in flight folder and upload on
D-0230 CFD
IndiGo World Portal (International flight)
Collate all documents in flight folder and upload on
D-0200 CFD
IndiGo World Portal (Domestic flight)
Obtain FIC/ADC
- Flights originating from DEL/JAI :
D-0145 Responsibility – Central Flight Dispatch CFD
- Flights originating from other FIRs:
Responsibility - Respective Airport Services

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Airport
D-0130 Retrieve Flight documents from IndiGo World Portal
Services
Print all documents and place them in Pre-Flight Airport
D-0130
Envelope for Crew Briefing Services

Obtain latest weather of DEP/DEST/ALT from IndiGo Airport

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


D-0100
Report Engine and provide it to crew. Services

D-0115 Crew reporting at Airport (International flight)

D-0100 Crew reporting at Airport (Domestic flight)

D-0055 Pre-Flight Medical for operating crew Doctor


Airport
D-0055 All flight briefing documents provided to Operating Crew
Services
Dispatcher contacting crew if there is any important
D-0050 briefing CFD
Crew contacting CFD if they have any queries Airport
D 0050 related to flight (facilitated by Airport Services) Services

D-0045 Finalize Fuel figure for the flight Crew


Pass final figure to Load Planner and MCC Airport
D-0045
Services
Pass flight release number to crew, to be written on
D-0045 flight Release along with Crew signature. This CFD
signifies flight acceptance by Operating crew
D-0030 Crew reporting at Aircraft
Send scanned copies of all flight releases to CFD - Airport
D-0010 to be saved along with Pre flight document. Services
D-0010 Check on the latest for DEP/DEST/ALT Wx INDIGO MET

D-0010 Any bad weather reported, intimate CFD INDIGO MET


Intimate bad weather if reported, to operating
D-0005 crew CFD

ETD Flight departure from station


Capture airborne timings of the flight from
ROCADE software and automatic updation of
At event airborne time in Flight Following software for the Automatic
purpose of flight tracking.

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Flight Following software obtains position


In-Flight report through ACARS for Flight Tracking. Automatic

ORIG / DEST / ALTN weather uploaded to Automated


In-Flight aircraft through ACARS Wx
Server

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Capture Touchdown timings of the flight by
At event Rocade/Flight Following software. Automatic

1.8.9.16 Flight Planning - General

Flight Dispatch is responsible for preparing an Operational Flight Plan (OFP) that
is safe, economical and complies with prevailing ATC constraints, DGCA
requirements & company policy.

Company has set up a computerised flight planning system to generate the OFP.
During the process of preparation of flight plan a number of checks are required
e.g. NOTAMs, aerodrome Weather, Significant Weather Charts, Upper Air Data,
aircraft under MEL / CDL, Expected payload & RTOW limitations, Tankering etc.

Detailed explanations about the layout of Operational Flight Plan (OFP) are
provided in Operations Manual, Chapter 16.

1.8.9.17 Route Guide

Refer Operations Manual, Part C.

1.8.9.18 Alternate Airports

Refer Chapter 17 for selection of alternate airports.

Take-Off Alternates

Under conditions specified in Chapter 17, a take-off alternate may be specified for
certain flights. Flight dispatcher, in such a case, will provide a notation on the flight
plan designating a take-off alternate.

In case, a take-off alternate must be assigned after the flight plan has been issued
the dispatcher will:

i) Contact the flight crew and advise the pilot-in-command the take-off
alternate assigned, prevailing / forecast weather conditions and fuel
required

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ii) Record the acceptability of the take-off alternate in the dispatch log
book

iii) Flight crews will record the agreed take-off alternate on the
operational flight plan.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Similarly, flight crew will advise dispatch in the event they become aware a take-
off alternate is required. The Commander will advise:

i) The requirement for a take-off alternate.

ii) Verify the acceptability of the take-off alternate suggested

iii) Record the agreed take-off alternate on the operational flight plan

1.8.9.19 Operational Flight Plan (Manual and Computerized)

An Operational Flight Plan (OFP) shall be prepared for all IndiGo flights. The Flight
Release/OFP for all sectors shall be approved and signed by the Pilot-in-
Command.

a) Preparation Of An Operational Flight Plan (OFP)

Flight planning is the process of optimising aircraft performance and


economics. Flight shall be planned to operate at the optimum altitudes,
based on Fuel & Speed policy defined by the Airline. An optimum route
shall be selected keeping in mind weather, prohibited & restricted areas,
availability of en-route navigational aids, suitable and adequate en-route
alternate airports, sector length etc.

It is the duty of the Flight Dispatcher to review that the OFP has been
computed on latest meteorological forecast data to simulate an actual
operating environment.

OFP shall be computed for a take-off weight which shall be lowest of:

i) Structural Limited TOW

ii) Performance Limited TOW (correction if any)

iii) Estimated Zero Fuel Limited TOW

iv) Estimated Landing weight limited TOW

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b) Minimum Fuel Required

Minimum fuel computed for a flight shall be as per Airline‟s fuel policy
given in Chapter 12.

c) Operational Flight Plan For Dispatch Under MEL / CDL

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


When an airplane is dispatched with a MEL / CDL bringing performance
penalty, an OFP shall be generated reflecting the performance penalty.
The performance penalty shall be in accordance with the aircrafts AFM /
FCOM.

An indicative list of MEL / CDL which may result in aircraft performance


restrictions / penalties is placed at Company Operations manual, Part B.

d) AD HOC Flights

For non-scheduled operations to any online / off line airports, the


following actions shall be taken:

- For additional flights/ rerouting etc to pick up stranded


passengers, an ATC plan must be filed. Permission from
defence authorities must be obtained.
- Prepare an OFP.
- Indicate fuel tankering requirements when applicable.

e) Computation Of OFP

The OFPs for all flights shall be computed no later than three and a half
(3.5) hours prior to ETD. This will allow enough time for collection and
distribution of documents at out station airports. Flight Dispatch shall
verify all the data used / entered in the preparation of flight plan before
releasing the OFP for safe, legal and economical operation.

OFPs shall be computed based upon EZFW which includes 01 tons of


cargo for all flights. However, cargo may be reduced / omitted to meet the
minimum fuel requirements for the sector.

The following steps are recommended for computation of OFPs:

i) Check with OCC for any changes to ETD, Routing and Airplane
Registration Number.

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ii) Check for MEL / CDL for applicable performance penalties.

iii) Get MET folder from IndiGo MET section and compile a summary of
weather brief, Terminal Area Forecast (TAFs), Aviation
Meteorological Routine Report (METARs) or Aerodrome weather
warnings, Significant Weather Charts, Upper Air Wind Data, etc.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


iv) Check TAFs for Origin, Destination and Alternates to ascertain that
the weather shall be at or above the prescribed minima at the
estimated time of departure; arrival at destination or at the alternate
airport should a diversion become necessary.

v) Refer to applicable Airline Aerodrome Operating Minima (AOM) for


the Minima requirements.

vi) Ascertain area of low / high Pressure, location of jet stream, CAT
and CB clouds from Significant Weather Chart.

vii) Check NOTAMS for origin, Destination & Alternate airport, including
En-route Alternates. Attention shall be given to any deficiencies in
services, reduction in runway length, closures of runways/ taxiways/
un-serviceability of landing/ navigational aids. Closure or restrictions
on airways etc. Special attention shall be paid to landing aids and
their components, as the landing minima may get altered and affect
the scheduled flight operation.

viii) Based on weather and NOTAMS, consider a change in alternate for


destination.

ix) Check Fuel Advisory Bulletin and determine, if tankering will be


required. No payload should be offloaded to achieve fuel tankering.
Note: In the event of decrease / increase in ZFW up to three (3) tons, after an OFP
have been computed, no fresh OFP is required to be given to the crew, however the
crew shall be briefed. If the change in ZFW is greater than three (3) tons, a fresh OFP
will be computed and issued.

f) Check Accuracy Of OFP:

Irrespective of the fact that flights plan computation is computerised, it is


the duty of Flight Dispatcher to perform the following checks to detect any
inadvertent error/omission.

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i) Conformity of the OFP routing with ATC Flight Plan.

ii) Airplane type, Registration, departure date, estimated time of


departure (ETD), estimated ZFW / TOW / FOB.

iii) Wind data compared to en-route MET forecast.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


iv) Minimum required fuel for each flight sector.

v) MEL / CDL items when applicable and the performance penalty.

1.8.9.20 MEL / CDL Handling Procedure

MEL provides operational flexibility to maintenance. It is permissible to operate


revenue flights without certain systems being fully serviceable. CDL caters to non-
availability of certain fitments in the airplane without affecting its airworthiness.
However, when an airplane is certified airworthy under MEL / CDL, there may be
certain amount of restrictions in its operational use or certain operational penalties
might apply.

a) Flight Dispatch shall be advised by Maintenance Control Centre


(MCC) whenever a new MEL / CDL is invoked / revoked from an
airplane.

b) The message from MCC shall contain the following details:

i) Airplane registration number

ii) Type of defect

iii) MEL / CDL reference

iv) Expiration date of the MEL / CDL

v) Additional relevant information if any.

c) Flight Dispatch shall refer to the MEL / CDL manuals to calculate the
restrictions / penalties associated with invocation of MEL / CDL on
airplane performance.

d) If there is a performance penalty, Flight Dispatch shall review the


impact of restrictions / penalties on the entire series of flights
planned for affected airplane.

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e) Flight Dispatch shall advise MCC / OCC to review the tail rotation
plan to minimise the impact of MEL/CDL operational restrictions /
penalties. The review should aim at maximising the payload
available and minimising additional fuel burn.

f) Flight Dispatch shall inform Operations Control Centre (OCC) and

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


Load Control Staff about the payload reduction.

g) OFPs shall be re-computed with the performance penalty applied


and the flight release remarks section shall include the Reference
number of the MEL / CDL along with action taken by the Flight
Dispatch.

1.8.9.21 Aircraft Performance Weight Limitations

The controlling Flight Dispatcher shall maintain an adequate working knowledge of


the performance parameters, including performance and structural limitations of
the aircraft types operating under his jurisdiction. This knowledge in conjunction
with meteorological and operational analysis shall be used to:

 Establish the Maximum allowable takeoff weight based on:

- Structural limitations

- Aircraft performance

- Runway limiting factors

- En route terrain clearance

 Establish the Maximum allowable landing weight based on:

- Structural limitations

- Aircraft performance

- Runway limiting factors for destination and alternate terminals

The company RTOW charts provide Take-off data for airports on the company
network and some frequently used alternates airports.

When calculating airport MTOW limits using the RTOW charts dispatchers should
be aware that take-off weights established by this transaction may limit payload. It
is essential therefore that Flight Dispatchers closely monitor takeoff weights to

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ensure maximum payload is carried and that an overload is not permitted.

1.8.9.22 Handling Payload Restrictions

Due to various operational reasons, including extreme weather or aircraft released


under MEL, payload restrictions might apply. This may lead to a last minute

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


offloading of passengers and / or baggage. If the restriction is expected in
advance, an early notice of payload penalty to Load Control at respective airport
and other concerned sections needs to be sent. All out efforts shall be made to
avoid last minute offloading of fare-paying passengers and their baggage.

Procedures to Handle Payload restrictions

Dispatcher must monitor factors that may cause payload restrictions. Some of
these are:

a) Destination / Alternate weather

b) En-route Tropical Storm Warning

c) Route restrictions

d) Aircraft MEL / CDL

e) Non-availability of fuel at destination for onward journey

f) WAT limitation (Weight, Altitude, Temperature) etc.

When any of the above situations prevails, Flight Dispatch shall take the following
actions. Check sequence:

a) Analyze the effect of the restriction for the given sectors.

b) If it affects payload, check the booked load or get the EZFW.

c) Run a TEST OFP to determine allowable payload for the sectors.

d) If the penalty results in offloading of passengers, due to aircraft MEL


/ CDL, check if the defect can be rectified or airplane may be
swapped.

e) If payload is affected, inform the penalty to Load Control of that


airport and Operations Control Centre (OCC) for further action.

f) If the aircraft cannot be fixed and planned to be dispatched under


the existing MEL / CDL, advice Flight Operations Support to

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produce special optimised RTOW Charts to minimise the extent of


restriction.
Note: WAT stands for Weight, Altitude and Temperature and all three can affect RTOW,
especially with their combined effect. When temperatures are high, RTOW charts must be
checked and QNH correction applied. RTOW for airports at elevation greater than 1,000 feet

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


shall be checked when OAT is high.

1.8.9.23 Fuel Tankering

IndiGo has a policy to tanker fuel from airports where the fuel costs are low. The
Flight Operation Support is responsible to analyse the benefit of cost differential
vis-a-vis additional fuel burnt to carry tankered fuel and advice flight dispatch on
tankering sectors based assumed payloads.

Before tankering decisions are made, the Flight Dispatch shall consider the
following:

a) Tankering must only be done to benefit from the cost differential of


next sector. Tankering for onward sectors is not recommended.

b) For aircraft going into maintenance, seek Maintenance Control


Centre‟s advice prior to tankering.

c) Dispatcher on duty shall ensure that at no time, a tankering /


uplifting of additional fuel shall result in loss of payload. The only
exception when additional fuel may be carried shall be due to the
weather consideration and the flight safety.

1.8.9.24 Crew Briefing/Debriefing Procedure

a) Crew Check In

Flight Crew after completion of the pre-flight medical will “check in” together into
their crew briefing computer with their unique password and will confirm their
legality, view any recent circular and then down load the flight document for self-
briefing (once automated check in/out process is in place). Details of the crew
check in procedure for each originating station will be intimated by a NOTAM from
time to time.

Central Flight Dispatch is responsible to provide comprehensive briefing


documentation for self-briefing of Crew.

- At each airport, station staff have been trained to help the crew

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in accessing pre-compiled briefing documentation, taking print


outs, maintaining data-links with Central Flight Dispatch,
providing communication facilities to crew whenever they want
to discuss an operationally important matter with flight dispatch.
- Once the Pilot-in-Command is satisfied with the flight plan, he is

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


required to sign and specify time (UTC) along with ATPL
number on flight release signifying his acceptance of the flight.
- Once the flight release has been signed Pilot-in-Command is
responsible for the operations control, safety and final
disposition of aircraft. However the „Period of Command‟ is
defined earlier in the chapter.

The crew briefing documentation will contain the following information:


a) Flight Release
b) An OFP for each flight segment
c) ATS Flight Plan for each flight segment
d) MET Folder containing:
- Summary of Weather Brief.
- TAF / METAR for departure, destination and alternate airports.
- Significant Weather Charts and Upper Air Wind Data.
- Satellite Picture (Alternate airports may be destination / enroute
alternates and take off alternate when required).
e) NOTAMs for departure, destination and alternate airports. (Alternate
airports may be destination / enroute alternates, and take off
alternate when required) and list of important NOTAMs for each
FIR.
f) MEL / CDL listing applicable.
g) Security Briefing when applicable.
h) Miscellaneous Documents:
- Frequency List
- Flight Safety Circulars
- Any other important circulars, etc.
- List of alternates (preferred/non preferred)

b) Debrief and Crew Check Out.

On completion of the flight both crew members are required to Check out and file

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a debrief, relevant reports etc. (once automated check in/out process is in


place).They will be required to review the updated roster and confirm etc.

However, till the automated check in /out process is in place, two additional
columns namely “Reporting Time” and “Signature” are being included in the
crew manifest (as shown below). The hard copy will be presented to the crew,

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


which shall be appended with reporting time and the signatures against it. The
completed crew manifest will be scanned and forwarded by airport services to
the dispatch for record purpose. This procedure is applicable for cockpit crew
only. Crew joining during transit will also be provided with a copy of crew
manifest form for recording „reporting time‟.

Crew Reporting Signature


Category Emp. Code Status
Name Time
CPT IGA Local Boarding1

FO IGA Local Boarding

FO IGA Transit Boarding2

1
Local Boarding: Crew reporting at station where the flight originates.
2
Transit Boarding: Crew joining during transit.

1.8.9.25 Flight Release


A sample Flight Release is placed at Annexure 2.

1.8.9.26 Issuance of amended Flight Release

If the Flight Dispatch becomes aware of significant changes in the conditions on


which the original release was predicated, it does not always require that a
complete new release be generated and an Amended Release may be sufficient.
An Amended Release may comprise a revision of one or more items contained in
the original release. It may consist of handwritten changes entered on the original
with the UTC Time and Dispatcher‟s initials are noted. When a flight release is
amended, whether at departure or enroute, the concurrence of the PIC must be
obtained. All details including the new fuel requirements are a matter of record and
for retention in the flight file.
NOTE: Flight Dispatch must annotate all details of amended releases and the time of the
amendment. If several revisions are to be made, it may be preferable to generate a New
Flight Release.

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1.8.9.27 Requirement for issuance of amended Flight Release

The following conditions will require an amended Flight Release to be issued by


Company Flight Dispatch:
a) When a flight is delayed beyond a release void time specified in the
remarks section of that release.

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


b) When an operational condition set forth in that release cannot be
met.
c) Any time there is a change of a PIC / tail
d) Invoking of MEL having operational impact etc.

1.8.9.28 Requirement for issuance of New Flight Release

The following conditions will render a Flight Release automatically void, and will
require that a New Flight Release to be issued by company Flight Dispatch.

a) When a flight crew has discontinued a takeoff and has returned to


the gate for change of aircraft.

b) Whenever a revised OFP is issued

c) Whenever an aircraft has remained on the ground at an


intermediate stop for more than six (6) hours.

A Flight release may be issued for multiple legs. The difference between release
time and the planned departure time of a flight leg from any of the enroute airports
should not exceed six hours. If the difference between the release time and the
planned departure time of a flight leg from any of the enroute airports exceeds six
hours, the Flight Dispatch should provide the flight crew within 6 hours of
scheduled departure time updated numbers for the fuel burns to destination,
alternate, hold, reserve, additional fuel, and minimum fuel required. The most
recent weather available should also be provided at this time. This would be
considered an amendment to the flight release.

1.8.9.29 Manual Flight Planning

In the event of a computer failure and operations is unable to produce electronic


flight plans, Flight Dispatch will use the historical Flight Plan Data by applying an
appropriate route reserve based on current weather conditions and applicable
NOTAMs on the route to be flown.

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1.8.9.30 ATS Flight Plan

Refer Chapter 16 and 17.

1.8.9.31 Repetitive Flight Plan (RPL)

IndiGo has an arrangement with ATC for filing repetitive flight plans. The RPLs, as

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per the format given in Operations Manual, Part A, Chapter 17 are filed with
respective ATC authorities by IndiGo Flight Operations as per current schedule.
On daily basis Flight Dispatch shall prepare list of all flights with current
registration, SELCAL, and any other relevant information which varies from the
RPL filed with ATC. The list shall be transmitted to the concerned ATC via
following methods:
a) Fascimile Transmission (FAX)
b) AFTN or other acceptable means
c) Through airport services staff

Flight Dispatch will confirm the receipt of this transmission to the appropriate
authorities by phone. Delay message / Cancellations / Change of A/C registration
formats, as given in Chapter 17 are used to inform respective ATC units in the
event of any disruption.

1.8.9.32 Test Flights, Maintenance Ferry & Training Flights

It is a company requirement to prepare an OFP for Test Flights, Maintenance


Ferry Flight, and Training Flights even if these flights are conducted in the vicinity
of the local airport, i.e. origin airport and destination airport of the flight are the
same.

Flight Dispatch shall provide OFP and shall file the ATS Flight Plan for all the
above flights. If required, a manual routing shall be obtained from the local ATC
authority.

Test Flights & Maintenance Ferry Flights are conducted at the request of
Maintenance Control or Maintenance Planning, for maintenance reasons. Often
these flights will require a Maintenance Authorization. Flight Dispatch shall not
release a flight requiring a Maintenance Authorization, unless a copy of
Maintenance Authorization is furnished to Flight Dispatch by Maintenance. Flight
Dispatcher shall abide by the restrictions placed in Maintenance authorization to
generate the OFP and necessary flight documents and shall verify that the
Commander (PIC) has a copy of Maintenance Authorization as well.

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1.8.9.33 Automated Systems Failure

Most systems provided in Flight Dispatch are highly reliable and have adequate
redundancy. However, a system may be unavailable due to a scheduled
maintenance or may not be available due to an unscheduled outage. It is
important that Flight Dispatchers shall be aware of all the scheduled maintenance

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and plan their work around the system down time.
All electronic data are backed up at disaster recovery‟ (DR) site, which is
controlled by the IT department.

1.8.9.34 Scheduled System Outage

Flight Dispatch shall schedule their work around the scheduled outage time. They
shall ensure that all flight documents are produced and transmitted to the airports
for an on time departure. Flight Dispatch shall take all necessary precautions and
advise all concerned departments of the scheduled system outage in advance to
avoid flight disruptions.

1.8.9.35 Unscheduled System Outage

Unscheduled Flight Planning System failure shall be passed to the Flight Planning
Provider‟s help desk, their assistance shall be solicited to generate / transmit the
required documents and to get an estimated time when the system will be
restored.

Other system failures (VHF, E-MAIL, etc.) shall be reported to their respective
Help Desks. Phone numbers for all the Help Desks have been provided in Flight
Dispatch Directory. An all out efforts shall be directed to re-store all systems back
to normal as soon as possible.

All occurrences of the system failure shall be logged in the dispatch log, along with
their consequences, and shall be passed down to next shift personnel for proper
follow up.

1.8.9.36 Role of Dispatcher And Pilot-In Command

Prior to acceptance of the Operational Flight Plan (OFP) by the pilot-in-command,


Operational control on the flight, as delegated by the Chief of Flight Operations is
exercised by the flight dispatcher.

After the pilot-in-command accepts the Operational Flight Plan, the flight
dispatcher and the pilot-in-command have responsibility for Flight Watch. Once a

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flight has commenced, the final decision on any changes to the Operational Flight
Plan shall be taken by the pilot-in-command based on considerations of safety.

Limited pilot self-dispatch of flights may be permitted at those enroute stops where
a lack of communications facilities may exist. In such a case, the Pilot-in-
Command will either prior to departure inform flight dispatch of intended flight plan

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or when possible, will establish enroute communication with flight dispatch for
monitoring of the flight.

1.8.9.37 Disagreement Resolution Policy

The controlling Flight Dispatcher and the Pilot-in-Command shall make every
effort to resolve all disagreements pertaining to the exercise of operational
supervision in a safe, efficient and timely manner.

When for the reasons other than flight safety, there arises a dispute between Pilot-
in-Command and Flight Dispatcher, Chief Pilot (Line) shall provide necessary
resolution

1.8.9.38 Flight Watch

Flight watch is a process to monitor the progress of a flight, expected weather /


ATC disruptions / other irregularities enroute and at Destination/Alternate airports,
keeping crew informed of such disruptions etc. All IndiGo aircraft are equipped
with ACARS which is used to transmit flight movement and position reports as per
the company policy. Flight Dispatchers on duty are responsible for maintaining
Flight Watch. The flight movement / progress information received from aircraft
through ACARS is fed into automated systems, which compare the flight planning
information with the actual flight movement. Variation between the two is used to
identify any enroute delays / direct routing and revised flight time estimates are
notified to maintenance, airport services personnel etc.

Whenever flight movement or position reports are not received, following steps are
taken by Dispatch to ensure the flight is still safely enroute to the planned
destination.

- An ACARS message is sent to the flight involved requesting the


appropriate information, and the response is awaited.
- If no response is received, Air Traffic Control is contacted to
confirm that the flight is still on its planned route.

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Various software installed in Flight Dispatch continuously retrieve airfield weather


information (METARs and SPECI) from authorised IMD websites. These software
are able to segregate SPECIs from METARs. The SPECIs and weather warnings
are immediately presented on the computer displays at meteorologist‟s
workstations. Meteorologist are required to promptly evaluate the change and if

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required bring it to the notice of flight dispatcher on duty. Any deterioration in
weather is also transmitted to aircraft through ACARS, in case any flight is likely to
be affected.

1.8.9.39 Communications

All Flight Dispatch personnel shall comply with and adhere to all guidelines as
stipulated by DGCA for the use and control of radio telephone communications
and equipment.

Company mainly relies on ACARS for communication between aircraft and


Operations Control Centre. Procedures for the flight crew to use the ACARS
system are laid down in FCOM -DSC.

All communication records shall be stored & maintained for minimum 03 months.

Order of Priority

All incoming Flight Dispatch radio communications shall be answered by Flight


Dispatch personnel immediately upon receipt.

For the continued preservation of safety, if due to individual and/or Flight Dispatch
departmental workload requirements, there should become a necessity to
prioritise the handling of incoming radio and/or telephone calls, the following
sequence shall be followed:

 Radio calls associated with airborne flights and flights in motion on the
ground, which have declared an emergency.
 Telephone calls associated with airborne flights and flights in motion
while on the ground that have declared an emergency only, if the
information supplied is critical to the continued safe conduct of the flight
and/or has been specifically requested by the operating Flight Crew
and/or controlling Flight Dispatcher.
 Radio calls associated with airborne flights operating under normal
conditions.
 Radio calls associated with flights while in normal motion on the ground

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during their departure phase of operation.


 Radio calls associated with flights while in normal motion on the ground
during their arrival phase of operation.
 Telephone calls associated with normal operations of either ground or
airborne flights communication on ACARS

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1.8.9.40 Delay Handling Procedures

All out efforts shall be made by Flight Dispatch to run the entire IndiGo network on
schedule. However, there may be occasions when delays / diversions are
inevitable. When a flight is delayed / diverted, IndiGo Flight Dispatch in
conjunction with OCC shall make all efforts to minimize the impact of the delay /
diversion on IndiGo network

 Flight Dispatch shall receive a delay notification from OCC along with a
provisional ETD when the length of delay is known.
 Flight Dispatch shall either revise or prepare a new OFP depending upon
the duration of the delay.
 Flight Dispatch shall coordinate closely with the crew scheduling and
OCC to monitor the crew flight duty time limitations (FDTL).
 Flight Dispatch shall either revise or re-file ATS plan as may be
appropriate.

1.8.9.41 Diversion Handling Procedures

Diversions may be effected from any point in flight. It could be due to aircraft
developing in-flight defects or Pilot-in-Command not being able to land at his
destination.

Pilot-in-Command

Pilot-in-command will endeavour to inform flight dispatch of his intended future


action and his requirements on ACARS / VHF.

Flight Dispatch

 Flight Dispatch may receive information regarding diversion through,


ACARS, VHF, Air Traffic Control (ATC), OCC, Airport staff
 It is the primary responsibility of flight dispatch to provide support to
aircraft in flight. Flight dispatch shall review NOTAMs and weather

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information for the enroute and alternate airport and advise crew through
ACARS/VHF. If flight dispatch is unable to establish direct contact with
the aircraft, controlling ATC unit may be requested to relay the
information.
 Upon receipt of such information Flight Dispatcher on duty shall inform

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OCC (if not already aware of the diversion).
 OCC, on receiving information from flight dispatch, will relay the relevant
departure / arrival / delay messages to all stations concerned with details
of the diversion.
 In case of a weather related diversion, flight dispatch shall seek opinion
from Meteorologist who shall be monitoring surface weather conditions
along with the weather trend, forecast for destination and the airport of
diversion.
 Flight Dispatch shall coordinate closely with the crew scheduling and
OCC to monitor the crew flight duty time limitations (FDTL).
 As weather improvement is observed, an ATS flight plan with delayed
time shall be filed in conjunction with crew.
 New OFP shall be sent to crew through email or fax.
 If an aircraft diverts to an off line airport, flight dispatch will be the focal
point to provide following support to crew:
 Advise OCC/Airport service for ground facilitation
 Locate the address for the handling agent or the ATC centre to send the
OFP. If the aircraft has a serviceable ACARS printer, the OFP (Route
and fuel summary) may be sent directly to the crew.
 Availability of fuel
 Availability of load & trim personnel
 Development of RTOW charts in coordination with flight operations
support.
 Identification of route in consultation with Pilot-in-command.

1.8.10 Operations Supervision and Crew Records

Refer Operations Manual Part D

1.8.11 Operations Control Centre (OCC)

The Operations Control Centre (OCC) is the nerve centre of IndiGo‟s operations
which monitors and direct the daily execution of the IndiGo flight schedule on a

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real time basis focusing on optimum system performance and customer service.
The OCC will coordinate the activities associated with any condition that could
negatively impact operations or service delivery including ATC initiatives, severe
weather, winter operations, and delayed or cancelled flights.

The OCC will exercise control of airline operations from the present time plus 72

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hours. Present within the OCC will be the disciplines of Flight operations (pilot
operations controllers), Engineering (maintenance controllers), airport operations,
crew scheduling (both pilot and cabin attendant), flight dispatch, meteorology and
commercial planning.

During periods of anticipated or actual irregular operations (“IRROPs”), the OCC


will coordinate the actions of the airline to recover safely and efficiently by
coordinating the activities of all relevant departments, assessing operational and
customer needs regarding aircraft re-assignments, delays or cancellations and
initiate management notification of operational irregularities when necessary.

Under Commander‟s Emergency Authority a Pilot in Command retains full


authority to take any action in an emergency or under unusual circumstances, in
order to preserve the safety of the aircraft, its occupants, mail and freight.

The Vice President (OCC) shall be responsible for the functioning of OCC. He
must ensure that the provisions of the Company Operation Manual and DGCA
instructions and Directives are complied with and that Constant flight watch (flight
following) on each Aircraft is maintained. While Exercising supervision and Control
it must also be assured that no action is taken that conflicts with established
procedures, Operations Manual, DGCA and Government Rules, regulations and
directives.

1.9 ADMINISTRATIVE INFRASTRUCTURE

The Company administration department is responsible and shall provide the


necessary facilities, workspace, equipment and supporting services, as well as
work environment, necessary to deliver safe and secure flight operations.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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2.1 FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITS AND REST PERIODS .......................3

2.2 RESPONSIBILITY OF ALL AIR CREW ...................................................3

2.3 GENERAL GUIDELINES .........................................................................3

2.3.1 Definitions...................................................................................3

2.3.2 Applicability ................................................................................6

2.3.3 CUMULATIVE FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic and


international ................................................................................7

2.3.4 DUTY PERIOD: domestic and international operations .............7

2.3.5 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic/ neighbouring countries


...................................................................................................7

2.3.6 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: International operations ..............8

2.3.7 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS .................................................. 10

2.3.8 Extension due unforeseen operational circumstances ............. 10

2.3.9 Consecutive night operations ................................................... 11

2.3.11 Standby .................................................................................... 11

2.3.12 Positioning ................................................................................ 12

2.3.13 Rest .......................................................................................... 12

2.3.14 Reporting time: ......................................................................... 14

2.3.15 Records .................................................................................... 14

2.3.16 Cabin Attendants - FDTL .......................................................... 15

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2.1 FLIGHT AND DUTY TIME LIMITS AND REST PERIODS

2.2 RESPONSIBILITY OF ALL AIR CREW

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It is the responsibility of all Air Crew to make the optimum use of the opportunities
and facilities for rest provided by the Airline and to plan their rest periods properly,
so as to minimize the risk of fatigue.

In accordance with the provision, herein, it is the responsibility of each flight crew
not to fly if he is suffering from such fatigue as may endanger the safety of the
aircraft or its occupants. All flight crew are, however, reminded that the provisions
of this paragraph are not intended to cover instances where normal tiredness
resulting from the physical and mental effort of a flight is likely. Individual crew
members should make the best use of their rest periods, in order to prevent
cumulative sleep deficit.

2.3 GENERAL GUIDELINES

(CAR – Section 7, Series J, Part III)

Company policy

IndiGo policy is more restrictive in certain areas. However, in case of exigencies,


Vice President/Director (Flight Operations) and Pilot–In–Command at their
discretion, and after taking note of the circumstances of other members of the
crew, revert to the requirements as laid down in the CAR. Under all circumstances
the provisions of the CAR will be binding unless specific approval of DGCA is
received in extraordinary circumstances.

Flight Duty Time Limitations (FDTL) specifies Duty Time, Flight Duty Time, Flight
time limits and Rest Period requirements. Remaining within the established limits
is the responsibility of both the individual crew and crew scheduling.

2.3.1 Definitions

a) Augmented flight crew. A flight crew that comprises more than the
minimum number required to operate the aeroplane and in which
each flight crew member can leave his or her assigned post and be
replaced by another flight crew member, who shall hold qualifications

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which are equal to or superior to those held by the crew member


who is to be replaced for the purpose of in-flight rest.

b) Duty. Any task that flight crew members are required by the operator

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to perform, including, for example, flight duty, administrative work,
training, positioning and standby when it is likely to induce fatigue.

c) Duty period. A period which starts when a flight crew member is


required by an operator to report for or to commence a duty and
ends when that person is free from all duties.

d) Fatigue. A physiological state of reduced mental or physical


performance capability resulting from sleep loss or extended
wakefulness, circadian phase, or workload (mental and/or physical
activity) that can impair a crewmember’s alertness and ability to
safely operate an aircraft or perform safety related duties.

e) Flight Duty Period. A period which commences when a flight crew


member is required to report for duty that includes a flight or a series
of flights and which finishes when the aeroplane finally comes to rest
and the engines are shut down at the end of the last flight on which
he/she is a crew member.
Note: As a company policy, Flight Duty Time will be calculated so as to start
from 60 minutes prior to schedule time of Domestic Departure and 75
minutes prior to the schedule time of International Departure; or revised time
of departure, if crew has been advised about it prior to leaving residence
/hotel. Flight Duty Time will end 30 minutes after completing a flight/ series of
flights (CHOCKS ON).

f) Flight time. The total time from the moment an aeroplane first
moves for the purpose of taking off until the moment it finally comes
to rest at the end of the flight.
Note.—“Flight time” as here defined is synonymous with the term “block to
block” time or “chock to chock” time in general usage which is measured from
the time an aeroplane first moves for the purpose of taking off until it finally
stops at the end of the flight.

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g) Home base. The location nominated by the operator to the


crewmember from where the crewmember normally starts and ends
a duty period or a series of duty periods.

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h) Local night. A period of eight hours falling between 2200 and 0800
local time. IndiGo will follow a fixed 8 hour period of 0000-0800 Local
Time

i) Neighbouring Countries. Countries whose standard times falls


within a band of 3 hours (+1:30 hours on either side of India) i.e.
countries covered in the standard time zone band of UTC+4 to
UTC+7.

j) Night Operations: For FDTL planning purpose, Night will be defined


as a time starting from 0000 to 0800 Hrs. However, Pilots will log
flight times based on the actual conditions in their respective
logbooks as per Aircraft Rules 1937.

k) Positioning. The transferring of a non-operating crewmember from


place to place as a passenger at the behest of the operator.
Note — “Positioning” as here defined is synonymous with the term
“Deadheading”.

l) Reporting time. The time at which flight crewmembers are required


by an operator to report for duty.

m) Rest Period. An uninterrupted and defined period of time during


which a crewmember is free from all duties and airport standby.

n) Split Duty (Break). Means a period free of all duties, which counts
as duty, being less than a rest period.

o) Standby. It is a defined period of time during which a flight


crewmember is required by the operator to be available to receive an
assignment for a specific duty without an intervening rest period.
However, it shall not include any time during which an operator
requires a crewmember to be contactable for the purpose of giving
notification of a duty, which is due to start 10 hours or more ahead.

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p) Ultra Long Range (ULR) operations. Continuous non-stop flights


between the specific city pairs having a flight time of over 16 hours
and duty periods between 18 and 22 hours. As of date IndiGo

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doesn’t have ULR operations. The scheme for ULR operations will
be updated as and when such operations are commenced.

q) Unforeseen operational circumstance. An unplanned event, such


as unforecast weather, equipment malfunctions, or air traffic delay
that is beyond the control of the operator.

r) Window of Circadian Low (WOCL) is best estimated by the hours


between 0200 and 0600 for individuals adapted to a usual day-wake/
night sleep schedule. This estimate of the window is calculated from
scientific data on the circadian low of performance, alertness, subject
report (i.e., peak fatigue), and body temperature. For flight duty
periods that cross 3 or fewer time zones, the window of circadian low
is estimated to be 0200 to 0600 home-base/ domicile time. For flight
duty periods beyond 3 or more time zones, the window of circadian
low is estimated to be 0200 to 0600 home-base/ domicile time for the
first 48 hours only. After a crew member remains more than 48 hours
away from home-base/ domicile time, the window of circadian low is
estimated to be 0200 to 0600 referred to local time at the point of
departure.

s) Flight Crew Flight crew means the pilots who fly the aircraft and
shall also include a flight engineer and flight navigator

t) Period of transportation It will be considered as 45 minutes before


start of Flight Duty and 45 minutes after end of Flight Duty. It will
neither form a part of Flight Duty nor of Rest period.

2.3.2 Applicability

These flight time/flight duty time limitations shall be applicable to all flight crew
personnel.

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2.3.3 CUMULATIVE FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic and


international

Cumulative Period Flight Time Limitation (Hours)

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In 7 consecutive days 35

In 30 consecutive days 125

In 365 consecutive days 1000

2.3.4 DUTY PERIOD: domestic and international operations

Crew Scheduling shall not assign and no flight crew member shall accept any duty
to exceed:

a) 190 duty hours in any 28 consecutive days, spread evenly as


practicable through out this period;

b) 100 duty hours in 14 consecutive days; and

c) 60 duty hours in any seven consecutive days.

2.3.5 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: domestic/ neighbouring countries

The Flight Time Limitations are as follows :

Maximum Daily Flight Duty Maximum Number of Maximum Flight


Period (FDP) Limitation landings Time Limitation

12.5 hours 2 for night operations


9 hours
3 for day operations

12 hours 4

11.5 hours 5 8 hours

11 hours 6

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When the FDP starts in the WOCL, the maximum FDP stated in above points shall
be reduced by 100 % of its encroachment up to a maximum of two hours. When
the FDP ends in or fully encompasses the WOCL, the maximum FDP stated in
above points shall be reduced by 50 % of its encroachment.

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2.3.6 FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: International operations

a) Requirements for international operations

Daily maximum flight time limitations for international operations during any
24 consecutive hours:

Crew Complement Maximum Flight Time Limitation/


Max Number of Landings**
Two-Pilot Operations 10 hours/ up to 1 landings
For day operations: 9 Hours/up to 3 landings
For night operations: 9 Hours/up to 2 landings
Three-Pilot Operations 12 Hours/1 landing
Four-Pilot Operation 16 Hours/1 landing
Four-Pilot ULR More than 16 hours
Operations*
** Maximum Number of Landings is further dependent on Flight Duty Period

b) Maximum Daily Flight Duty Period – Two Pilot Operations

Maximum Daily Flight Duty period for two pilot operations shall be as per the
following table:
Maximum Daily Flight Maximum Number of Maximum Flight
Duty Period (FDP) landings Time Limitation
Limitation**
13 hours 1 10 hours
12.5 hours 2 for night operations 9 hours
3 for day operations 9 hours
** Reduction of Flight duty period due to operation in WOCL

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When the FDP starts in the WOCL, the maximum FDP stated in above points shall
be reduced by 100 % of its encroachment up to a maximum of two hours. When
the FDP ends in or fully encompasses the WOCL, the maximum FDP stated in
above points shall be reduced by 50 % of its encroachment.

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c) Augmented Crew

The maximum flight duty period may be extended in accordance with the following
table in case of the flight crew is augmented
Rest facility Maximum extension of the FDP
available Augmented crew Double crew
(3 Pilots) (4 Pilots)
Rest seat 2H 4H
Bunk 4H 6H

 In flight, rest of less than 03 hours doesn't allow for the extension of
the FDP.

 The applicable Flight Duty Period may be increased up to a


maximum of 16 hours in case of Rest Seat and up to a maximum of
18 hours in case of Bunk. In case of double crew, rest facilities shall
be available for both pilots not on active duty.

 In case of augmented/double flight crew, the division of duty and rest


between the flight crew members being relieved will be kept in
balance. All crew members are expected to be on controls for
equivalent period. For e.g. if the flight is for 09 hours, each crew
member will log 9*2/3 = 6 hours individually and should be on
controls for 06 hours each. It is the responsibility of PIC to ascertain
that all crew members get equal rest during the flight.

 Rest Seat will be at least a ‘Business Class’ seat reclining to at least


40° back angle to the vertical, outside the cockpit and separated
from passengers by a dark curtain.

 Crew shall be allowed to return to controls only after 30 minutes of


waking after bunk/seat rest, which may be part of the rest of 03
hours.

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2.3.7 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

IndiGo follows the requirements of this CAR based on type of flight being
operated i.e. if all sectors of a flight are within the neighbouring countries, then

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requirements for ‘domestic operations’ shall be followed and in case even one
sector of the flight falls in international operation then for the full/ entire flight
requirements of ‘international Operations’ shall be followed.

2.3.8 Extension due unforeseen operational circumstances

a) For an unplanned event, such as un-forecast weather, equipment


malfunction, or air traffic delay that is beyond the control of the
Company ‘Flight Time’ and ‘Flight Duty Period’ may be extended as
follows:

i. Flight Time by maximum of 1½ hours and FDP by maximum of 03


hours subject to a cumulative limit of maximum of 03 hours and
maximum of 06 hours respectively in 30 consecutive days. One
Additional Landing is permitted over and above the prescribed limits
(specified in 2.3.5 and 2.3.6) for Aircraft Recovery and Passenger
convenience provided, an additional crew member over and above
the minimum crew complement, is available for specified operations.
(Example for two pilot operations, there will be a third pilot provided
as ACM). Under all circumstances, this flight has to be completed
within the Extended Flight Duty Time and Duty Period.

ii. Subject to the maximum limit of extension of FDP i.e. 03 hours on


individual event and 06 hours on cumulative basis, extension shall be
decided between PIC and other members of the crew.

iii. PIC in consultation with the other crew members will convey their
willingness (or consent) to the Duty Officer – Operations Control
Center (OCC) who in turn will obtain the permission from Head of
Operations.

b) Whenever the flight duty period gets extended, the rest period shall be
pro-rata increased by twice the amount of extended time of flight duty
period.

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2.3.9 Consecutive night operations

Flight crew should not be deployed nor shall a flight crew undertake any Flight
duty between periods embracing 0000 to 0500 hours local time if during the

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previous day he/she performed duty between the periods embracing 0000 to 0500
hours local time. However, a pilot can undertake a duty if he had undergone a
flight duty the previous night between 0000 to 0500 hours. Flight Crew can be
planned for simulator/ground duties between 0000 to 0500 Hours for a maximum
of 02 consecutive days.

2.3.11 Standby

a) General

i. Crew scheduling shall include ‘Standby’ as part of their regular


rosters and concerned crew shall be kept notified.

ii. In case of exigencies when ‘Standby’ duty may go beyond the roster,
Crew scheduling shall ensure that concerned crew is notified in
advance.

b) Standby Period

i. Standby period shall not extend beyond 12 hours. However, a


maximum standby at airport (with or without sleeping quarters) shall
not exceed 08 hours.

ii. If the standby period is at the airport and

 Standby culminates into a flight duty then the total period (i.e.
100%) shall be counted towards the flight duty period and also
towards cumulative duty period

 Standby does not culminate into a flight duty then the total
period (i.e. 100%) shall be counted towards cumulative duty
period

iii. If the standby period is at home or in a hotel and culminates into duty

 Within first 06 hours then no part of standby shall be considered


as part of flight duty period or cumulative duty period

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 At 06 hours or later then flight duty period shall be reduced by 50%


of the standby time.

iv. If standby period is at home or in a hotel does not culminate into a

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duty then, 25% of its time shall be considered under cumulative duty.

c) Rest period after Standby:

 When any period of standby finishes, during which a call-out has not
occurred, at least 10 hours rest shall follow prior to the next duty
period.

 When standby culminates in to a duty, then the rest period shall be


decided based on total period of duty i.e. the duty plus the
percentage of standby counted for duty.

2.3.12 Positioning

a) All the time spent on positioning for Company Requirements shall be


counted as duty.

b) Positioning time shall be part of a flight duty period when it immediately


precedes (i.e., without an intervening rest period) a flight duty period in
which that person participates as a flight crew member.

c) Positioning after operating a flight duty period without an intervening rest


period shall be counted for determining rest period.

d) Positioning shall not count as a landing for purposes of determining


‘Flight Duty Period’.

e) Positioning shall be counted as a landing if, after a positioning journey,


the crew member spends less than a minimum rest period at suitable
accommodation provided by IndiGo or at home, and then extends FDP
using ‘Split Duty’.

2.3.13 Rest

a) Minimum Rest (Before a flight)

The minimum rest, which must be provided before undertaking a flight


duty period, shall be atleast as long as the preceding duty period,

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OR

12 hours /14 hours on crossing 3 time zones/ 36 hours on crossing 8 time


zones whichever is the greater;

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If the preceding duty period, which includes any time spent on
positioning, exceeds 18 hours, then the ensuing rest period shall include
a local night.

Period of transportation to and from an airport shall neither be counted


towards duty time nor rest period. IndiGo Policy on period of
Transportation for planning purposes will be a fixed time of 45 Minutes
each, before and after the flight.

b) Rest after return to base

 Crew Scheduling shall ensure that effects on crew members of time


zone differences will be compensated by additional rest as specified
below.

 Minimum rest including local nights shall be given, according to the


table below when coming back to home base, to any crew member
who has been away from the home base in such a way that the
WOCL had to be modified.
Time zone difference Hours of rest Local nights
More than 3 to 7 36 2
Beyond 7 72 3

"Time zone difference" in this table is the time zone difference between
the starting and finishing points of the initial duty.” (Currently all Indigo
Flights are less than 3 time zone difference.)

c) Weekly Rest. Crew scheduling shall ensure that the minimum rest is
increased periodically to a weekly rest period, being a 36-hour period
including two local nights (0000 to 0800 Hours), such that there shall
never be more than 168 hours between the end of one weekly rest period
and the start of the next. For planning purpose, we will restrict this to 144
Hours.

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 In case Time Zone difference is less than 3, the weekly rest period is
inclusive of the required rest period for the last day flight prior to the
beginning of weekly rest period.

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 In case time zone difference is more than 3, the weekly rest period
will be in addition to the required rest period for the last day flight
prior to the beginning of weekly rest period.

2.3.14 Reporting time:

a) Crew is to report 0100 /0115 Hours prior to departure time for Domestic/
International flights respectively

b) A standard allowance of 30 minutes shall be added at the end of flight


time to allow for the completion of checks and records.

c) For record purposes, the pre-flight report time shall count both as duty
and as flight duty, and the post-flight allowance shall count as duty.

2.3.15 Records

To ascertain that the fatigue management system is functioning, as intended and


as approved, records will be kept for 18 months of the duties performed and rest
periods provided, so as to facilitate inspection by the authorized personnel and
surveillance/audit by DGCA officers.

The Crew scheduling shall ensure that these records include for each flight crew
member, at least:

 the start, duration and end of each flight duty period;

 the start, duration and end of each duty period;

 rest periods; and

 flight time.

The Crew scheduling shall also keep records of occasions when discretion was
used by the PIC to extend the prescribed limits.

If discretion was used for similar reasons on more than 20 percent of occasions
when a particular route or route pattern is flown, then the VP Flight Operations /VP

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OCC shall review and change the schedule or the crew scheduling arrangements
so as to reduce the frequency at which such events occur.

In addition, DGCA may require submission of copies and analysis of records in the

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manner deemed fit.

Flight crew members shall maintain a personal record of their daily flight time, duty
period, flight duty period and rest periods. All Flight crew members shall
maintain a personnel record of their daily flight time in their personal Flying
Log Books.

Existing system is a fool proof, transparent & computerised system, on which


there is an online link for DGCA to monitor. Only designated officers of the DGCA
and Company will have access to the system. The system also has a provision of
‘audit trail’ so that any changes made in the data can be tracked down to its
source.

Through the computerised system it shall be ensured that the Flight Crew member
is well within the flight time, flight duty, duty and rest period requirements before
permitting him to operate the flight. For the purpose of FDTL monitoring, IndiGo
uses the ACARS automated messages for real time monitoring of Flight Times.

These records shall not be kept only on paper. Any violation of this provision shall
attract penalties as laid down in relevant law including action against persons. The
Company records are fully automated in terms of FDTL.

Personal records maintained by individual pilot are to be reconciled with the


Company’s records from time to time.

2.3.16 Cabin Attendants - FDTL

Refer SEP Manual and CAR Section 7, Series J , Part 1, for Cabin Attendants
flight duty time limitations.

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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK-

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 03

NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED CHAPTER 03

TABLE OF CONTENTS

3. NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED .................................................3

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3.1 EQUIPMENTS ..........................................................................................4

3.2 GENERAL CONCEPT ..............................................................................4

3.3 RNAV .......................................................................................................4

3.3.1 RNAV System - Basic Functions ................................................5

3.3.2 RNP System - Basic Functions ..................................................5

3.3.3 Navigation Error Components ....................................................6

3.3.4 Equipment List............................................................................8

3.4 PERFORMANCE BASED NAVIGATION (PBN) ......................................8

3.4.1 Elements of PBN ........................................................................9

3.5 FLIGHT CREW PROCEDURES............................................................. 11

3.6 OPERATING PROCEDURES SPECIFIC TO RNAV/RNP


SPECIFICATIONS.................................................................................. 11

3.6.1 OPERATING PROCEDURES- RNAV 10 (RNP 10) ................. 11

3.6.2 Operating procedures –RNAV 5 ............................................... 15

3.6.3 Operating procedure – RNAV 1 & 2 ......................................... 18

3.7 OPERATING PROCEDURE-BASIC RNP-1 .......................................... 23

3.7.1 Pre-flight planning .................................................................... 23

3.7.2 General operating procedures .................................................. 24

3.7.3 Basic-RNP 1 SID specific requirements ................................... 27

3.7.4 Basic-RNP 1 STAR specific requirements................................ 27

3.7.5 Contingency Procedures .......................................................... 28

3.8 RNAV INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE (IAP) ...................... 29

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3.8.1 Regulatory Background ........................................................... 29

3.8.2 Aircraft requirements System performance monitoring and


alerting ..................................................................................... 29

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3.8.3 Operating procedures .............................................................. 32

3.8.4 Contingency procedures .......................................................... 36

3.8.5 NAV Database Integrity Validation Process ............................. 36

3.9 FLIGHT CREW ERROR REPORTING .................................................. 37

3.10 FLIGHT PLANNING & MANAGEMENT ................................................ 38

3.11 DISPLAY AND SYSTEM CONTROL .................................................... 38

3.12 NON COMPLIANCE WITH RNP REQUIREMENTS.............................. 38

3.13 RNAV PHRASEOLOGY ........................................................................ 38

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3. NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

(CAR Section 8, Series O, Part II, Para 7)


Navigation procedures are dependent on the airplane equipment, the route being

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flown and ATS requirements. The Aeronautical radio navigation service comprises
all types and systems of radio navigation aids in the International aeronautical
service.

An airplane is provided with navigation equipment which will enable it to proceed:-

- in accordance with the flight plan,

- in accordance with prescribed Required Navigation Performance (RNP)


types, and

- in accordance with the requirements of air traffic services;

except when, if not so precluded by DGCA, navigation for flights under the visual
flight rules is accomplished by visual reference to landmarks at least every 60 NM
(110 km).

On flights in which it is intended to land in instrument meteorological conditions, an


aircraft shall be provided with radio equipment capable of receiving signals
providing guidance to a point from which a visual landing can be effected. This
equipment shall be capable of providing such guidance for each aerodrome at
which it is intended to land instrument meteorological conditions and for any
designated alternate aerodromes.

The company aircraft (A 320) are equipped with:

i) The Instrumentation and avionics which are clearly visible to the pilot,
necessary to conduct operations in accordance with Air Operators Permit and
meet applicable flight parameters, manoeuvres and limitations;
ii) Operational communication equipment requirements, including emergency
communication;
iii) Avionics, equipment and components satisfy applicable navigation
requirements, provide necessary redundancy and, as applicable, authorized by
the State for use in RNP, and RVSM operations;

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iv) Avionics, instrumentation and radio equipment necessary to satisfy


applicable approach and landing requirements;
v) Other components and equipment necessary to conduct operations
under applicable flight conditions, including instrument meteorological
conditions.

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(Refer FCOM DSC, Chapter 34 and 31)

3.1 EQUIPMENTS

The following facilities for Navigation purposes are available to the Pilots:

GPS (Dual), FMS-IRS, VOR, NDB, DME

3.2 GENERAL CONCEPT

Conventional navigation procedures are based on the availability of satisfactory


ground navigation aids, infrastructures (VOR, DME, NDB) and airplane navigation
systems, which enable Navaids to Navaids navigation. Large safety margins
mandated with respect to airplane separation contribute to airspace saturation in
certain areas.
Such air navigation structure of conventional airways, SIDs, STARs, etc. does not
take into account the availability of modern navigation systems with enhanced
performance or the availability of glass cockpits, which provide crew with improved
awareness when flying such procedures.
The ICAO has recognised the need to benefit from available RNAV technology to
improve existing air navigation systems, in the interest of increasing airspace
capacity, and offering such advantages as fuel savings, direct tracks, etc. The
introduction of RNP and RNAV will enable each country to design and plan routes
that are not necessarily located over radio Navaids installations.

3.3 RNAV

RNAV is defined as “a method of navigation which permits aircraft operation on


any desired flight path within the coverage of station-referenced navigation aids or
within the limits of the capability of self-contained aids, or a combination of these.”
This removes the restriction imposed on conventional routes and procedures
where the aircraft must over fly referenced navigation aids, thereby permitting
operational flexibility and efficiency. This is illustrated in Figure below

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Conventional Route RNAV Route

RNAV allows “point-to-point” navigation, the aircraft position being determined by


the on-board navigation systems using the information from several navigation
aids such as VOR/DME, DME/DME or GNSS (GPS). This allows approaches
constituted by a succession of non-aligned straight segments.
Inertial Reference System (IRS) / Inertial Navigation System (INS) allow extension
of this “Area Navigation” further than the range of the navigation aids.

3.3.1 RNAV System - Basic Functions


RNAV systems are designed to provide a given level of accuracy, with repeatable
and predictable path definition, appropriate to the application. The RNAV System
typically integrates information from sensors such as air data, inertial reference,
radio navigation, satellite navigation, together with inputs from internal database
and crew-entered data to perform the following functions:

 Navigation

 Flight Plan Management

 Guidance and Control

 Display and System Control

3.3.2 RNP System - Basic Functions

An RNP system is an RNAV system whose functionalities support on-board


performance monitoring and alerting. Specific requirements include:

Capability to follow a desired ground track with reliability, repeatability and


predictability, including curved paths where vertical profiles are included for

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vertical guidance, use of vertical angles or specified altitude constraints to define a


desired vertical path.

The performance monitoring and alerting capability may be provided in different


forms depending on the system installation, architecture and configurations,

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including:

- Display and indication of both the required and estimated navigation


system performance. Monitoring of the system performance and alerting
the crew when RNP requirements are not met.
- Cross track deviation displays scaled to RNP, in conjunction with
separate monitoring and alerting for navigation integrity.

An RNP system utilizes its navigation sensors, system architecture and modes of
operation to satisfy the RNP navigation specification requirements. It must perform
the integrity and reasonableness checks of the sensors and data, and may provide
a means to deselect specific types of navigation aids to prevent reversion to an
inadequate sensor. RNP requirements may limit the modes of operation of the
aircraft e.g. for low RNP where flight technical error is a significant factor, manual
flight by the crew may not be allowed. Dual system/sensor installations may also
be required depending on the intended operation or need.

3.3.3 Navigation Error Components

The inability to achieve the required lateral navigation accuracy may be due to
navigation errors related to aircraft tracking and positioning. The three main errors
in the context of on-board performance monitoring and alerting are Path Definition
Error (PDE), Flight Technical Error (FTE), and Navigation System Error (NSE), as
shown in Figure below. The distribution of these errors is assumed to be
independent with zero-mean.

(Refer next page)

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Lateral Navigation Errors (95%)

PDE occurs when the path defined in the RNAV system does not correspond to
the desired path i.e. the path expected to be flown over the ground. Use of an
RNAV system for navigation presupposes that a defined path representing the
intended track is loaded into the navigation database. A consistent, repeatable
path cannot be defined for a turn that allows for a fly-by turn at a waypoint,
requires a fly-over of a waypoint, or occurs when the aircraft reaches a target
altitude

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FTE relates to the air crew or auto pilot’s ability to follow the defined path or track,
including any display error (e.g., CDI centring error). FTE can be monitored by the
auto pilot or air crew procedures and the extent to which these procedures need to
be supported by other means depends, for example, on the phase of flight and the

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type of operations. Such monitoring support could be provided by a map display.
Note. – FTE is sometimes referred to as Path Steering Error (PSE)

NSE refers to the difference between the aircraft’s estimated position and actual
position.
Note. – NSE is sometimes referred to as Positioning Estimation Error (PEE)

3.3.4 Equipment List


MEL requirements are based on the type of RNAV / RNP airspace,
Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51, on required Navigation performance equipment.

3.4 PERFORMANCE BASED NAVIGATION (PBN)


(CAR Section 8, Series O, Part VI, Issue II)

PBN is a concept based on the use of Area Navigation (RNAV) systems rather
than sensor-specific navigation. So far the RNAV requirements were based on the
limited statement of required performance accuracy and containment limits. PBN
signifies a transition to more extensive statements of required performance in
terms of accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability of functionality, together with
descriptions of how this performance is to be achieved in terms of aircraft and
crew requirements.

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The Required Navigation Performance (RNP) concept has been replaced by the
PBN concept. Therefore, a lot of RNP terminology has been replaced by PBN
terminology. A new ICAO document 'Performance Based Navigation Manual’
replaces the existing document 'Manual on Required Navigation Performance

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(RNP) ICAO Doc 9613'.

3.4.1 Elements of PBN


There are three elements of PBN within an Airspace context:
a) Navigation Application The application of a Navigation Specification
and the supporting NAVAID Infrastructure to specific routes, procedures
and/or defined airspace volumes. For example; to have RNAV / RNP
terminal area procedures for Delhi.
Navigation Applications, indicating the designation of the required
Navigation Specification plus any established limitations imposed for the
particular Navigation Application, will be detailed in charts and in the
Aeronautical Information Publications (AIPs).
b) Navigation Aid (NAVAID) Infrastructure The ground, space or on-
board NAVAIDs which support or provide positioning capability.
Examples of NAVAIDS are as follows:

- Ground: Very High Frequency Omni-Range (VOR), Distance


Measuring Equipment (DME), etc.

- Space: Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), (GPS and


GLONASS)

- On-board: Inertial Reference Units


c) Navigation Specification The aircraft and aircrew requirement needed
to support PBN operations. These are entered in the Air Operator Permit.

- A Navigation Specification is either a ' RNP' specification or a '


RNAV' specification

- A RNP specification includes a requirement for on-board self-


contained performance monitoring and alerting, whilst a RNAV
specification does not.

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Each Navigation Specification has a designator. e.g. RNAV 5, BASIC-


RNP 1, RNP APCH, RNP AR APCH. The number in the designator
represents the minimum lateral navigation accuracy in nautical miles
(nm) that must be maintained for at least 95% of the flight time. The

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required lateral accuracy limits the combined total of all errors that may
exist in an aircraft system. This combined error is known as the 'Total
System Error' (TSE). It should be noted that the accuracy limit is only one
of the performance requirements for PBN procedures.
Facilitation of the operational approval process for operators by providing
a limited set of navigation specifications intended for global use, as given
below.

Notes:
i) The numbers given in the table refer to the 95% accuracy requirements (NM).
ii) RNAV 5 is an en-route navigation specification which may be used for the initial
part of the STAR outside 30NM and above MSA.
iii) RNP 2 and Advanced-RNP 1 are expected to be included in a future revision of
the ICAO PBN Manual;
iv) 1a means that the navigation application is limited to use on STARs and SIDs
only;
v) 1b means that the area of application can only be used after the initial climb of a
missed approach phase
vi) 1c means that beyond 30 NM from the airport reference point (ARP), the
accuracy value for alerting becomes 2 NM

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(Example of an Application of RNAV and RNP Specifications to ATS Routes and
Instrument Procedures)

3.5 FLIGHT CREW PROCEDURES

Flight crew procedures complement the technical contents of the navigation


specification. Flight crew procedures are usually embodied in the company
operating manual. These procedures could include, for example, that the flight
crew notify ATC of contingencies (equipment failures, weather conditions) that
affect the aircraft’s ability to maintain navigation accuracy. These procedures
would also require the flight crew to state their intentions, coordinate a plan of
action and obtain a revised ATC clearance in such instances. At a regional level,
established contingency procedures should be made available so as to permit the
flight crew to follow such established procedures in the event that it is not possible
to notify ATC of their difficulties.

3.6 OPERATING PROCEDURES SPECIFIC TO RNAV/RNP


SPECIFICATIONS

3.6.1 OPERATING PROCEDURES- RNAV 10 (RNP 10)

3.6.1.1 Flight Planning

Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for RNAV 10 (RNP 10) operations in AOP
before routing the same on RNP 10 routes.

a) Flight crew should verify that that two LRNS [long-range navigation
systems- Two FMGC (or 1 FMGC + 1 BACK UP NAV)] are operational.
Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51.

b) IndiGo fleet is equipped with GNSS (GPS) which obviates the


requirement of time limitation for RNP-10 operations.

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 For aircraft with unserviceable GPS, the flight time outside radio
navaid coverage is limited to the following criteria:

 6.2 h since IRS ground alignment.

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 5.7 h since last FM radio update.

RAIM levels required for RNP10 should be verified through RAIM NOTAMs (where
available) issued by ATS Authorities. Refer Para 3.8.3.3 for RAIM NOTAM
description.

c) ATS Filling guidance for RNP 10 routes-

Item 10a - “R” (PBN approved)

Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/- “A1” (RNP 10)

d) Ref FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for any operating restriction on navigation


system.

3.6.1.2 Pre-flight procedures

The following actions should be completed during pre-flight:


a) Flight crew to review FRB to ascertain the condition of the equipment
mentioned in FCOM PRO-SPO-51 required for flight in RNP 10 airspace
or on an RNP 10 route. Ensure that maintenance action has been taken
to correct defects in the required equipment

b) Refer guidance given in FCOM PRO-SPO-51 P 4/6 to recognize when


the aircraft is no longer able to navigate to its RNP 10 approval capability
and ATC must be advised.

3.6.1.3 Navigation equipment

Indigo fleet is equipped with following long range navigation systems with the
corresponding standards:
a) The FMGS has been demonstrated to comply with applicable
requirements of FAA AC 20-130A, for a navigation system integrating
multiple navigation sensors, when operating with aircraft position based
on:

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 IRS position and GPS update, or


 IRS position and radio navaid update, or
 IRS position only.

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b) The IRS has been demonstrated to comply with the position accuracy
criteria of AC 25.4 and FAR 121 appendix G for flight time up to 16 h (ie
in excess of aircraft range)

3.6.1.4 Availability of navaids

At flight planning stage, dispatch should check RAIM NOTAMS issued by ATS
Authorities to ensure that the maximum allowable time for which the FDE
capability is projected to be unavailable is 34 minutes on any one occasion only.

3.6.1.5 En route

a) Refer guidance given in FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for minimum required


equipment to enter a RNP-4/RNP-10 airspace .In case of unavailability;
flight crew should consider an alternate route which does not require that
particular equipment or having to make a diversion for repairs.

b) Before entering oceanic airspace, check "GPS PRIMARY” message


displayed on the MCDU (PROG page, [5R] field and scratchpad) and
temporarily on the ND which ensures navigation accuracy. In case of
downgrading of GPS, a navigation accuracy check must be performed by
using external navaids. This may require DME/DME and/or VOR checks
to determine navigation system errors through displayed and actual
positions. Refer FCOM DSC-22_20-20-20 for Navigation Accuracy
Check.

c) Refer FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-15 for mandatory cross-checking


procedures to identify navigation errors in cruise to prevent aircraft from
inadvertent deviation from ATC-cleared routes.

d) Flight Crew must advise ATC of any deterioration or failure of the


navigation equipment below the navigation performance requirements or
of any deviations required for a contingency procedure. Refer FCOM
PRO-SPO-51 P.

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e) Flight crew should use a map display deviation (ND), flight director, or
autopilot in lateral navigation mode on RNP 10 operations to maintain
route centrelines, as depicted by respective displays (unless authorized
to deviate by ATC or under emergency conditions).

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f) The cross-track error/deviation (the difference between the RNAV system
computed path and the aircraft position relative to the path) should be
limited to ±½ the navigation accuracy associated with the route (i.e. 5
NM). Brief deviations from this standard (e.g. overshoots or undershoots)
during and immediately after route turns, up to a maximum of one-times
the navigation accuracy (i.e. 10 NM), are allowable.

3.6.1.6 Manual radio position updating (Refer FCOM DSC-22_20-20-30)

Radio navaids are tuned for two different purposes: Display and computation. It is
possible to perform tuning for display in three different ways:
 Automatic tuning via FMGC software

 Manual tuning via the MCDU RAD NAV page

 Manual tuning via the Radio Management Panel (RMP) if either both
FMGCs or both MCDUs fail.

The FMGS automatically tunes the radio navaids for computation of the radio
position.
Note: The manual selection of a VOR or VOR/DME may prevent the FMGS from
automatically tuning a VOR/DME to compute position. In this case, the related MCDU
displays ―TUNE BBB FFF.FF‖ (BBB = ident, FFF.FF = frequency).

 In dual mode and independent mode, each FMGC simultaneously tunes


the navaids on its own side (one VOR, one DME, one ILS and one ADF).
In these modes, the flight crew can also manually tune the VOR (and
associated DME), ILS, and ADF.

 In single mode, the valid FMGC tunes navaids on both sides. The flight
crew can also use the RAD NAV page to manually tune both VORs, both
ADFs and the ILS.

Manual tuning has priority over automatic tuning.


Note: If one radio receiver fails, both FMGCs use the operative radio receiver to compute the
position of the aircraft.

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3.6.2 Operating procedures –RNAV 5

3.6.2.1 Pre-flight planning

a) Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for RNAV 5 operations in


AOP before routing the same on RNAV 5 routes.

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b) ATS Filling guidance for RNAV 5 routes-

Item 10a -“R” (PBN approved)

Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/ -“B1” (RNAV 5)

c) Dispatch should confirm the availability of the navaid infrastructure,


including any non-RNAV contingencies, must be confirmed for the period
of intended operations.

Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for list of the on-board navigation equipment


necessary for the operation.

d) Navigation database should be current and appropriate for the region of


intended operation and must include the navigation aids and waypoints
required for the route.

e) RAIM levels required for RNAV 5 should be verified through RAIM


NOTAMs (where available) issued by ATS authorities. Refer Para 3.8.3.3
for RAIM NOTAM description. In the event of a predicted, continuous loss
of appropriate level of fault detection of more than five minutes for any
part of the RNAV 5 operation, the flight planning should be revised (i.e.
delaying the departure or planning a different departure procedure)

3.6.2.2 General operating procedures

a) RNAV 5 routes should not be filled or requested unless they satisfy all
the inherent criteria. Ref FCOM PRO-SPO-51 P 3/6 for guidance on
same. Flight crew should inform the ATC, and revert to conventional
navigation in case of nonconformity to the RNAV clearance.

b) Flight crew should comply with any instructions or procedures identified


by the manufacturer as being necessary to comply with the performance
requirements of RNAV-5.These should include AFM limitations or

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operating procedures required to maintain the navigation accuracy


specified for the procedure.

c) Flight crew must confirm that the navigation database is up to date. Ref
FCOM PRO-NOR-SRP-01-10.

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d) Flight crews should cross-check the cleared flight plan by comparing
charts or other applicable resources with the MCDU and the aircraft map
display (ND), if applicable. If required, the exclusion of specific navigation
aids should be confirmed.

e) During the flight, flight progress should be monitored for navigational


reasonableness, by cross-checks with conventional navigation aids using
the primary displays in conjunction with the RNAV control and MCDU.
Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-15.

f) For RNAV 5, flight crew should use a map display deviation (ND), flight
director, or autopilot in lateral navigation mode. Lateral deviation scaling
should be checked to be suitable for the navigation accuracy associated
with the route/procedure (e.g. full-scale deflection: ±5 NM).

g) Flight crew are expected to maintain route centre lines, as depicted by


on-board lateral deviation indicators and/or flight guidance, during all
RNAV operations, unless authorized to deviate by ATC or under
emergency conditions. For normal operations, cross-track error/deviation
(the difference between the RNAV system-computed path and the aircraft
position relative to the path) should be limited to ±½ the navigation
accuracy associated with the procedure or route (i.e. 2.5 NM). Brief
deviations from this standard (e.g. overshoots or undershoots) during and
immediately after procedure/route turns, up to a maximum of one-times
the navigation accuracy (i.e. 5 NM), are allowable.

h) If ATS issues a heading assignment taking the aircraft off a route, the
pilot should not modify the flight plan in the RNAV system until a
clearance is received to re-join the route or the controller confirms a new
clearance. When the aircraft is not on the published route, the specified
accuracy requirement does not apply.

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3.6.2.3 Contingency Procedures

Flight crew must notify ATC when the RNAV performance ceases to meet the
requirements for RNAV 5. The communication to ATC must be in accordance with
the authorized procedures. Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51 for further guidance.

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When GPS PRIMARY is not available, periodically crosscheck the FM position
with navaid raw data. Manual selection of a required accuracy on the MCDU is
optional.

If manual entry of a required accuracy is desired enter 5 nm or use the radial


equivalent to 5 nm XTK accuracy that is 6.1 nm.

When leaving RNAV-5 airspace, or when entering the terminal area revert to
the default required accuracy, or enter the appropriate value on the MCDU.

If one of the following MCDU or ECAM messages is displayed check


navigation accuracy with navaid raw data, or with the GPS MONITOR page:

 NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD

 FMS1/FMS2 POS DIFF

 CHECK IRS 1(2)(3)/FM POSITION

 ECAM : FM/GPS POS DISAGREE (if GPS installed)

If the accuracy check confirms that RNAV-5 capability is lost, or if both FMGCs
have failed inform the ATC, and revert to conventional navigation.

If the accuracy check confirms that only one FMGC position is incorrect, resume
navigation with the other FMGC.

In inertial navigation, RNAV-5 capability is maintained for 2 h, independently of the


estimated accuracy displayed on the MCDU.

In the event of communications failure, the flight crew should continue with the
flight plan in accordance with the published “lost communication” procedure.

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3.6.3 Operating procedure – RNAV 1 & 2

3.6.3.1 Pre-flight planning

a) Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for RNAV 1 & 2 operations in

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


AOP before routing the same on RNAV 1 & 2 en-route and terminal
procedures.

b) ATS Filling guidance for RNAV 1 & 2 routes-

Item 10a - “R” (PBN approved)


Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/- “C1” (RNAV 2)
- “D1” (RNAV 1)
c) The on-board navigation data must be current and appropriate for the
region of intended operation and must include the navigation aids,
waypoints, and relevant coded ATS routes for departure, arrival, and
alternate airfields.
Note. — Navigation databases are expected to be current for the duration of the
flight. If the AIRAC cycle is due to change during flight, flight operation department
should ensure the accuracy of the navigation data, including the suitability of
navigation facilities used to define the routes and procedures for flight. Follow
procedures described in FCOM DSC-22_20-20-50 P ½-[OPERATIONS WITH AN
OUTDATED NAVIGATION DATABASE].

d) RAIM levels required for RNAV 1 or RNAV 2 should be verified through


RAIM NOTAMs (where available) issued by ATS Authorities. Refer Para
3.8.3.3 for RAIM notam description. The availability of the navaid
infrastructure, required for the intended routes, including any non-RNAV
contingencies, must be confirmed for the period of intended operations
using all available information.

In the event of a predicted, continuous loss of appropriate level of fault


detection of more than five minutes for any part of the RNAV 1 or RNAV
2 operation, the flight plan should be revised (e.g. delaying the departure
or planning a different departure procedure).

e) Distance measuring equipment (DME) availability: For navigation relying


on DME, NOTAMs should be checked to verify the condition of critical
DMEs. Flight crew should be aware of their capability to navigate

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(potentially to an alternate destination) in case of failure of critical DME


while airborne.

3.6.3.2 General operating procedures

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a) Flight crew should comply with any instructions or procedures identified
by the manufacturer as necessary to comply with the performance
requirements.

b) Flight crew should not request or file RNAV 1 and RNAV 2 operation
unless they satisfy all the inherent criteria of the intended operation.
Refer PRO-SPO-51 for guidance on the same. Flight crew should inform
the ATC of the loss of RNAV 1 and RNAV 2 capability, and follow ATC
instructions in case of nonconformity to the RNAV clearance.

c) At system initialization, flight crew must confirm the navigation database


is current and verify that the aircraft position has been entered correctly.
(REF FCOM PRO-NOR-SRP-01-10)

d) Flight crew must verify proper entry of their ATC assigned route upon
initial clearance and any subsequent change of route. They must ensure
the waypoints sequence, depicted by their navigation system, matches
the route depicted on the appropriate chart(s) and their assigned route.

e) Flight crew must not fly an RNAV 1 or RNAV 2 SID or STAR unless it is
retrievable by route name from the on-board navigation database and
conforms to the charted route. However, the route may subsequently be
modified through the insertion or deletion of specific waypoints in
response to ATC clearances. The manual entry or creation of new
waypoints by manual entry, of latitude and longitude or rho/theta values
is not permitted. Additionally, flight crew must not change any RNAV SID
or STAR database waypoint type from a fly-by to a flyover or vice versa.

f) Whenever possible, RNAV 1 and RNAV 2 routes in the en-route domain


should be extracted from the database in their entirety, rather than
loading individual waypoints from the database into the flight plan.
However, it is permitted to select and insert individual, named
fixes/waypoints from the navigation database, provided all fixes along the
published route to be flown are inserted. Moreover, the route may

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subsequently be modified through the insertion or deletion of specific


waypoints in response to ATC clearances. The creation of new waypoints
by manual entry of attitude and longitude is not permitted.

g) Flight crews should cross-check the cleared flight plan by comparing

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charts or other applicable resources with the navigation system textual
display and the aircraft map display, if applicable. If required, the
exclusion of specific navigation aids should be confirmed.
Note.— Crew may notice a slight difference between the navigation information
portrayed on the chart and their primary navigation display(ND). Differences of 3
degrees or less may result from the equipment manufacturer’s application of
magnetic variation and are operationally acceptable.

h) During the flight, where feasible, the flight crew should use available data
from ground-based navigation aids to confirm navigational
reasonableness.

i) For RNAV 2 routes, flight crew may use a navigation map display with as
a lateral deviation indicator, as with or without a flight director or autopilot.

j) For RNAV 1 routes, flight crew must use a lateral deviation indicator (in
ND), flight director, or autopilot in lateral navigation mode.

k) Flight crew must ensure that lateral deviation numeric values (in ND) is
suitable for the navigation accuracy associated with the route/procedure:

Lateral deviation values;

±1 NM for RNAV 1,

±2 NM for RNAV 2,

l) Flight crew are expected to maintain route centrelines, as depicted by on-


board lateral deviation indicators (ND) and/or flight guidance during all
RNAV operations, unless authorized to deviate by ATC or under
emergency conditions. For normal operations, cross-track error/deviation
(the difference between the RNAV system computed path and the aircraft
position relative to the path, i.e. FTE) should be limited to ±½ the
navigation accuracy associated with the procedure or route (i.e. 0.5 NM
for RNAV 1, 1.0 NM for RNAV 2). Brief deviations from this standard (e.g.

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overshoots or undershoots) during and immediately after procedure/route


turns, up to a maximum of one times the navigation accuracy (i.e. 1.0 NM
for RNAV 1, 2.0 NM for RNAV), are allowable.

m) If ATC issues a heading assignment taking the aircraft off a route, crew

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should not modify the flight plan in the RNAV system until a clearance is
received to re-join the route or the controller confirms a new route
clearance. When the aircraft is not on the published route, the specified
accuracy requirement does not apply.

3.6.3.3 RNAV SID specific requirements

a) Prior to commencing take-off, flight crew must verify the aircraft’s RNAV
system is available, operating correctly, and the correct airport and
runway data are loaded. Prior to flight, it must be verified that the aircraft
navigation system is operating correctly and the correct runway and
departure procedure (including any applicable en-route transition) are
entered and properly depicted. Flight crew who are assigned an RNAV
departure procedure and subsequently receive a change of runway,
procedure or transition must verify the appropriate changes are entered
and available for navigation prior to take-off. A final check of proper
runway entry and correct route depiction, shortly before take-off, is
recommended.

b) RNAV engagement altitude:. Flight crew must be able to use RNAV


equipment to follow flight guidance for lateral RNAV no later than 153 m
(500 ft) above the airport elevation. The altitude at which RNAV guidance
begins on a given route may be higher (e.g. climb to 304 m (1 000 ft)
then direct to …).

c) Flight crew must use a navigation map display/flight director/autopilot to


achieve an appropriate level of performance for RNAV 1.

d) Before the take-off roll commences GNSS (GPS) signal must be


acquired. [IndiGo’s fleet is equipped with TSO-C129/C129A certified
GNSS sensors which subsequently require the departure airport to be
loaded into the flight plan in order to achieve the appropriate navigation
system monitoring and sensitivity.]

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3.6.3.4 RNAV STAR specific requirements

a) Prior to the arrival phase, the flight crew should verify that the correct
terminal route has been loaded. The active flight plan should be checked
by comparing the charts with the map display (if applicable) and the

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MCDU. This includes confirmation of the waypoint sequence,
reasonableness of track angles and distances, any altitude or speed
constraints, and, where possible, which waypoints are fly-by and which
are flyover. If required by a route, a check will need to be made to
confirm that updating will exclude a particular navigation aid. A route
must not be used if doubt exists as to the validity of the route in the
navigation database.
Note.: As a minimum, the arrival checks could be a simple inspection of a suitable
map display that achieves the objectives of this paragraph.

b) The creation of new waypoints by manual entry into the RNAV system by
the flight crew would invalidate the route and is not permitted.

c) Where the contingency procedure requires reversion to a conventional


arrival route, necessary preparations must be completed before
commencing the RNAV route.

d) Route modifications in the terminal area may take the form of radar
headings or “direct to” clearances and the flight crew must be capable of
reacting in a timely fashion. This may include the insertion of tactical
waypoints loaded from the database. Manual entry or modification by the
flight crew of the loaded route, using temporary waypoints or fixes not
provided in the database, is not permitted.

e) Flight crew must verify their aircraft navigation system is operating


correctly and the correct arrival procedure and runway (including any
applicable transition) are entered and properly depicted.

f) Although a particular method is not mandated, any published altitude and


speed constraints must be observed.

3.6.3.5 Contingency procedures

Flight crew must notify ATC of any loss of the RNAV capability, together with the
proposed course of action. If unable to comply with the requirements of an RNAV

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route, pilots must advise ATS as soon as possible. The loss of RNAV capability
includes following failure or event causing the aircraft to no longer satisfy the
RNAV requirements of the route (Ref FCOM PRO-SPO-51).

 If GPS is NOT required for the P-RNAV/RNP-1 procedure :

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Check that GPS PRIMARY is available (GPS PRIMARY displayed on the
MCDU PROG page).
 IF GPS PRIMARY is not available:
Crosscheck the FM position with the navaid raw data, before starting the
procedure. Check or enter RNP-1 in the REQUIRED field of the MCDU
PROG page, and check that HIGH accuracy is available. When
completing the terminal procedure, revert to the default value or enter the
appropriate value on the MCDU PROG page.
 If one of the following messages appears, while flying the procedure:

a) ”NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD” (on MCDU and ND) on both sides, or


b) “FMS1/FMS2 POS DIFF” (on MCDU), or
c) ”CHECK IRS 1(2)(3)/FM POSITION” (on MCDU), or
d) ”NAV FM/GPS POS DISAGREE” (on ECAM, if GPS installed)

Then inform the ATC of the loss of P-RNAV/RNP-1 capability, and follow
ATC instructions.
Note: If the ―NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD‖ message is displayed on one side only, navigation
may be continued using the other FMGC.

In the event of communications failure, the flight crew should continue with the
RNAV route in accordance with established lost communications procedures.

3.7 OPERATING PROCEDURE-BASIC RNP-1

3.7.1 Pre-flight planning

a) Dispatch should ascertain aircraft approval for Basic RNP-1 operations in


AOP before routing the same on Basic RNP-1 terminal procedures.

b) ATS Filling guidance for BASIC-RNP 1 SIDs and STARs -


 Item 10a - “R” (PBN approved)

 Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/- “O1” (BASIC-RNP 1)

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c) Crew should ensure on-board navigation data TO be of current AIRAC


cycle.

d) RAIM levels required for Basic-RNP 1 should be verified through RAIM


NOTAMs (where available) issued by ATS Authorities. Refer Para 3.8.3.3

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


for RAIM NOTAM description. The availability of the navaid infrastructure,
required for the intended routes, including any non-RNAV contingencies,
must be confirmed for the period of intended operations using all
available information.

e) In the event of a predicted, continuous loss of appropriate level of fault


detection of more than five minutes for any part of the Basic-RNP 1
operation, the flight plan should be revised (e.g. delaying the departure or
planning a different departure procedure).

3.7.2 General operating procedures

a) Flight crew should comply with any instructions or procedures identified


by the manufacturer as necessary to comply with the performance
requirements of Basic RNP 1.
Note. - Pilots must adhere to any AFM limitations or operating procedures required
to maintain Basic-RNP 1 performance for the SID or STAR.

b) Flight crew should not request Basic-RNP 1 procedures unless they


satisfy system criteria (Refer FCOM PRO-SPO-51). System criteria
should include navigation accuracy, minimum equipment needed for
Basic RNP-1 etc. If the flight crew receives a clearance from ATC to
conduct a Basic-RNP 1 procedure, they must advise ATC if he/she is
unable to accept the clearance and must request alternate instructions.

c) At system initialization, flight crew must confirm that the navigation


database is current and verify that the aircraft Position has been entered
correctly. Flight crew must verify proper entry of their ATC assigned route
upon initial clearance and any subsequent change of route and must
ensure that the waypoint sequence depicted by their navigation system
matches the route depicted on the appropriate chart(s) and their
assigned route.

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d) Flight crew must not fly a Basic-RNP 1 SID or STAR unless it is


retrievable by procedure name from the on-board navigation database
and conforms to the charted procedure. However, the procedure may
subsequently be modified through the insertion or deletion of specific

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waypoints in response to ATC clearances which includes DIR TO, radar
vectoring, insertion of waypoints loaded from the navigation database.

e) The manual entry or creation of new waypoints, by manual entry of


latitude and longitude or rho/theta values is not permitted. Additionally,
pilots must not change any SID or STAR database waypoint type from a
fly-by to a flyover or vice versa.

f) The terminal procedure (RNAV SID, RNAV STAR, RNAV TRANSITION,


...) must be loaded from the FM navigation database and checked for
reasonableness, by comparing the waypoints, tracks, distances and
altitude constraints (displayed on the F-PLN page), with the procedure
chart.
Note. — Pilots may notice a slight difference between the navigation information portrayed
on the chart and their primary navigation display. Differences of 3 degrees or less may result
from the equipment manufacturer’s application of magnetic variation and are operationally
acceptable.

g) When flying in an RNP environment, the crew can insert the appropriate
RNP value (1) in the REQUIRED ACCUR field of the PROG page.

When HIGH is displayed


- The RNP requirement is estimated to be fulfilled.

When LOW is displayed

- The RNP requirement is estimated not to be fulfilled.

In this case:
 The crew crosschecks navigation with raw data, if available,
 If the crosscheck is negative, or if raw data is unavailable, the
crew informs the ATC.

h) For Basic-RNP 1 routes, flight crew must use a navigation map display,
flight director, or autopilot in lateral navigation mode. A lateral deviation

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display must ensure that lateral deviation scaling is suitable for the
navigation accuracy associated with the route/procedure (e.g. full-scale
deflection: ±1 NM for Basic-RNP 1).

i) Flight crew are expected to maintain center lines, as depicted by on-

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


board lateral deviation indicators and/or flight guidance during all Basic-
RNP 1 operations unless authorized to deviate by ATC or under
emergency conditions. For normal operations, cross-track error/deviation
(the difference between the system computed path and the aircraft
position relative to the path, i.e. FTE) should be limited to ±½ the
navigation accuracy associated with the procedure (i.e. 0.5 NM for Basic-
RNP 1). Brief deviations from this standard (e.g. overshoots or
undershoots) during and immediately after turns, up to a maximum of
one-times the navigation accuracy (i.e. 1.0 NM for Basic-RNP 1) are
allowable.

j) If ATC issues a heading assignment that takes an aircraft off of a route,


the flight crew should not modify the flight plan in the RNP system until a
clearance is received to re-join the route or the controller confirms a new
route clearance. When the aircraft is not on the published Basic-RNP 1
route, the specified accuracy requirement does not apply.

k) The terminal procedure loaded from the FM navigation database should


be checked for RNP value in the REQUIRED field of the PROG page to
be 1 or lower, for Basic-RNP 1 SIDs and STARs. The displayed RNP is
(in a decreasing order of priority):

 The value that the flight crew entered


 The navigation database procedure value
 The system’s default value.

When a flight crew enters an RNP that is higher than the published value, one of
the following messages is displayed: "PROCEDURE RNP IS XX.XX", or "AREA
RNP IS XX.XX". When this occurs, the flight crew should verify the RNP value that
was manually entered in the REQUIRED field of the PROG page, and clear or
modify it if necessary.

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3.7.3 Basic-RNP 1 SID specific requirements

a) Prior to commencing take-off, the flight crew must verify:

 Aircraft’s Basic-RNP 1 system including navigation system is

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


available and operating correctly (REF FCOM PRO-SPO-51 P 5/6).

 Correct runway and departure procedure (including any applicable


en-route transition) are entered and properly depicted (REF FCOM
PRO-NOR-SRP-01-10 P 8/32).

 Any subsequent change of runway, procedure or transition must


verify the appropriate changes are entered and available for
navigation prior to take-off (REF FCOM PRO-NOR-SRP-01-15).

 A final check of proper runway entry and correct route depiction,


shortly before take-off, is recommended.

b) Engagement altitude. The pilot must be able to use Basic-RNP 1


equipment to follow flight guidance for lateral RNAV no later than 153 m
(500 ft) above airport elevation.

c) GPS signal must be verified before the take-off roll commences (GPS
PRIMARY AVAILABLE MSG). The departure airport must be loaded into
the flight plan in order to achieve the appropriate navigation system
monitoring and sensitivity.

d) The flight crew should verify the RNP value required for Basic-RNP 1 SID
in the REQUIRED field of the PROG page, and clear or modify it if
necessary.
3.7.4 Basic-RNP 1 STAR specific requirements

a) Prior to the arrival phase, the flight crew should perform following checks:

o Verify that the correct terminal route has been loaded.

o The active flight plan should be checked by comparing the


charts with the map display and the MCDU. This includes
confirmation of the waypoint sequence, reasonableness of track
angles and distances, any altitude or speed constraints, and,
where possible, which waypoints are fly-by and which are
flyover.

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o A check will need to be made to confirm that updating will


exclude a particular navigation aid.

o A route must not be used if doubt exists as to the validity of the


route in the navigation database.

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Note.- As a minimum, the arrival checks could be a simple inspection of a map
display(ND).

b) The creation of new waypoints by manual entry into the Basic-RNP 1


system by the flight crew would invalidate the route and is not permitted.

c) Where the contingency procedure requires reversion to a conventional


arrival route, necessary preparations must be completed before
commencing the Basic-RNP 1 procedure.

d) Procedure modifications in the terminal area may take the form of radar
headings or “direct to” clearances and the flight crew must be capable of
reacting in a timely fashion. This may include the insertion of tactical
waypoints loaded from the database. Manual entry or modification by the
flight crew of the loaded route, using temporary waypoints or fixes not
provided in the database, is not permitted.

e) Flight crew must verify navigation system is operating correctly and the
correct arrival procedure and runway (including any applicable transition)
are entered and properly depicted.

f) Published altitude and speed constraints must be observed.

g) If the Basic-RNP 1 STAR begins beyond 30 NM from the ARP,


REQUIRED field of the PROG page must be set for the Basic-RNP 1
STAR, and the flight director or autopilot should be used.

3.7.5 Contingency Procedures

Flight crew must notify ATC of any loss of the RNP capability (integrity alerts or
loss of navigation). If unable to comply with the requirements of a Basic-RNP 1
SID or STAR for any reason, pilots must advise ATS as soon as possible. The
loss of RNP capability includes any failures causing the aircraft to no longer satisfy
the Basic-RNP 1 requirements of the route.
If one of the following messages appears while flying the procedure:

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 ”NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD” (on MCDU and ND) on both sides, or

 “FMS1/FMS2 POS DIFF” (on MCDU), or

 ”CHECK IRS 1(2)(3)/FM POSITION” (on MCDU), or

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 ”NAV FM/GPS POS DISAGREE” (on ECAM, if GPS installed)

Then: Inform the ATC of the loss of P-RNAV/RNP-1 capability, and


follow ATC instructions.
Note: If the ―NAV ACCUR DOWNGRAD‖ message is displayed on one side only, navigation
may be continued using the other FMGC.
3.8 RNAV INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE (IAP)

With advent of modern navigation equipment, RNAV IAPs are seen as the future
of terminal navigation and is currently prevalent in the USA, Europe and other
parts of the world. Recently RNAV IAPs have also been incorporated in Indian
airspace. These IAPs incorporate RNP approach (RNP APCH) procedures include
existing RNAV (GNSS) approach procedures designed with a Straight segment.

3.8.1 Regulatory Background

IndiGo fleet of A320-232 with its multi-sensor RNAV systems using GNSS,
complies with both European (EASA AMC 20-27) and United States (AC 20-130A)
guidance assures automatic compliance with ICAO PBN manual, Doc 9613,
obviating the need for further assessment or AFM documentation.

3.8.2 Aircraft requirements System performance monitoring and


alerting

The inability to achieve the required lateral navigation accuracy may be due to
navigation errors related to aircraft tracking and positioning. The three main errors
are path definition error (PDE), flight technical error (FTE) and navigation system
error (NSE). ICAO PBN manual, Doc 9613 mandates adherence to the respective
limits as mentioned below along with the monitoring & alerting measures.

3.8.2.1 Flight technical error (FTE)

FTE relates to the air crew or autopilot's ability to follow the defined path or track,
including any display error.

During operations on the initial and intermediate segments:

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 95 per cent FTE should not exceed 0.5nm.(as prerequisite to


comply accuracy)

 The lateral total system error must be within ±1 NM for at least 95


per cent of the total flight time.

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During operations on the final approach segment of an RNP APCH:

 95 per cent FTE should not exceed 0.25 NM as prerequisite to


comply accuracy).

 The lateral total system error must be within ±0.3 NM for at least 95
per cent of the total flight time.

 The along-track error must also be within ±0.3 NM for at least 95 per
cent of the total flight time.

When Barometric VNAV is used for vertical path guidance during the final
approach segment, deviations above and below the Barometric VNAV path must
not exceed +30 m/–15 m (+100 ft/–50 ft), respectively.

Crew Compliance

The use of a deviation indicator (ND for XTKE) with 1 NM lateral deviation on the
initial and intermediate segments, and for the RNAV missed approach and 0.3 NM
on the final approach segment, to be used as an acceptable means of compliance
as per ICAO PBN manual, Doc 9613.

Selected RNP value is monitored on PROGRESS page at [6L].RNP ≤ 0.3 NM is


set automatically by NAV-database for a Departure or an Arrival/Approach
procedure or manually by pilot

3.8.2.2 Navigation system error (NSE)

NSE refers to the difference between the aircraft's estimated (FMGS) position and
actual position. It can be monitored by tracking estimated position error (EPU) on
both MCDU s-pad message as well as ND indication.

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Crew Compliance

Accuracy can be monitored on PROG page. When EPE (ESTIMATED value)


becomes greater than the REQUIRED value, "NAV ACCUR
DOWNGRAD" s-pad msg (amber) is displayed.

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 On ND message is displayed in amber.

 PROG key.........................Press

 Check accuracy.

Consider appropriate navigation Procedures as described in the contingency


procedures as referred in Para 3.8.4 of this chapter.

When accuracy improves to the required value "NAV ACCUR UPGRAD" s-pad
msg (white) is displayed on MCDUs and NDs.

3.8.2.3 Path definition error

PDE occurs when the path defined in the RNAV system does not correspond to
the desired path, i.e. the path expected to be flown over the ground. Path
definition error (PDE) is considered negligible due to the quality assurance
process (NAV DATABASE INTEGRITY VALIDATION PROCESS) and crew
procedures.

3.8.2.4 GPS accuracy and integrity monitoring-

Crew Compliance

When both GPS accuracy and integrity requirements are met, the Confidence
Status on GPS position is designated as GPS PRIMARY, displayed on PROG
page [5R].

If these requirements are not met, field [5R] is blank and GPS/IRS mode is lost;
"GPS PRIMARY LOST" message (amber) is triggered on MCDU and ND of the
affected side. It cannot be cleared from ND.

When GPS/IRS mode is restored "GPS PRIMARY" message (white) is triggered


on MCDU and on ND; GPS PRIMARY is again displayed in [5R].

Regulatory Assurance: IndiGo’s fleet of A320-232 has multi-sensor systems using


GNSS and is approved in accordance with AC20-130A (AFM DOCUMENTATION)

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as having been demonstrated for RNP APCH capability. ICAO PBN manual Doc
9613 assures accuracy, integrity and continuity requirements of aforesaid criteria
of System performance monitoring and alerting.

3.8.3 Operating procedures

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3.8.3.1 Pre-flight planning

Dispatch Action:

To conduct operations using an RNP APCH procedure, Dispatch must file the
appropriate flight plan suffixes.

ATS Filling guidance for RNP APCH approaches-

Item 10a - “R” (PBN approved)


Corresponding entry in Item 18 PBN/- - “S1” (RNP APCH)**S1

in ATS Flight Plan means Crew and Aircraft is capable of RNP APCH.

 On-board navigation data must be current and include appropriate


procedures. If the AIRAC cycle is due to change during flight, the
accuracy of navigation data, including the suitability of navigation facilities
used to define the routes and procedures for the flight has to be ensured.

 Dispatch must take account of any NOTAMs that could adversely affect
the aircraft system operation, or the availability or suitability of the
procedures at the airport of landing, or any alternate airport;

 For missed approach procedures based on conventional means (VOR,


NDB), Dispatch must ensure that the associated ground-based navaids
are operational along with airborne equipment (any affecting MEL).

Flight Crew Action:

In addition to the normal pre-flight planning checks, the following must be


included:

 Crew must ensure that approaches which may be used for the intended
flight (including alternate Aerodromes) are selected from a valid

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navigation database (current AIRAC cycle), and are not prohibited by a


company instruction or NOTAM (NAVDATA bulletin);

 During the pre-flight phase, the Crew should ensure sufficient means are
available to navigate and land at the destination or at an alternate

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aerodrome in the case of loss of RNP APCH airborne capability.

 When cold weather temperatures exist, the pilot should check the chart
for the instrument approach procedure to determine the limiting
temperature for the use of Barometric VNAV capability. Example; VOCI
°
RNP APCH Approach has limiting temp as +5 C. Approach below the
limiting temperature is prohibited.

3.8.3.2 Required equipment to perform RNAV (GNSS)

Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-18-C for the list of required equipment to perform


RNAV (GNSS) (RNP APCH) approaches using either Final APP or FPA Guidance
mode.

In the event of degraded operation, dispatch (at pre- flight stage) & flight crew to
plan non RNP-APCH approaches to the intended destination.

3.8.3.3 RAIM Availability

Dispatch Action:

RAIM levels required for RNP APCH should be verified through NOTAM. NOTAM
are issued by ATS Authorities (AAI etc.) for all the FIRS citing availability of FD
(fault detection confirming availability of 5 satellites) & FDE (fault detection and
exclusion confirming availability of 6 satellites).Further these NOTAM specifies the
time interval taken as unit for outage estimation. Example shown below is showing
RAIM availability within 30sec of time interval and 5 DEG above azimuth. This
NOTAM ensures the RAIM availability with no outage.

Example:
C0113/12 NOTAMN
Q)VIXX/QXXXX/IV/NBO/E /000/999/
A) VIDF/VABF B) 1205040001 C) 1205042359
E) GPS RAIM PREDICTION FOR THE DAY 04/05/2012
AERODROME WISE DURATION OF NON AVAILABILITY
RAIM FD AND FDE FUNCTIONALITY

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WITH ELEVATION CUTOFF = 5 DEG


WITH TIME INTERVAL OF = 30 SEC
FOR VAAH
FAULT DETECTION - NO OUTAGES
FAULT DETECTION EXCLUSION - NO OUTAGES

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RAIM availability prediction NOTAM does not guarantee the service, rather they
are tools to assess the expected capability of meeting the required navigation
performances. Because of unplanned failure of some GNSS elements, pilots must
realize that RAIM or GPS navigation altogether may be lost while airborne which
may require reversion to an alternative means of navigation. Therefore, pilots
should assess their capability to conduct:

 Conventional Navaid approaches to the intended destination.

 Navigate (potentially to an alternate destination) in case of failure of GPS


navigation.
Note: In the event of a predicted, continuous loss of appropriate level of fault detection of
more than five minutes for any part of the RNP APCH operation, the flight planning should
be revised for non RNP-APCH contingencies. RAIM NOTAM uses the time lapse period of
30 seconds so the availability of RAIM as per the AAI NOTAM ensures above.

3.8.3.4 Prior to commencing the procedure

In addition to the normal procedure prior to commencing the approach (before the
IAF and in compatibility with crew workload), the flight crew must verify that the
correct procedure was loaded (comparison with the approach charts). This check
must include:

 The waypoint sequence;

 Reasonableness of the tracks and distances of the approach legs,


and the accuracy of the inbound course and length of the final
approach segment.
Note: As a minimum, this check could be a simple inspection of a suitable map display that
achieves the Objectives of this paragraph.

 Check using the published charts, the map display or control display
unit (CDU), which waypoints are fly-by and which are flyover.

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 The final approach is laterally and vertically monitored, using the


appropriate data: the distance to the runway or to the MAP versus
altitude is the primary means of vertical navigation, the deviation on
the PFD may be unreliable.

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 The crew must verify, during the approach, that the GNSS sensor is
used for position computation.

 The flight crew should perform a new RAIM Availability checks if


ETA is more than 15 minutes different from the ETA used during the
pre-flight planning.

 Flight crews should take precautions to switch altimeter settings


before starting the final approach and request a current altimeter
setting if the reported setting may not be recent, particularly at times
when pressure is reported or is expected to be rapidly decreasing.
Remote altimeter settings are not allowed.

FMS Modes to be used by Crew:

FINAL APP GUIDANCE -‐ RNAV (GNSS) approaches with LNAV and


LNAV/VNAV minima

FPA GUIDANCE - RNAV (GNSS) approaches using mixed NAV FPA


guidance with LNAV minima only

In complying with ATC instructions, the flight crew should be aware of the
implications for the RNP system:

 The manual entry of coordinates into the RNAV system by the flight crew
for operation within the terminal area is not permitted.

 “Direct to” clearances may be accepted to the intermediate fix (IF)


provided that the resulting track change at the IF does not exceed 45
degrees.

 “Direct to” clearance to FAF is not acceptable.

 The lateral definition of the flight path between the FAF and the missed
approach point (MAPt) must not be revised by the flight crew under any
circumstances.

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3.8.3.5 During the procedure Flight Crew Action:

Ref FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-18-C for detailed guidance.

Missed approach should not be commenced with RNP system if:

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 RNP system is not operational; or
 Missed approach is not loaded from the database.

3.8.4 Contingency procedures

Crew must notify ATC of any loss of the RNP APCH capability, together with the
proposed course of action. If unable to comply with the requirements of an RNP
APCH procedure, Crew must advise ATS as soon as possible. The loss of RNP
APCH capability includes any failure or event causing the aircraft to no longer
satisfy the RNP APCH requirements of the procedure.

Before starting the approach, check that GPS PRIMARY is available on both
MCDUs.

In the event of communications failure, the flight crew must continue with the RNP
APCH in accordance with the published lost communication procedure. Refer
FCOM PRO-NOR-SOP-18-C for detailed guidance.

3.8.5 NAV Database Integrity Validation Process

IndiGo navigation database in generic format is obtained from European


Aeronautical Group UK Ltd that complies with EUROCAE document ED 76,
Standards for Processing Aeronautical Data. EASA TYPE1 LOA issued in
accordance with EASA IR 21 subpart G which demonstrates compliance with this
requirement.

This generic data in turn is incorporated into the aircraft interface through
compatible format by GE Aviation. The latter is endorsed by FAA LOA TYPE 2 in
accordance with FAA AC 20-153 and conforms to RTCA DO 200A.

As a part of internal quality assurance process imbibing recommendations of AMC


20-27 , the navigation database listing obtained from the diskette is converted to
readable format through GE software and is manually crosschecked (by company
authorized person as specified by OM-A) prior to its uploading on the aircraft. All

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IAP for \the envisaged destinations are then be verified, in comparison to the
published approach charts.

The following data are verified:

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 Path Terminators
 Waypoint identifications
 Waypoint coordinates (as necessary)
 Distances between waypoints
 Approach course
 Crossing altitudes
 Flight Path Angle(s)
 No waypoint common to a STAR or VIA and FAF, with different
altitude constraints

This verification is performed periodically with every new cycle. Any discrepancies
found are subsequently notified to the CREW & Dispatch through “NAVDATA
BULLETIN” with unequivocal flight crew instruction to mitigate these
inconsistences.

Appropriate Flight Crew Error reporting mechanism is established to mitigate any


residual discrepancies.

3.9 FLIGHT CREW ERROR REPORTING

The crew must report any errors / discrepancies between Nav Database and
Jeppesen charts, lateral or vertical NAV guidance anomaly to Flight Operations
Support at fltops@goindigo.in
The report must be fully documented for further investigation and corrective
actions:
 Approach designation and airport

 A/C type, MSN, GW, wind/temp

 Navigation database cycle

 Pilot selections, FMA, ND, MCDU displays

 Description of anomaly, flight path

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3.10 FLIGHT PLANNING & MANAGEMENT

The Flight Planning function performs the creation and assembly of the lateral and
vertical flight plan used by the guidance function. A key aspect of the flight plan is
the specification of flight plan waypoints using latitude and longitude, without

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reference to the location of any ground navigation aids.

RNAV systems routinely provide flight progress information for the waypoints en-
route, for terminal and approach procedures, and the origin and destination.

The information includes estimated time or arrival, and distance to go, useful in
tactical and planning coordination with ATC.

3.11 DISPLAY AND SYSTEM CONTROL

Display and system controls provide the means for system initialization, flight
planning, path deviations, progress monitoring, active guidance control and
presentation of navigation data for flight crew situational awareness.

3.12 NON COMPLIANCE WITH RNP REQUIREMENTS

In the event the airplane is unable to comply the RNP requirement the flight crew
should:

i) Notify ATC of contingencies (equipment failure, weather, etc.) and


state intentions and obtain revised clearances

ii) If unable to notify and obtain prior ATC clearance for deviating from
assigned flight path, crew should follow established contingency
procedures and obtain ATC clearance as soon as possible.

3.13 RNAV PHRASEOLOGY

Following phraseology is to be used between Pilot and ATC controller during PBN
operations.

Refer next page

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CIRCUMSTANCES PHRASEOLOGIES

RNAV arrival or departure *UNABLE (designator)

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procedure cannot be accepted by DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL] DUE
the pilot RNAV TYPE

Pilot is unable to comply with an *UNABLE (designator)


assigned terminal area procedure DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL]
(reasons)
ATC unable to assign an RNAV UNABLE TO ISSUE (designator)
arrival or departure procedure DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL] DUE
requested by a pilot due to the type RNAV TYPE
of on-board RNAV equipment
ATC unable to assign an arrival or UNABLE TO ISSUE (designator)
departure procedure requested by DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL]
the pilot (reasons)
Confirmation whether a specific ADVISE IF ABLE (designator)
RNAV arrival or departure DEPARTURE [or ARRIVAL]
procedure can be accepted
Informing ATC of RNAV Informing ATC of no RNAV
degradation or failure *(aircraft call capability *(aircraft call sign)
sign) UNABLE RNAV DUE NEGATIVE RNAV
EQUIPMENT
* Denotes pilot transmission

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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4. LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES ........................................ 3

4.1 GENERAL ................................................................................................ 3

4.2 EXTENDED DIVERSION TIME OPERATIONS (EDTO) PROCEDURES 4

4.3 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION ..................................................................4

4.3.1 Accuracy Monitoring (In-flight Navigation Accuracy) .................. 4

4.3.2 Abnormal Operation/Failure ....................................................... 6

4.4 GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) ............................................... 6

4.4.1 General Requirements ............................................................... 8

4.4.2 Use of GPS for IFR Oceanic, Enroute, And Terminal Area
Operations .................................................................................. 9

4.4.3 Equipment And Database Requirements- ..................................9

4.5 REDUCED VERTICAL SEPERATION MINIMUM (RVSM) ...................... 9

4.5.1 General Concept ........................................................................ 9

4.5.2 Definitions................................................................................. 10

4.5.3 Flight Envelopes ....................................................................... 11

4.5.4 Approval Requirements ............................................................ 12

4.5.5 Airplane Certification Status ..................................................... 13

4.5.6 Equipment Required ................................................................. 13

4.5.7 MEL Requirements ................................................................... 13

4.5.8 RVSM Procedure ..................................................................... 13

4.5.9 Contingency Procedures .......................................................... 15

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4. LONG RANGE NAVIGATION PROCEDURES

4.1 GENERAL

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The Airway Manual provides the complete route guide and some of the
special information at departure, enroute alternate, destination and
designated alternate fields. Route planning is done as per the enroute chart
provided in the manual. The operational flight plan which is handed over to
the pilot during pre-flight briefings contains the enroute radio aids, radio
frequencies, way point co-ordinates obtained from the Airway Manual.
i) To ensure accurate navigation and monitoring of flight progress during all
phases of flight, including flights being radar vectored, using GPIRS, or
operating with visual reference to the ground, full use shall be made of
radio navigation and landing aids during all weather conditions. In case of
failure of any navigation aid or airborne radio navigational equipment
essential for safe and accurate navigation, or for complying with ATS
procedures, the commander shall notify the appropriate ATS unit making
full use of radar assistance if available.
ii) Radio navigation aids promulgated as being ‘unreliable’ or ‘on test’ shall
not be used. Facilities published as being ‘ground checked only’ may be
used during the enroute phase of flight, provided they can be cross
checked by the use of other radio navigation aids.
iii) If a radio navigation aid on which adjacent route segments are based or
by which an intersection is defined is found unreliable or out of service
the highest minimum safe grid altitude concerned shall apply to maintain
adequate terrain clearance.

Any facility which is ground checked only and is required for approach and
landing or departure shall not be used, except an ILS which may be used,
provided that without Glide Path MDA is applied.

Except where topographical features dictate or operational requirements


permit a reduction of the specified limits, the ILS localizer coverage sector
extends from the localizer antenna to distances of 25 NM within ±10° of the
front course and 17 NM within ±35° of the front course.

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4.2 EXTENDED DIVERSION TIME OPERATIONS (EDTO)


PROCEDURES

Detailed Operational procedures governing EDTO are covered in Company

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EDTO Manual.

4.3 LONG RANGE NAVIGATION

IndiGo airplanes are fitted with IRS and dual GPS equipments. FCOM
recommended cross check procedures will provide the pilots with an
indication of any deviation from the desired track on the ND. Cross checking
the present position periodically on the Navigation Chart will draw the
attention of the crew to any deviation so that corrective action can be taken
without loss of time.
i) The crew will individually check the flight plan using the F-PLN page
and ND in the PLAN mode versus the Computerised flight plan or the
enroute chart. The total distance and time on the F-PLN page will be
checked with the Computerised flight plan.
ii) If the distance between two consecutive waypoints is 300 NM or more,
a midway point will be inserted between the two waypoints.
iii) The flight crew can update the FMS position via the “UPDATE AT” field
by entering either the IDENT for a waypoint, a NAVAID, an airport, a
latitude and longitude, a place/bearing/distance, or a place-
bearing/place-bearing. When the flight crew has entered this data, this
field changes its format to "CONFIRM UPDATE AT" followed by the
latitude/longitude and IDENT of the inserted position with an asterisk .
Note: The flight crew should press the RSK adjacent to the asterisk to confirm the
update, only when the aircraft overflies the inserted position.

4.3.1 Accuracy Monitoring (In-flight Navigation Accuracy)

Crew are to crosscheck navigation accuracy as ‘High’ in terminal areas/en-


route (a comparison of actual navigation performance to the required
navigation performance on FMGS) as appropriate through suitable means as
described in the FCOM /FCTM /SOP. Any degradation in Navigation

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performance should be reviewed as per required procedures. Also refer


FCOM – PRO – SPO – 51

Each FMGC computes its own aircraft position (called the "FM position")

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from a MIX IRS position (see below), and a computed radio position or GPS
position.

The FMGS selects the most accurate position, considering the estimated
accuracy and integrity of each positioning equipment. Nevertheless, when
over flying a waypoint, crew are expected to check Track and Distance to the
next waypoint.

When the GPS primary is available, the navigation accuracy check is not
required.

When the GPS is not available (GPS deselected or inoperative), the pilot
must. perform this essential check:

- When over flying a waypoint

- prior to extended flight under IRS guidance

- prior to initiating descent

- when entering a terminal/approach area

The procedure is to compare raw data from the tuned navaids with the
corresponding IRS computed data on the navigation display. This check
verifies and quantifies the IRS accuracy. It confirms the reliability of IRS data
itself and of the navigation display presentation.

Co-located VOR/DME provides rapid and accurate quantification of nav


accuracy. During cruise, If the error is less than 3 nm, the IRS position is
considered reliable. However, if the error is more than 3 nm, then only raw
data should be used for navigation.

Prior to any approach, a navigation accuracy check is to be carried out. On


aircraft equipped with GPS however, no navigation accuracy check is
required as long as GPS PRIMARY is available.

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4.3.2 Abnormal Operation/Failure

4.3.2.1 Pre-Flight Errors

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The ADIRS keeps a record of the last position it had the last time it was in
NAV mode. It is also able to estimate the present latitude after a
complete alignment. The ADIRS may use this information to detect
coarse initialization errors.

If the ADIRS alignment or initialization is not correct, the ALIGN light will
flash. If any of the 3 ADIRS indicates an alignment error, the prompt
REALIGN IRS appears on the INIT page (instead of ALIGN IRS).

If the IR FAULT light flashes, the affected ADIRS can only be used in
ATT mode.

If the ALIGN light flashes, crew must follow procedures as per FCOM
PRO-SUP-34

4.3.2.2 In-Flight Failures / Errors

For In flight failures & errors, crew must refer to FCOM PRO-ABN-34

4.4 GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)

Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is a worldwide position


and time determination system that includes one or more satellite
constellations, aircraft receivers and system integrity monitoring,
augmented as necessary to support the required navigation
performance for the intended operation.

Global Navigation Satellite System – GLONASS is a similar system


though operated by Russian Federation.

GPS is a satellite-based radio navigation system developed and


operated by the U.S. Department of Defence (DOD). GPS permits land,
sea, and airborne users to determine their three-dimensional position,
velocity, and time 24 hours a day, in all weather, anywhere in the world
with a precision and accuracy far better than other radio navigation
systems available today or in the foreseeable future.

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GPS consists of three segments: space, control, and user.

The Space Segment consists of 24 operational satellites in six circular orbits


20,200 km (10,900 NM) above the earth. The satellites are spaced in orbit so that

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at any time a minimum of 6 satellites will be in view to users anywhere in the
world. The satellites continuously broadcast position and time data to users.

The Control Segment consists of a master control station, with five monitor
stations and three ground antennas located throughout the world. The monitor
stations track all GPS satellites in view and collect ranging information from the
satellite broadcasts. The monitor stations send the information they collect from
each of the satellites back to the master control station, which computes
extremely precise satellite orbits. The information is then formatted into updated
navigation messages for each satellite. The updated information is transmitted
to each satellite via the ground antennas, which also transmit and receive
satellite control and monitoring signals.

The User Segment consists of the receivers, processors, and antennas that
allow land, sea, or airborne operators to receive the GPS satellite broadcasts
and compute their precise position, velocity and time as needed for their marine,
terrestrial, or aeronautical applications.

The GPS concept of operation is based upon satellite ranging. Users figure their
position on the earth by measuring their distance from the group of satellites in
space. The satellites act as precise reference points. The GPS coordinate
system is the Cartesian Earth-centred Earth-fixed co-ordinates as specified in
World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS-84).

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GNSS services that are used by aircraft may use various combinations of
following elements installed on the ground, on satellites and/or on board
the aircraft:

GPS / GNSS

ABAS – Aircraft Based Augmentation System

GBAS – Ground Based Augmentation System

SBAS – Satellite Based Augmentation System

GRAS – Ground based Regional Augmentation System

Aircraft GNSS Receiver

4.4.1 General Requirements

General Requirements-Authorization to conduct any GPS operation


under IFR requires:
- Airplane using GPS equipment under IFR must be equipped with an
approved and operational alternate means of navigation appropriate
to the flight. Active monitoring of the alternative navigation equipment
is not required if the installation uses RAIM (Receiver Autonomous
Integrity Monitoring). For these systems, active monitoring by the
flight crew is only required when the RAIM capability of the GPS
equipment is lost.

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- In the event that the loss of RAIM capability is predicted to occur, the
flight must rely on other approved equipment or delay departure for
rectification if using GPS primarily.

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- The GPS operation must be conducted in accordance with the
approved Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or Flight Manual supplement.
- Airplane navigating the GPS is considered to be RNAV aircraft.
Therefore, the appropriate equipment suffix must be included in the
ATC flight plan. Pilots should review the appropriate NOTAMs.

4.4.2 Use of GPS for IFR Oceanic, Enroute, And Terminal Area
Operations

GPS in IFR operations in oceanic areas can be conducted as soon as the


proper avionics systems are installed provided all general requirements
are met.
GPS enroute and terminal IFR operations can be conducted as soon as
the proper avionics systems are installed provided all general
requirements are met.

4.4.3 Equipment And Database Requirements-

Authorization to fly approaches under IFR using GPS avionics systems


when authorised, requires that:
- A pilot uses GPS avionics with TSO C-129 authorization in class A1,
B1, B3, C1, or O3 airspace.
- The specific approach procedure to be flown must be retrievable
from the airborne navigation database.

4.5 REDUCED VERTICAL SEPERATION MINIMUM (RVSM)


(CAR Section 8, Series S, Part II)

4.5.1 General Concept

RVSM airspace is defined as an airspace or route where airplanes are


vertically separated by 1000 ft between FL 290 and FL 410 inclusive.
The objective is to increase the route capacity of saturated airspace,

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while maintaining (at least) the same level of safety. This can be
achieved by imposing stringent requirements on equipment and on the
training of flight crews and ATC controllers. As part of the RVSM

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program, the airplane “altitude-keeping performance” is monitored,
overhead specific ground-based measurement units, to continuously
verify that airspace users are effectively applying the approved criteria
and that overall safety objectives are maintained.
DGCA requirements for aircraft & crew certification and operating
procedures are given in CAR mentioned above.
Non RVSM approved aircraft intending to climb/descend through RVSM
airspace and other operations such as humanitarian, maintenance, ferry
flights and State/military aircraft shall be dealt with by DGCA in
coordination with the Air Traffic Management on case to case basis with
limitations/ restrictions as may be considered necessary for relevant ATC
airspace.

4.5.2 Definitions

Altimetry System Error (ASE) is the difference between the pressure


altitude displayed to the flight crew when referenced to the International
Standard Atmosphere ground pressure setting (1013.25 hPa /29.92 in.
Hg) and free stream pressure altitude.
Assigned Altitude Deviation (AAD) is the difference between the
transponder Mode C altitude and the assigned altitude/ flight level.
Automatic Altitude Control System: Any system that is designed to
automatically control the aircraft to a referenced pressure altitude.
Avionics Error (AVE) is the error in the processes of converting the
sensed pressure into an electrical output, of applying any static source
error correction (SSEC) as appropriate, and of displaying the
corresponding altitude.
Basic RVSM Envelope: The range of Mach numbers and gross weights
within the altitude ranges FL 290 to FL 410 (or maximum attainable)
where an aircraft can reasonably be expected to operate most frequently.
Flight Technical Error (FTE) is the difference between the altitude

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indicated by the altimeter display being used to control the aircraft and
the assigned altitude/flight level.
Full RVSM Envelope: The entire range of operational Mach numbers,

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Weight, and altitude values over which the aircraft can be operated within
RVSM airspace.
Height Keeping Capability Aircraft height keeping performance that can
be expected under nominal environmental operating conditions, with
proper aircraft operating practices and maintenance.
Height keeping Performance is the observed performance of an aircraft with
respect to adherence to a flight level.
Residual Static Source Error is the amount by which static source error (SSE)
remains under-corrected or overcorrected after the application of SSEC.
Static Source Error is the difference between the pressure sensed by the static
system at the static port and the undisturbed ambient pressure.
Static Source Error Correction (SSEC) is a correction for static source error.
Total Vertical Error (TVE) is the Vertical geometric difference between the actual
pressure altitude flown by an aircraft and its assigned pressure altitude (flight
level).
W/δ: Aircraft weight, W, divided by the atmospheric pressure ratio, δ

4.5.3 Flight Envelopes

The RVSM operational flight envelope, is the Mach number W/δ and altitude
ranges over which an aircraft can be operated in cruising flights within the RVSM
airspace. The RVSM operational flight envelope for any aircraft may be divided
into two parts as explained below:-

Full RVSM Flight Envelope: The full envelope will comprise the entire range of
operational Mach number, W/δ and altitude values over which the aircraft can be
operated within RVSM airspace. Table below establishes the parameters to be
considered.

Basic RVSM Flight Planning Envelope: The boundaries for the Basic envelope
are the same as those for the full envelope except for the upper Mach boundary.

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FULL RVSM ENVELOPE BOUNDARIES


Lower Boundary Upper Boundary

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Level The lower of;
- FL 410
FL 290 - Aircraft maximum certified
altitude;
- Altitude limited by; cruise
thrust / Buffet margins / other
aircraft flight limitations.
Mach - The lower of: - The lower of
or - Maximum endurance - Mmo / Vmo
Speed (holding speed) - Speed limited by cruise
- Manoeuvre speed thrust; buffet; other aircraft
flight limitations.
Gross - The lowest gross - The highest gross weight
weight weight compatible with compatible with operations
operations in RVSM in RVSM airspace.
airspace.

Note: Long Range Cruise Mach number is the Mach for 99% of best fuel mileage at the
particular wind speed under consideration.

4.5.4 Approval Requirements

Airspace where RVSM is applied should be considered special qualification


airspace. Both the individual aircraft and the specific aircraft type or types that
the operator intends to use will need to be approved by DGCA before the
operator conducts flights in RVSM airspace.

Approval process encompasses the following elements: -


a) Airworthiness aspects (including continued airworthiness)
b) Operational requirements
c) Provision for height monitoring of operator's aircraft

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4.5.5 Airplane Certification Status

All IndiGo Airbus airplanes have RVSM capability and have been authorised
by DGCA to operate in RVSM airspace.

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4.5.6 Equipment Required

RVSM equipment requirements are given in the FCOM PRO-SPO-50.

In addition, DGCA CAR requires that TCAS /ACAS (FCOM DSC-34-50-10)


must be serviceable.
In the RVSM airspace, it shall be ensured that all aircraft authorized for such
operations are equipped to:
 Indicate to the flight crew the flight level being flown;
 Automatically maintain a selected flight level;
 Provide an alert to the flight crew when a deviation occurs from the
selected flight level, with the threshold for such alert not to exceed 90 m
(300 feet)..
Any Airbus airplane is considered to be a member of an airplane group for the
purposes of RVSM approval. A modification or SB number formalises the
RVSM data package implementation. This modification or SB is required for
inclusion of the RVSM capability in the AFM.

4.5.7 MEL Requirements

The MEL for all Airbus models have also been revised to refer to the list of
equipment required as per regulation.

4.5.8 RVSM Procedure

General RVSM procedures valid in any RVSM airspace are published in the
FCOM for all Airbus models:

FCOM PRO/LIM/OEB/FCBUL (PRO-SPO-50)

a) Pre-Flight

Check that

- The required equipment for RVSM is operative (MEL).

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- No maintenance log entry, concerning defects that may affect RVSM


capability. Corrective actions have been taken, if necessary.

On ground, PFD altitude indications (QNH Reference) of ADR1 and ADR2

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do not differ from the airport altitude by more than the tolerances indicated
in the FCOM PRO-SPO-50.

- On ground, the difference between the two primary altitude indications


is less than the tolerance specified in FCOM PRO-SUP-34
"Maximum Differences between Altitude Indications".

- Review the weather forecast paying particular attention to severe


turbulence, which may affect airplane altitude, in order to maintain
the required RVSM performance.

- Check that the letter “W” is written in field 10 of the ATC Flight Plan to
indicate RVSM capability.

b) Prior to entry into RVSM Airspace

The required minimum equipment as given in FCOM PRO-SPO-50 and the


TCAS/ one ATC Transponder must be operative otherwise; a new clearance
to avoid RVSM airspace must be obtained.

c) Within RVSM AIRSPACE

All operating limitations, as given in RVSM airworthiness approval shall be


complied with.

Procedures given in FCOM PRO-SPO-50 shall be followed.

Autopilot shall remain engaged during level cruise, except when


circumstances such as the need to re-trim the aircraft or turbulence require
disengagement.

d) Post Flight

Any malfunction or deviation in relation to the altitude keeping capability and


failure of the required RVSM equipment must be reported. As per CAR, it
should also include action taken by Crew to try to isolate and rectify the fault.

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e) In-Flight Abnormal Procedures

When flying within RVSM airspace, the ATC must be informed in case of:

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- Any of the contingencies mentioned in FCOM PRO-SPO-50

- Excessive discrepancy of altitude indications without means of


determining which indication is valid.

- Abnormal situation, preventing the airplane from maintaining the


assigned FL If one AP is unable to keep the assigned altitude, select the
other AP.

If the pilot is advised in real time that the aircraft has been identified by a
height monitoring system as exhibiting a TVE greater than ±300 ft and/or an
ASE greater than ±245 ft then the pilot should follow established regional
procedures to protect the safe operation of the aircraft. This assumes that the
monitoring system will identify the TVE or ASE within the set limits for
accuracy.

If the pilot is notified by ATC of an assigned altitude deviation which exceeds


±300 ft then the pilot should take action to return to cleared flight level as
quickly as possible.

4.5.9 Contingency Procedures

Weather deviation and engine failure procedures in RVSM environment are


the basic contingencies that may arise. Guidance for contingency procedures
should not be interpreted in anyway as prejudicing the final authority and
responsibility of the Pilot in command for the safe operation of the aircraft.
a) If the Pilot is unsure of the vertical or lateral position of the aircraft or
the aircraft deviates from its assigned altitude or track for cause
without prior ATC clearance, then the pilot must take action to mitigate
the potential for collision with aircraft on adjacent routes or flight levels.
In this situation, the pilot should alert adjacent aircraft by making
maximum use of aircraft lighting and broadcasting position, flight level,
and intentions on 121.5 MHz (as a back-up, the appropriate VHF inter-
pilot air-to-air frequency 123.45 or any other as per area of operation

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may be used).
b) Unless the nature of the contingency dictates otherwise, the pilot
should advise ATC as soon as possible of a contingency situation and

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if possible, request an ATC clearance before deviating from the
assigned route or flight level.
c) The radio-telephony distress signal (MAYDAY) or urgency signal
(PAN-PAN) preferably spoken three times shall be used as
appropriate. Subsequent ATC action with respect to that aircraft shall
be based on the intentions of the pilot and the overall air traffic
situation.
d) If a revised ATC clearance cannot be obtained in a timely manner and
action is required to avoid potential conflict with other aircraft, then the
aircraft should be flown at an altitude and/or on a track where other
aircraft are least likely to be encountered:
This can be accomplished by offsetting from routes or altitudes
normally flown in the airspace. The ICAO Doc 7030 / AIP India ENR
1.9 "Special Procedures for In-flight Contingencies" provide
recommendations on the order of preference for the following pilot
actions:

- The Pilot may offset half the lateral distance between routes or tracks.

- The Pilot may offset half the vertical distance between altitudes
normally flown.

- The Pilot may also consider descending below FL 285 or climbing


above FL 410. (The vast majority of oceanic traffic has been found to
operate between FL 290 and 410. Flight above FL 410 or below FL 285
may limit exposure to conflict with other aircraft).
e) When executing a contingency manoeuvre the pilot should:
- Watch for conflicting traffic both visually and by reference to
ACAS,
- Continue to alert other aircraft using 121.5 MHz (as a back-up, the
VHF inter-pilot air-to-air frequency may be used).

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- Continue to fly offset tracks or altitudes until an ATC clearance is


obtained.
- Obtain an ATC clearance as soon as possible.

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f) Contingency procedures after entering RVSM airspace are:
- The pilot shall notify ATC of contingencies (equipment failures,
weather) which affect the ability to maintain the cleared flight level,
and co-ordinate a plan of action appropriate to the airspace
concerned.

Examples of equipment failures, which shall be notified, to ATC are:

 failure of all automatic altitude-control systems aboard the aircraft;

 loss of redundancy of altimetry systems,

 loss of thrust on an engine necessitating descent; or

 any other equipment failure affecting the ability to maintain cleared


flight level (CFL);
i) The pilot should notify ATC when encountering greater than moderate
turbulence.
ii) If unable to notify ATC and obtain an ATC clearance prior to deviating
from the assigned flight level, the pilot shall follow the established
contingency procedures and obtain ATC clearance as soon as
possible.
g) Five different scenarios are tabulated below:

(Refer next page)

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Scenario 1: All automatic altitude control systems fail (e.g., Automatic


Altitude Hold).
The Pilot should ATC can be expected to

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Initially
Maintain CFL -
Evaluate the aircraft's capability to
-
maintain altitude
Subsequently
Watch for conflicting traffic both
-
visually and by reference to TCAS
If considered necessary, alert
nearby aircraft by
1) making maximum use of exterior
lights;
-
2) Broadcasting position, FL, and
intentions on 121.5 MHz (as a
back-up, the VHF inter-pilot air-to
air frequency may be used.)
Notify ATC of the failure and
intended course of action. Possible -
courses of action include:
1) Maintaining the CFL and route, 1) If the pilot intends to continue in RVSM airspace,
The aircraft can maintain level. assess if the aircraft can be accommodated through
the provision of lateral, longitudinal, or conventional
vertical separation, and if so, apply the appropriate
minimum.
2) Requesting ATC clearance to climb 2) If the pilot requests clearance to exit RVSM airspace,
above or descend below RVSM accommodate expeditiously, if possible.
airspace if the aircraft cannot
maintain CFL and ATC cannot
establish lateral, longitudinal or
conventional vertical separation.
3) Executing the Doc 7030 / AIP India 3) If adequate separation cannot be established and it is
ENR 1.9 contingency manoeuvre to not possible to comply with the pilot's request for
offset from the assigned track and clearance to exit RVSM airspace, advise the pilot of
FL, if ATC clearance cannot be essential traffic information, notify other aircraft in
obtained and the aircraft cannot the vicinity and continue to monitor the situation.
maintain CFL.
4) Notify adjoining ATC facilities/ sectors of the situation.

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Scenario 2: All primary altimetry systems are considered unreliable or fail

The Pilot should ATC can be expected to

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Maintain CFL by reference to the standby
-
altimeter (if the aircraft is so equipped).

Alert nearby aircraft by


1) making maximum use of exterior lights;
2) broadcasting position, FL, and intentions on -
121.5 MHz (as a back-up, the VHF inter-pilot
air-to-air frequency may be used.

Consider declaring an emergency. Notify ATC


Obtain pilot's intentions, and pass
of the failure and intended course of action.
essential traffic information.
Possible courses of action include:
1) If the pilot intends to continue in RVSM
airspace, assess traffic situation to
1) Maintaining CFL and route provided that ATC determine if the aircraft can be
can provide lateral, longitudinal or conventional accommodated through the provision of
vertical separation. lateral, longitudinal, or conventional
vertical separation, and if so, apply the
appropriate minimum

2) Requesting ATC clearance to climb above or


2) If the pilot requests clearance to exit
descend below RVSM airspace if ATC cannot
RVSM airspace, accommodate
establish adequate separation from other
expeditiously, if possible.
aircraft.

3) If adequate separation cannot be


established and it is not possible to
3) Executing the Doc 7030 / AIP India ENR 1.9 comply with the pilots request for
contingency manoeuvre to offset from the clearance to exit RVSM airspace,
assigned track and FL, if ATC clearance cannot advise the pilot of essential traffic
be obtained. information, notify other aircraft in the
vicinity and continue to monitor the
situation.

4) Notify adjoining ATC facilities/ sectors of


the situation.

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Scenario 3: Loss of redundancy in primary altimetry systems

The Pilot should ATC can be expected to

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If the remaining altimetry system is functioning Acknowledge the situation and
normally, couple that system to the automatic continue to monitor progress
altitude control system, notify ATC of the loss of
redundancy and maintain vigilance of altitude
keeping.

Scenario 4: The primary altimeters diverge by more than 200ft (60m)

The Pilot should

Attempt to determine the defective system through established trouble-


shooting procedures and / or comparing the primary altimeter displace to
the standby altimeter (as corrected by the correction cards, if required).

If the defective system can be determined, couple the functioning altimeter


system to the altitude keeping device.

If the defective system cannot be determined, follow the guidance in


Scenario 3 for failure or unreliable altimeter indications of all primary
altimeters.

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*Scenario 5: Turbulence (greater than moderate) which the pilot believes will
impact the aircraft's capability to maintain flight level.

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The Pilot should ATC can be expected to

Watch for conflicting traffic both visually


-
and by reference to TCAS,

If considered necessary, alert nearby


aircraft by:
1) making maximum use of exterior lights;
2) Broadcasting position, FL, and intentions -
on 121.5 MHz (as a back-up, the VHF
inter-pilot air-to air frequency may be
used).

Notify ATC of intended course of action


as soon as possible. Possible courses -
of action include:

1) Assess traffic situation to determine if the


aircraft can be accommodated through the
1) Maintaining CFL and route provided ATC
Provision of lateral, longitudinal, or
can provide lateral, longitudinal or
conventional vertical separation, and if so,
conventional vertical separation.
apply the appropriate minimum:

2) If unable to provide adequate separation Advise


2) Requesting flight level change, if
the pilot of essential traffic information and
necessary.
request pilot’s intensions.

3) Executing the Doc 7030 contingency


manoeuvre to offset from the assigned
3) Notify other aircraft in the vicinity and monitor
track and FL, if ATC clearance cannot
the situation.
be obtained and the aircraft cannot
maintain CFL.

4) Notify adjoining ATC facilities/ sectors of the


situation

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

5. RADIO LISTENING WATCH .........................................................................3

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5. RADIO LISTENING WATCH

An airplane shall not be flown on an IFR flight within controlled airspace unless
a continuous listening watch is maintained on the appropriate VHF radio

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frequency. A two-way communication must be established with the appropriate
air traffic control unit.

It is the responsibility of the commander to ensure that at least one crew


member continuously monitors the appropriate ATC frequency at all times

The flight crew shall maintain a radio listening watch on the frequencies
appropriate for the area of operation and as required by the applicable
authorities. It shall include, as a minimum, an additional requirement for the
flight crew to monitor:

i) VHF emergency frequency (121.5MHz);


 On long-range over-water flights or on flights that require the
carriage of an emergency locater transmitter (ELT), except
during those periods when aircraft are carrying out
communications on other VHF channels, or when airborne
equipment limitations or flight deck duties do not permit
simultaneous guarding of two channels;

 If required by the applicable authorities, in areas or over routes


where the possibility of military intercept or other hazardous
situations exist.
ii) If required, the appropriate common frequency used for inflight
communication in designated airspace without ATC coverage. The
monitoring of the In Flight Broadcast Procedures (IFBP) frequency shall
be adhered to, in areas where such procedures are required.
Over water and uncontrolled / advisory airspace, a radio listening watch
must be maintained by one of the crew on appropriate primary HF
frequency of the concerned Flight Information Centre. The provision of
SELCAL on HF/RT is deemed to satisfy this condition. When outside
control airspace and VHF range the inter-pilot air-to-air VHF 123.45MHz
is to be monitored for blind transmissions of position reports. This
frequency is the air to air dedicated frequency to exchange necessary

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operational information and to facilitate resolution of operational


problems.

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DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT
CHAPTER 06
ALTITUDES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

6. DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES ..........................3

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6.1 MINIMUM VFR ALTITUDE REQUIREMENTS .........................................3

6.1.1 Application of Minimum Altitudes for VFR Flights .......................3

6.1.2 Minimum IFR Altitude Requirements ..........................................4

6.1.3 Minimum Altitudes Definitions ....................................................5

6.2 TERMINAL AREA ....................................................................................7

6.3 EN-ROUTE MINIMUM ALTITUDE ...........................................................8

6.3.1 Normal Operation .......................................................................8

6.3.2 Abnormal Operation ...................................................................8

6.4 MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDE CORRECTIONS......................................9

6.4.1 Temperature Correction .............................................................9

6.4.2 Pressure Correction ................................................................. 12

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CHAPTER 06
ALTITUDES

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6. DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDES

6.1 MINIMUM VFR ALTITUDE REQUIREMENTS

The company normally does not allow VFR operations for revenue flight. If

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VFR is required for a specific flight or part(s) of a flight, an authorisation of the
Vice President Flight Operations is required unless the flight segment is a part
of an approved company route. For VFR altitudes requirements, refer to ICAO
Rules of the Air - Annex 2 chapter 4 and The Aircraft Rules 1937 and any
national regulations applicable to the area over flown. (Also refer Para 4 of
CAR section 9, Series C, Part-1)

6.1.1 Application of Minimum Altitudes for VFR Flights


AIP India ENR 1.2 / 1.7

The flights are conducted so that the airplane is flown in conditions of visibility
and distance from clouds equal to or greater than those specified in ICAO
Rules of the Air except as otherwise authorised by the appropriate air traffic
control unit for VFR flights within control zones.
Note:

 VFR Flights within a control zone shall not be conducted if the ground visibility is
less than 5 Km or if the ceiling is less than 450 metres (1500’) at the aerodrome
concerned except when authorised by the appropriate air traffic control unit.

 VFR Flights outside controlled airspace shall not be conducted at a height of less
than 300 metres (1000’) above the ground or water and shall maintain sight of the
ground or water.

 VFR flights shall not be operated


o Above FL150
o more than 100NM seaward from the shoreline within controlled airspace

 Except when necessary for taking off, landing, or with permission of appropriate
Air Traffic Control Units, the airplane shall not be flown:

o Over congested areas, cities, towns, settlements or over an open air


assembly of persons unless at such a height which will permit, in the event of
any emergency, a landing to be made without undue hazard to persons or
property on the surface. This height shall not be less than 300 metres (1000’)

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above the highest obstacle within a radius of 600 metres (2000’) from the
aircraft.

o Elsewhere than as specified in clause (i) above, at a height less than 150
metres (500 feet) above the ground or water.

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 VFR flights shall not be operated between 20 mts after sunset and 20mts before
sunrise, except when exempted by air traffic control for local flights and such
training flights of flying club aircraft as may be cleared by air traffic control.

6.1.2 Minimum IFR Altitude Requirements

(AIP India ENR 1.7-3/CAR section 9, Series C, Part-1, Para 5)

It is the Company Policy that the Pilot-in-Command will ensure that the
minimum flight altitude applicable for all phases of flight is met. For
information and definition regarding Minimum flight altitude such as
Minimum Safety Altitude (MSA), Minimum En-route Altitude (MEA),
Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude (MOCA), Minimum Off-Route
Altitude (MORA) Minimum Vectoring Altitude (MVA) are published in
Jeppesen Manual and every flight shall be planned to operate at or above
these stipulated altitudes.

Note: 1. The minimum altitudes will be in compliance with the respective


state regulatory stipulation.

Note: 2. In respect of airfields that are not covered by Jeppesen manual,


the above minimum flight altitudes shall be as published by state or its
designated authority. All flights shall be planned to operate at or above
the stipulated Minimum altitudes on a published route when operating or
deviating from these routes.

a) Minimum Safe Heights

When an aircraft is operated for the purpose of commercial air transport,


the minimum altitude/flight level at which it is permitted to fly may be
governed by national regulations, air traffic control requirements, or by
the need to maintain a safe height margin above any significant terrain or
obstacle en route. Whichever of these requirements produces the highest
altitude/flight level for a particular route will determine the minimum flight
altitude for that route.

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CHAPTER 06
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In India, the minimum flight altitude on the ATS routes as presented in


AIP, AIP supplements or NOTAMs have been determined so as to
ensure at least 1000ft (300M) vertical clearance above the highest
obstacle within 10NM on each side of the centre line of the route.

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b) Minimum Levels
AIP India ENR 1.3-1

Except when necessary for take-off or landing or when specifically


authorised by the appropriate authority, an IFR flight shall not be flown at
a level that is below the established minimum flight altitude or where no
such minimum flight altitude has been established-

 Over high terrain or in mountainous areas, at a level which is at least


600M (2000 Ft) above the highest obstacle located within 8KM of the
estimated position of the aircraft
 Elsewhere than as specified above, at a level which is at least 300M
(1000 Ft) above the highest obstacle located within 8KM of the
estimated position of the aircraft.

In India the quadrantal system of Flight Altitudes has been replaced by


semi-circular system. The procedures outlined in the following
paragraphs are to be followed when calculating the minimum altitude for
the safe avoidance of en-route terrain and obstacles keeping in mind the
track.

6.1.3 Minimum Altitudes Definitions

a) MEA (Minimum En-route IFR Altitude)

The lowest altitude (or Flight Level), as derived by Jeppesen and


depicted on enroute charts, between radio fixes that meets obstacle
clearance requirements between those fixes and in many countries
assures acceptable navigational and radio signal coverage.

b) MORA (Minimum Off-Route Altitude) – As derived by Navigational


Database/Chart supplier like Jeppesen etc.

A route MORA provides reference point clearance within 10 NM (18.5


km) of the route centreline (regardless of the route width) and end fixes.

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A grid MORA altitude provides a reference point clearance within the


section outlined by latitude and longitude lines.

MORA values clear all reference points by 1000 ft (300 m) in areas


where the highest reference points are 5000 ft (1500 m) MSL, or lower.

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MORA values clear all reference points by 2000 ft (600 m) in areas
where the reference points are above 5000 ft (1500 m) MSL.

When a MORA is shown along a route as "unknown" or within a grid as


"un-surveyed" a MORA is not shown due to incomplete or insufficient
information.

c) MOCA (Minimum Obstruction Clearance altitude)

The lowest altitude, as derived by Jeppesen and depicted on Jeppesen


en-route charts, in effect between radio fixes on VOR airways, off-
airways routes, or route segments, which meets obstacle clearance
requirements for the entire route segment.

d) MSA (Minimum Sector Altitude)

Altitude depicted on instrument approach, SID or STAR charts and


identified as the minimum altitude which provides a 1000 ft (300 m)
obstacle clearance within a 25 NM (46 km) (or other value as stated)
radius from the navigational facility upon which the MSA is predicated.
This altitude does not necessarily guarantee NAVAID reception.

e) MINIMUM VECTORING ALTITUDE (MVA)

The lowest MSL altitude at which an IFR flight can be vectored by a radar
controller, for radar approaches, departures and missed approaches. The
altitude meets IFR Obstacle Clearance criteria, It may however be lower
than the published MEA along an airway.

During departure and approach, crew should not descend below the
Minimum Sector Altitude (MSA) or minimum altitude depicted on the
Jeppesen SID/ STAR, Instrument Approach chart for the departure/
approach being conducted. However, during radar vectoring crew should
be aware of the Minimum Vectoring Altitude (MVA). MVA charts are not
always available in the Jeppesen Airport charts, although they are

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available to the radar controllers. In case the crew are directed by the
radar controller to descend below MSA and MVA charts are not available,
crew must bring it to the notice of the radar controller. If in doubt, crew
should not descend below MSA.

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f) DECISION ALTITUDE / HEIGHT(DA/H)

A specified altitude or height in a precision approach at which a missed


approach must be initiated if the required visual reference to continue the
approach has not been established.
Note:

i) Decision Altitude (DA) is referred to Mean Sea Level (MSL) and Decision
Height (DH) is referred to the threshold elevation and is used in conjunction
with CAT II and CAT III approaches. For CAT I and non-precision approaches
term MDA is used on airbus family aircraft.

ii) The required visual reference means that section of the visual aids or of the
approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the Pilot
to have made an assessment of the airplane position and rate of change of
position, in relation to the desired flight path.

g) OBSTACLE CLEARANCE ALTITUDE / HEIGHT (OCA/H)

The lowest altitude (OCA), or alternatively the lowest height above the
elevation of the relevant runway threshold or above the aerodrome
elevation as applicable (OCH) used in establishing compliance with
appropriate obstacle clearance criteria.

h) MINIMUM DESCENT ALTITUDE / HEIGHT (MDA/H)

A specified altitude/height in a non-precision approach, CAT I ILS (For


Airbus aircraft) or circling approach below which descent may not be
made without the required visual reference.

6.2 TERMINAL AREA

Except during IFR approach or departure when on track with a published


minimum altitude on airport charts, airplane must not be flown at altitude
lower than the Minimum Sector Altitude (MSA).

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6.3 EN-ROUTE MINIMUM ALTITUDE

6.3.1 Normal Operation

En-route IFR flight levels or altitudes should be higher than the published

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Minimum En-route IFR Altitude (MEA) indicated on en-route charts.

The minimum safe en-route altitude should be the higher of the Minimum Off-
Route Altitude (MORA) and the published Minimum Obstruction Clearance
Altitude (MOCA). Both minimum altitudes are indicated on en-route charts
when they exist.

In case of incomplete or lack of safety altitude information, obstacles and


reference points have to be located on Operational Navigation Charts (ONC)
or topographic maps. The minimum safe en-route altitude must clear all
obstacles within 5 NM (9.3 km) of the route centreline by 1000 ft (300 m) if the
reference point is not higher than 5000 ft (1500 m) MSL or 2000 ft (600 m) if
reference point is higher than 5000 ft MSL.

If available and not limiting, the grid MORA may be used as minimum flight
altitude.

These minimum altitudes must be respected along the track with all engines
operative unless a procedure has been approved to cope with
depressurisation. During flight preparation, the en-route minimum altitudes
must be established for all the route segments.

6.3.2 Abnormal Operation

It may be necessary to establish diversion procedures for critical cases taking


into account the topography along the route and the requirements mentioned
below (engine(s) failure, depressurisation).

It may be necessary to determine Point(s) of No Return (PNR) and establish


appropriate procedures (drift down on course, turn back or diversion outside
the track depending on the aircraft position).

When obstacle limited, the pilot should be reminded for correct drift down
procedure as specified in the appropriate chapter of the FCOM (one engine(s)
inoperative).

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Diversion procedures established for obstacle limited routes are described in


the Operations Manual Part C (Route Guide).

6.4 MINIMUM FLIGHT ALTITUDE CORRECTIONS

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In order to determine the geometrical altitude of the aircraft and thus ensure
adequate obstacle clearance, corrections have to be applied when Outside
Air Temperature and/or pressure differ from standard atmosphere.

6.4.1 Temperature Correction


FCOM PER (PER-OPD-GEN-P8/10)

The calculated minimum safe altitudes/heights must be corrected when the


OAT is much lower than that predicted by the standard atmosphere.

The correction has to be applied on the height above the elevation of the
altimeter setting source. The altimeter setting source is generally the
atmosphere pressure at an airport, and the correction on the height above the
airport has to be applied on the indicated altitude. The same correction value
is applied when flying at either QFE or QNH.

a) Low altitude temperature corrections

Approximate correction

Increase obstacle elevation by 4% per 10°C below ISA, of the height above
the elevation of the altimeter setting source or decrease aircraft indicated
altitude by 4% per 10°C below ISA of the height above the elevation of the
altimeter setting source.

This method is generally used to adjust minimum safe altitudes and may be
applied for all altimeters setting source altitudes for temperatures above -
15°C.

Tabulated corrections

For colder temperatures, a more accurate correction should be obtained from


the following table calculated for a sea level aerodrome. It is conservative
when applied at higher aerodrome.

Values to be added by the pilot to minimum promulgated


heights/altitudes (ft)

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Height above the elevation of the altimeter setting source (ft)


Aerodrome
Temperature 300
200 300 400 500 1000 2000 4000 5000
0

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0°C 20 20 30 30 60 120 170 230 290

-10°C 20 30 40 50 100 200 290 390 490

-20°C 30 50 60 70 140 280 430 570 710

-30°C 40 60 80 100 190 380 570 760 950

-40°C 50 80 100 120 240 480 720 970 1210

-50°C 60 90 120 150 300 600 890 1190 1500

b) High altitude temperature corrections

The graph given hereafter has to be used en-route for high altitude
operation. It does not take into account the elevation of the altimeter
setting source.
In theory, this correction applies to the air column between the ground
and the aircraft. When flying above high terrain, the use of this
correction gives a conservative margin.

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DETERMINATION OF MINIMUM FLIGHT
CHAPTER 06
ALTITUDES

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CHAPTER 06
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Altitude temperature correction for high altitude use

Example: Given: MEA = FL200 / ISA-30°C

Find: min FL = 230

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6.4.2 Pressure Correction

When flying at levels with the altimeter set to 1013hPa, the minimum safe
altitude must be corrected for deviations in pressure when the pressure is
lower than the standard atmosphere (1013hPa).

The appropriate correction is 28 ft per hPa below 1013hPa

The following table gives more accurate data. The following correction is to be
applied to the indicated altitude (reference 1013 hPa) to determine the
geometrical aircraft altitude.

QNH correction

QNH of nearest Correction QNH of nearest Correction


station station

1013 - 0 ft

1050 + 1000 ft 1010 - 80 ft

1045 + 860 ft 1005 - 220 ft

1040 + 720 ft 1000 - 380 ft

1035 + 590 ft 995 - 510 ft

1030 + 460 ft 990 - 630 ft

1025 + 320 ft 985 - 780 ft

1020 + 180 ft 980 - 920 ft

1015 + 50 ft 975 - 1080 ft

1013 + 0 ft

Example: Given: Indicated altitude = 20000 ft, ISA, local QNH = 995 hPa

Find: Geometrical (true) altitude = 20000 - 510 = 19490 ft.

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CHAPTER 06
ALTITUDES

When using the QNH or QFE altimeter setting (giving altitude or height above
QFE datum respectively), a pressure correction is not required.

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CHAPTER 06
ALTITUDES

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OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

DETERMINATION OF AERODROME
CHAPTER 07
OPERATING MINIMA

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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7. METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF AERODROME
OPERATINGMINIMA ...............................................................................5

7.1 CONCEPT OF MINIMA ............................................................................5

7.1.1 DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................7

7.2 AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA......................................................9

7.2.1 GENERAL ..................................................................................9

7.2.2 CONSIDERATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING THE AERODROME


OPERATING MINIMA: ............................................................. 10

7.2.3 ADDITIONAL CRITERIA TO BE ENSURED: ........................... 10

7.3 TAKEOFF OPERATING MINIMA ..........................................................11

7.3.1 GENERAL ................................................................................ 11

7.3.2 VISUAL REFERENCE.............................................................. 12

7.3.3 REQUIRED VISIBILITY/RVR ................................................... 13

7.3.4 Pilot Assessment of equivalent TDZ RVR ................................ 15

7.4 APPROACH CAT I, APV AND NON-PRECISION APPROACHES .......16

7.4.1 Cat I, APV AND NON-PRECISION APPROACH OPERATIONS


................................................................................................. 16

7.4.2 DECISION HEIGHT (DH) ......................................................... 17

7.4.3 MINIMUM DESCENT HEIGHT (MDH) ..................................... 17

7.4.4 SYSTEM MINIMA ..................................................................... 18

7.4.5 VISUAL REFERENCE ............................................................. 19

7.4.6 APPROACH LIGHT SYSTEMS ................................................ 19

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CHAPTER 07
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7.4.7 RVR/CMV/Visibility Minima ...................................................... 20

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7.5 LOW VISIBILITY OPERATIONS (CAT II, CAT IIIA/B, LVTO) .............. 25

7.5.1 PRECISION APPROACH – CATEGORY II OPERATIONS ..... 26

7.5.2 PRECISION APPROACH – CATEGORY III OPERATIONS .... 27

7.5.3 OUTAGE OF LIGHTING SYSTEM-PRECISION APPROACH


RUNWAY CATEGORY II AND/OR III ...................................... 31

7.5.4 LOW VISIBILITY TAKE-OFF –LVTO ....................................... 31

7.6 CIRCLING APPROACH MINIMA .......................................................... 32

7.7 VISUAL APPROACH ............................................................................ 33

7.8 OPERATIONAL CRITERIA FOR MINIMA APPLICABILITY................. 33

7.8.1 LANDING MINIMA ................................................................... 33

7.8.2 ALTERNATE AERODROME PLANNING MINIMA FOR


DISPATCH ............................................................................... 33

7.8.3 BELOW MINIMA CONDITIONS............................................... 35

7.8.4 DISPATCH OF FLIGHT / CONTINUATION OF IFR FLIGHT .. 36

7.8.5 COMMENCEMENT OF INSTRUMENT APPROACH


PROCEDURE .......................................................................... 36

7.8.6 TAKE-OFF FROM AERODROME HAVING MORE THAN ONE


INSTRUMENT RUNWAY ........................................................ 36

7.8.7 TAKE-OFF AND LANDING AT AERODROME HAVING NO


INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE ............................ 37

7.8.8 COMMANDERS’ RESPONSIBILITY ....................................... 37

7.8.9 PROHIBITION OF LANDING BELOW MINIMA ....................... 37

7.8.10 CONVERSION OF REPORTED METEOROLOGICAL


VISIBILITY TO RVR/CMV ...................................................... 37

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CHAPTER 07
OPERATING MINIMA

7.8.11 FAILED OR DOWNGRADED EQUIPMENT - EFFECT


ON LANDING MINIMA: .......................................................... 39

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7.8.12 PRESENTATION OF AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA ... 41

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CHAPTER 07
OPERATING MINIMA

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CHAPTER 07
OPERATING MINIMA

7. METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF AERODROME


OPERATINGMINIMA

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7.1 CONCEPT OF MINIMA

Aerodrome Operating Minima are established in order to ensure the desired


level of safety in Airplane Operations at an Aerodrome by limiting these operations
in specified weather conditions. The values of aerodrome operating minima for a
particular operation must ensure that at all times the combination of information
available from external sources and the airplane instruments and equipment is
sufficient to enable the airplane to be operated along the desired flight path. In
determining the values of aerodrome operating minima, a large number of factors
are involved which fall primarily into three groups as follows:

- The ground environment and the design, maintenance and operation of


ground equipment;

- The characteristics of the aeroplane and its equipment; Aircraft


capability as given in the Airplane Flight Manual defines the lowest
minima for which an aircraft has been certified.

- The operator’s procedures, flight crew training and experience.

The Aerodrome Operating Minima comprise the limits of usability of an aerodrome


for either take-off or landing, usually expressed in terms of visibility or Runway
Visual Range (RVR), and Decision Altitude/Decision Height (DA/DH) or minimum
Descent Altitude/Minimum Descent Height (MDA/MDH). DA (DH) or MDA (MDH)
depends upon the OCA (OCH) specified in the Instrument Approach Procedure.
The value of Visibility (RVR) minima depends upon Decision Height / Minimum
Descent Height and Approach Lighting System (Nil,Basic, Intermediate or full
facilities). Higher the DH/MDH, higher would be the corresponding visibility / RVR
minima.
The minima always takes obstacle clearance into account and have
different values depending on the weather conditions and the aerodrome
facilities available.The term “minima” refers to the aerodrome weather
conditions and defines the minimum horizontal visibility and minimum ceiling
prescribed for taking off from, or landing a civil aircraft to this particular
aerodrome.

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CHAPTER 07
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Different concepts of minima:

Aircraft capability given in the Aircraft Flight Manual defines the lowest

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minima for which the aircraft has been certified.

The lowest minima depends on:

- The aircraft type, performance and handling characteristics;

- The equipment available on the aircraft for the purpose of


navigation and/or control of the flight path.

• Aerodrome operating minima are established in accordance with the


national authorities of the aerodrome. National Authority of the operator may
require the operator to apply increment to the published aerodrome
operating minima.

The aerodrome operating minima depends on:

- The dimension and characteristics of the runways which may be


selected for use;

- The adequacy and performance of the available visual and non-


visual ground aids;

- The obstacles in the approach, missed approach and the


climb-out areas required for the execution of contingency
procedures and necessary clearance.

- The obstacle clearance altitude/height for the instrument


approach procedures;

- The means to determine and report meteorological conditions.

• Operator’s minima approved by the national authority of the operator.


They are the lowest minima that the operator is allowed to use.

• Crew minima. They are the minima that the crew is authorised to operate.
They are based upon the qualification of the flight crewmembers.

The applicable minima are the highest of these minima.

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CHAPTER 07
OPERATING MINIMA

7.1.1 Definitions

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Runway visual range
An instrumentally derived value, based on standard calibrations that represent the
horizontal distance a Pilot is expected to see down the runway from the approach
end. It is based on the sighting either high intensity runway lights or on the visual
contrast of other targets whichever yields greater visual range. The range over
which the pilot of an airplane on the centre line of a runway can see the runway
surface markings or the lights delineating the runway or identifying its centre line.
RVR is horizontal visual range, not slant visual range. It is based on measurement
of distance by a transmissometer located near the touchdown point, midpoint or
roll out end of the instrument runway and is reported in metres. RVR is required to
be reported when the prevailing visibility or RVR is less than 1500 meters. The
commander may request an RVR if it is not reported.

There may be as much as three RVR values measured on an instrument runway.

i) Touchdown RVR - The RVR readout values obtained from RVR


equipment serving the runway touchdown zone.

ii) Mid RVR - The RVR values obtained from RVR equipment located
midfield of the runway.

iii) Roll out RVR - the RVR values obtained from RVR equipment located
near the roll out end of the runway.
Decision altitude/ Decision height (DA)/ (DH)

A specified altitude or height in a precision approach or approach with vertical


guidance at which a missed approach must be initiated, if the required visual
reference to continue the approach, has not been established.
Note 1. — Decision altitude (DA) is referenced to mean sea level and decision height (DH) is
referenced to the threshold elevation.
Note 2. — The required visual reference means that section of the visual aids or of the
approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the pilot to have made an
assessment of the aircraft position and rate of change of position, in
relation to the desired flight path. In Category III operations with a decision height the required
visual reference is that specified for the particular procedure and operation.

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CHAPTER 07
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Note 3. — For convenience where both expressions are used they may be written in the form
―decision altitude/height‖ and abbreviated ―DA/H‖.

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Visibility

Visibility for aeronautical purposes is the greater of:

a) the greatest distance at which a black object of suitable dimensions,


situated near the ground, can be seen and recognized when observed
against a bright background;
b) The greatest distance at which lights in the vicinity of 1 000 candelas
can be seen and identified against an unlit background.

Note 1. — The two distances have different values in air of a given extinction coefficient, and
the latter b) varies with the background illumination. The former a) is represented by the
meteorological optical range (MOR).

Note 2. — The definition applies to the observations of visibility in local routine and special
reports, to the observations of prevailing and minimum visibility reported in METAR and
SPECI and to the observations of ground visibility.

Minimum descent altitude (MDA) or minimum descent height (MDH)

A specified altitude or height, in a non-precision approach or circling approach


below which, descent must not be made without the required visual reference.

Note 1.— Minimum descent altitude (MDA) is referenced to mean sea level and minimum
descent height (MDH) is referenced to the aerodrome elevation or to the threshold elevation
if that is more than 2 m (7 ft) below the aerodrome elevation. A minimum descent height for a
circling approach is referenced to the aerodrome elevation.
Note 2. — The required visual reference means that section of the visual aids or of the
approach area which should have been in view for sufficient time for the pilot to have made
an assessment of the aircraft position and rate of change of position, in relation to the
desired flight path. In the case of a circling approach the required visual reference is the
runway environment.
Note 3. — For convenience when both expressions are used they may be written in the form
―minimum descent altitude/ height‖ and abbreviated ―MDA/H‖.

A-7-8 Effective 09-Jul-14


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

DETERMINATION OF AERODROME
CHAPTER 07
OPERATING MINIMA

7.2 AERODROME OPERATING MINIMA

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


7.2.1 GENERAL

To enable operations safely at an aerodrome under limiting weather


conditions, Aerodrome Operating Minima (AOM) are established. There
are two sets of Aerodrome Operating Minima for application by Indian
operators and at Indian aerodromes;

- Normal Aerodrome Operating Minima and


- Restricted Aerodrome Operating Minima.
Normal AOM is to be applied by scheduled operators. Restricted AOM
consists of additives of height and visibility to the normal AOM and is to be
applied in the following cases;

 By non-scheduled and general aviation operators.


 By PICs when operating first flight to a destination aerodrome or
where recency requirements are not met as per the CAR Section 8
Series O, Part II Para 9.4.3.3( where the requirement of restricted
minima is obviated by qualifing the Pilot in command to land at
aerodrome concerned by means of an adequate pictorial
representation). IndiGo complies with this requirement by providing
adequate pictorial presentation depicted in approach plates and
subsequent briefings as given in Company Operations Manual (Part-
C).
 By PICs (For pilots on 1st command or change of aircraft type) till
they have gained command experience of 100 hours on type.
Following are the Additives of height and visibility to the normal
AOM:
i.DA(H) or MDA(H) + 100 ft
ii.Approved VIS/RVR + 400 meters,
Note:

 Visibility increment will not be considered beyond 5000m

A-7-9 Effective 09-Jul-14


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A ISSUE II, Rev 04

DETERMINATION OF AERODROME
CHAPTER 07
OPERATING MINIMA

 A conditional captain on release to unconditional command will be


restored to normal minima

Not a controlled copy, printed from e-manual / Company Portal


 Conditional Captains will not exercise Low Visibility Take ff Minima.
7.2.2 CONSIDERATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING THE AERODROME
OPERATING MINIMA:

In establishing the aerodrome operating minima which will apply to any particular
operation, following considerations are taken full account of:

a) The type, performance and handling characteristics of the aeroplane;


b) The composition of the flight crew, their competence and experience;
c) The dimensions and characteristics of the runways which may be selected for
use;
d) The adequacy and performance of the available visual and non-visual ground
aids;
e) The equipment available on the aeroplane for the purpose of navigation
and/or control of the flight path, as appropriate, during the take-off, the
approach, the flare, the landing, roll-out and the missed approach;
f) The obstacles in the approach, missed approach and the climb-out areas
required for the execution of contingency procedures and necessary
clearance;
g) The obstacle clearance altitude/height for the instrument approach
procedures;
h) The means to determine and report meteorological conditions; and
i) The flight technique to be used during the final approach.
7.2.3 ADDITIONAL CRITERIA TO BE ENSURED:

a) The PIC and Co-pilot must hold an instrument rating for flights under IFR and
meet the requirements for recent experience;
b) All flight crew members should be qualified and trained for take-off, instrument
approaches and operations to the lowest Cat-I/II/III minima as applicable;

A-7-10 Effective 09-Jul-14


INTERGLOBE AVIATION LTD FLT.OMA

OPERATIONS MANUAL PART A