Sie sind auf Seite 1von 3

Women’s Monologues

Home | Students | Admissions | BFA Acting, BFA Musical Theatre | Audition Information 
 Areas of Study
 Admissions 
o BFA Acting, BFA Musical Theatre 
 Audition Information 
 Men's Monologues
 Women's Monologues
 Retention/Continuation Requirements
o BFA Design/Tech
o BA Theatre
o BFA History/Dramaturgy
o Theatre Minor
o BA Film & TV
o BFA Film & TV
o Film & TV Minor
o MFA Design/Technology
o Graduate Minor in Theatre
 Advising and Registration
 Student Resources

Note to those auditioning: The Acting/Musical Theatre Faculty strongly recommend that you read the 
play from which the monologue is selected. This will allow you to make informed acting choices. 
Monologues must be memorized. At your audition you may be given direction by the faculty and asked to 
make adjustments in your performance. Please dress professionally and wear shoes in which you can move.
We encourage you to seek coaching on your monologue and/or songs from your current or past theatre or 
music teacher or director. Please arrive at least fifteen minutes early for your appointment.

You will be auditioning for a Professional Training Program which is designed for those individuals who 
wish to pursue a professional career in the theatre. Admission to the Acting and Musical Theatre programs 
is competitive and the training is rigorous.

Pick only ONE of the below pieces to prepare as your audition (note: these are WOMEN'S monologues; 
men's are on a separate page). Choose a second monologue outside of this list, in case you are asked to 
show a further example of your acting work

All monologues on this site and the plays from which they are excerpted are protected by US 
copyright law.

Beneatha
A Raisin in the Sun
by Lorraine Hansbury
©1984
Published by Samuel French Incorporated
ISBN: 978­0­573­61463­7

When I was very small... we used to take our sleds out in the wintertime and the only hills we had were the 
ice­covered stone steps of some house down the street. And we used to fill them in with snow and make 
them smooth and slide down them all day... and it was very dangerous you know... far too steep... and sure 
enough one day a kid named Rufus came down too fast and hit the sidewalk... and we saw his face just split
open right there in front of us. And I remember standing there looking at his bloody open face thinking that
was the end of Rufus. But the ambulance came and they took him to the hospital and they fixed the broken 
bones and they sewed it all up... and the next time I saw Rufus he just had a little line down the middle of 
his face... I never got over that. That that was what one person could do for another, fix him up­­­ sew up 
the problem, make him all right again. That was the most marvelous thing in the world... I wanted to do 
that. I wanted to cure. It used to be so important to me.

Cathy
Whiteout
by Alan Newton
Published by Dramatic Publishing Company
ISBN: 978­1­58342­102­4

Well, the first day of ninth grade, here I am, the strange new girl from Detroit, and my dad and I drive up 
in his little Yugo. The first thing I hear as I'm walking to my brand­new school is some girl say, "Is that a 
car or a shoe box?" I suddenly just froze, right there in front of everyone. I was ten yards away from my 
new school, but I'd never felt farther away from anything. I turned back around to see if Dad was still 
there, and every car I saw was a Cut¬lass, a Beamer, or a Volvo station wagon. All the kids getting out of 
them were tall and tan and yearbook­cute, all the parents behind the wheels looked like tennis pros. . . . 
And then, lo and behold, into the lot comes the only car whose status was anywhere near that tenth cir¬cle 
of hell in which the Yugo will forever languish—a 1977, burnt­orange, AMC Pacer! And I knew I had a 
friend.

Laurie
The Glass Menagerie
by Tennessee Williams
Published by Dramatists Play Service, Inc.
ISBN: 978­0­8222­0450­3

Well, I do—as I said—have my—glass collection. Little articles, they're ornaments mostly! Most of them 
are little animals made out of glass, the tiniest little animals in the world. Mother calls them a glass 
menagerie! Here's an example of one, if you'd like to see it! This one is one of the oldest. It's nearly 
thirteen. Oh, be careful—if you breathe, it breaks! Go on, I trust you with him! There now—you're holding 
him gently! Hold him over the light, he loves the light! You see how the light shines through him? I 
shouldn't be partial, but he is my favorite one. Haven't you noticed the single horn on his forehead?
He stays on a shelf with some horses that don't have horns and all of them seem to get along nicely 
together. I haven't heard any arguments among them!
Put him on the table. They all like a change of scenery once in a while!

Clea
The Scene
By Theresa Rebeck
©2007
Published by Samuel French, Inc.
ISBN: 978­0­573­65066­6

No no, I don’t drink. You go ahead. I mean, that’s just for me, I don’t impose that on people or anything…

Because you know, I was at this party last week it was such a scene, there were so many people there. You 
know it was this young director, he’s got like seven things going at once, Off Broadway; it was his birthday
party, and they rented out the top two floors of this loft in Chelsea, it was this wild party, like surreal, and 
then at one point in the evening? I just realized, that everyone was just totally shit­faced. The whole party! 
Everybody was like slurring their words and this one guy was just leaning against the wall like he couldn’t 
even stand up, it was just really disgusting and I got so triggered. I mean I don’t want to be reactive in 
situations like that, I don’t like to judge people on a really superficial level or anything but it was kind of 
horrifying.

I mean, not that I—you know, drink, you should drink! Enjoy yourselves!
Clara
The Light in the Piazza
by Craig Lucas
©2006
Published by Theatre Communications Group, Inc.
ISBN: 978­1­55936­267­2

No.  I don’t want to go back to the hotel.  I don’t want to do what you want me to do.  You’re not sorry at 
all.  Look at you, you’re happy.  Because you are!  You’re happy to be the one who knows everything I 
need and has the final word.  It’s clear.  I don’t care what you are, honestly, Mother.  You ignore what I 
say, what I want.  You make things up the way you want them.  You lie about things.  Yes! To everyone! 
How we all love one another.  Daddy doesn’t love you!  Look in his eyes for once.  Look at yourself in the 
mirror!

Antigone
Antigone
by Jean Anouilh
© 1951 by Jean Anouilh and Lewis Galantiere
Samuel French, Inc.
ISBN: 0573605467

You must keep me safe, the way you used to when I was little. Nanny! Stronger than all fever, stronger than
any nightmare, stronger than the shadow of the cupboard that used to snarl at me and turn into a dragon 
on the bedroom wall. Stronger than the night itself…stronger than death, give me your hand, Nanny, as if I 
were ill in bed, and you sitting beside me.

It’s just that I’m a little young still for what I have to go through. But nobody but you must know that.

Put your hand like this against my cheek. There! I’m not afraid anymore.