You are on page 1of 6

6/26/2016 www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.

htm

BTech Course Structure and Syllabus for Biotechnology
 
(To be applicable from 2013 batch onwards)
 
Course      Course       
Course Name L T P C Course Name L T P C
No. No.
Semester ­ 1   Semester ­2
CH101 Chemistry 3 1 0 8   BT101 Modern Biology 3 0 0 6
EE101 Electrical Sciences 3 1 0 8   CS 101 Introduction to Computing 3 0 0 6
MA101 Mathematics ­ I 3 1 0 8   MA102 Mathematics ­ II 3 1 0 8
PH101 Physics ­ I 2 1 0 6   ME101 Engineering Mechanics 3 1 0 8
CH110 Chemistry Laboratory 0 0 3 3   PH102 Physics ­ II 2 1 0 6
ME110/    
Workshop /Physics Laboratory 0 0 3 3 CS110 Computing Laboratory 0 0 3 3
PH 110
  Basic Electronics
ME 111 Engineering Drawing 1 0 3 5 EE102 0 0 3 3
Laboratory
  PH110/       Physics
SA 101 Physical Training ­I 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 3
      ME 110 Laboratory/Workshop
  SA 102 Physical Training ­II 0 0 2 0
12 4 9 41    
      14 3 9 43
Semester 3   Semester 4
MA201 Mathematics­ III 3 1 0 8   BT202 Microbiology 3 0 0 6
BT201 Biochemistry 3 0 0 6   BT205 Biophysics 2 1 0 6
  Molecular Biology &
CL201 Chemical Process Calculations 2 1 0 6 BT208 3 1 0 8
Genetic Engineering
CL202 Fluid Mechanics 3 1 0 8   CL205 Mass Transfer Operation ­ I 2 1 0 6
Chemical Engineering  
CL203 2 1 0 6 HS2xx HSS Elective ­ II 3 0 0 6
Thermodynamics ­I
  Biomolecular Analysis
HS2xx HSS Elective ­ I 3 0 0 6 BT290 0 0 6 6
Laboratory
NCC/NSO/COS 0 0 2 0   NCC/NSO/COS 0 0 2 0
16 4 0 40       13 3 6 38
Semester 5   Semester 6
Bioinformatics and Computational  
BT301 2 0 0 4 BT302 Biochemical Engineering 3 1 0 8
Biology
BT303 Immunology 3 0 0 6   BT305 Industrial Microbiology 3 0 0 6
BT309 Plant Biotechnology 3 0 0 6   BT306 IPR, Ethics and Bio­safety 3 0 0 6
CL303 Chemical Reaction Engineering ­ I 2 1 0 6   BT308 Animal Cell Biotechnology 3 0 0 6
HS3xx HSS Elective ­III 3 0 0 6   BTxxx Departmental Elective ­ I 3 0 0 6
  Biochemical Engineering
BT380 Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory 0 0 6 6 BT330 0 0 6 6
Laboratory
Bioinformatics and Computational  
BT310 0 0 6 6     15 1 6 38
Biology Lab
13 1 12 40              
Semester 7   Semester 8
BT404 Bioseparation Engineering 3 0 0 6   BT401 Frontiers in Biotechnology 3 0 0 6
BT405 Environmental Biotechnology 3 0 0 6   BTxxx Departmental Elective ­ IV 3 0 0 6
BTxxx Departmental Elective ­ II 3 0 0 6   BTxxx Departmental Elective ­ V 3 0 0 6
BTxxx Departmental Elective ­ III 3 0 0 6   HS4xx HSS Elective ­ IV 3 0 0 6
XXxxx Open Elective ­ I 3 0 0 6   XXxxx Open Elective ­ II 3 0 0 6
BT 498 Project ­I 0 0 6 6   BT 499 Project  ­II 0 0 6 6
15 0 6 36       15 0 6 36
 
CH 101             Chemistry                    (3­1­0­8)
 
Structure  and  Bonding;  Origin  of  quantum  theory,  postulates  of  quantum  mechanics;  Schrodinger  wave  equation:  operators  and  observables,
superposition  theorem  and  expectation  values,  solutions  for  particle  in  a  box,  harmonic  oscillator,  rigid  rotator,  hydrogen  atom;  Selection  rules  of
microwave and vibrational spectroscopy; Spectroscopic term symbol; Molecular orbitals: LCAO­MO; Huckel theory of conjugated systems; Rotational,
vibrational and electronic spectroscopy; Chemical Thermodynamics: The zeroth and first law, Work, heat, energy and enthalpies; The relation between
C  v  and Cp;  Second  law:  entropy,  free  energy  (the  Helmholtz  and  Gibbs)  and  chemical  potential;  Third  law;  Chemical  equilibrium;  Chemical  kinetics:
The rate of reaction, elementary  reaction  and  chain  reaction;  Surface:  The  properties  of  liquid  surface,  surfactants,  colloidal  systems,  solid  surfaces,
physisorption and chemisorption;  The  periodic  table  of  elements;  Shapes  of  inorganic  compounds;  Chemistry  of  materials;  Coordination  compounds:
ligand, nomenclature, isomerism, stereochemistry, valence bond, crystal field and molecular orbital theories; Bioinorganic chemistry and organometallic
chemistry; Stereo and regio­chemistry of organic compounds, conformers; Pericyclic reactions; Organic photochemistry; Bioorganic chemistry: Amino
acids, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids; Macromolecules (polymers); Modern techniques in structural elucidation of
compounds (UV­vis, IR, NMR); Solid phase synthesis and combinatorial chemistry; Green chemical processes.
 
Texts:
1. P. W. Atkins, Physical Chemistry, 5th Ed., ELBS, 1994.
2. C. N. Banwell, and E. M. McCash, Fundamentals of Molecular Spectroscopy, 4th Ed., Tata McGraw­Hill, 1962.
3. F. A. Cotton, and G. Wilkinson, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd Ed., Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi, 1972, reprint in 1988.
4. D. J. Shriver, P. W. Atkins, and C. H. Langford, Inorganic Chemistry, 2nd Ed., ELBS ,1994.
5. S. H. Pine, Organic Chemistry, McGraw­Hill, 5th Ed., 1987
 
References:
1. I. A. Levine, Physical Chemistry, 4th Ed., McGraw­Hill, 1995.
2. I. A. Levine, Quantum Chemistry, EE Ed., prentice Hall, 1994.
3. G. M. Barrow, Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy, International Edition, McGraw­Hill, 1962
4. J. E. Huheey, E. A. Keiter and R. L. Keiter, Inorganic Chemistry: Principle, structure and reactivity, 4th Ed., Harper Collins, 1993
5. L. G. Wade (Jr.), Organic Chemistry, Prentice Hall, 1987.
 
 
 
CS 101             Introduction to Computing                  (3­0­0­6)
http://www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm 1/6
6/26/2016 www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm

 
Introduction: The  von  Neumann  architecture,  machine  language,  assembly  language,  high  level  programming  languages,  compiler,  interpreter,  loader,
linker, text editors, operating systems, flowchart; Basic features of programming (Using C): data types, variables, operators,  expressions, statements,
control  structures,  functions;  Advanced  programming  features:  arrays  and  pointers,  recursion,  records  (structures),  memory  management,  files,
input/output, standard library functions, programming tools, testing and debugging; Fundamental operations on data: insert, delete, search, traverse and
modify;  Fundamental  data  structures:  arrays,  stacks,  queues,  linked  lists;  Searching  and  sorting:  linear  search,  binary  search,  insertion­sort,  bubble­
sort, selection­sort, radix­sort, counting­sort; Introduction to object­oriented programming
 
Texts:
 
1.  A Kelly and I Pohl, A Book on C, 4th Ed., Pearson Education, 1999.
2.  A M Tenenbaum, Y Langsam and M J Augenstein, Data Structures Using C, Prentice Hall India, 1996.
 
References:
 
1. H Schildt, C: The Complete Reference, 4th Ed., Tata Mcgraw Hill, 2000
2. B Kernighan and D Ritchie, The C Programming Language, 4th Ed., Prentice Hall of India, 1988.
 
CS 110                         Computing Laboratory             (0­0­3­3)
 
Programming Laboratory will be set in consonance with the material covered in CS101. This will include assignments in a programming language like C.
 
References:
 
1.     B. Gottfried and J. Chhabra,  Programming With C,  Tata Mcgraw Hill, 2005

 
MA 102       Mathematics ­ II           (3­1­0­8)
 
Vector functions of one variable – continuity and differentiability; functions of several variables – continuity, partial derivatives, directional derivatives,
gradient, differentiability, chain rule; tangent planes and normals, maxima and minima, Lagrange multiplier method; repeated and multiple integrals with
applications to volume, surface area, moments of inertia, change of variables; vector fields, line and surface integrals; Green’s, Gauss’ and Stokes’
theorems and their applications.
 
First order differential equations – exact differential equations, integrating factors, Bernoulli equations, existence and uniqueness theorem, applications;
higher­order linear differential equations – solutions of homogeneous and nonhomogeneous equations, method of variation of parameters, operator method;
series solutions of linear differential equations, Legendre equation and Legendre polynomials, Bessel equation and Bessel functions of first and second
kinds; systems of first­order equations, phase plane, critical points, stability. 
 
Texts:
1.        G. B. Thomas (Jr.) and R. L. Finney, Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 9th Ed., Pearson Education India, 1996.
2.        S. L. Ross, Differential Equations, 3rd Ed., Wiley India, 1984. 
References:
1.      T. M. Apostol, Calculus ­ Vol.2, 2nd Ed., Wiley India, 2003.
2.      W. E. Boyce and R. C. DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, 9th Ed., Wiley India, 2009.
3.      E. A. Coddington, An Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations, Prentice Hall India, 1995.
4.      E. L. Ince, Ordinary Differential Equations, Dover Publications, 1958.
 
ME 101             Engineering Mechanics                        (3­1­0­8)
 
Basic  principles:  Equivalent  force  system;  Equations  of  equilibrium;  Free  body  diagram;  Reaction;  Static  indeterminacy.  Structures:  Difference
between  trusses,  frames  and  beams,  Assumptions  followed  in  the  analysis  of  structures;  2D  truss;  Method  of  joints;  Method  of  section;    Frame;
Simple beam;  types  of  loading  and  supports;  Shear  Force  and  bending  Moment  diagram  in  beams;  Relation  among  load,  shear  force  and  bending
moment.  Friction:  Dry  friction;  Description  and  applications  of  friction  in  wedges,  thrust  bearing  (disk  friction),  belt,  screw,  journal  bearing  (Axle
friction); Rolling  resistance.  Virtual  work  and  Energy  method:  Virtual  Displacement;  Principle  of  virtual  work;  Applications  of  virtual  work  principle  to
machines;  Mechanical  efficiency;  Work  of  a  force/couple  (springs  etc.);  Potential  energy  and  equilibrium;  stability.  Center  of  Gravity  and  Moment  of
Inertia:  First  and  second  moment  of  area;  Radius  of  gyration;  Parallel  axis  theorem;    Product  of  inertia,  Rotation  of  axes  and  principal  moment  of
inertia;  Moment  of  inertia  of  simple  and  composite  bodies.  Mass  moment  of  inertia.  Kinematics  of  Particles:  Rectilinear  motion;  Curvilinear  motion;
Use of  Cartesian,  polar  and  spherical  coordinate  system;  Relative  and  constrained  motion;  Space  curvilinear  motion.  Kinetics  of  Particles:  Force,
mass and acceleration; Work and energy; Impulse and momentum; Impact problems; System of particles. Kinematics and Kinetics of Rigid Bodies:
Translation;  Fixed  axis rotational;    General  plane  motion;  Coriolis  acceleration;    Work­energy;    Power;    Potential  energy;    Impulse­momentum  and
associated conservation principles;  Euler equations of motion and its application.
 
Texts
1. I. H. Shames, Engineering Mechanics: Statics and Dynamics, 4th Ed., PHI, 2002.
2. F. P. Beer and E. R. Johnston, Vector Mechanics for Engineers, Vol I ­ Statics, Vol II – Dynamics, 3rd Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, 2000.
 
 
References
1. J. L. Meriam and L. G. Kraige, Engineering Mechanics, Vol I – Statics, Vol II – Dynamics, 5th Ed., John  Wiley, 2002.
2. R. C. Hibbler, Engineering Mechanics, Vols. I and II, Pearson Press, 2002.
 
 
PH 102             Physics ­ II                   (2­1­0­6)
 
Vector Calculus: Gradient, Divergence and Curl, Line, Surface, and Volume integrals, Gauss's divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem in Cartesian,
Spherical polar, and Cylindrical polar coordinates, Dirac Delta function.
 
Electrostatics:  Gauss's  law  and  its  applications,  Divergence  and  Curl  of  Electrostatic  fields,  Electrostatic  Potential,  Boundary  conditions,  Work  and
Energy,  Conductors,  Capacitors,  Laplace's  equation,  Method  of  images,  Boundary  value  problems  in  Cartesian  Coordinate  Systems,  Dielectrics,
Polarization, Bound Charges, Electric displacement, Boundary conditions in dielectrics, Energy in dielectrics, Forces on dielectrics.
 
Magnetostatics:  Lorentz  force,  Biot­Savart  and  Ampere's  laws  and  their  applications,  Divergence  and  Curl  of  Magnetostatic  fields,  Magnetic  vector
Potential, Force and torque on a magnetic dipole, Magnetic materials, Magnetization, Bound currents, Boundary conditions.
 
Electrodynamics:  Ohm's  law,  Motional  EMF,  Faraday's  law,  Lenz's  law,  Self  and  Mutual  inductance,  Energy  stored  in  magnetic  field,  Maxwell's
equations, Continuity Equation, Poynting Theorem, Wave solution of Maxwell Equations.
 

http://www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm 2/6
6/26/2016 www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm

Electromagnetic waves: Polarization, reflection & transmission at oblique incidences.
 
Texts:
1. D. J. Griffiths, Introduction to Electrodynamics, 3rd Ed., Prentice­Hall of India, 2005.
2. A.K.Ghatak, Optics, Tata Mcgraw Hill, 2007.
 
References:
1. N. Ida, Engineering Electromagnetics, Springer, 2005.
2. M. N. O. Sadiku, Elements of Electromagnetics, Oxford, 2006.
3. R. P. Feynman, R. B. Leighton and M. Sands, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol.II, Norosa Publishing House, 1998.
4. I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips, Electromagnetism, John Wiley, 1990.
 
 
EE 102 Basic Electronics Laboratory               (0­0­3­3)
 
Experiments using diodes and bipolar junction transistor (BJT): design and analysis of half ­wave and full­wave rectifiers, clipping circuits and Zener
regulators, BJT characteristics and BJT amplifiers; experiments using operational amplifiers (op­amps): summing amplifier, comparator, precision
rectifier, astable and monostable multivibrators and oscillators; experiments using logic gates: combinational circuits such as staircase switch, majority
detector, equality detector, multiplexer and demultiplexer; experiments using flip­flops: sequential circuits such as non­overlapping pulse generator,
ripple counter, synchronous counter, pulse counter and numerical display.

References:
 
1. A. P. Malvino, Electronic Principles, Tata McGraw­Hill, New Delhi, 1993.
2. R. A. Gayakwad, Op­Amps and Linear Integrated Circuits, PHI, New Delhi,  2002.
3.     R.J. Tocci, Digital Systems, 6th Ed., 2001.

 
BT 201  Biochemistry                      (3­0­0­6)
Basic concept and design of metabolism; carbohydrate metabolism: glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen
metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation; photosynthesis; fatty acid metabolism; protein: synthesis, targeting and turnover; biosynthesis of amino acids and
nucleotides; Integration of metabolisms; hormones; enzymes: structure, mechanism and reaction kinetics; introduction to information metabolism. 
 
Texts: 
1.        D. L. Nelson and M. M. Cox, Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, 5th  Ed., Macmillan Worth, 2007.
2.        J. L. Tymoczko, J. M. Berg and L. Stryer, Biochemistry, 5th  Ed., W. H. Freeman, 2002. 
 
References: 
1.        W. W. Parson, D. E. Vance and G. L. Zubay, Principles of Biochemistry, Wm. C. Brown Publishers, 1995.
2.        K. E. Van Holde, C. K. Mathews and K. G. Ahern, Biochemistry, Pearson Education, 2000.
3.        R. K. Murray, D. K. Granner, P. A. Mayes and V. W. Rodwell, Harper’s Biochemistry, McGraw Hill, 2002.
 
 
BT 202  Microbiology                        (3­0­0­6)
 
Microbial cell structure and function; fundamentals of microbial taxonomy and diversity; molecular tools in microbial taxonomy; microscopic techniques; microbial
nutrition; growth and control; microbial metabolism; mutations and DNA repair; plasmids; transformation; conjugation; transduction; transposons; fundamentals of
gene regulation; fundamentals of microbial genomics; microbial pathogenicity and diseases. 
 
Texts: 
1.     G. Tortora, B. Funke and C. Case, Microbiology, An Introduction (International Edition), 8th  Ed., Pearson Education, 2003.
2.     M. Madigan, J. Martinko and J. Parker, Brock’s Biology of Microorganisms, 10th  Ed., Prentice Hall, 2002. 
 
References: 
1.     R. Y. Stanier, J. L. Ingraham, M.L. Wheelis and P. R. Painter, General Microbiology, 5th  Ed., Macmillan Press, 1987.
2.     L. M. Prescott, J. P. Harley and D. A. Klein, Microbiology, 6th  Ed., McGraw Hill, 2005.
3.     J. G. Black, Microbiology: Principles & Explorations, 5th  Ed., John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2002.
4.     Benjamin Lewin, Genes VIII, Pearson Education, International Edition, 2004.  
 
 
BT 205  Biophysics                           (2­1­0­6)
 
Structure and structural dynamics of DNA, RNA and proteins; techniques for monitoring structure and dynamics: absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, light
scattering; methods for separation and characterization of molecules; size­exclusion chromatography; electrophoresis; MALDI–TOF; ESI–quadrupole mass
spectrometry; thermodynamics and equilibria of macromolecules in solution; biophysics of membranes; photobiological processes; nerve impulse; muscle
contraction; modelling biological processes; protein folding and aggregation; protein function (Myosin and Kinesin). 
 
Texts: 
1.    K. E. van Holde, W. C. Johnson and P. S. Ho, Principles of Physical Biochemistry, Prentice Hall, 1998.
2.   C. R. Cantor and P. R. Schimmel, Biophysical Chemistry (Parts I, II and III), W. H. Freeman and Co., 1980. 
 
Reference: 
 
1.  K. A. Dill and S. Bromberg, Molecular Driving Forces. Statistical thermodynamics in Chemistry and Biology, Garland Science, 2003.
 
 
BT 208  Molecular Biology & Genetic Engineering      (3­1­0­8)
 
 
Cell organization and subcellular structure; structure and properties of nucleic acids; organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes; mechanisms of DNA
replication; mutagenesis and processes of DNA repair; transcription; translation; mechanisms of DNA recombination; regulation of gene expression; eukaryotic
RNA splicing and processing; cell cycle; programmed cell death; cell transformation; genes in differentiation and development; oncogenes. genetic engineering:
restriction modification enzymes; cloning vectors: plasmids, phages, cosmids, phagemids, yeast and bacterial artificial chromosomal vectors; construction cDNA
and genomic libraries; screening of libraries: by DNA hybridization, immuno and protein assays; gene cloning and expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes;
recombinant protein expression in E. coli, yeast and baculovirus; mammalian cell expression vectors (Selectable markers, Two­hybrid expression system); chimeric
vectors; Site­directed mutagenesis and its applications; transposons, gene targeting; site specific recombination; polymerase chain reaction (PCR); applications of
reverse transcription PCR (RT­PCR) and real time PCR; principles and applications of DNA finger printing; gene mapping by restriction fragment length
polymorphism (RFLP); application of differential display and subtractive hybridization. 
 
Texts:          

http://www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm 3/6
6/26/2016 www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm

1.    B. Alberts, A. Johnson, J. Lewis, M. Raff, K. Roberts and P. Walter, Molecular Biology of Cell, 4th  Ed., Garland Publishing, 2002.
2.    H. Lodish, A. Berk, S. L. Zipursky, M. P. Scott and J. Darnell, Molecular Cell Biology, 4th  Ed., W. H. Freeman & Co., 2003.                                         
 
References: 
1.    B. Lewin, Genes VIII, International Edition, Pearson Education, 2004. 
2.    B. R. Glick and J. J. Pasternak, Molecular Biotechnology: Principles and Applications of Recombinant DNA, 3rd  Ed., ASM Press, 2003.
3.    R. M. Twyman, S. B. Primrose and R. W. Old, Principles of Gene Manipulation, Blackwell Science, 2001.
 
 
 
BT 290   Biomolecular Analysis Laboratory                (0­0­6­6)
 
Theory, operation and handling of instruments to be used in this Lab course; Estimation of DNA in solution; Estimation of protein in solution; Estimation of
carbohydrate; Enzyme Linked Immuno Assay; Purification of protein by chromatography; Equilibrium unfolding of a protein; Gel electrophoresis of protein; Study of
Enzyme kinetics.
 
Texts:
 
1. R. Boyer, Modern Experimental Biochemistry, 3rd   Ed., Pearson Education (Singapore) Pvt. Ltd., 2001.
2. R. L. Switzer and L. F. Garrity, Experimental Biochemistry, 3rd   Ed., W. H. Freeman, 1999.
 
Reference:
 
1. K. Wilson and J. Walker (ed.), Practical Biochemistry, Principles and Techniques, Cambridge University Press, 1995.
 
 
BT 301   Bioinformatics and Computational Biology   (2­0­0­4)
 
Introduction to bioinformatics; Gene bank sequence database; submitting sequences to database; Analysis of genome content and organization; Analysis of protein
content and organization; Analysis of protein structures; Identification of signature motifs in proteins; Secondary structure prediction; Comparative genomics and
proteomics, Basics of aligning nucleic acid and protein sequences; Phylogenetic analysis using internet; protein structure­function relationships; computational
analysis of protein­ligand binding; enzyme catalysis and protein folding.  
 
Texts: 
1.     D. Baxevanis, and B. F. F. Ouellette, Bioinformatics – A Practical Guide to the Analysis of Genes and Proteins, 2nd  Ed., John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2001.
2.     A. R. Leach, Molecular Modelling: Principles and Applications, Addison­Wesley Pub. Co. 1997. 
 
References: 
1.      P. E. Bourne and H. Weissig, Structural Bioinformatics, WILEY, 2003.
2.     T. Lengauer, Bioinformatics ­ From Genomes to Drugs, Vols 1 and 2, Wiley­VCH, 2002.
 
 
BT 303   Immunology                         (3­0­0­ 6)
 
Introduction to immune system; evolution of immunity; elements of Immune system; cell migration & inflammation; immunogens & antigens; antibody structure and
function – catalytic Antibodies, antigen antibody interactions, humoral and cellular immunity – MHC, antibody diversity, dendritic cells (APC), control mechanisms in
the immune response cytokines – complement – autoimmunity; immunity to different types of pathogens, vaccination; tumor immunology; immune diseases and
disorders; transplantation immunology; co­stimulatory pathways; hybridoma and immunoassays. 
 
Texts: 
 
1.  I. Roitt, J. Brostoff and D. Male, Immunology, 6th  Ed., Harcourt Publishers, 2001.
2.  R. A. Goldsby, T. J. Kindt, B. A. Osborne and J. Kuby, Immunology, W. H. Freeman & Co, 2003.
 
 
References: 
 
1.  A. K. Abbas, A. H. Lichtman and J. S. Pober, Cellular and Molecular Immunology, W. B. Saunders Co., 2000.
2.  D. M. Weir and J. Stewart, Immunology, Churchill Livingstone, 1997.
3.  A. Cooke, M. Owen, J. Trowsdale, B. Champion and D. K. Male, Advanced Immunology, Mosby Publ., 1996.
4.  R. Coico, G. Sunshine and E. Benjammini, Immunology: A short Course, Wiley­Liss Publ., 2003.
 
 
BT 309  Plant Biotechnology                          (3­0­0­6)
 
 
Plant morphogenesis; cellular totipotency; in vitro culture; protoplast isolation and culture; somatic hybridization; haploid and triploid production; somaclonal
variation; embryo rescue and synthetic seeds; production of secondary metabolites; cryopreservation and conservation of germplasm; plant gene structure, function
and regulation; plant transformation; marker genes; promoters; molecular analysis; chloroplast transformation; genetic engineering for resistance to insects, pests,
virus, pathogens and tolerance to herbicides; gene silencing; metabolic engineering; molecular farming; molecular markers for plant improvement; plant genomics. 
 
Texts:  
1.     A. Slater, N. Scott and M. Fowler, Plant Biotechnology: The genetic manipulation of plants, Oxford University Press, 2003.
2.     S. S. Bhojwani and M. K. Razdan, Plant Tissue Culture: Theory and Practice, Elsevier, 1996.

References: 
1.     J. Hammond, P. McGarvey and V. Yusibov, Plant Biotechnology: New Products and  Applications, Springer Verlag, 1999.
2.     P. Jones, P. J. Jones and J. M. Sutton, Plant Molecular Biology: Essential Techniques, John Wiley & Sons, 1997.
3.     Potrykus and G. Spangenberg, Gene Transfer to Plants, Springer Verlag, 1995.
 
 
BT 380  Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory            (0­0­6­6)
 
 
Theory, operation and handling of instruments to be used in this Lab course; Aseptic Techniques for plant and microbial culture; In vitro plant regeneration by
Organogenesis, Somatic embryogenesis, Meristem and Nodal segment Culture; Meiotic and Mitotic Chromosome preparation; Isolation of pure microbial culture
and quantification of viable cells; Preparation of chemically competent E. coli cells; Transformation of E. coli; Small scale isolation of recombinant plasmid from E.
coli; Analysis of the recombinant plasmid using Restriction Endonucleases; Agrobacterium­mediated plant transformation & transient reporter gene expression
assay; Analysis of a transgene by PCR.
 
Texts:
1. H. S. Chawla, Laboratory Manual for Plant Biotechnology, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co., New Delhi, 2003
2. S. J. Karcher, Molecular Biology: A Project Approach, Academic Press, 2001.
 
References:
1. J. Sambrook, D. W. Russell and J. Sambrook, Molecular Cloning, A laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA, 1999.
2. J. G. Chirikjian, Biotechnology: Theory and Techniques (Genetic Engineering, Mutagenesis and Separation Technology), Jones & Bartlett Publishers, U.K., 1995.
3. H. Jones and John M. Walker, Plant Gene Transfer and Expression Protocols: Methods in Molecular Biology, 49, Humana Press, 1996.
4. J. G. Chirikjian, Biotechnology: Theory and Techniques (Plant Biotechnology, Animal Cell Culture and Immunobiotechnology), Jones & Bartlett Publishers, U.K.,
http://www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm 4/6
6/26/2016 www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm
1996.
5. D. M. Glover and B. D Hames, DNA Cloning II, IRL Press, 1995.
 
 
BT 310   Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Laboratory           (0­0­6­6)
 
Molecular databases and their organization; Analysis of Restriction sites in a known DNA fragment; Design of a specific PCR primer for an amplicon; Homology
search algorithm; Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis; Gene identification strategies; Identification of structural and functional motifs;
Visualization and analysis of protein structure; Homology Modeling of protein.
 
Texts:
 
1. B. Bryan, Bioinformatics computing: the complete practical guide to bioinformatics for lifescientists, Prentice  Hall, 2000.
2. S. Misener and S. A. Krawetz, Bioinformatics: methods and protocols, Humana Press, 2000.
 
References:
 
1.   D. Baxevanis and B.F. F. Ouellette, Bioinformatics: a practical guide to the analysis of genes and proteins, 2nd   Ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2001.
2.   S. A. Krawetz and D. D. Womble, Introduction to bioinformatics: a theoretical and practical approach, Humana Press, 2003.
3. D. Higgins and W. Taylor (ed.), Bioinformatics: sequence, structure and databanks­a practical Approach, Oxford, 2000.
 
 
BT 302   Biochemical Engineering                (3­1­0­8)
 
Unique features of the field, definitions and concepts, introduction of organisms as mass and energy consumers, metabolic stoichiometry and energetics, kinetics of
substrate utilization, product formation and biomass production in cell cultures, Transport phenomena in bioprocess systems: gas­liquid mass transfer in cellular
systems, determination of oxygen transfer rates, Design and analysis of biological reactors: batch, continuous, fed­batch, fluidized bed reactor, packed bed reactor,
bubble column, trickle bed reactor,  animal and plant cell reactor technology, aeration and agitation, Instrumentation and control: physical, chemical and
biosensors, online sensors, computers and interfaces,  scale up, applied enzyme catalysis; media and air sterilization, product recovery, bioprocess economics.  
 
Texts:  
1.        H. W. Blanch and D. S. Clark, Biochemical Engineering, Marcel, Dekker Inc., 1996.
2.       J. E. Bailey and D. F. Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2nd  Ed., McGraw­Hill Inc., 1986.
 
References: 
1.   P. A. Belter, E. L. Cussler and W. S. Hu, Bioseparations: Downstream Processing for Biotechnology, John Wiley & Sons, 1988. 
2.  H. J. Rehm and G. Reed,  Biotechnology­A multi­ Volume Comprehensive Treatise, Vol 3, 2nd  Ed., VCH, 1993
3.  M. Moo­Young, Comprehensive Biotechnology, Vol 2, Pergamon Press, 2004
4.  S. Aiba, A. E. Humphrey and N. Millis, Biochemical Engineering, Prentice­Hall 1978
5.  P. F. Stanbury and A. Whitaker, Principles of fermentation technology, Pergamon press, 1984
6.    H. C. Vogel and C. L. Tadaro, Fermentation and Biochemical Engineering Handbook ­ Principles, Process Design, and Equipment, 2nd  Ed., William
Andrew Publishing/Noyes, 1997.
 
 
BT 305   Industrial Microbiology                                     (3­0­0­6)
 
Pre­requisite:  BT 202 or equivalent. 
 Basis and development of Industrial Fermentation Processes (Screening cultures, media, inoculum, scale­up); Control of microorganisms; Fermentation
Processes; Microbial production of Antibiotics, Alcohols, Enzymes, Organic acids, Amino acids, Vitamins, Biopolymers; Microbial polysaccharides; Bioplastics;
Biosurfactants; Bioinsecticides; Pigments and flavors with their applications; Microbial leaching; Bio­transformation; Bio­degradation; Food production involving
microorganisms and their products; Fermentation involving genetically engineered microbes; Industrial applications of extremophiles; Safety aspects of industrial
processes. 
Texts: 
 
1.    M. A. Malden, Industrial Microbiology: An Introduction, Blackwell Science, 2001. 
2.    A. N. Glazer and H. Nikaido, Microbial Biotechnology: Fundamentals of Applied Microbiology, W. H. Freeman & Co, 1995.  
 
References:
 
1.    L. Demain, R. M. Atlas, G. Cohen, C. L. Hershberger, W. S. Hu, D. H. Sherman, R. C. Wilson and J. H. David, Manual of Industrial Microbiology and
Biotechnology, 2nd  Ed, ASM Press, 1999.
2.      H. J. Rehm and G. Reed, Biotechnology: A Comprehensive Treatise, VCH publisher, 2001.
 
 
BT 306  IPR, Ethics and Bio­Safety                               (3­0­0­6)
 
General  overview  of  Intellectual  Properties;  Patent  and  utility  models;  Design  and  trademark;  Trade  secret  and  unfair  competition;  New  plant  varieties  and
geographical  indication;  Copyright  and  related  rights;  International  intellectual  property  treaties;  Patents  structure    and  classification;  Patenting  procedures; 
Economic  impact  of  the  patent  system  and  legal issues;  Licensing  and  enforcing  intellectual  property;  Commercializing  an  invention;  Case  studies;  Scope  of
intellectual properties in India – Biodiversity and Traditional knowledge; Biosafety­ classification and description of biosafety levels; Design of clean rooms  and
biosafety labs; Biosafety regulations  to  protect  nature;  Growers  and  consumers  interest  and  nation  interest;  Potential  risk  from  genetically  modified  organisms;
Ethical issues in research and case studies.
 
Texts:
1.     C.B. Raju, Intellectual Property Rights, Serial Publication, New Delhi, 2006
2.     B.A.Brody and H.T. Engelhardt (Jr.), Bioethics: Reading & Cases, Person Education, Inc., 2007
 
References:
1.     P.N. Cheremisinoff, R. P. Ouellette and R.M. Bartholomew, Biotechnology Applications and Research, Technomic Publishing Co., Inc., USA, 1985.
2.      D. Balasubramaniam, C.F.A. Bryce, K. Dharmalingam, J. Green and K. Jayaraman, Concepts in Biotechnology, University Press  (Orient  Longman  Ltd.),
2002.
3.     D. Bourgagaize, T.R. Jewell and R. G. Buiser, Biotechnology: Demystifying the Concepts, Wesley Longman, USA, 2000.
 

 
BT 308                   Animal Cell Biotechnology               ( 3­0­0­6)
Pre­requisite: BT 208 or equivalent
 
Animal cell biotechnology: Animal cell and tissue engineering; Animal cell culture techniques relevant to mRNA knockdown (e.g. antisense and ribozyme
technology); generation of immortalized cell lines. In vitro organogenesis; Stem Cells; Differentiation of animal and human cells; Animal cloning; Mechanisms of
drug resistance and cell death; Basic developmental Biology; Structure and organization of tissues; Cell Surface markers; FACS analysis; Cell Migration: control of
cell migration in tissue engineering; Transplantation immunology. 
 
Texts: 
1.        T. A. Brown, Gene Cloning and DNA Analysis: An Introduction, Blackwell Science, 2001. 

http://www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm 5/6
6/26/2016 www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm

2.        T. A. Brown, Genomes, 2nd  Ed., BIOS Scientific Publishers, 2002.
 
References:  
1.        B. R. Glick and J. J. Pasternak, Molecular Biotechnology: Principles and Applications of Recombinant DNA, 3rd  Ed., ASM Press, 2003. 
2.        R. I. Freshney, Animal Cell Culture:  A Practical Approach, 2nd  Ed., IRL Press, 1992.
3.        R. E. Spier, Encyclopedia of Cell Technology, Vols 1 and 2, Wiley Biotechnology Encyclopedia, John Wiley & Sons, 2000.
4.        A. Doyle, J. B. Griffiths and D. G. Newell, Cell and Tissue Culture Laboratory Procedures, John Wiley & Sons, 1998.
 
 
BT 330   Biochemical Engineering Laboratory                           (0­0­6­6)
 
Theory, operation and handling of instruments to be used in this Lab course; Determination of biomass concentration by dry weight method; Determination of
bacterial specific growth rate and substrate utilization rate in a batch operated reactor; Study of substrate inhibition kinetics of bacterial growth in shake flask
culture; Production and purification of an enzyme from a microbial source; Determination of deactivation kinetics of a soluble enzyme; Determination of Kla.
 
Texts:
 
1. J. E. Bailey and D. F. Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2nd  Ed., McGraw­Hill Inc., 1986.
2. P. A. Belter, E. L. Cussler and W. S. Hu., Bioseparations: Downstream Processing for Biotechnology, John Wiley & Sons, 1988.
 
References:
 
1. H. J. Rehm and G. Reed., Biotechnology ­ A Multi­volume Comprehensive Treatise, Vol.3, 2nd  Ed., VCH, 1993.
2. M. Moo­Young, Comprehensive Biotechnology, Vol 2, Pergamon Press, 2004.
3. P. F. Stanbury and A. Whitaker, Principles of fermentation technology, Pergamon Press, 1984.
4. S. Aiba, A. E. Humphrey and N. Millis, Biochemical Engineering, Prentice­Hall 1978.
 
 
BT 404   Bioseparation  Engineering             (3­0­0­6)
 
Downstream processing of products: filtration, centrifugation, sedimentation, solvent extraction, aqueous two phase system, sorption, precipitation, chromatography
; whole broth processing; Cell separation: disruption by presses, homogenizers, milling, sonication, and non mechanical methods; preparative electrophoresis;
product recovery schemes for antibiotics, commercial enzymes and organic acids. 
 
 
Texts: 
1.    T. Nagamune, S. Katoh and T. Yonemoto, Bioseparation Engineering, Elsevier Science Publication, 2002.
2.   M. R. Ladisch, Bioseparations Engineering: Principles, Practice and Economics, Wiley­Inter Science, 2001. 
 
 
References: 
1.    R. G. Harrison, P. Todd, S. Rudge and D. P. Petrides, Biosperations Sceince and Engineering, Oxford University Press, 2003.
2.    P. A. Belter, E. L. Cussler and W. S. Hu, Bioseparations: Downstream Processing for Biotechnology, John Wiley & Sons, 1988.
 
 
BT 405   Environmental Biotechnology        (3­0­0­6)
 
Introduction to environment; pollution and its control; pollution indicators; waste management: domestic, industrial, solid and hazardous wastes; strain
improvement; biodiversity and its conservation; microbes for bioremediation technology such as petroleum, hydrocarbon decontamination, radionuclei, toxic metal,
dyes and lignin removal and xenobiotics; phytoremediation; biomass for removal and biosorption of heavy metal and other inorganic ions; removal of volatile
organic compounds from waste gas. 
 
Texts: 
1.     B. Ritmann and P. L. McCarty, Environmental Biotechnology: Principle & Applications, 2nd  Ed., McGraw Hill Science, 2000.
2.     G. M. Evans and J. C. Furlong, Environmental Biotechnology: Theory and Applications, Wiley Publishers, 2002. 
 
References: 
1.     H. S. Peavy, D. R. Rowe and G. Tchobanoglous, Environmental Engineering, McGraw­Hill Inc., 1985.
2.     J. S. Devinny, M. A. Deshusses and T. S. Webster, Biofiltration for Air Pollution Control, CRC Press, 1998.
3.     H. J. Rehm and G. Reed, Biotechnology – A Multi­volume Comprehensive Treatise, Vol. 11, 2nd  Ed., VCH Publishers Inc., 1993.
 
 
BT 401   Frontiers in Biotechnology                              (3­0­0­6)
 
Introduction to microfluidics and microfabrication, micropatterning and lithographic techniques, applications of microfluidic systems in biology; Biosensors and
biofuel cells; Mechanisms, therapeutic and computational aspects of cancer, AIDS and neurodegenerative disorders; Systems biology; Modern analytical
techniques in biotechnology.
 
Texts:
  nd 
1. J.Cooper, and T. Cass, Biosensors, 2 Ed., Oxford University Press, 2004.
2. L. Pecorino, Molecular Biology of Cancer: Mechanisms, Targets, and Therapeutics, 2nd  Edn., OUP, 2008.
 
References:
 
1. J.B. Park and J.D. Bronzino, Biomaterials: Principles and Applications. CRC Press. 2002.
2. T.S. Hin (ed.), Engineering Materials for Biomedical Applications. World Scientific. 2004.
3. V. C. Yang and T. T. Ngo (eds.), Biosensors and their applications, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, Moscow, 2000.
4. T. Finkel and J. S. Gutkind (eds.), Signal transduction and human disease, Wiley Interscience, 2003.
 

 
.
 

http://www.iitg.ac.in/acad/CourseStructure/btUG2013onwards.htm 6/6