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1. What did we cover today that’s important to you to remember?

2. How much did you feel you could trust your therapist today?

3. Was there anything that bothered you about therapy today? If so, what
was it?

4. How much homework had you done for therapy today? How likely are
you to do the new homework?

5. What do you want to make sure to cover at the next session?

FIGURE 5.2. Therapy Report. From J. S. Beck (2011). Copyight 2011 by Judith S. Beck.
Reprinted by permission.

Reprinted by permission in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond, Second Edition, by Judith
S. Beck (Guilford Press, 2011). Permission to photocopy this material is granted to purchasers of
this book for personal use only (see copyright page for details).
MON. TUE. WED. THU. FRI. SAT. SUN.
6–7

7–8

8–9

9–10

Morning

10–11

11–12

12–1

1–2

Afternoon
2–3

(cont.)

FIGURE 6.1. Activity Chart. From J. S. Beck (2011). Copyright 2011 by Judith S. Beck. Adapted by permission.

Reprinted by permission in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond, Second Edition, by Judith S. Beck (Guilford Press, 2011). Permission to photocopy
this material is granted to purchasers of this book for personal use only (see copyright page for details).
MON. TUE. WED. THU. FRI. SAT. SUN.
3–4

4–5

Afternoon

5–6

6–7

7–8

8–9

9–10

Evening
10–11

11–12

12–1

FIGURE 6.1. (cont.)

Patient’s name: Date:


Diagnosis: Axis I Axis II

Relevant Childhood Data


Which experiences contributed to the development and maintenance of the core belief(s)?

Core Belief(s)
What are the patient’s most central beliefs about him/herself?

Conditional Assumptions/Beliefs/Rules
Which positive assumption help him/her cope with his/her core belief(s)?
What is the negative counterpart of this assumption?

Compensatory/Coping Strategy(ies)
Which behaviors help him/her cope with the belief(s)?

Situation 1 Situation 1 Situation 1


What was the problematic
situation?

Automatic Thought Automatic Thought Automatic Thought


What went through his/her mind?

Meaning of the A.T. Meaning of the A.T. Meaning of the A.T.


What did the automatic thought
mean to him/her?

Emotion Emotion Emotion


What emotion was associated
with the automatic thought?

Behavior Behavior Behavior


What did the patient do then?

FIGURE 13.1. Cognitive Conceptualization Diagram. Adapted from Cognitive behavior


therapy worksheet packet. Copyright 2011 by Judith S. Beck. Bala Cynwyd, PA: Beck Insti­
tute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Reprinted by permission in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond, Second Edition, by Judith
S. Beck (Guilford Press, 2011). Permission to photocopy this material is granted to purchasers of
this book for personal use only (see copyright page for details).
1. Review of past week(s)
u What positive things have happened? What do I deserve credit for?
u What problems came up? What did I do? If the problem recurs, what, if
anything, should I do differently?

2. Review of homework
u Did I do what I had planned? If not, what got in the way (practical
problems; automatic thoughts), and what can I do about that next
time?
u What should I continue to do this week?

3. Current problematic issues/situations


u Am I viewing this problem realistically, or have I been overreacting? Is
there another way of viewing this?
u What should I do?

4. Prediction of future problems


u What problems may come up in the next few days or weeks, and what
should I do about them?

5. Set new homework


u What homework would be helpful? Should I consider:
 Doing Thought Records?
 Scheduling pleasure or mastery activities?
 Reading therapy notes?
 Practicing skills such as relaxation?
 Doing a credit list?

6. Schedule the next self-therapy appointment

FIGURE 18.3. Guide to self-therapy sessions. From Cognitive behavior therapy worksheet
packet. Copyright 2011 by Judith S. Beck. Bala Cynwyd, PA: Beck Institute for Cognitive
Behavior Therapy.

Reprinted by permission in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond, Second Edition, by Judith
S. Beck (Guilford Press, 2011). Permission to photocopy this material is granted to purchasers of
this book for personal use only (see copyright page for details).
1. Schedule ahead—make definite appointments, if possible, and call to
confirm.

2. Consider coming as a preventive measure, even if you have been


maintaining your progress.

3. Prepare before you come. Decide what would be helpful to discuss,


including:

a. What has gone well for you?

b. What problems arose? How did you handle them? Was there a better
way of handling them?

c. What problem(s) could arise between this booster session and your
next booster session? Imagine the problem in detail. What automatic
thoughts might you have? What beliefs might be activated? How will
you deal with the automatic thoughts/beliefs? How will you problem-
solve?

d. What cognitive behavior therapy work did you do? What cognitive
behavior therapy work would you like to do between now and the
next booster session? What automatic thoughts might get in the way
of doing the cognitive behavior therapy work? How will you answer
these thoughts?

e. What further goals do you have for yourself? How will you achieve
them? How can the things you learned in cognitive behavior therapy
help?

FIGURE 18.5. Guide to booster sessions. From Cognitive behavior therapy worksheet
packet. Copyright 2011 by Judith S. Beck. Bala Cynwyd, PA: Beck Institute for Cognitive
Behavior Therapy.

Reprinted by permission in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond, Second Edition, by Judith
S. Beck (Guilford Press, 2011). Permission to photocopy this material is granted to purchasers of
this book for personal use only (see copyright page for details).