You are on page 1of 31

Addressing Community

Involvement Through
Understanding by Design

By

Hayley jonason

Meghan kuppe

Kaitlyn Parks
PROBLEM OF PRACTICE

The problem of practice we’ve identified is how schools can incorporate the local community to enrich
student learning?

We need to work as a community to nurture our schools for our particular community needs. Strong,
authentic community connections and involvement, through families, community groups, and
businesses, will support student learning and allow students to have a richer more meaningful
experience throughout their education. Schools have a critical responsibility in the development of a
host of other skills and attributes in addition to those cognitive skills measured by standardized tests,
and working with the community can help student’s gain these other essential competencies
(Pijanowski. 2015).

This problem of practice is actionable as relationships with community memberships can be built in a
short period of time. The main resources are not financial in nature, but more dependent on time and
effort. This can be built into a unit design and can be prepared ahead of time. Incorporating community
to enrich student learning is greatly impactful as this connects students to the community, but also the
community to the schools. Students will gain real-world knowledge and understand issues and resources
that are in the world around them. Additionally, communities can learn from the ideas that students
generate. It would be authentic and enrich the learning of the students by applying the curricular
content. Students would have the chance to recognize themselves as active members of society. It also
maps well Alberta Education (Government of Alberta. 2013) focuses on the three E’s: Engaged thinkers,
Ethical Citizens, and Entrepreneurial Spirits; these are addressed by incorporating community
engagement.

We need to encourage active participation in community issues, and spark growth in our students’
entrepreneurial spirits. To develop this mindset in our students, entrepreneurial attributes like
perseverance, exploration of ideas, competitiveness, adaptability, and resilience all need to be
considered. Encouraging students to get involved in their local communities will allow them to see the
individual impact they can have, and will inspire an element of self-discovery while relating curricular
content to real world problems. Community involvement in performance tasks will allow students to
develop their interests and begin cultivating relationships with involved organizations, potentially
uncovering a passion they want to pursue. Students need to be encouraged to develop ideas, take
initiative, and become involved in the local community to enhance their education.

Providing students opportunities to work with and be inspired by active community role models, we
believe our students can be motivated to become Engaged Thinkers. In exposing students to community
members, a world of information and new understandings is made available, creating a vast playing field
for critical thinking, multiple perspectives, and problem solving. Our communities are composed of
experts who can assist with the integration of technology and disciplinary knowledge, prompting
innovation, discovery, and learning in the classroom.

Exposure to the world beyond the classroom can prompt empathy to drive student contribution to the
school community and beyond. By incorporating community in our classrooms, students can develop
into Ethical Citizens through participating in authentic learning activities that create relationships and an
open-mindedness to the world around them.
For example, these priorities from the ministerial order can be seen in the Calgary Board of Education’s
(CBE) three-year plan, and thus in the schools at the CBE will follow through with implementation and
uphold these plans on a school level (2016). The big shift has been towards a student-centered focus,
which can be seen through High School Redesign (Alberta Education. 2016), at schools such as Robert
Thirsk. Thirsk focuses on personalizing, connecting and thriving, all of which align with the CBE three-
year plan and ministerial order to focus on the three E’s. This is one example of a school, but there are
many more, such as Connect Charter, which has implemented an Experiential, Place based, Outdoor
(EXPO) Program. Through inquiry learning, students are being connected to the community to engage
with and develop deeper connections. Overall, all of the schools are need to encompass the ministerial
order into their practice, and some schools have the autonomy to determine how they will go about
this.

Community involvement is evidently extremely impactful for student learning as it incorporates


authentic, meaningful rich tasks and allows students to gain skills and competencies which will allow
them for success beyond school.

To go about addressing this problem of practice, the design process that is most beneficial to implement
is Understanding by Design (UbD). Through utilizing a backwards design process, authentic performance
tasks can be created with community involvement in mind, and additionally, it ensures that the tasks
align with curricular outcomes stated by Alberta Education. Designing performance tasks through a UbD
approach will allow for the embodiment of the three E’s of the Alberta Framework for Student Learning
that will enhance the connection with the school community and outside world. This design process is
extremely beneficial since community involvement can often times not completely align what needs to
be covered in the program of studies. This can be because some community involvements are so
engaging, authentic and memorable that you want to incorporate it into your classroom, however this
can make them seem like a large-scale endeavor. The UbD approach is a guide to ensure that the
curricular outcomes are being met while designing a task that involves the community so that students
gain an organic learning experience. It makes the impossible seem possible through using the three
stages of design (Desired Results, Evidence, and Learning Plan), which helps structure and guide your
thinking as a designer (Wiggins and McTighe. 2005). It is important to note, that while UbD is at the
forefront of the design process for planning community involvements within the classroom, many of the
actual tasks that could be completed in the classroom will incorporate a Universal Design of Learning
approach, as well as a Design Thinking or Project-Based Learning.

Involving the community demonstrates the interdisciplinarity of education, as it allows students to see
how Math connects to Social Studies and how Science could connect to Physical Education and English.
This is why exactly why the community should get involved, it provides opportunities for real world
experiences. UbD also allows for easy planning of multiple disciplines into a performance task. The more
disciplines involved, the more curriculums you need to address, and UbD can help simplify this process.

In summary, the UbD framework helps focus curriculum and teaching on the development and
deepening of student understanding and transfer of learning. This is achieved through knowing that
effective curriculum is planned backward from long-term, desired results through a three-stage design
process. Lastly, this design process uses a framework which reflects a continual improvement approach
to student achievement and teacher craft.
References

Alberta Education. (2016). Moving forward with high school redesign. Retrieved from
https://education.alberta.ca/moving-forward-high-school-redesign/moving-forward-with-high-
school-redesign-1/everyone/documents/?searchMode=3

Calgary Board of Education. 2016. Calgary Board of Education Three-Year Education Plan 2017-20.
Retrieved from http://www.cbe.ab.ca/FormsManuals/Three-Year-Education-Plan.pdf

Government of Alberta. 2013. Department of Education Ministerial Order (#001/2013). Retrieved from
https://education.alberta.ca/media/1626588/ministerial-order-on-student-learning.pdf

Pijanowski, J. (2015). Defining a problem of practice. Retrieved from


https://sites.google.com/site/pijanowskihome/Home/topics-in-education-research/defining-a-
problem-of-practice

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision
and Curriculum Development. Introduction & Chapter 1 (1-34). Retrieved from
https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.ezproxy.lib.ucalgary.ca/lib/ucalgary-
ebooks/reader.action?ppg=13&docID=3002118&tm=1513206738882
Grade 7 Science
Science Unit B: Plants for Food and Fibre
(Green) Thumb Wars

Performance Task: Students will take their cumulative knowledge gained in the
Plants for Food and Fibre unit to research the supports and environment available on a
local farm during a field trip. They then use their knowledge and research to create a
proposal for a chosen plant to be grown on campus. This performance task will ensure
that students can identify and connect plant needs to local human needs.

Community Involvement: Students first engage with their local community in


visiting a neighbouring farm to collect research on a field trip. Upon final
preparation of our proposals, we then invite our farming hosts to our school,
where students present their research and suggestions. In collaboration with our
community guests, we will select 2 or 3 different plants to begin growing, and
with their help and advice, plant in our school garden.
Unit Plan Template Guide
Understanding by Design Framework

Course Science 7 Grade Level 7

Subject Unit B: Plants for Food and Fibre Time Frame 6 Weeks

Title (Green) Thumb Wars Developed by Meghan Kuppe

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Content Standards
As per the Alberta Education Program of Studies for Grade 7 Science… (overview)
• Investigate plant uses; and identify links among needs, technologies, products and impacts
• Investigate life processes and structures of plants, and interpret related characteristics and needs of plants in a local environment
• Analyze plant environments, and identify impacts of specific factors and controls
• Identify and interpret relationships among human needs, technologies, environments, and the culture and use of living things as sources of
food and fibre

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas: Essential Questions:


Students will understand that. . . Content specific . . .
• There is a wide variety of uses for plants • What are plants? How do they live and reproduce?
• Like other organisms, plants have unique life • What plant-derived products do we use daily?
processes and structures which allow them to • What would happen if plants ceased to exist?
live in certain environments
• Humans are dependent on plants Prior Knowledge:
What do students already know . . .
Related misconceptions . . . - Plant Growth and Changes (Grade 4 Science)
• Plants lack mitochondria - Trees and Forests (Grade 6 Science)
• All plants reproduce the same way, and have the
same needs (water, sunlight, abiotic nutrients) Unit Emphasis:
Social and Environmental Contexts

Knowledge objectives (general outcomes): Skills/Attitudes objectives (General outcomes):


Students will be able to describe and think critically about Students will be able to . . .
the following concepts . . . - Ask questions about the relationships between and among
- Needs and uses of plants observable variables, and plan investigations to address
- Plant propagation and reproduction those questions
- Life processes and structure of plants
- Fertilizers and soil nutrients - Conduct investigations into the relationships between and
- Chemical and biological controls among observations, and gather and record qualitative and
- Plant varieties quantitative data
- Selective breeding
- Monocultures - Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and develop and
- Resource management assess possible explanations
- Sustainability
- Work collaboratively on problems; and use appropriate
language and formats to communicate ideas, procedures
and results

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Task(s):
Summative Assessment: Crop Proposal Presentation for Local Farmers
- Following our class field trip to a local farm, in groups of 2-3, students will work to research a plant used in Southern Alberta
agriculture, and then create a presentation for a small group of local farmers proposing that we begin growing that crop in
our school garden.
- In research, students will need to gather data from local farmers about the needs of plants, and how the farmers use the
plants they grow. Additional research can be done online to learn more about potential crops (varieties, breeding, required
nutrients)
- In their groups, students will then develop an informed, convincing argument for the inclusion of their plant of choice on
school property. Students then give rough presentation to peers about their crop and gather formative peer feedback.
- Students then take argument, and create a presentation for a group of farmers (Power Point, poster, video, etc.)
Community Connection:
- Students first engage with their local community in visiting a neighbouring farm to collect research on a field trip. Upon final
preparation of our proposals, we then invite our farming hosts to our school, where students present their research and
suggestions. In collaboration with our community guests, we will select 2 or 3 different plants to begin growing, and with
their help and advice, plant in our school garden.

Standards & Criteria for Success Rubric


(attached below)
G - Students will gain a deeper understanding of our
connection to edible plants and identify the needs of plans.
R - Students will take on the role of researcher and farmer.
A – Peers, the teacher, but namely the participating
community of farmers will be our audience.
S - Students will need to understand the needs of plants for
successful growth and propagation and be able to identify
plants well suited to our local environment.
P – Students will present their research and rationale for why a
certain plant should be grown on school property.
S - See attached rubric.

Student Self-Assessments Other Evidence (assessments)

- Teacher approval and formative feedback on plant - Ongoing teacher observations


choice - Exit slip following field trip
- Peer feedback during informal presentations - Class discussions
- Self-assessment document submission prior to - Community, peer, and teacher evaluations on
presentation (with time to make adjustments) presentations

Stage 3 – Learning Plan


W: Students will take their cumulative knowledge gained in the Plants for Food and Fibre unit to research the supports and
environment available on a local farm during a field trip. They then use their knowledge and research to create a proposal
for a chosen plant to be grown on campus. This performance task will ensure that students can identify and connect plant
needs to local human needs.
H: Students will be hooked in by the field trip providing a hands-on experience to learn more about local agriculture, and the
responsibility of their potential impact on the involved farmers and school garden.
E: Students will be equipped with the majority of the unit curricular content prior to our field trip and proposal creations and
will be connected to the participating farmers to use appropriately as a resource.
R: From initial teacher approval on plant choice, to peer feedback collection, to self-evaluation prior to presentation time,
students have multiple opportunities to incorporate revisions into their proposals.
E: Self, peer, local farmer, and teacher feedback are offered throughout this performance task to ensure that students can
evaluate and accommodate changes to their research and proposals as needed.
T: Students will work in collaborative groups and can be assisted or challenged by our farming experts and teacher as the need
arises, providing a differentiated environment for learning. Universal Design for Learning will also be referenced in the
design of each lesson to ensure that students are provided tailored opportunities to meet their needs.
O: As the final, cumulative performance in this unit, there is additional flexibility for the teacher to respond to student
progression should we face any hurdles. To maintain the integrity of the project, the entire timeline will be laid out for
students in advance, and we will adjust accordingly if any of our tasks’ 5Es need a little more time.
Plant Proposal Rubric
Requires Developing Meets Exceeds
Assistance Expectations Expectations
Depth of I do not actively My search for My search for I actively and
Research search information is limited information is enthusiastically seek out
for information, but and includes easily complete new information that
attain it passively or and frequently and includes less then spurs me on to find
rely on those around accessed resources frequently accessed related or peripheral
me to deliver only. I also rely resources. I seek out information. I seek out
information to on information that information that those that have differing
me. My information others have found. expresses multiple views so I can contrast
may be incomplete. points of views. and compare these
sources to determine
who is correct and why,
or which I believe and
why.
Collaboration My actions and words My actions contribute My actions are still My actions are focused
do not value the ideas to the work of our focused on one aspect on all aspects of our
of others or myself team, but I / we do of our group work, but group work; and I have
equally. I devalue the not “co-labor”. We I have some some responsibilities in
ideas of others by divide our work to responsibilities in all others’ portions of our
taking over in group streamline and find others portions of our work. I solicit others for
work, or I allow others efficiencies but walk work. I solicit others feedback, and provide
to do the work for me away with only a for feedback for others.
thus devaluing my partial understanding feedback and to
ideas. of our content or the participate in my
work submitted. contributions as well.

Content My information My information My information My information is


provides limited shows a basic demonstrates supported by evidence
evidence of understanding of understanding of the in the form of examples,
understanding. I do the topic, with topic. I use evidence comparisons, analogies
not include supporting superficial to and facts. I use other
evidence (e.g. figures, support in the form of support my claims. methods of
diagrams, quotes). unsubstantiated My ideas are communication such as
evidence. constructed in figures, tables, graphs
a way that helps to and images to
transmit and strengthen my ideas.
represent my Purposeful use of words
knowledge. construct a concise
representation of my
knowledge.
What do I I have incorrect or I have basic ideas in I have multiple ideas I have multiple ideas in
limited ideas in my my work, supported in my work that are my work that are
know?
work. by limited examples supported by details supported by details
or details that may and and examples building
not be substantiated. examples with a connections and
“because statement”. inferences using
Your work is clearly because statements. I
constructed to clearly indicate
demonstrate learning connections to
and previous learning.
shows connections
with previous
knowledge.
Grade 8 Science
Unit: Light and Optics

Performance Task: students will try to pull off the


world’s most famous jewel heist. Their study of how
light is reflected, refracted, and absorbed by different
materials will be put to the test to avoid the motion
sensor security system protecting the jewel. Using the
scientific process, students will hypothesize what
movements or materials would enable them to get close
enough to the jewel without the motion sensors being
triggered.

Community Involvement: This rich task incorporates


the community to ensure students gain an authentic
experience, and will help them work on their
communication, problem solving, critical thinking, and
collaboration competencies. Students will explore this
unit through engaging with a laser tag field trip, as well
as visiting the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory.
Both of these experiences, will shine a light on some of
the possibilities that can be achieved through
understanding light and optics.
Understanding By Design Framework

Course Science 8 Grade Level Eight

Subject Science Time Frame Two - Three Weeks

Title You Light Up My Life Developed by Kaitlyn Parks

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Content Standard (s) (Front Matter) As per the Alberta Science Program of Studies…
• Investigate the nature of light and vision; and describe the role of invention, explanation and inquiry in
developing our current knowledge
• Investigate the transmission of light, and describe its behaviour using a geometric ray model
• Investigate and explain the science of image formation and vision, and interpret related technologies
Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas: Essential Questions:
Students will understand that . . . • Does light have energy?
• Light is a form of energy • Why is it true that a black shirt is hotter than a white
• Our world is based largely on what we see, both shirt in the summer?
directly and aided by optical devices to • Do you think mirrors are a necessity or an invention
improve/extend our vision. of vanity?
• Reflection, Refraction and Absorption of light
Prior Knowledge:
Related misconceptions . . . What do students already know . . .
• Only shiny materials reflect light. • Grade Four - 4-9 Identify sources of light, describe
• When a lens is moved, an image will become the interaction of light with different materials, and
bigger or smaller but will always remain sharp. infer the pathway of a light beam.
• Different wavelengths of light have different • Grade Six - 6-7 Observe, describe and interpret the
energy and therefore different speeds movement of objects in the sky; and identify pattern
and order in these movements.
Unit Emphasis:
Nature of Science and Science Technology in Society
Knowledge objectives (general outcomes): Skills/Attitudes objectives (General outcomes):
Students will know . . . Students will be able to . . .
• How light is reflected, transmitted and absorbed • Ask questions about the relationships between and
by different materials; and describe differences among observable variables, and plan investigations
in the optical properties of various materials to address those questions
• How to measure and describe the refraction of • Conduct investigations into the relationships
light through different materials between and among observations, and gather and
• Materials used in optical technologies; and record qualitative and quantitative data
predict the effects of changes in their design, • Work collaboratively on problems; and use
alignment or composition appropriate language and formats to communicate
• Demonstrate the formation of real images, using ideas, procedures and results
a double convex lens, and predict the effects of • Analyze qualitative and quantitative data, and
changes in the lens position on the size and develop and assess possible explanations
location of images explain how objects are seen • Measure and predict angles of reflection
by the eye, and compare eyes with cameras
• How to investigate and interpret emerging
technologies for storing and transmitting images
in digital form
Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s):
Summative Assessment: Jewel Heist
• Students will work in groups to avoid the alarm system that surrounds the world’s most valuable jewel.
They will need to use their knowledge of reflection, refraction, and absorption of light to explain how they
will avoid the system.
• Students will need to submit a “game plan” of their proposed heist. Then they will need to have trial runs to
experiment with materials to block the lasers, and learn what will work best for their plan.
• The final performance is testing out their plans to see if they can reach the end of the hall and retrieve the
jewel!
Community Involvement:
• Students will expand their knowledge on optical systems by exploring the capabilities of optical
technologies, through visiting the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory as well as visiting a Laser Tag
facility.
Standards & Criteria for Success Attach rubric
G – The goal of this performance task is for students to illustrate their
understanding of light properties. See Rubric Below
R – Students will be taking on the role of a designer
A – The audience will be other classmates and the teacher.
S – Students will need to understand the law of reflection and
refraction, as well as absorption, additive and subtractive properties
and apply this to real life scenarios, and how technologies are
created.
P – Students will need to demonstrate their plan to steal the jewel to the
class and see if they can avoid the lasers. Additionally, students will
need to submit their rationale as to why they are doing what they
are doing to avoid the lasers.
S – see attached rubric below

Student Self-Assessments Other Evidence (assessments)


• Students will self-assess through comparing • The “game plan” which shows the groups design
themselves to the checklist of what they should and the rationale for the materials they are using.
understand. • The final performance of trying to retrieve the
• Formative feedback from peers and the teacher jewel
• Self-assessment at the end of the assignment to • Small lab reports examining the light properties
reflect on group contributions. • K-W-L Chart
• Think, Pair Share • Exit/Entrance Cards
• Class Discussions
Stage 3 – Learning Plan
Learning Activities:

W: This lesson is going to allow students to understand the complexities of optical systems, as well as
developing a deeper understanding for the properties of light. From this performance task, it is expected that
students will develop hypotheses what movements and materials would get them close enough to the jewel.

H: The hook for students will be participating in laser tag. This fun event will get students moving and allow
them to understand how optics can be fun and engaging, and hopefully see different materials and how they
respond to light. The lasers can be easily integrated into the performance task students will be working towards.
E: Equipping students with the knowledge will be achieved through small lab experiments, and direct instruction
on the topics. Additionally, through visiting the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory, students will gain an
appreciation for the various goals that can be achieved through optics. Connecting students to the community
will allow them to explore the opportunities of where this curricular content could be applied.

R: Revising will be incorporated into the design process. Students would need to continually refine their
hypotheses after running trials and experimenting with different materials. Through peer feedback, they can
receive suggestions from what worked for other groups to reevaluate their own plan.

E: Through peer feedback, exit cards, and class discussions, students will be able to gain a deeper understanding
of the topic. They can evaluate their work by checking the universal rubric, which is provided to all. This can
serve as a checklist for them to see where they are, and what they need to do to reach their goals.

T: Universal Design for Learning will be included throughout the design and implementation of this project.
Student needs will be considered and the activity will make sure to include differentiated tasks so that the
performance task is accessible to all, such as multimodal instruction, and assistive technologies.

O: To fully organize and implement the design of this performance task, the 5 E’s cognitive learning cycle will
be used: Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend, Evaluate.

Adapted by Jeff Turner (2016) from:

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexander, Virginia: Association


for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.

Llewellyn, D. (2013). Teaching high school science through inquiry and argumentation.
Thousand Oaks, CA:
Sage.
Requires Developing Meets Exceeds
Assistance Expectations Expectations
Collaboration My actions and My actions My actions are still My actions are
words contribute focused on one focused
do not value the to the work of our aspect on all aspects of our
ideas team, but I / we do of our group work, group work; and I
of others or myself not “co-labor”. We but have some
equally. I devalue divide our work to I have some responsibilities in
the streamline and find responsibilities in all others’ portions of our
ideas of others by efficiencies but walk others portions of work. I solicit others
taking over in group away with only a our for feedback, and
work, or I allow partial work. I solicit others provide feedback for
others understanding of for others.
to do the work for our content or the feedback and to
me work submitted. participate in my
thus devaluing my contributions as
ideas. well.
Depth of I do not actively My search for My search for I actively and
Research search information is information is enthusiastically seek
for information, but limited complete out new information
attain it passively or and includes easily and includes less that then spurs me on
rely on those around and frequently frequently accessed to find related or
me to deliver accessed resources resources. I seek peripheral information.
information to only. I also rely out I seek out those that
me. My information on information that information that have differing views
may be incomplete. others have found. expresses multiple so I can contrast and
points of views. compare these
sources to determine
who is correct and
why, or which I
believe and why.
Content My information My information My information My information is
provides limited shows a basic demonstrates supported by
evidence of understanding of understanding of the evidence in the form
understanding. I do the topic, with topic. I use evidence of examples,
not include superficial to comparisons,
supporting support in the form support my claims. analogies
evidence (e.g. of My ideas are and facts. I use other
figures, diagrams, unsubstantiated constructed in methods of
quotes). evidence. a way that helps to communication such
transmit and as
represent my figures, tables, graphs
knowledge. and images to
strengthen my ideas.
Purposeful use of
words construct a
concise
representation of my
knowledge.
What do I I have incorrect or I have basic ideas in I have multiple ideas I have multiple ideas
know? limited ideas in my my work, supported in my work that are in
work. by limited examples supported by details my work that are
or details that may and supported by details
not be examples with a and examples building
substantiated. “because connections and
statement”. Your inferences using
work is clearly because statements. I
constructed to clearly indicate
demonstrate connections to
learning and previous learning.
shows connections
with previous
knowledge.
Grade 9
ENVOE and Science
Environmental and Outdoor Education
Science Unit: Electrical Principles and Technologies

Performance Task: Students will connect Science


9 (Electrical Principles and Technologies) with
their ENVOE class through building digital
compasses with the help of local “coding
experts”. Once introduced to wayfinding with
compasses, students will then be introduced to
traditional Indigenous means of wayfinding that
can be used as an alternative to GPS or modern
technology.

Community Connection: In the coding and initial


use of our digital compasses, family members
and close friends with experience in computer
science (basic coding) are invited to come help
us. Our fieldtrip will introduce us to Indigenous
wayfinding experts in a neighboring community.

Andrew King, August 2016


Unit Plan Template Guide
Understanding by Design Framework

Course ENVOE 9 (and Science 9) Grade Level 9


Outdoor Education (and Unit D:
Subject Electrical Principles and Time Frame 4 Weeks
Technologies)
Title Never Enter Stinky Washrooms Developed by Meghan Kuppe

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Content Standard (s) (Front Matter)
- Students will demonstrate skills in researching, interpreting and applying the information necessary for safe route planning.
- Students will develop respect and appreciation for self and others.
- Students will investigate and interpret the use of devices to convert various forms of energy to electrical energy, and electrical energy to
other forms of energy.

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas: Essential Questions:


Students will. . . Content specific . . .
- Know how to use a compass - How do we know which way to go?
- Build a circuit - What is a compass?
- Recognize the connection between coding and - How can technology help us enjoy the natural world?
technology use - Are there other ways of wayfinding, without a compass?
- Understand that Indigenous peoples also have other
specialized means of wayfinding Prior Knowledge:
What do students already know . . .
Related misconceptions . . . - Grade 8 Science Mechanical Systems
- Cardinal directions - Introduction to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit history and
- Technology is only useful if the internet is involved culture
- Computer coding is for university students - ENVOE outdoor experience
- Indigenous people don’t use technology
Unit Emphasis:
Social and Environmental Contexts

Knowledge objectives (general outcomes): Skills/Attitudes objectives (General outcomes):


Students will . . . Students will be able to . . .

- modify the design of an electrical device, and - Appreciate that scientific understanding evolves from the
observe and evaluate resulting changes interaction of ideas involving people with different views and
- develop, test and troubleshoot circuit designs backgrounds
for a variety of specific purposes, based on low
voltage circuits - demonstrate skill, judgment, confidence and sensitivity in a wide
- investigate toys, models and household range of environmentally responsible activities in outdoor settings
appliances; and draw circuit diagrams to show
the flow of electricity through them
- practice using a compass, following directions
- gain an introduction to Indigenous wayfinding

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Task(s):
Summative Assessment: Treasure Hunt with Compass Computer
- After learning about the four cardinal directions, and practicing orienteering with a classic compass, students will use
MicroBits and introductory level computer science to code a digital compass. Local experts will be invited to help code
compasses.
- Students will then be assigned unique sets of directions to follow in groups of three, using their compasses, to retrieve a
large puzzle piece.
- Students will assemble puzzle pieces into a large map, indicating the location of our field trip
- Bringing along our coded compasses, we “follow” map to location, where in collaboration with a local Indigenous education
resource (like Painted Warriors, or Mahikan Trails), we orienteer with our compasses, and learn about Indigenous Trail Trees
- Students will be interviewed by teacher as a summative assessment of their wayfinding knowledge gained through building
and using a digital compass
Community Connection:
- In the coding and initial use of our digital compasses, family members and close friends with experience in computer science
(basic coding) are invited to come help us.
- Our fieldtrip will introduce us to Indigenous wayfinding experts in a neighboring community.

To honor deep listening, and the nature of oral conversations, the


rubric has been replaced with a simple assessment of student
Standards & Criteria for Success understanding through oral questioning. Students will be informed that
they will be asked 4 questions and assessed for evidence of
G – Students will learn how to connect technology and comprehension and connection to the material. Questions will be
nature through wayfinding. Students will also learn provided in advance, and assessed as “developing”, “meets
of traditional Indigenous wayfinding. expectations”, and “excelling”:
R – Students will take on the role of wayfinding expert.
A – The teacher is the audience. - What is a compass?
S – Students will need to understand the purpose and - How do you use a compass?
use of a compass and other wayfinding techniques. - How can technology help us enjoy the outdoors?
P – Students will communicate their learning about - What is one thing you learned about Indigenous wayfinding on
Indigenous wayfinding and need to present their our field trip?
understanding of the importance and use of a
compass.
S – Students will be assessed through an oral interview. For teacher’s formative feedback about lesson:
- What did (or didn’t) you like about wayfinding, and why?

Student Self-Assessments Other Evidence (assessments)


- Teacher-led “thumbs up or down” formative - Ongoing teacher observations
assessment during coding portion of task - Community coding expert feedback to teacher
encourages students to identify how well they’re - Oral interview
understanding and engaging with the material.
- Students self-report understanding of wayfinding
after first opportunity to use compasses in the
field

Stage 3 – Learning Plan


W: Students will connect Science 9 (Electrical Principles and Technologies) with their ENVOE class through building digital compasses
with the help of local “coding experts”. Once introduced to wayfinding with compasses, students will then be introduced to
traditional Indigenous means of wayfinding that can be used as an alternative to GPS or modern technology.
H: Students can be hooked by the opportunity to build something involving new technology, while engaging with community from
beyond the school. Indigenous knowledge and off-campus activities can also serve to engage students.
E: Students will be partnered with “expert” community members that can fill in any potential computer science gaps in knowledge.
This activity is scaffolded to lead students through progressively more difficult wayfinding experiences, helping develop the
knowledge and skills they will need for the next level.
R: The step-by-step nature of the opportunities leading up to this performance task allow students to reflect and revise their
understandings of wayfinding, coding, and Indigenous culture.
E: Self-evaluation, community member feedback, and teacher assessments are shared with the students as they progress through
this task.
T: The experienced coding community members and Indigenous partner organization will have specialized knowledge that can help
challenge or support students by providing alternative entry points. The outdoor components will be evaluated for
appropriateness for student physical ability.
O: This performance task is structured in a series of activities and tasks, that can be followed linearly, but tie back into previous
activities, allowing the teacher to progress forward and address misconceptions and gaps in knowledge as they keep the
students progressing.

Adapted by Jeff Turner (2016) from:

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexander, Virginia: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.

Llewellyn, D. (2013). Teaching high school science through inquiry and argumentation. Thousand Oaks, CA:
Sage.
GRADE 10
SCIENCE & SOCIAL STUDIES

Science Unit: Energy Flow in Global Systems

Social Studies Unit: To what extent does globalization


contribute to sustainable prosperity for all people?

Performance Task: Students will be creating an editorial on


globalization within a specific biome in the world. They will need to
consider the scientific facts, investigate theories of climate change, while
understanding the human impact from globalization on environments.
The final product should showcase how the biome has changed over
time due to human impact, and what could we do about it now.

Community Involvement: Students will be engaged in Science through


discussions with a Meteorologist, and with a Journalist for Social Studies.
This provides students the opportunity to experience real world jobs, and
engage in conversations and learn from experts in the field.
Understanding By Design Framework

Course Science 10/ S. S. 10-1 Grade Level Ten

Subject Science and Social Studies Time Frame Two Weeks

Title Go With The Flow Developed by Kaitlyn Parks

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Content Standard (s) As per the Alberta Science and Social Studies Program of Studies…
• Relate climate to the characteristics of the world’s major biomes, and compare biomes in different regions
of the world
• Investigate and interpret the role of environmental factors on global energy transfer and climate change
• To what extent does globalization contribute to sustainable prosperity for all people?
• Students will assess economic, environmental and other contemporary impacts of globalization.

Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas: Essential Questions:


Students will understand that . . . • How can we reduce our impact on the biosphere
• Human impact on the biomes can have positive and on global climate, while still meeting human
and negative effects needs?
• Different perspectives will focus on different • To what extent does globalization contribute to
areas of emphasis when making decisions. sustainable prosperity for all people?
• Technology plays a large role in describing and
assessing environmental concerns. Prior Knowledge:
What do students already know . . .
Related misconceptions . . . • Grade 7 Science, Unit A: Interactions and
• Climate change isn’t real Ecosystems
• Globalization concept • Grade 7 Science, Unit C: Heat and Temperature
• Understanding various needs for the land • Grade 8 Science, Unit E: Freshwater and
Saltwater Systems
• Grade 9 Science, Unit A: Biological Diversity

Unit Emphasis:
Social and Environmental Contexts

Knowledge objectives (general outcomes): Skills/Attitudes objectives (General outcomes):


Students will know . . . Students will be able to . . .
• How to identify evidence to investigate past • Recognize and appreciate impacts of globalization
changes in Earth’s climate on the interdependent relationships among people,
• How to assess, from a variety of perspectives, the economy and the environment
the risks and benefits of human activity, and its • Conduct investigations into relationships between
impact on the biosphere and the climate and among observable variables, and use a broad
• How to identify the potential effects of climate range of tools and techniques to gather and record
change on environmentally sensitive biomes data and information
• How to analyze multiple perspectives on • Work as members of a team in addressing
sustainability and prosperity in a globalizing problems, and apply the skills and conventions of
world science in communicating information and ideas
and in assessing results
Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s):
Summative Assessment: Editorial on the effects of globalization on biomes
• Through an editorial, students will research and describe the globalization effects on a specific biome of
their choosing. They will need to include a description of the biome, locations in the world this biome
exists, plants and animals’ adaptations in this biome, and ultimately the human impact on this biome. For
the human impact, students will need to consider the history of this biome and how it has evolved due to
globalization. Additionally, students will consider what are some ways that we can mitigate the various
issues that are present through engaging in a debate.
• Throughout this project, students will engage in the Social Studies 10-1 curriculum by analyzing political
and economic challenges and opportunities of globalization, exploring multiple perspectives regarding the
relationship among people, the land and globalization, and evaluating the actions and policies associated
with globalization that impact the environment.
• For the science curriculum, students will identify and analyze various perspectives on reducing the impact
of human activity on the global climate through investigating the earth’s climate, and engaging with
theories associated with our changing climate.
• The final product will be an editorial that students will create to showcase their growing knowledge on this
subject matter and how they can make a difference.

Community Involvement:
• Students will expand their knowledge on globalization and climate change by having a speaker come in for
both subjects. In science, there could be a meteorologist that comes in to talk about the changing weather
patterns that have been evident over the years, and for social studies, there could be a journalist present to
discuss fake news and how to portray your ideas in a meaningful manner.

Standards & Criteria for Success Attach rubric


G – The goal of this task is for students to expand their understanding of
human impact on the environment. See Rubric Below
R – Students will be taking on the role of a researcher to learn more about
biomes and political, economic, and environmental impacts of
globalization on that biome.
A – The audience will be specifically the class and teacher, and possibly a
solution towards a specific organization.
S – This scenario reflects upon the large concerns and decisions society
makes in regard to the environment. Students will get to experience
real world problems and learn how to see different perspectives
P – The final product will be an editorial to showcase the human impact
on an environment.
S – see attached rubric
Student Self-Assessments Other Evidence (assessments)
• Students will self-assess through comparing • K-W-L Chart
themselves to the checklist of what they should • Exit/Entrance Cards
understand. • Class Discussions
• Formative feedback from peers and the teacher • Tests
• Self-assessment at the end of the assignment to • Globalization Debate
reflect on group contributions.
• Think, Pair Share
Stage 3 – Learning Plan
Learning Activities:

W: This lesson is going to allow students to understand the complexities of human impact on the environment
through learning about the implications globalization has had on the various biomes through economic, social,
and political decision making that occurs every day.

H: The hook for students in science will be viewing a planet earth video that describes the various biomes, and
Social Studies will introduce the topic by looking at the empire that McDonalds has become.

E: Engaging the community in these projects will ensure that students see how problems they are learning about
in the classroom are applicable to not only their community but the world itself. Connecting real world jobs to
this performance task allows students to see possibilities of future careers and see the meaning behind this task.

R: Through the assistance of the journalist, students will have a chance to have their editorials critiqued, and
elaborated on in terms of how to strengthen. This will allow for a strong piece of work to be submitted in the
end.

E: Through peer feedback, exit cards, and class discussions, students will be able to gain a deeper understanding
of the topic. They can evaluate their work by checking the rubric, which is provided to all. This can serve as a
checklist for them to see where they are, and what they need to do to reach their goals.

T: Universal Design for Learning will be included throughout the design and implementation of this project.
Student needs will be considered and the activity will make sure to include differentiated tasks so that the
performance task is accessible to all, such as multimodal instruction, and assistive technologies.

O: To fully organize and implement the design of this performance task, the 5 E’s cognitive learning cycle will
be used: Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend, Evaluate.

Adapted by Jeff Turner (2016) from:

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexander, Virginia: Association


for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.

Llewellyn, D. (2013). Teaching high school science through inquiry and argumentation.
Thousand Oaks, CA:
Sage.
Criteria Excellent Proficient Satisfactory Unsatisfactory
(85+) (85-70) (70-55) (Below 55)
Research on biome Students exceptionally Students demonstrate Students demonstrate Students demonstrate
and explanation of demonstrate thorough solid research with a average research with below average
human impacts on this research and a deep good understanding on a surface level research with little
biome and the understanding on the the biome. The understanding of the understanding of the
environment from a biome. The student student, with minimal biome. The student biome. The student
political, social and correctly demonstrates mistakes, makes a few obvious makes multiple errors
environmental the human impact on demonstrates the errors on how human on how human impact
perspective. this biome throughout human impact on this impact has effected has effected this biome
history. biome throughout this biome throughout throughout history.
history. history.

Inclusion of climate Student includes an Student includes a solid Student includes an Student includes a
change theories, and exceptional explanation on various average explanation on below average
different perspectives explanation on various climate change various climate change explanation on various
about globalization climate change theories effecting their theories effecting their climate change
theories effecting their biome, and different biome, and different theories effecting their
biome, and different perspectives on perspectives on biome, and different
perspectives on globalization. The globalization with few perspectives on
globalization. The student includes errors. The student globalization with
student includes questions that are includes surface level multiple errors. The
thought provoking relevant and relatable questions that are student includes
questions that is to present research but somewhat relatable to irrelevant questions
relevant and relatable could go deeper. present research. that are unrelated to
to present research. present research.
Clarity and creativity Student presents a Student presents a Student presents a Student presents a
of work seamless project that strong project that project that is project that is unclear
clearly expresses their clearly expresses their somewhat clear in in expressing their
knowledge and knowledge and expressing their knowledge and
understanding of the understanding of the knowledge and understanding of the
research project. The research project. The understanding of the research project. The
student presented their student presented their research project. The student shows no
understandings in a understandings in a student is lacking creativity in how they
creative way that fairly creative way that creativity in how they present their
enhanced the project. enhances the project present their understandings.
for the most part. understandings and it
does not enhance the
project.
Grade 11 - Science 20
Unit: Change in Motion

Performance Task: Design a playground


Using the design thinking process, students will create a 2-D design of a
playground based on the research from the community members. Within this
design they must include two structures that include motion and discuss how
they are going to calculate displacement, time, velocity and acceleration. They
then must research safety measures of playgrounds and ensure their structures
meet the safety expectations.

Community Connection:
This performance task will connect to the community through student research
of the communities needs in physical activity and want of a play structure. The
older students will get to connect with all ages of community members to
understand their needs and make an impact in the community.

Cross-Curricular Component:
As a cross-curricular component, students will also need to write a grant
proposal to the municipal government for funding of their project. They will
need to explain the benefits this design will have to the community as well as
the safety precautions that were taken when creating the design.
Unit Plan Template Guide
Understanding By Design Framework

Course Science 20 Grade Level 11

Subject Change in Motion Time Frame 4 Weeks

Developed by Hayley Jonason

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Content Standard (s)
Motion is an important aspect of our lives, and the understanding of the effects of force on motion has many technological
applications. Students learn that these applications can range from the design of safer roads and sports equipment to the
investigation of traffic accidents. In this unit, students investigate the concepts of displacement, velocity, acceleration, force,
momentum and mechanical energy and consider the relationships among them.
Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas: Essential Questions:
• Students will describe one-dimensional motion of • How does the design of safety equipment and systems take into
objects in terms of displacement, time, velocity and account concepts of changes in motion and forces?
acceleration. • What has been the influence of society on the development of
• Students will describe and analyze the law of safety technology?
conservation of momentum for one-dimensional • What are the contextual constraints and limitations to these
collisions and change in momentum (impulse) to technological solutions?
explain how force affects motion.
Prior Knowledge:
Related misconceptions . . . • Grade 8 Science, Unit D: Mechanical Systems
• Everything that moves, will eventually come to a stop • Science 10, Unit B: Energy Flow in Technological Systems
• A continuous force is needed for continuous motion
• An object is hard to push because its heavy Unit Emphasis:
• Heavier objects fall faster than lighter ones Nature of Science (observation and evidence)
Science, Technology and Society (developed solutions)
Knowledge objectives (general outcomes): Skills/Attitudes objectives (General outcomes):
• Students will describe one-dimensional motion of Students will be able to . . .
objects in terms of displacement, time, velocity and • formulate questions about observed relationships and plan
acceleration. investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues
• Students will describe and analyze the law of • conduct investigations into relationships among observable
conservation of momentum for one-dimensional variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather
collisions and change in momentum (impulse) to and record data and information
explain how force affects motion. • analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to
develop and assess possible solutions
• work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and
conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and
in assessing results
Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s):
Summative assessment: Playground design using Physics concepts in creation process
- Students will work in collaborative groups to create a playground design that includes structures with moving parts. In this
design, they must include calculations on displacement, time, velocity and acceleration to ensure these play structures are
safe for the students to use.
- Students will make a 2-D design of their playground that take in to account the needs from the community. Within this
design they must include two structures that include motion and discuss how they are going to calculate displacement, time,
velocity and acceleration. They then must research safety measures of playgrounds and ensure their structures meet the
safety expectations.
- Before creating their final design, students will need to participate in formative assessment through peer feedback and
group checklists to enhance their works.
- As a cross-curricular component, students will also need to write a grant proposal to the municipal government for funding
of their project. They will need to explain the benefits this design will have to the community as well as the safety
precautions that were taken when creating the design.
Community Connection:
- This performance task will connect to the community as students will need to research the communities needs in physical
activity and what these communities would want in a play structure. The older students will get to connect with all ages of
community members to understand their needs and make an impact in the community.

Attach rubric
Criteria Excellent Proficient Satisfactory Unsatisfactory
(85+) (85-70) (70-55) (Below 55)
Research on Students Students Students Students
community needs exceptionally demonstrate solid demonstrate demonstrate
for a playground demonstrate research with a average research below average
and how this thorough research good with a surface research with little
research will and a deep understanding on level understanding of
influence the understanding on the community understanding of the community
design the community needs. The the community needs. The
Standards & Criteria for needs. The student has fair needs. The student does not
Success student has strong arguments on how student makes include how this
G – Students will accomplish a arguments on how this research will little connection research will
deeper understanding on this research will influence their on how this influence their
motion calculations and how it influence their design. research will design.
design. influence their
is important to calculate these
design.
when looking at safety of
2-D design of Students include a Students include a Students include a Students include
technologies. playground with thorough design of descriptive design design of their an incomplete
R – The students will be taking connections to their research with of their research research with little design of their
on the role of the research clear connections with connections connections to the research with no
researcher/designer. conducted to the research to the research research connections to the
A – The audience will be the conducted conducted conducted research
community members and the previously. previously. previously. conducted
municipal government. previously.
S – Students will need to Two structures Students design Students design Students design Students design
that include two creative two structures one creative structures that
understand how to calculate
moving parts and structures with with moving parts. structures with have no moving
displacement, time, velocity
the calculations in moving parts. The The calculations moving parts. The parts. The
and acceleration and how this regards to safety calculations are are mostly correct calculations are calculations are
relates to motion when for children correct and ensure and consider user riddled with errors not included and
designing their playgrounds. user safety. safety. and somewhat ensure user safety.
P – Students will present their consider user
designs coupled with a grant safety.
proposal to the municipal Grant Proposal Student presents a Student presents a Student presents a Student presents a
government to put forward letter addressed seamless letter to comprehensive letter to the letter to the
their design and the reasoning to the municipal the municipal letter to the municipal municipal
government government that municipal government that government that is
why it would be important to
clearly expresses government that somewhat unclear in respects
their community the research and expresses the expresses the to the research
S – See attached rubric creativity of the research and research and and creativity of
design. It includes creativity of the creativity of the the design. It
3 comprehensive design. It includes design. It includes includes no
reasons for why 2 comprehensive 1 comprehensive comprehensive
this is necessary reasons for why reasons for why reasons for why
for the this is necessary this is necessary this is necessary
community. There for the for the for the
are little to no community. There community. There community. The
errors in the are a few errors in are multiple errors errors in the
writing. the writing. in the writing writing make it
difficult to
comprehend.
Student Self-Assessments Other Evidence (assessments)
- Teacher meeting - KWL chart
- Student checklist - Think, Pair, Share
- Opportunity for self/peer evaluations - Class Discussions
- Teacher monitoring
- Exit/entrance cards
- Quizzes
- Notes

Stage 3 – Learning Plan


WHERETO
W: Students will be using the content learned throughout the unit about forces applied on moving objects and momentum to create
a playground design considering these forces. The big picture is for students to participate in an authentic task where they can use
these physic properties in a real-world example while building a relationship with the community around them.
H: By taking students to a playground at the beginning of this unit will hook the students in to the unit as they wil understand how
physics concepts relate to their everyday lives and excite them for their final performance task.
E: Through content learned through the lessons, students will be equipped and experience what they need in order to complete this
performance task. They will be given the opportunity to talk with community members as well as documents on safety regulations to
create an authentic experience.
R: This performance task embraces the design thinking process which allows for rethinking of ideas to occur. Students will be making
multiple drafts of this playground design based on prototyping and revising what has been created. This will give students the
opportunity to challenge prior assumptions and have shifts in perspective.
E: throughout this experience, students will gain formative feedback from their teacher, peers and self, allowing the groups of
students to readjust work to develop the best product possible.
T: Students will participate in a variety of learning experiences that include collaboration, independent work, inquiry, experiental
learning, etc. to enhance their understandings and create a differentiated learning environment. This will attempt to reach all
different types of learners in the classroom.
O: The sequence of lessons will follow along with the programs of study as it scaffolds material nicely. As well, the skills and STS
competencies will be introduced and utilized throughout the lessons to ensure all outcomes are met.

Adapted by Jeff Turner (2016) from:

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexander, Virginia: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.

Llewellyn, D. (2013). Teaching high school science through inquiry and argumentation. Thousand Oaks, CA:
Sage.
Grade 12 – Biology 30
Unit: Nervous and Endocrine
System
Performance Task: Inquiry into Nervous and Endocrine
Diseases/Disorders
Students will work in pairs and randomly pick a disease or disorder to study,
relating their research of the disease/disorder to the course material and
how it impairs the nervous and endocrine systems This performance task
will consist of research on the specific disease/disorder, how it impacts the
nervous and endocrine system (impairment of structures and functions),
why the nervous and endocrine system cannot maintain homeostasis, the
impact of technology and medical treatments on the disease/disorder, and
further questions for future research.

Community Connection:
Students will dive into the health and medicine community, having the
opportunity to discuss diseases or disorders with health professionals,
discuss research that is present, and submit a new research question to
participate and contribute to the medical community.

Cross-Curricular Component:
An English Language Arts component can be added to this performance
task in order to create a cross-curricular performance task. Once
students have researched the specific disease/disorder, they will have
to create some sort of children’s literature that will present the content
in a easy to follow way.
Unit Plan Template Guide
Understanding By Design Framework

Course Biology 30 Grade Level 12


Unit A: Nervous and Endocrine 4 weeks
Subject Time Frame
System
Developed by Hayley Jonason

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Content Standard (s) (Front Matter)
- Nature of Science emphasis on the investigation into how systems control homeostasis
- Social and Environmental Contexts emphasis on the pros and cons of enhancing human capabilities
Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas: Essential Questions:
Students will understand that . . . Content specific . . .
- The nervous system is the control system in which - How does the human body maintain equilibrium between its
the body maintains equilibrium internal and external environments?
- The endocrine system contributes to keeping - What physiological processes and control systems are involved
homeostasis within the body in maintaining homeostasis?
- The use of technology can enhance societal needs - What medical technologies are available to alleviate disorders
of the nervous and endocrine systems?
Related misconceptions . . .
- The nervous and endocrine system do not rely on Prior Knowledge:
each other What do students already know . . .
- The spine is not a crucial part of the nervous - Grade 8 Science, Unit B: Cells and Systems
system - Science 10, Unit C: Cycling of Matter in Living Systems
- The endocrine system is not an integral part of the - Biology 20, Unit D: Human Systems
body system
Unit Emphasis:
Nature of Science
Social and Environmental Contexts

Knowledge objectives (general outcomes): Skills/Attitudes objectives (General outcomes):


Students will know . . . Students will be able to . . .
1. explain how the nervous system controls physiological 1. formulate questions about observed relationships and plan
processes investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues
2. explain how the endocrine system contributes to 2. conduct investigations into relationships between and among
homeostasis. observable variables and use a broad range of tools and
techniques to gather and record data and information
3. analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to
develop and assess possible solutions
4. work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills
and conventions of science in communicating information and
ideas and in assessing results

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence


Performance Task(s):
Summative assessment: Research and report how a disorder/disease affects the nervous and endocrine systems
- Students will work in pairs and randomly pick a disease or disorder. They will have to relate their research of the
disease/disorder to the course material and how it impairs the nervous and endocrine systems. Students will be able to
collaborate and use each other’s strengths in order to produce the best quality product that they can. This is important for
differentiation as it allows students to work in a collaborative environment and feed off of each students strengths as a
learner.
- This performance task will consist of research on the specific disease/disorder, how it impacts the nervous and endocrine
system (impairment of structures and functions), why the nervous and endocrine system cannot maintain homeostasis, the
impact of technology and medical treatments on the disease/disorder, and further questions for future research.
- Students will be able to represent their knowledge and understandings in any way that best suits their expression of
learning. This inclusion of differentiation will allow all students the opportunity to express their understanding in a way that
best suits them, ultimately leading to a higher success rate in students. This is especially important with ELL learners or
students with learning disabilities as they will be able to express their knowledge in a way that best suits their strengths as a
learner.
- Students will be given the opportunity for formative assessment through peer feedback and brief teacher meetings. This will
allow for students to reflect on their work through the process and to critically analyze their work in order to submit the best
possible product.
- The students will participate in the creation of the rubric, thus allowing them to be a part of the assessment process. This
will give students a complete understanding of the performance task as well as clear expectations of requirements for
success.
- I would do this performance task every year and collect exemplars to show students so that they have an idea of the quality
of work that I am expecting of them. This will give students a basis of what quality work is and how I will mark the project.
Community Connection:
- Students will dive into the health and medicine community, having the opportunity to discuss diseases or disorders with
health professionals in the community, discuss research that is present, and submit a new research question to participate
and contribute to the medical community.

Attach rubric
*Note: due to the criteria of this assignment, I have included a rubric for the performance task
assessment but in reality, students will be included in the creation of the rubric
Criteria Excellent Proficient Satisfactory Unsatisfactory
(85+) (85-70) (70-55) (Below 55)
Research on Students Students Students Students
disease or exceptionally demonstrate solid demonstrate demonstrate
Standards & Criteria for disorder and demonstrate research with a average research below average
Success explanation of thorough research good with a surface research with little
G – Students will accomplish a how this affects and a deep understanding on level understanding of
deeper understanding on how the nervous understanding on the disease or understanding of the disease or
diseases or disorders impact and/or the the disease or disorder. The the disease or disorder. The
endocrine system disorder. The student, with disorder. The student makes
the nervous/endocrine system.
(structures and student correctly minimal mistakes, student makes a multiple errors on
R – The students will be taking functions) relates how this relates how this few obvious errors how the
the role of disease or disease or disorder on how the disease/disorder
researcher/presenter disorder is is impacting the disease/disorder is impacts the
A – The audience will be their impacting the nervous and/or impacting the nervous and/or
classmates and science nervous and/or endocrine system. nervous and/or endocrine system.
community endocrine system. endocrine system.
S – Students will need to Description of Student shows Student Student Student
understand the structures and how this exceptional demonstrates a demonstrates an demonstrates a
functions and discover what is disease/disorder understanding of solid average below average
cannot maintain homeostasis and understanding of understanding of understanding of
malfunctioning in the system to
homeostasis goes above and homeostasis and homeostasis and homeostasis and
cause the disease or disorder beyond in their gives a strong gives basic gives a partially
P – Students will present their description of how description on description on incorrect
research in the form that best homeostasis how homeostasis how homeostasis description on
suits them. As long as the cannot be cannot be cannot be how homeostasis
requirements are fulfilled, maintained maintained. maintained. Few cannot be
students will be able to Minimal errors are errors are present. maintained. Many
complete the performance task present errors present.
to a high quality Inclusion of Student includes Student includes a Student includes Student includes a
medical and an exceptional solid explanation an average below average
S – See attached rubric
technological explanation on the on the inclusion of explanation on the explanation on the
advances inclusion of medical and inclusion of inclusion of
pertaining to medical and technological medical and medical and
disease/disorder technological advances related technological technological
and questions for advances related to their advances related advances related
further research to their disease/disorder. to their to their
disease/disorder. The student disease/disorder disease/disorder
The student includes questions with few errors. with multiple
includes thought that are relevant The student errors. The
provoking and relatable to includes surface student includes
questions that is present research level questions irrelevant
relevant and but could go that are somewhat questions that are
relatable to deeper. relatable to unrelated to
present research. present research. present research.

Clarity and Student presents a Student presents a Student presents a Student presents a
creativity of work seamless project strong project that project that is project that is
that clearly clearly expresses somewhat clear in unclear in
expresses their their knowledge expressing their expressing their
knowledge and and understanding knowledge and knowledge and
understanding of of the research understanding of understanding of
the research project. The the research the research
project. The student presented project. The project. The
student presented their student is lacking student shows no
their understandings in creativity in how creativity in how
understandings in a fairly creative they present their they present their
a creative way way that enhances understandings understandings.
that enhanced the the project for the and it does not
project. most part. enhance the
project.
Student Self-Assessments Other Evidence (assessments)
- Teacher meeting - KWL chart
- Student checklist - Think, Pair, Share
- Opportunity for self/peer evaluations - Class Discussions
- Teacher monitoring
- Exit/entrance cards
- Quizzes
- Notes

Stage 3 – Learning Plan


WHERETO
W: students will be introduced to the performance task at the beginning of the unit so that they are aware of what will be expected
of them as well as build an excitement of how they will be a part of the medical community.
H: The hook of this unit will be looking at current research and the impact that the medical community has on diseases and disorders
that are currently effecting the nervous and endocrine system. It will allow students to understand the impact research has on the
human population and increase their interest in developing their own research questions.
E: Students will participate in lessons that will equip them with the knowledge on the nervous and endocrine system, as well as the
skills needed to research and contribute to the medical community. Students will have access to multiple research databases as well
as experts in the profession to enhance their learning and success in the performance task.
R: Students will be able to discuss their performance task with other students and with the teacher in order to have the opportunity
to revise their work and listen to different perspectives on the topic. They will also be able to look int current research and allow this
to influence the work that they produce and understand different perspectives and understandings.
E: there will be opportunities for formative feedback from the teacher, their peers and self-assessment for students to ensure they
are putting their best work forward.
T: Students will participate in multiple learning activities that will attempt to reach all types of learners in the classroom. As well, this
performance task allows for students to demonstrate their understandings and findings in a way that best suites them, that allows for
expression of content in a creative and nontraditional way.
O: The unit is laid out in a way that is sequential for student understanding and will scaffold the students to succeed in the
performance task. I will ensure the skills and attitudes are woven into the content.

Adapted by Jeff Turner (2016) from:

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexander, Virginia: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.