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Technical Publication

4iiFJ9
TP-9

The Water Content and the Solubility of CO2


in Equilibrium with DEG-Water and TEG-Water
'" Solutions at Feasible Absorption Conditions

Shinji Takahashi
Riki Kokyashi
Rico U n M i
Haurtari,li~cas
lhcemkr. 1982

,
.. Gas
Proc e s 8 ors
A s s o c i at ion 1812 First Place Tulsa. Okla. 74103 Phone: 918/582-5112

' .?
c
GPA TP-9 82 3824677 003rlL27 258 =

FOREWORD

The experimental investigations summarized in t h e ensuing report was neither spon-

sored or financed by GPA, hence, t h e information is issued as a Technical Publication


(TP-9 ) rather than our conventional Research Report.

Glycols are commonly used in t h e gas processing industry for t h e dehydration of


natural gases to achieve acceptable water specifications for transmission in pipelines.

The dehydration of CO2-rich gases for transmission and handling require specifications
that are peculiar to CO2 and to the conditions under which it is to be transported. This

report presents basic phase equilibria d a t a on t h e ability of DEG and TEG to dehydrate

CO2 at feasible absorption conditions.


The water content of the CO2-rich fluids in equilibrium with liquid water or
hydrates sets t h e acceptable water content specification while t h e water content of t h e

CO2-rich fluid in equilibrium with the glycols-water solution presented in this work

provides t h e water concentration achievable in t h e dehydration process.

The solubility of carbon dioxide in t h e glycol and glycol-water solutions at high


pressures is appreciable, hence must be taken into account both in t h e absorption and

stripping aspects of the process. The CO2 solubility d a t a are also necessary in explaining

the unusual dehydration qualities of t h e glycols for COz.

The GPA and the Authors thank t h e Arco Oil and Gas Company who financed these
studies for permission to publish this work.

earl Sutton, Secretary


i
G P A TP-9 82 3 8 2 4 6 9 9 0011128 1 9 4 I

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
FOREWORD ....................................... i
AUTHOR'S INTRODUCTION .......................... 1

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ........................... 1

EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS / PROCEDURE / REAGENTS


Apparatus ................................... 3

Procedure ................................... 4
Reagents .................................... 5

REMARKS ........................................ 5

REFERENCES ..................................... 6

LIST OF TABLES AND TABLES ....................... 7

LIST OF FIGURES AND FIGURES ....................... 12


GPA TP-9 82 3 8 2 4 b 9 9 0011127 020 =

AUTHOR'S INTRODUCTION

The water content of CO2 in equilibrium 3.5 wt % H 2 0 and 7.0 wt % %O in both

DEC and TEC have been measured t o pressures as high as 1165 psia at temperatures of 75,
100, and 120°F. These experimental data have been combined with the experimental data
on the CO2-water system Wiek and Gaddy, 1941, Takenouchi and Kennedy, 1961, and
Todheide and Franck, 1963 to present the water content of the C02-rich fluid phase over
the entire concentration range from pure glycol to pure water.

Measurements of the solubility of COt in the glycol-water solutions were carried


out at similar conditions to provide d a t a which are needed for process calculations and in
quantitatively explaining the unusual dehydration hypothesis of the glycols for COz.

Two important categories of information have not been obtained:

(1) the e f f e c t of pressure on t h e glycol vaporization losses, and


(2) calorimetric data on t h e heats of solutions of CO2 in the glycol-water
solutions.
The former are important, because absorption conditions in which the CO2 phase
densities approach liquid-like densities are being proposed. The heats of solution of t h e
CO2 in the glycol-water solution reaction are important because of the high solubility of
CO2 in the glycol solutions.

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

The water content of the CO2-rich fluid phase in equilibrium with 3.5 and 7.0

weight percent water in TEG and DEG solutions were measured at 75, 100, and 120°F at
pressures of 365, 565, and 765 psia. Measurements were also carried out at 120°F and
1165 psia.

1
G P A TP-9 82 11811 3 8 2 4 b ï 9 001LL30 8 4 2

The solubility of carbon dioxide in the liquid solutions were measured at conditions

indentical to those listed above.


The water content data are summarized in Tables I and II. Interpolated literature

values from the earlier studies of Wiek and Gaddy, 1941, a r e included in the tables.
The CO2 solubility data are summarized in Tables III and Tables IV. Experimental
data on t h e solubility of CO2 in pure TEG and in pure DEG were combined with t h e CO2
solubility data of Wiebe and Caddy, 1941, in pure liquid water to give t h e terminal pure
component solubility values shown in Tables III and Tables IV.
The experimental water content values were first plotted as log water content
versus log pressure curves shown in Figures 2 through Figures 5. Superimposed on t h e
same curves are the water content values obtained from an enlarged version of the water
content curves for natural gas obtained from Figure 5-8 of t h e Handbook of Natural Gas
Engineering, McGraw-Hill, Katz, et al., (1959).

The log water content versus log pressure curves for natural gas in particular,
provided valuable "reference slopes." The log water content versus log pressure curves
indicate that there will be a pressure at which the dehydration qualities of the glycols for
natural gas exceeds the dehydration qualities for COz. This results from t h e fact t h a t
CO2 is so much more incompressible than natural gas at high pressures at these
temperatures. Figures 6 through 9 present log water content versus 1/T plots to show
their near linear, parallel behavior.

The tabulated water contents, together with the assumption t h a t the water content
of CO2 in equilibrium with the anhydrous glycols would be zero, led to t h e construction of
Figures 10 through Figure 17. The curves are not as well &fined as they might have been,
had two or three additional glycol-water consentration been run, however, the figures are
presented for their comprehensive grasp of the phase behavior of the systems rather than
rigor.

2
G P A TP-9 8 2 I3824697 O O L L L 3 L 7 8 9 9

Figures 18 through Figure 23 show that the dehydration qualities of the glycol-

watcr solutions for pure COz generally exceed t h a t for natural gas. An eventual cross-
over point, however, does exist as the pressure continues to increase and the gas-like
behavior of CO2 becomes more liquid-like.
The CO2 solubility data in pure TEG, pure DEG and the four solutions are plotted
as solubility versus pressure along isotherms, Figures 24 through Figure 29, including t h e
CO2 solubility in pure TEG and pure DEG. The solubility data of CO2 in the pure
components, the glycols and water, together with t h e mixture solubilities led to the
construction of Figures 31 through 35.
To extrapolate the CO2 solubility data to higher pressures, one can use the
Kritchevsky-Kosarnovsky relationship, 1935, Kobayashi and Katz (1953) and t h e pure
component fugacity data of CO2 assuming t h a t the partial volume of dissolved CO2 is
essentially constant at constant temperature and glycol-water composition.

EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS / PROCEDURE / REAGENTS

Apparatus:

V-L-E was established in a vapor-recycle apparatus described and utilized by Elliot,


et ai (1941) and (19741, in their study of t h e methane-n-butane system. However,
significant modifications to the sampling and analytical procedures were necessary t o
obtain reproducible water concentrations. The entire experimental system, including t h e
sampling and analytical system but excluding the recorder is shown in Figure 1.
The water content in t h e gaseous phase was analyzed using a Lockwood and
McLorie, Inc. moisture analyzer. The adsorption column, O, was packed with Chromosorb
which had been treated with glycerol. The water content of the glycol-water solution was
measured using a Photovolt titrator based on t h e K a r l Fischer method.

3
G P A TP-9 82 I3824699 0011132 b15

Procedure:

The sampling procedure, a most difficult s t e p was as follows:

The sampling line from the top of the equilibrium-cell to the valve, Vj, was heated
in advance t o a temperature 10°F higher than t h e ceil temperature to prevent
water vapor condensation,
Before each sample was collected in D, valves VI, V2, V3, and V4 were closed at
the beginning of the run and t h e line between V3 and V4 purged by t h e flow,
the adsorption column D, was mounted upon the sampling line, as shown in Figure

1, after t h e water was absorbed by t h e packing material in D. The water was


subsequently eluted from the column using bone-dry helium to remove all of the
water from D,
tb path through V5 was changed to pass sample gas and He in the line between V j

and V5 was replaced with sample gas by opening the valve Vq for a moment,
the valves V2 and V3, then V4, were opened allowing a fixed quantity of sample gas

to pass slowly through colum D, i.e. valve V4 was closed as the pressure in t h e
sampling loop between V I and V4 was qradually allowed to increase to 365 psia,
V3 was then closed and the sampled gas allowed to expand intc a gas buret K, by
opening VI slowly. The volume of t h e sampled gas taken was about 75 cm3 at
atmospheric pressures, room temperature,
finally, closing V2, the absorption column D, was disconnected at junctions JI and
J2 and mounted in the moisture analyzer which was used to measure t h e water
directly d a t e d with t h e measured gas volume of Ca. 75 c m 3

The sampk acquisition step was t h e most tedious and important step because of
the need to exclude moisture from the air, moistures from previous sampling operation,

mosture condensation, etc.

4
GPA TP-9 82 3 8 2 4 b 9 9 0011133 5 5 1

dubility of CO2 in the liquid phase was determined as follows:


the separator I was mounted in the sample line, as shown in Figure I, after

being weighed.
the mixture of CO2 and solution was introduced into the separator by

opening t h e valve, V6 slowly. The volume of separated CO2 was measured


by a gas buret. A pressure control valve, not shown in Figure 1, was used t o
keep the cell pressure constant.
the separator containing the liquid was disconnected and weighed. The
weight difference of t h e separator before and a f t e r sampling gave t h e
weight of the liquid portion of the sample.
iaterial balance calculations yielded the results reported in t h e tabulations of t h e
dr

Leagents:

Xesearch grade carbon dioxide was purchased from the Mathew Gas Company with
a :ed purity of 99.8 plus % purity. The carbon dioxide was used without further

P :ation.
The "Reagent Grade" diethylene and triethylene glycols were purchased from

F Y Scientific Co. The minimum purities reported were 99.8 and 99.0 weight percent
with no more than 0.2 weight percent water. Distilled water was used to prepare the
glycol-water solutions, and the water content of the final solution checked by a Karl
Fischer Titration.
REMARKS

The water content of CO2 gas and dense fluids in equilibrium with TEC-H20 and
DEG water solutions have been measured at three temperatures: 75, 100, and 120°F, for
several pressures up to 1161 psia. The solubility of CO2 in the same glycol-water
solutions have been measured at identical conditions. All the data are reported tabularly
and figuratively.

5
G P A TP-9 82 3824699 O O L L L 3 i . 1 i.198

The water content of the CO2 in equilibrium with the glycol solutions indicate that
over a wide range of conditions t h e latter dehydrates CO2 more effectively than natural
gases at the same pressure, temperature and glycol concentration. However, as the
pressures approaches values wherein CO2 begins to assume liquid-like behavior, the
dehydration effectiveness is reversed.
Since CO2 is quite soluble in the glycols and glycol-water solutions, we postulate
t h a t CO2 effectively dehydrates t h e glycol solution by reacting with t h e water in t h e
liquid phase, to enhance the dehydration qualities of the glycols.
Since t h e CO2 is so soluble in t h e glycol-water solution, calorimetric mC. e-
ments of the heat of solution of CO2 are in order. The vaporization losses of the giycols
in dense-phase CO2 will be rather greater than in natural gases at comparable pressures
and temperatures and should therefore be determined.
The data measured in this report have been combined with measurements reported
in the literature, Wiebe and Caddy, 1934, 1941, to present dehydration and solui..ity
curves from 100% glycol to pure water at several temperatures and pressures.

LIST OF REFERENCES

1. Wiek, R. and V.L. Caddy, "The Vapor Phase Composition of Carbon Dioxide Water
Mixtures at Various Temperatures to 700 Atmosphere," J. ACS 6j, 475 (1941).
2. .Takenouchi, S. and G.C. Kennedy, T h e Binary System H20-C02 at High Tempera-
tures and Pressures, Am. J. Su. 262,1055-1074 (1961).
3. Todheide, K. and E.U. Franck, "Das Zweiphasengebiet und die Kritische Kurve in
System Kohlendioxid-Wassen bis ZU Drucken von 3500 Bar," 2. Physik. Chim. Neue
Folge 387-401 (1963).
4. Katz, D.L. et al, Handbook of Natural Cas Engineering, McGraw-Hill(l959).
5. W i e k , R. and V.L. Caddy, !'The Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Water at Various
Temperatures from 12 to-40°C and at Pressures to 500 Atmospheres," J. ACS 62,
815 (1940).
6. Kritchevsky, I.R. and J.S. Kasarnovsky, ttThermodynamic*.! Calculations of Solubili-
ties of Nitrogen and Hydrogen in Water at High Pressures, J. ACS 57, 2168 (1935).
i

7. Kobayashi, Riki and D.L. Katz, V a p o r Liquid Equilibria for Binary Hydrocarbon-
Water Systems," I.E.C. 45, 440 (1953).
8. Elliot, D.C., R.J.J. Chew, P.S. Chappelear, and R. Kobayashi, V a p o r
Liquid Equilibrium of t h e Methane-n-Butane System at Low Temperatures and
High Pressures," J. C.E.D. 19, 71 (1974).

6
GPA TP-9 82 3824699 O O L L L 3 5 3 2 4 II

LIST OF TABLES

Table No. Description Page No.

I Summary of Data on Water Content in CO in Equib;ibrium


with T E G H 2 0 Solution, Ibs H20/MMCF Cb,
at 60 F, 14.7 psia 8

II Summary of Data on Water Content in CO infquilibrium with


DEGHZO Solution, Ibs H20/MMCF CO2 a360 F, 14.7 psia 9

III Summary of SO2 Solubility Data in TEGWaJer Solution,


ml CO2 at 60 F, 14.7 psia/ml solution at 60 F 10

N Summary of SO2 Solubility Data in DEGWger Solution,


ml CO2 at 60 F, 14.7 psia/ml Solution at 60 F 11

7
GPA TP-9 8 2 W 3 8 2 4 6 9 9 0011136 260

TABLE I.

Summary of Data on Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with TEG -H20Solution,


lbs H20/MMCF CO2 at 60°F, 14.7 p i a

w% H20 in solution 3.5 7.0 loo*


mol % H20 in solution 23.23 38.58 1O0
75'F 365 psia 8.64 17.6 73
565 psia 7.05 15.0 64
765 psia 6.19 13.1 59
100°F 365psia 19.6 38.8 152
565 pia 15.6 29.0 113
765 psia 14.7 25.6 1O0
120'F 365 pia 34.6 64.8 280
565 psia 29.6 49.3 200
765 psia 27.5 42.2 169
1165 p i a 26.6 37.9 174

* R. Wiebe and V.L. Caddy; LACS, 63,475 (1941).


TABLE II

Summary of Data on Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEC-H20 Solution,


Lbs H20/MMCF CO2 a t 60°F, 14.7 psia

w% H 2 0 in Solution 3.5 7.0 100"

mol % i-$O in Solution 17.61 30.73 1O0


75'F 365 psia 9.29 18.3 73
565 psia 6.83 13.2 64
765 psia 6.12 12.3 59
1OO°F 365 psia 18.3 31.5 152

565 psia 13.1 23.3 113


765 psia 11.5 20.8 1O0
120°F 365 psia 29.5 58.3 280
565 psia 22.9 39.1 200

765 p i a 20.5 32.7 169


1165 pia 17.9 28.4 174

* R. Wiebe and V.L. Caddy, J. ACS, 63, 475 (1941).

9
GPA TP-9 82 W 382Lib99 O O L L L 3 8 033 D

TABLE III

Summary of CO2 Solubility Data in TEG-Water Solution,


m l CO2 at 60°F, 14.7 psia/ml solution at 60°F

w% H 2 0 in Solution 0.0 3.5 7.0

mol % H 2 0 in Solution 0.0 23.23 38.58


75'F 365 psia 46.3 40.2 33.3
565 psia 76.4 67.4 56.6
765 psia 113.8 98.2 81.2
100'F 365 psia 31.9 28.3 25.2
565 psia 57.6 46.5 42. I
765 psia 84.9 68.1 58.0
120°F 365 psia 29.8 23.3 23.3
565 psia 48.8 38.1 39.5
765 psia 69.5 56.0 56.4
1165 psia 133.7 97.0 88.6

CC of co2at O'C, i atm/g Soiution

w% H 2 0 in Solution 0.0 3.5 7.0 100 *

mol % H 2 0 in Solution 0.0 23.23 38.58 1O0

75'F 365 psia 38.8 33.80 28.1 16.86


565 psia 64.1 56.7 47.7 23.76
765 psia 95.4 82.6 68.4 28.44
100°F 365 psia 26.8 23.8 21.2 12.12
565 psia 48.3 39.1 35.5 17.28
765 psia 71.2 57.3 48.9 21.23
120°F 365 pia 25.0 19.6 19.6 9.70
5é5 pia 40.9 32.0 33.3 14.50
765 p i a 58.3 47.1 47.5 18.34
1i65 psia 112.1 81.6 68.7 23.20

* R. Wick and V.L. Caddy, J.ACS, 61,315 (1939).


ibid, 62, 815 (1940).

10
GPA T P - 9 82 m 3824b99 OOLLL39 T 7 T m

TABLE IV

Summary of CO2 Solubility Data in DEG-Water Solution,


m l CO2 at 60°F, 14.7 psia/ml Solution at 60°F

w% H 2 0 in Solution 0.0 3.5 7.0 100.0


mol % H20 in Solution 0.0 17.61 30.73 100.0

75'F 365 psia 39.9 34.9 31.8 17.8


565 psia 67.5 59.9 52.5 25.1
765 psia 106.0 86.8 74.9 30.0
100°F 365 psia 31.1 27.3 25.8 12.8
565 psia 51.0 42.1 40.0 18.2
765 psia 76.5 62.7 60.2 22.4
120°F 365 psia 24.8 24.5 20.3 10.2
565 psia 41.1 38.2 33.6 15.3
765 psia 59.3 53.1 50.9 19.4
1165 psia 110.5 85.5 80.9 24.5

CC of co2a t OOC, i atm/g Soiution

w% H 2 0 in Solution 0.0 3.5 7.0 100"

mol % H 2 0 in Solution 0.0 17.61 30.73 1O0


75'F 365 psia 33.7 29.5 26.9 16.86
565 psia 57.0 50.7 44.5 23.76
765 pia 89.5 73.5 63.5 28.44
100'F 365 pia 26.3 23.1 21.9 12.12 .
565 pia 43.1 35.6 33.9 17.28
765 psia 64.6 53.1 51.0 2 1.23
120°F 365psia 20.9 20.7 17.3 9.70
565 psia 34.7 32.3 28.5 14.50
765 p i a 50.1 44.9 43.1 18.34
1165 psia 93.3 72.4 68.6 23.20

* Wiek and V.L. Gaddy, J. ACS, 61,315 (1939).


ibid, 62, 8 15 ( 1940).

11
G P A TP-9 ô2 3824699 O O L L L 4 0 7 9 1

LIST OF FIGURES

F i n u r e No. Des cr i p t i o n Page No.

1. Schematic Diagram f o r Recycle Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium 14


Apparatus

2. Water Content of CO2 i n Equilibrium with TEG 3.5 wt% 15


H20 Solution ( c o n s t a n t Temp)

3. Water Content of CO2 i n Equilibrium with TEG 7.0 u% H20 16


(constant T 1

4. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with DEG-3.5 u% H20 17


Solution (constant T ) .

5. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with DEG-7.0 u% H20 18


S o l u t i o n ( c o n s t a n t T).

6. Water Content of CO2 i n Equilibrium with TEG 3.5 w t % 19


H 2 0 Solution. (Constant P)

7. Water Content of CO2 i n Equilibrium with TEG 7.0 u% H20 20


(constant P1

8. Water Content i n CO i n Equilibrium with DEG-3.5 w% H20 21


s o i u t i o n (constant $ ).
9. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with DEG-7.0 u% H20 22
Solution ( c o n s t a n t P).

10. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with TEG-Water 23


Solution a t 365 p s i a . (Constant T )

li. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with TEG-Water 24


Solution at 565 p s i a . (Constant T )

12. Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with TEG-Water 25


Solution a t 765 p s i a . (Constant T )

13. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with TEG-Water 26


S o l u t i o n a t 1165 p s i a . (Constant T )

14. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with DEG-Water 27


S o l u t i o n a t 365 p s i a . (Constant T)

15. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with DEG-Water 28


S o l u t i o n a t 565 p s i a . (Constant T )

16. Water Contert i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with DEG-Water 29


Solution a t 765 p s i a . (Constant T )

17. Water Content i n CO2 i n Equilibrium with DEG-Water 30


Solution a t 1165 p s i a . (Constant T )

18. Water Content i n Gaseous Phase i n Equilibrium with TEG- 31


Water S o l u t i o n a t 365 p s i a . (Constant T)

12
GPA TP-9 82 3 8 2 4 b 9 3 O O L L L 4 L 628

F i w e No. Des cr i p t ion Page No.

19. Water Content i n Gaseous Phase i n Equilibrium with 32


TEG-Water Solution a t 565 p s i a . (Constant T )

20. Water Content i n Gaseous Phase i n Equilibrium with 33


TEG-Water Solution a t 765 p s i a . (Constant T)

21. Water Content i n Gaseous Phase i n Equilibrium with 34


DEG-Water Solution a t 365 p s i a . (Constant T)

22. Water Content i n Gaseous Phase i n Equilibrium with 35


DEG-Water Solution a t 565 p s i a . (Constant T I

23. Water' Content i n Gaseous Phase i n Equilibrium with 36


DEG-Water Solution a t 765 p s i a . (Constant T)

24. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n P u r e TEG. (Constant T ) 37

25. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n TEG 3.5 w t % H20 (constant T I . 38

26. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n TEG 7.0 w t % H20 ( c o n s t a n t T I . 39

27. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n Pure DEG. 40

28. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n DEG-3.5 w t % H20 ( c o n s t a n t T ) . 41

29. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n DEG 7.0 wt% H20 (constant T I . 42

30. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n TEG H20 Solution a t 75OF. (Con- 43


stant P)

31. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n TEG H20 Solution a t 1OOOF. (Con- 44


stant P)

32. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n TEG-H20 Solution a t 12OOF. (Con- 45


s t a n t Pl

33. CO2 Solubility i n DEG-H20 Solution at 75pF. (Con- 46


s t a n t P)

34. CO2 S o l u b i l i t y i n DEG-H20 Solution a t 10OOF. (Con- 47


stant P)
35. CO20 S o l u b i l i t y i n DEG-H20 Solution a t 12D°F. 48
(Constant P )

13
G P A TP-9 8 2 I3824b99 O O L l L 4 2 564

a
W
A
J
O
p:
I-
Y
O
O
O
a Q
O Q.
c e
a Q
cn
cn
a
J
a

w
A
o
*
o
W
a

14
G P A TP-9 82 = 3824679 0011143 4T0

100 I I I I I 1 1 1 I I
90 1
80
70
60
50
40
30

20 120 O F

15
IOO*F
=X \

10
9
8
7
6
75 O F
5 -1
4
3
1
2
200 300400 1000 1500
PRESSURE psia

Fig. 2 Water Content of CO2 in Equilibrium with TEG 3.5 wt% H20 Solution (constant
Temp)
15
G P A TP-7 8 2 I3824679 001LL44 33'7

-3
Q
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30

20
15

I I I I I 1 1 1 I
200 300400 1000 1500
PRESSURE psia

38. 3 Water Content of CO2 in Equilibrium with TEG 7.0 w% H20 (constant T)

16
G P A TP-9 82 - 3824699 0011145 273

70
60
50
40
30

12OoF
20

10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3

2
-
--o---
NAT, GAS

I I I I I 1 1 1 1 I
200 300400 700 1000 1500
PRESSURE psia

Fig. 4 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEG3.5 w% H20 Solution (constant
TI. 17
G P A TP-9 ô 2 W 3 8 2 4 6 9 9 O O L L L 4 h LOT

o 100
.o

3 90
I I I I I I l I I I
-
IC 80 1
qf ?O
- 60
o
li-

(o
50
s 40
30

20

IO

5t
4- i I I I I I I I I I I

Fig. 5 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEC-7.0 w% H20 Solution


c (constant
T). i8
-
GPA TP-9 ô 2 E 3824699 O O L L L 4 7 046

TEMPERATURE, O F
60 70 80 90 I00 110 120 130140
too ' I I I I I I I I
90-
80 - -
70
60 =
50 -
40 - 365 psis

30- 765

20 -
15 -
IO -
9-
8-
7-
6-
5-
4-
a 3-
W
I-
a
3 2-
I I I I I
33 3.4 3.3 3.2 3,l 3.0 2,9
TEMPERATURE,WK) x 103

Fig. 6 Water Content of CO2 in Equilibrium with TEG 3.5 wt % H20 Solution.
(C ~ - mP)
t 19
GPA TP-9 ô2 m 3824b99 OOLLL48 T ô 2 m

TEMPERATURE OF

80
70 O'
365 psia
60
565
50
765
40

20
15
0-
0

-0-
IO CO2
9
0
7
6
5
4' I I I I I I
3.5 3.4 383 3.2 38 I 3,O 2.9
TEMPERATURE, (VK) x 103

Fig. 7 Water Content of CO2 in Equilibrium with TEG 7.0 w% H20 (constant P)
3n
TEMPERATURE, OF
IO0
90
80

a
IL 365 psia
0 30
O
(D 565 psia
0 20 765 psia

=- 109
cn

O
o 7

c 5

Fig. 8 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEG-3.5 w% H20 Solution (constant
w. ~~ ~~~
21
GPA TP-7 82 m 3824677 0011150 630 m

TEMPERATURE, O F
60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140
100 L
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70 -
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TEMPERATURE, (VK) x 103

Fig. 9 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEE7.0 w% H20 Solution (constant
Pl.
22
GPA TP-9 82 3824699 O O L L L S L 577

li
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MOLE FRACTION OF H20

Fig. 10 Water Content in COz in Equilibrium with TEG-Water Solution at 365 psia.
(Constant T)
23
G P A TP-9 8 2 E 3 8 2 4 6 9 9 O O L L L 5 2 403

300

200

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MOLE FRACTION O F H g

Fig. 11 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with TEC-Water Solution at 565 psia.
(Constant TI

24
G P A TP-9 82 = 3824b99 OOLLL.53 34T

150
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MOLE FRACTION OF H20

Fig. 12 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with TEGWater Solution at 765 psia.
(Constant T)
25 ~ ~~ ~~
G P A TP-9 8 2 B 3824677 0011154 28b

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150
I
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MOLE FRACTION OF H20

Fig. 13 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with TEG-Water Solution at 1165 psia.
(Constant TI 26
Fig. 14
G P A TP-9

300

200

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MOLE FRACTION OF H20
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Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEC-Water Solution at 365 psia.


(Constant T)

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(Constant TI
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G P A TP-9 82 3829699 OOLLL57 T95

m
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Fig. 16 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEG-Water Solution at 765 psia.
(Constant TI

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G P A TP-9 82 3824b99 0011158 721 =

MOLE FRACTION OFH20

Fig. 17 Water Content in CO2 in Equilibrium with DEG-Water Solution at 1165 psia.
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